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PNNL Touts Biocrude Conversion Process Progress (Ind. Report)
PNNL,Bioproducts Institute
Date: 2021-04-14
The U.S. DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is reporting a large-scale demonstration using hydrothermal liquefaction to convert wastewater sludge and food waste biocrude to renewable diesel fuel has passed a significant test, operating for more than 2,000 hours continuously without losing effectiveness.

"The research showed that essentially any biocrude, regardless of wet-waste sources, could be used in the process and the catalyst remained robust during the entire run. While this is just a first step in demonstrating robustness, it is an important step," according to John Holladay, a PNNL scientist and co-director of the joint Bioproducts Institute, a collaboration between PNNL and Washington State University.

According to the PNNL release, Wet wastes from sewage treatment and discarded food can provide the raw materials for an innovative process called hydrothermal liquefaction, which converts and concentrates carbon-containing molecules into a liquid biocrude. This biocrude then undergoes a hydrotreating process to produce bio-derived fuels for transportation.

The next steps for the research team include gathering more sources of biocrude from various waste streams and analyzing the biofuel output for quality. In a new collaboration, PNNL will partner with a commercial waste management company to evaluate waste from many sources. Ultimately, the project will result in a database of findings from various manures and sludges, which could help decide how facilities can scale up economically. The project is supported by the DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO). (Source: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PR, Website, 12 Apr., 2021) Contact: PNNL, Michael Thorson, Project Manager, www.pnnl.gov; John Holladay, Co-director Bioproducts Institute, contact.bpi@ubc.ca, www.bpi.ubc.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioproducts Institute,  PNNL,  Biofuel,  Biocrude,  


NIFA Supports Bio-jet Fuel Technology R&D (R&D Report)
USDA,National Institute for Food and Agriculture
Date: 2019-12-18
In the Cornhusker State, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) is reporting receipt of grant funding from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to support collaborative research by Washington State University and University of Nebraska-Lincoln on the use of camelina oilseeds and other vegetable oil crops in renewable bio-based jet fuel manufacturing.

The research is aimed at developing new bio-based jet fuel manufacturing technology and crop feedstocks with vegetable oil compositions tailored for this technology.

The research team will use camelina as an oilseed platform to develop vegetable oil formulations with shorter carbon chains that are better suited for the processing technology. These genetic strategies will be transferred to other vegetable oil feedstocks, such as soybean and oil-rich sorghum, which are currently being developed by university faculty for the U.S. DOE Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI).

Research at UNL builds on prior US DOE and Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research'funding. (Source: University of Nebraska, Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, UNL IANR NEWS, 17 Dec., 2019) Contact: UNL Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, 402-472-2081, www.unl.edu; National Institute for Food and Agriculture, www.nifa.usda.gov; U.S. DOE Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation, www.cabbi.bio

More Low-Carbon Energy News Camelina,  Oilseed,  USDA,  National Institute for Food and Agriculture,  


WSU Research Contributes to Aviation Biofuel Project (Ind. Report)
Washington State University,GEVO
Date: 2019-10-07
Northwest Advanced Bio-Fuels, LLC (NWABF) reports it is working with Washington State University's Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA), a project that established the availability and sustainability of woody biomass/forest residues as a feedstock for the production of aviation biofuels using Boulder, Colorado-based GEVO technology, The planned biorefinery, which is expected to go into production in 2023, would be constructed at Aberdeen, Washington.

As previously reported, Delta Air Lines, in partnership with NWABF, is investing $2 million to assess the biofuel refinery project's feasibility. Additionally, the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture funded NARA with $39.5 million over 5-years. (Source: Northwest Advanced Bio-Fuels, LLC (NWABF), Washington State Univ. Evergreen, 3 Oct., 2019) Contact: Washington State University, NARA, Ralph Cavalieri, (509) 335-5581, cavalieri@wsu.edu, www.nararenewables.org; Northwest Advanced Bio-Fuels, LLC Chris Whitworth,Dir. Project Dev., www.facebook.com/NWABiofuels; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Aviation Biofuel,  Woody Biomass,  


WSU Researchers Find Carbon Reserve Underfoot (R&D, Ind. Report)
Washington State University
Date: 2018-12-07
According to research from Washington State University at least a quarter of all the carbon stored in Earth's soil is found locked up in minerals roughly six feet beneath the surface. But new research suggests this unique carbon reservoir will become less efficient at carbon storage as the planet warms. The research details the way carbon physically and chemically binds to minerals in soils across the globe.

The new data showed minimal amounts of carbon are stored in the sediments of deserts and dry forests, but roughly six feet beneath the surfaces of wet forests, scientists found an abundance of carbon bound to reactive minerals. The persistence of water and decaying organic matter on the forest floor helps leach carbon from above and transport to minerals buried below.

According to the new research, global warming won't impact the carbon that is already stored beneath the surface of wet forest floors, but it will alter the pathway by which new carbon gets stored. Temperature increases are likely to minimize the amount of water running through forest soil, even if precipitation levels remain stable.

The results of the survey were published in the journal Nature Climate Change HERE. (Source: Washington State University, Vancouver, UPI, 2 Nov., 2018) Contact: Washington State University, Vancouver, Assoc. Prof. Marc Kramer, Environmental Chemistry, marc.kramer@wsu.edu, https://labs.wsu.edu/kramerlab/marc-g-kramer

More Low-Carbon Energy News Washington State University,  Carbon Storage,  


Peabody Energy Increases Clean Coal Consortium Support (Funding)
Peabody Energy
Date: 2018-08-31
St. Louis-based coal giant Peabody Energy has reportedly donated an additional $1.5 million for a total of $6.5 million since 2008, to the Washington University Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU), of which Peabody is a founding member.

The CCCU aims to make coal a safer and more affordable source of energy, with minimal impact on the environment. Donations fund new research projects, facilities, and outreach activities involving clean coal. The research projects are conducted by faculty from both Washington University and international partner universities. In total, the program has completed 24 research projects, 114 peer-reviewed papers and one book.

The CCCU is a part of the International Center for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (InCEES), which was established in 2007 as a larger effort to coordinate research on energy, environment, and sustainability.

According to Peabody Director of Corporate Communications Charlene Murdock, "Coal remains an essential part of the world' energy mix, and technologies are central to continuing to reduce the emissions profile." Murdock adds that "Peabody is dedicated to reducing emissions." (Source: Washington State University, Peabody Energy, Student Life, 28 Aug., 2018) Contact: CCCU, Richard Axelbaum, Dir., cleancoal.wustl.edu; Peabody Energy, Glenn Kellow, CEO, Travis Snyder (314) 342-4351, www.peabodyenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Peabody Energy,  Clean Coal,  ,  

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