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Blue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis (Marine Conservation Society Report Attached)
Marine Conservation Society
Date: 2021-05-05
In the UK, the Marine Conservation Society, in partnership with Rewilding Britain, has released Blue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis, a report on the ocean's vital role in fighting the climate crisis and blue carbon solutions as an effective strategy for hitting net zero by 2050. In recognition of the vital role oceans must play in climate change mitigation and adaptation, ocean-based solutions must be adopted with pace and at scale by 2030.

Globally, the "rewilding" of key blue carbon securing marine and coastal ecosystems -- seagrass beds, saltmarshes and mangroves -- could deliver CO2 mitigation amounting to 1.83 billion tonnes. That is 5 pct of the emissions savings we need to make globally. This figure doesn't include the enormous quantities of carbon stored in fish and other marine life; in marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, seaweeds and shellfish beds; or the vast stores of carbon in our seabed sediments.

The report motes that 500,000 km2 of the UK's shelf seas hold an estimated 205 million tonnes of carbon -- 50 million tonnes more than the entire quantity held within the UK's forests. Harmful fishing practices such as bottom trawling, and other activities such as dredging, disturb seabed sediments and have the potential to result in the loss of 13 million tonnes of carbon from vital blue carbon stores, including shellfish beds and kelp forests, over the next decade.

Nature-based solutions could provide a third of climate change mitigations required to address the climate crisis, but currently they attract less than 3 pct of funds invested globally in addressing climate change, he report notes. Internationally, the UK is leading the way by committing to significantly increase its spending on nature-based solutions, including those offered by the ocean. This must be matched with equally ambitious actions at home. Investment in protecting our marine ecosystems is vital, for both biodiversity and blue carbon storage.

The report makes the case for the development of a four nation Blue Carbon Strategy, focusing on three key action areas. First, scaling up marine rewilding for biodiversity and blue carbon benefits. Second, Integrating blue carbon protection and recovery into climate mitigation and environmental management policies. Third, working with the private sector to develop and support sustainable and innovative low-carbon commercial fisheries and aquaculture.

With COP26 occurring in six months time, it has never been more pertinent for UK governments to take action. Ocean-based solutions must be part of the many urgent and varied solutions required to address the climate crisis.

Download theBlue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis report HERE. (Source: Marine Conservation Society, PR Website, Apr., 2021) Contact: Marine Conservation Society, Dr Chris Tuckett, Prog. Dir., info@mcsuk.org, +44 0 1989 566017, www.mcsuk.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


Running Tide Touts Kelp Carbon Sequestration (Ind. Report)

Date: 2021-02-10
Portland, Maine based Running Tide Technologies, which began as an aquaculture operation focused on restoring oyster habitats -- is reporting its innovative approach to carbon sequestration -- "We're just fishing for carbon now, and kelp's the net."

The company grows massive amounts of kelp seaweed on floating bouys. The kelp soaks up carbon, via photosynthesis, then after about seven months the mature kelp sink into the ocean floor where it will sequester carbon for thousands of years, according to the release.

This spring, the company plans to deploy 1,600 buoys to demonstrate that in principle, the system could safely and economically be expanded to a global scale with millions of microfarms floating in the open sea, moving billions of tons of carbon from sky to ocean floor every year, according to the company release. (Source: Running Tide Technologies, MPR, 8 Feb., 2021) Contact: Running Tide Technologies, Marty Odlin, CEO, Adam Baske, Bus. Dev., media@runningtide.com, www.runningtide.com


Seattle Cutting CO2 Emissions, Funding "Blue Carbon" Research Project (Ind. Report)
Port of Seattle, US Gain
Date: 2020-04-17
In Washington State, the Port of Seattle Commission reports approval of a 10-year Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) supply contract with U.S. Gain to enable the Port to reach its 2030 goal to cut carbon emissions by 50 pct almost a decade early.

The $23 million contract allows the Port to purchase sufficient fuel to heat 55 pct of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) terminal and to power 100 pct of its bus fleet to reach its 50 pct port-wide carbon reduction goal. The fuel delivery begins October 1, 2020.

Natural gas accounts for 75 pct of the Port's annual climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions. This contract will result in the reduction of approximately 11,000 tpy of emissions the Port directly produces -- equivalent to heating 4,000 Seattle homes or taking 2,400 passenger vehicles off the roads each year of the contract.

Port Commissioners also approved an Inter-local agreement with the Washington State Departments of Ecology and Natural Resources for the Smith Cove "Blue Carbon" pilot project. Blue Carbon is the carbon stored in coastal ecosystems of mangroves, tidal marshes and sea grass meadows contain large stores of carbon deposited by vegetation and various natural processes over centuries. These ecosystems sequester and store more carbon per unit area than terrestrial forests. The goal of the study is to evaluate how well transplanted kelp and eelgrass offshore of Smith Cove Park sequester carbon and reduce ocean acidification associated with carbon concentrations. (Source: Port of Seattle, PR, Travel Daily News, 16 April, 2020) Contact: US Gain, Bryan Nudelbacher, Dir. RNG Business Development, 920.381.2190, www.usgain.com; Port of Seattle Commission, 206-787-3034, www.portseattle.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  US Gain,  Port of Seattle ,  Renewable Fuel,  


Marine BioEnergy Seaweed Biofuels Project Tests Continue (R&D)
Marine BioEnergy,DOE Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E)
Date: 2020-03-18
Further to our 30 Nov., 2018 coverage, researchers at the University of Southern California Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies will carry out a project proposed by Marine BioEnergy Inc., a California-headquartered company focused on growing and developing Pacific kelp as a source of biofuel.

The Marine Bioenergy plan includes submersible drones dragging lines seeded with kelp plants in deep, nutrient-rich waters during the night then floating it back up to shallow waters to take advantage of the sunlight during the day. The kelp would then be harvested at sea and processed into biocrude, the basis for biofuel.

Under optimal conditions, giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, which is used to generate a biofuel, can grow up to three feet per day without fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides or fertile land. These attributes make kelp a viable potential substitute for traditional fuels, as it can be sustainably farmed, harvested and converted into biofuel.

Marine BioEnergy ran its first trial last year is tentatively scheduled to begin its next round of tests this April. (Source: DOE ARPA-E, Mar., 2020) Contact: DOE ARPA-E, Marc von Keitz, Program Dir., arpa-e.energy.gov; Marine BioEnergy Inc., Cindy Wilcox, Pres. Marine BioEnergy, www.marinebiomass.com; USC Wrigley Institute, Diane Kim, Associate Director , (310) 510-0811, www.usc.edu/wrigley

More Low-Carbon Energy News Marine BioEnergy,  DOE ARPA-E,  


USC Wrigley Institute Investigating Kelp Biofuel Sustainability (R&D)
USC Wrigley Institute
Date: 2018-11-30
In Southern California, researchers at the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental are working on a project to convert open-ocean kelp into a biofuel that could someday replace gasoline.

Kelp, a species of macroalgae, is turned into a biofuel through a process called hydrothermal liquefaction. This involves drying the kelp, then processing the biomass in an extremely hot, pressurized and wet environment for long periods of time to allow the breakdown of the solid chemical structure to produce a biocrude which can be further distilled or processed into a fuel that can be used just like any petroleum-based fuel.

Researchers at Wrigley and partners at Marine BioEnergy Inc. have come up with an innovative open ocean "kelp elevator" to farm the massive amounts of kelp necessary for a commercialized fuel source. The current "kelp elevator" prototype models use PVC pipes in the ocean to grow and cycle kelp from the surface where the light is to the deep water where the nutrients are.

Under optimal conditions, giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, which is used to generate a biofuel, can grow up to three feet per day without fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides or fertile land. These attributes make kelp a viable potential substitute for traditional fuels, as it can be sustainably farmed, harvested and converted into biofuel. (Source: USC Wrigley Institute, Daily Trojan, 29 Nov., 2018) Contact: USC Wrigley Institute, Diane Kim, Associate Director , (310) 510-0811, www.usc.edu/wrigley; Marine BioEnergy Inc., www.marinebiomass.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Kelp,  

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