Return to Today's Publications

 

Newsletter:
Date Range (YYYY-MM-DD) -
Company, Industry or Technology:
  Search Tips


EU Ethanol Trade Assoc. Comments on Decarbonising Transportation (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
ePURE
Date: 2021-02-26
ePURE, the European renewable ethanol trade association, notes that as part of its European Green Deal roadmap, the EU is considering revising two key legislative tools it uses to drive decarbonisation -- the Emissions Trading System (ETS) which creates a market for carbon emissions by allowing emitters to buy or sell emission allowances, and the Effort Sharing Regulation (ESR) which sets binding greenhouse-gas emissions reduction targets for EU Member States for sectors not covered by the ETS, including transportation.

Among the policy options being considered are an extension of the scope of the ETS to include road transport and a possible phase-out of the ESR. ePURE has provided the following suggestions on how they can be better integrated with other EU policies to become more effective at achieving Europe's climate goals.

A successful decarbonisation policy in transport must ensure a total coherence of actions between car manufacturers, fuel suppliers and retailers. But an ETS for road transport would seriously disrupt the existing growing synergy between these stakeholders, hamper efforts to reduce emissions from transport, increase fuel prices and create social discontent.

A more effective solution would better integrate existing EU policies. For example, the targets of the EU Renewable Energy Directive should be increased in line with higher Green Deal ambitions. Other policies, such as the Energy Taxation Directive and CO2 standards for cars and vans must be revised in order to integrate the CO2 content and the biogenic content of fuels, thus better reflecting the real environmental performance of biofuels. These actions, however, do not necessitate the extension of the ETS to road transport, and their revision should be carried out independently.

At first glance the ESR has so far been a success with the EU achieving and even surpassing its 9.3 pct emissions reduction objectives as a whole by 2020 as early as in 2018, due mainly to progress in sectors that were the easiest to decarbonise, such as buildings and waste. There has been little to no decarbonisation in the transportation and agriculture sectors, which account for over 50 pct of the ESR emissions, and meeting the already agreed 2030 target of 30 pct. Moreover, there have been many differing levels of progress among Member States.

ePURE suggests the EU should not abandon what works but rather should strengthen and improve the legislative tools that actually boost renewable energy and fuels and encourage carbon abatement. This includes keeping ESR targets, the sole legally binding targets for Member States to reduce emissions in sectors not currently in the ETS. Keeping the existing legislation and increasing their ambition levels, including ESR, RED II and the Fuel Quality Directive is a safety net that the EU should not phase out without good reasons. (Source: ePURE, Website PR, 15 Feb., 2021) Contact: ePURE, Emmanuel Desplechin, Secretary-General, +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Ethanol,  GHG,  Greenhouse Gas,  Carbon Emissions,  


Austrocel Bioethanol Production Slated for Dec, Start-up (Int'l.)
Austrocel
Date: 2020-08-19
Austria's dissolving pulp producer AustroCel Hallein GmbH reports construction is underway on its 30 million lpy bioethanol production facility at the pulp mill in Hallein. The plant is expected to be commissioned in November for biofuel production in December, this year.

As previously reported , Autrocel has a multi-year biotehanol supply agreement with Austria's Vienna-headquartered oil and gas company OMV which will blend Autrocel supplied biofuel with gasoline to reduce the carbon intensity of OMV's fuel products and fulfill legal additive requirements under the Renewable Energy Directive II (RED II).

The REDII consumption target of 32 pct was introduced for the EU member states for 2030. The directive also requires fuel suppliers to supply a minimum of 14 pct of the energy consumed in road and rail transport by 2030 as renewable energy. (Source: Austrocel, EUWID Pulp & Paper, 19 Aug., 2020) Contact: AustroCel Hallein GmbH, Jorge Harbring, CEO, +43 6245 8900, www.austrocel.com; OMV, www.omv.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Austrocel,  Ethanol,  Bioethanol ,  


Forest Biomass Renewable Fuels Classification Challenged (Int'l)
Bord na Mona
Date: 2019-03-06
In an action filed Monday at the European General Court in Luxembourg, Ireland's state-owned energy company Bord na Mona Plc and six other plaintiffs claimed that classifying forest biomass as a renewable fuel "fatally undermines the goals of the new European Renewable Energy Directive's biomass energy policy."

The lawsuit seeks to remove forest biomass from the EUs Renewable Energy Directive (RED II) which raises the overall EU target for renewable energy sources consumption by 2030 from 20 pct to 32 pct. The plaintiffs contend RED II "ignores the science on forest bioenergy and promotes false climate solutions" and that RED II failed to properly account for the lifecycle carbon emissions from harvesting, producing, transporting, and burning woody biomass fuels.

The case is coordinated by the US-based Partnership for Policy Integrity with input from experts including the Dogwood Alliance; one of more than 30 conservation and environmental justice organizations in the southern US who wrote to the Government, the ESB and Bord na Mona in August 2018 pointing out it was planned that wood used in the Irish power plants would come from their region -- the U.S. North Atlantic Coastal Plain. According to the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland, the annual supply gap in wood production for biomass could be up to 1.88 million cubic metres by 2020 and more than twice that by 2025, all of which must be sourced outside Ireland.

According to Dr Mary S Booth, director of the US Partnership for Policy Integrity and lead science advisor on the case, "burning wood for energy emits more CO2 per unit of energy generated than coal but RED II counts these emissions as zero.". (Source: (Source: Bord na Mona, All Things Arb, Agricultural News, 5 Mar., 2019) Contact: Bord na Mona Plc, Mike Quinn, CEO, Patrick Madigan, Bioenergy Division, +353 45 439000, www.bordnamona.ie

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Fuel,  RED II,  Bord na Mona,  Carbon Emissions,  Woody Biomass,  Forest Biomass,  


ePURE Comments on EU Draft Regarding Palm Oil Use (Opinins, Editorials & Asides)
ePure
Date: 2019-02-18
The European Renewable Ethanol Association (ePURE) secretary general Emmanuel Desplechin has responded to the EU Commission's draft surrounding high risk indirect land-use change (ILUC) biofuels and the shift of focus away from unsustainable sources of palm oil.

The draft details curbing any biofuels with a high ILUC-risk and its amount of consumption in 2019 within the Member States. The EU also outlined an ambitious goal of reducing any high-risk biofuel's contribution to 0 pct by 2030.

"Directive (EU) 2018/2001 also calls for a specific limit to conventional biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels with high ILUC-risk and for which a significant expansion of the production area into land with high carbon stock is observed, in the amount of their level of consumption in each Member State in 2019," the draft stated. "Starting from 31 December 2023, their contribution should be gradually reduced to 0 pct by 2030 at the latest."

Despite the draft's promising changes to the uses of palm oil, ePure argues that the draft would still 'allow imported feedstock that violates spirit of RED II agreement.'

"Making an exception for feedstock produced by smallholders isn't just allowing high-ILUC-risk biofuels such as palm oil into Europe through the back door, it's allowing it through the front door. The hard-won compromise reached on RED II couldn't have been clearer in its message that Europe should phase out biofuels associated with the significant deforestation and peatland drainage that has defined most palm oil expansion."

"Low-ILUC-risk biofuels certified as such could escape from the phase-out, but these were clearly defined as either produced through improved agricultural practices or from unused land. By inventing a third, alternative criterion for smallholders, the Commission is making a mockery of the agreed RED II compromise," Desplechin claims. (Source: ePURE, Feb., 2019) Contact: ePURE Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePure,  Palm Oil,  Biodiesel,  


Palm Oil Still in EU Transportation Fuel Mix (Int'l Report)
ePure
Date: 2019-02-13
Reporting from Brussels, the European Commission (EC) reports it has gone most of the way toward banning the use of unsustainable palm oil in EU transport, but it hasn't quite closed the deal. Instead of acting on the RED II agreement and removing "high-ILUC-risk" biofuels from the 28-member trading bloc's transport mix, it has left a door open, according to a release.

"Making an exception for feedstock produced by smallholders isn't just allowing high-ILUC-risk biofuels such as palm oil into Europe through the back door, it's allowing it through the front door," said Emmanuel Desplechin, Secretary General of ePURE, the European renewable ethanol association. "The hard-won compromise reached on RED II couldn't have been clearer in its message that Europe should phase out biofuels associated with the significant deforestation and peatland drainage that has defined most palm oil expansion."

"Low-ILUC-risk biofuels certified as such could escape from the phase-out, but these were clearly defined as either produced through improved agricultural practices or from unused land. By inventing a third, alternative criterion for smallholders, the EC is making a mockery of the agreed RED II compromise," the ePure Secretary General added.

European renewable ethanol is made from European feedstock and delivers high greenhouse-gas reduction and is not associated with deforestation. Its use cuts GHG emissions by more than 70 pct on average compared to fossil petrol. (Source: ePure, EC, Feb., 2019) Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Palm Oil,  Biodiesel ,  ePure,  Biofuel,  


Palm Oil Producing Countries Comment on Biofuels, Climate Change (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries
Date: 2019-01-14
A recent meeting of the Jakarta-based Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries (CPOPC) , issued the following policy developments in the EU on biofuel:
  • Under the proposed Renewable Energy Directive II (RED II), the Commission of the European Union is mandated to establish criteria to help distinguish between high and low risk Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) across the vegetable oil sector in general used for biofuels;

  • There are several EU models for ILUC that have been proposed none of which, nor could provide definitive evidence that would allow for a clear distinction between high and low risk ILUC. Nevertheless, the Commission is mandated to establish criteria by February 2019 to allow for such a distinction to be made;

  • The ILUC concept is of US and EU origin, but it is not a globally accepted approach or standard for assessing the impact of ILUC on climate change. It helps underpins EU policy, but it is not an international norm upon which palm oil producing countries could or should build their environmental policies;

  • CPOPC draws attention to the fact that there is over 1.7 billion hectares of land devoted to the production of crops globally, of which only 4 pct is devoted to biofuel. In our view, the very marginal use of land for biofuel calls in to question the very basis premises of indirect land use change resulting from the cultivation of vegetable oils for biofuel;

  • While CPOPC considers that the scientific community of palm oil producing countries should engage with the Commission, the Governments in the developing world should be fearful of being drawn in to acknowledging, accepting or offering legitimacy to the ILUC scheme within the RED II;

  • Palm oil producing countries should also be mindful in the weeks ahead of the objectiveness of the criteria being established and whether they are being applied impartially across all vegetable oils. In this respect, there is concern that palm oil will be targeted as several EU models are associated with the conversion of forests and peat lands with ILUC;

  • CPOPC is of the view that the use of ILC to target palm oil would represent a basic violation of the non-discriminatory principles upon which the WTO multilateral system is based; and that any related EU regulation or decision would likely constitute a Technical Barrier to Trade;

  • CPOPC does not necessarily subscribe to this concern, but we believe that criteria established by the EU should also address carbon retention in lands that have been converted from forests and peat in Europe; as well as to take account of the relative productivity of vegetable oils and the importance that this plays in protecting the global land bank;

  • There are wider concerns that have been expressed by palm oil producing countries that criteria should also take into-account the historical impact of mass deforestation in Europe;

  • CPOPC supports the UN global agreement to achieve Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 (SDGs);

  • CPOPC considers that the SDGs does not mean a trade off between social and economic progress and the environment, but rather the need to balance out these aims and CPOPC and other Palm Oil Producing countries are willing and open to engage with trading partners and stakeholders on how to achieve the SDGs in the vegetable oil sector;

  • In contrast to the direction of EU RED II, CPOPC believes that the promotion of first generation biofuel is an essential element for achieving the SDGs in palm oil producing countries. The use of vegetable oils in biofuel is essential to combating climate change and it is also important for all Governments in Palm Oil Producing Countries to reassure and give certainty to our industries that biofuel investment will not be undermined as is the case in the European Union. (Source: CPOPC, Neutral English, Oct, 2018) Contact: CPOPC, Mahendra Siregar, Executive Director, +62 21 391 5160, +62 21 391 3961, secretariat@cpopc.org, www.cpopc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Palm Oil,  Biofuel,  Climate Change,  


  • PKN ORLEN Refocusing, Investing in Biofuels (Int'l Report)
    PKN ORLEN
    Date: 2018-12-21
    In Polnad, PKN ORLEN reports it is preparing preparing a new renewable energy directive (RED II) focused on second-generation biofuels made from algae, straw and other waste materials and, to that end, will increase its biofuel related R&D activities, construct biofuel production facilities and other support infrastructure.

    According to a statement, PKN ORLEN will use its existing refinery units in Płock and Litvínov to take the co-hydrotreatment process to an industrial scale. The process consists of co-feeding vegetable oils or used fats with petroleum distillates into refinery units. The output diesel oil contains a bio-component -- hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO).

    The decision to take the co-hydrotreatment process to an industrial scale was prompted by the successful completion of a test run carried out in September 2018 under the CO-BIO project, partly financed with a grant under the Inno-Chem programme. (Source: PKN ORLEN, Petrol Plaza, Dec., 2018) Contact: PKN ORLEN, Armen Artwich, Member of the Management Board, www.orlen.pl

    More Low-Carbon Energy News PKN ORLEN,  Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  


    Palm Oil Producing Countries Comment on Biofuels, Climate Change (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    The Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries
    Date: 2018-10-01
    Meeting last week in Jakarta, The Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries (CPOPC) , issued the following policy developments in the EU on biofuel:
  • Under the proposed Renewable Energy Directive II (RED II), the Commission of the European Union is mandated to establish criteria to help distinguish between high and low risk Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) across the vegetable oil sector in general used for biofuels;

  • There are several EU models for ILUC that have been proposed none of which, nor could provide definitive evidence that would allow for a clear distinction between high and low risk ILUC. Nevertheless, the Commission is mandated to establish criteria by February 2019 to allow for such a distinction to be made;

  • The ILUC concept is of US and EU origin, but it is not a globally accepted approach or standard for assessing the impact of ILUC on climate change. It helps underpins EU policy, but it is not an international norm upon which palm oil producing countries could or should build their environmental policies;

  • CPOPC draws attention to the fact that there is over 1.7 billion hectares of land devoted to the production of crops globally, of which only 4 pct is devoted to biofuel. In our view, the very marginal use of land for biofuel calls in to question the very basis premises of indirect land use change resulting from the cultivation of vegetable oils for biofuel;

  • While CPOPC considers that the scientific community of palm oil producing countries should engage with the Commission, the Governments in the developing world should be fearful of being drawn in to acknowledging, accepting or offering legitimacy to the ILUC scheme within the RED II;

  • Palm oil producing countries should also be mindful in the weeks ahead of the objectiveness of the criteria being established and whether they are being applied impartially across all vegetable oils. In this respect, there is concern that palm oil will be targeted as several EU models are associated with the conversion of forests and peat lands with ILUC;

  • CPOPC is of the view that the use of ILC to target palm oil would represent a basic violation of the non-discriminatory principles upon which the WTO multilateral system is based; and that any related EU regulation or decision would likely constitute a Technical Barrier to Trade;

  • CPOPC does not necessarily subscribe to this concern, but we believe that criteria established by the EU should also address carbon retention in lands that have been converted from forests and peat in Europe; as well as to take account of the relative productivity of vegetable oils and the importance that this plays in protecting the global land bank;

  • There are wider concerns that have been expressed by palm oil producing countries that criteria should also take into-account the historical impact of mass deforestation in Europe;

  • CPOPC supports the UN global agreement to achieve Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 (SDGs);

  • CPOPC considers that the SDGs does not mean a trade off between social and economic progress and the environment, but rather the need to balance out these aims and CPOPC and other Palm Oil Producing countries are willing and open to engage with trading partners and stakeholders on how to achieve the SDGs in the vegetable oil sector;

  • In contrast to the direction of EU RED II, CPOPC believes that the promotion of first generation biofuel is an essential element for achieving the SDGs in palm oil producing countries. The use of vegetable oils in biofuel is essential to combating climate change and it is also important for all Governments in Palm Oil Producing Countries to reassure and give certainty to our industries that biofuel investment will not be undermined as is the case in the European Union. (Source: CPOPC, Neutral English, 1 Oct, 2018) Contact: CPOPC, Mahendra Siregar, Executive Director, +62 21 391 5160, +62 21 391 3961, secretariat@cpopc.org, www.cpopc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  Palm Oil,  Council of Palm Oil Producing Countries,  


  • EU Affirms Palm Oil, Palm Oil Biofuels Import Position (Int'l)
    EU Renewable Energy Directive
    Date: 2018-06-18
    In a written statement issued in Jakarta on Saturday, EU Ambassador to Indonesia Vincent Guerend stressed that based on the outcome of a June 14 meeting between the European Commission, the European Parliament and the European Union Council on the revision to the EU Renewable Energy Directive (RED II), the EU remains the most open market for Indonesian palm oil.

    The EU June 14 meeting agreed on a revised EU Renewable Energy Directive including a gradual reduction of certain biofuels calculated to meet ambitious renewable energy use target of 32 pct by 2030. According to the ambassador, there is no specific or explicit reference to palm oil in the RED II Text and no prohibition or restriction on palm oil imports or palm oil based biofuels. The relevant provisions in RED II are only aimed at regulating the extent to which certain biofuels can be calculated by EU member states to achieve their sustainable energy targets. (Source: EU, Neutral English, Various Media, 17 June, 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EU Renewable Energy Directive,  EU,  Palm Oil,  Palm Oil Biofuel,  Palm Oil Biodiesel ,  

    Showing 1 to 9 of 9.