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Trudeau Tables New Cdn. Net-Zero Emissions Legislation (Reg. & Leg.)
Canada Climate Change
Date: 2020-11-20
In Ottawa, the Government of Prime Minster Justin Trudeau (Lib) Ministry of Environment and Climate Change has tabled new "legally binding" legislation -- bill C-12 -- that would force current and future federal governments to set binding climate targets although the bill fails to specify penalties for non compliance. If passed into law, federal governments would be required to set five-year interim emissions reduction targets over the next 30 years to ensure progress toward reaching "net-zero" by 2050.

The legislation calls for the creation of an outside 15-member advisory board composed of climate experts, scientists and Indigenous representatives, among others to advice the minister on setting targets and the best "sectoral strategies" that are "deemed effective" for achieving net-zero. The legislation also requires the minister to a plan in Parliament outlining how Ottawa will meet those targets as well as annual reports on the bill's progress.

Canada's carbon reduction target, set by the former Conservative government in May 2015, is to reduce emissions by 30 pct compared to 2005 levels by 2030. Current policies -- including the carbon tax, banning coal power plants and regulating methane emissions in the oil and gas industry -- will only get Canada about two-thirds of the way to its goal.

While the government describes this legislation as "legally binding," there would be no tangible penalty applied if the country fails to drive down emissions as promised. In short, bill C-12 appears to be little more than political window dressing.

As previously reported in Nov, 2019, Prime Minister Trudeau committed Canada to reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 and to reduce CO2 levels by 30 pct by 2030. In December 2018, Climate Change Canada projected Canada's total emissions by 2030 are only on track to be 19 pct -- not 30 pct -- below 2005 levels. (Source: Environment Canada, Various Media, CBC News, 19 Nov., 2020) Contact: Environment and Climate Change Canada, (800) 668-6767, www.canada.ca › environment-climate-change

More Low-Carbon Energy News Environment Canada,  Net-Zero Emissions,  Climate Change,  Trudeau,  


Irving Cuts Climate Change, Emissions Commitment (Ind. Report)
Irving Oil
Date: 2019-12-23
St.John New Brunswick-based Irving Oil, Canada's largest carbon emitter has reportedly abandoned a previous pledge to cut carbon output by 17 pct from 2005 levels by 2020, in favor of a "keeping up with the Jones" approach of keeping its emissions and environmental performance competitive with its rivals.

In 2017, the 320,000 bpd Irving family owned refinery in St. John emitted just over 3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e), according to Environment Canada. In effect, the company is no longer targeting an outright reduction in carbon emissions but is maintaining the status quo as dictated by the top 25 pct of rival refineries in Canada through 2025.

Founded in 1924, privately held Irving Oil operates Canada's largest refinery in Saint John, New Brunswick, more than 900 fueling locations and a network of distribution terminals spanning Eastern Canada and New England. It also operates Ireland's only refinery, located in the village of Whitegate, according to Wikepedia. (Source: Irving Oil, Reuters, Chronicle Herald, 20 Dec., 2019) Contact: Irving Oil, www.irvingoil.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


Canadian GHG Emissions in Slow Decline (Ind. Report)
Canada Climate Change,Environment Canada
Date: 2019-12-23
In Ottawa, the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Environment Minister Hon. Jonathan Wilkinson is reporting the country's carbon emissions are expected to be 227 million tonnes below projected levels by the end of the next decade.

Canada expects to its greenhouse gas emissions to 603 million tonnes by 2030 -- well above the 511 million tonne target Canada committed to under the COP15 Paris Climate Agreement. To that end, the government plans to plant two billion trees, cut energy waste and support zero-emissions clean tech companies, and various other initiatives and measures. Unfortunately, Canada is reportedly warming at twice the global average and and three times the global rate in its extreme northern regions. (Source: Environment Canada, Various Media, Canadian Press, Dec., 2019) Contact: Environment Canada, Environment Canada, www.canada.ca/en/government

More Low-Carbon Energy News Canada Carbon Emissions,  Canada Climate Change,  Environment Canada,  


Cdn. Oilsands CO2 Emissions Far Higher than Reported (Ind. Report)
Environment Canada
Date: 2019-04-24
In Ottawa, Environment Canada is reporting newly published research from Canadian federal scientists suggests a number of major oilsands operations in oil-soaked northern Alberta seem to be emitting significantly more carbon pollution than companies have been reporting, which could have profound consequences for government climate-change strategies.

The researchers, mainly from Environment Canada, calculated emissions rates for four major oilsands surface mining operations using air samples collected in 2013 on 17 airplane flights over the area. In results published today in the journal Nature Communications, the scientists say the air samples from just those surface mining operations suggest their carbon dioxide emissions are 64 pct higher, on average, than what the companies themselves report to the federal government using the standard United Nations reporting framework for greenhouse gases. The findings suggest Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions would be around 2.3 pct higher than previously thought.

The report suggests the differences between the new estimates and previously reported numbers are related to methodology. The standard "bottom up" method sees companies quantify the amount of fuel they use at each source of their operation, from extraction to delivery of crude to refineries. They then calculate their carbon emissions from their fuel use. The scientists behind the Environment Canada study used a "top-down" approach involving hundreds of air samples taken during more than 80 hours of flights over four major surface mining operations in northern Alberta: Syncrude Canada's Mildred Lake facility, Suncor's Millennium and North Steepbank site, Canadian Natural Resources Ltd.'s Horizon mine, and what was then Shell's Albian Jackpine operation, now majority owned by Canadian Natural.

The gap between the facilities' reported CO2 emissions and the levels calculated by researchers was 13 pct for the Suncor site, 36 pct for the Horizon mine, 38 pct for Jackpine and 123 pct for Syncrude. The study did not include emissions from all oilsands operations that use in-situ extraction, pumping steam into the ground to get the petroleum out. About 80 pct of oilsands reserves, and the majority of current production, require in-situ extraction. That means the overall amount of under reported greenhouse gas emissions could be significantly higher. (Source: Environment Canada, CBC News , 23 April, 2019) Contact: Environment Canada, John Liggio, www.linkedin.com/in/john-liggio-34349467

More Low-Carbon Energy News Environment Canada,  Carbon Emissions,  Oil Sands,  Carbon Emissions,  

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