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LanzaTech, BASF Tout Ind. Off-Gas n-Octanol Prod. (Ind. Report)
LanzaTech,BASF
Date: 2021-05-14
Transforming the carbon contained in industrial off-gases into valuable chemicals is the aim of a partnership between LanzaTech and BASF. Now the partners have achieved a key first success: With the help of special bacteria, they have been able to produce n-octanol at laboratory scale from carbon monoxide and hydrogen, the main components of emissions, e.g. from the steel industry.

In this partnership, the two companies are working on a process using a biological capability developed by Dr. Ramon Gonzalez, currently a Professor at the University of South Florida, that will allow the carbon in the off-gas to be utilized as a raw material for the production of chemical products like n-octanol. This innovative carbon recycling approach thereby reduces CO2 emissions from the industrial site and keeps fossil resources in the ground. LanzaTech's technology is already deployed at commercial scale transforming exhaust gas from steel production into ethanol. The collaboration has now paved the way to produce high value chemicals, such as n octanol through gas fermentation.

The two companies have also designed an innovative process concept to allow continuous product generation and purification. As a next step, the teams will focus on optimizing the biology and technology design to deliver an efficient production process, according to the LanzaTech release. (Source: LanzaTech, Website PR, 11 May, 2021) Contact: LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.com; BASF Dr. Detlef Kratz, Pres. Process Research & Chemical Engineering, +49 (0)621 60-0, www.basf.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News LanzaTech,  BASF,  


Opportunities and Limits of CO2 Recycling in a Circular Carbon Economy: Techno-economics, Critical Infrastructure Needs, and Policy Priorities (Report Attached)
Columbia Universitys Center on Global Policy
Date: 2021-05-07
The attached report, part of the Carbon Management Research Initiative at Columbia University's Center on Global Policy, examines 19 CO2 recycling pathways to understand the opportunities, technical and economic limits of CO2 recycling products gaining market entry and reaching global scale.

The pathways studied consume renewable (low-carbon) electricity and use chemical feedstocks derived from electrochemical pathways powered by renewable energy. Across these CO2 recycling pathways, the authors evaluated current globally representative production costs, sensitivities to cost drivers, carbon abatement potential, critical infrastructure and feedstock needs, and the effect of subsidies. Based on this analysis, the paper concludes with targeted policy recommendations to support CO2 recycling innovation and deployment. Key findings of the analysis include :

  • CO2 recycling pathways could deliver deep emissions reductions. -- When supplied by low-carbon electricity and chemical feedstocks, CO2 recycling pathways have the combined potential to abate 6.8 gigatonnes of CO2 per year (GtCO2/yr) when displacing conventional production methods.

  • Some CO2 recycling pathways have reached market parity today, while the costs of remaining pathways are high. -- Electrochemical carbon monoxide (CO) production, ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, concrete carbonation curing, and the CarbonCure concrete process all have an estimated cost of production (ECOP) lower than the product selling price. These pathways have a combined carbon abatement potential of 1.6 GtCO2/yr. Most remaining pathways have an ECOP of 2.5 to 7.5 times greater than the product selling price. In particular locations and contexts, ECOP may be substantially lower, but these costs are representative of CO2 recycling at global scale.

  • Catalyst performance and input prices are the main cost drivers. -- The largest component of ECOP is electricity and chemical feedstock costs, and the main cost drivers are those who influence these two cost components. For electrochemical pathways, ECOP is most sensitive to catalyst product selectivity (the ability of the catalyst to avoid unwanted side reactions), catalyst energy efficiency, and electricity price. For thermochemical pathways, the largest cost drivers are product selectivity, chemical feedstock price, and the price of the electricity used to make the feedstocks.

  • CO2 recycling at the scale of current global markets would require enormous new capacity of critical infrastructure. -- Each pathway at global scale would consume thousands of tWh of electricity, 30--100 million metric tpy of hydrogen, and up to 2,000 Mt of CO2 annually. This would require trillions of dollars of infrastructure per pathway to generate and deliver these inputs, including a combined 8,400 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy capacity and 8,000 GW of electrolyzer capacity across all pathways.

    Based on these findings, the authors recommend the following policy actions:

  • Ensure CO2 recycling pathways are fed by low-carbon inputs. -- Without low-carbon electricity and feedstocks, CO2 recycling could potentially be more carbon-intensive than conventional production.

  • Prioritize certain pathways strategically. -- CO2 recycling methane and ethane production are extremely uneconomic and should be deprioritized. All other pathways are more economically promising and could be the focus of a targeted innovation agenda to reduce costs. In addition, the following pathways that have an ECOP less than 5 times the selling price could be prioritized for early market growth: electrochemical CO production, green hydrogen, ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass, concrete carbonation curing pathways, CO2 recycling urea production, and CO2 hydrogenation to light olefins, methanol, or jet fuel.

  • Target research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) to catalyst innovation to bring down ECOP and reduce input demand. -- Policy makers can promote RD&D to improve the selectivity and energy efficiency of CO2 recycling catalysts. By decreasing a pathway's consumption of electricity and feedstocks, these innovations would both decrease ECOP and alleviate the sizable critical infrastructure needs.

  • Create demand pull for early market CO2 recycling products. -- Governments can use demand pull policies such as public procurement standards to bolster early markets for the most mature CO2 recycling pathways.

  • Promote build-out of critical infrastructure. -- To provide for the substantial infrastructure needs of CO2 recycling, policy makers can seek to remove barriers to and catalyze investment in building renewables installations, transmission lines, electrolyzers, and CO2 transport pipelines.

    Download the report HERE. (Source: Columbia University/ SIPA, Center for Global Energy Policy, 4 May., 2021) Contact: Columbia University, www.energypolicy.columbia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  


  • Toshiba Touts Rapid CO2 Conversion Device (New Prod. & Tech.)
    Toshiba
    Date: 2021-03-24
    In Tokyo, Japanese electronics giant Toshiba is touting a new CO2 collection-and-conversion device that rapidly processes CO2 into carbon monoxide with chemical reactions involving electricity, according to a release. Carbon monoxide can serve as a raw material for products such as aircraft fuel.

    According to Toshiba, in its present development stage, the equipment can process 1 tpy of CO2 but will be key to enabling carbon neutrality when combined with renewable energy and developed to commercial scale. (Source: Toshiba, PR, NHK Japan, Mar., 2021) Contact: Toshiba, +81-3-3457-4511, www.global.toshiba

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Toshiba,  Carbon Capture,  


    LanzaTech, Coty Pioneer Sustainable Ethanol Fragrance (Ind. Report)
    LanzaTech
    Date: 2021-03-05
    LanzaTech is reporting cosmetics and fragrance company Coty Inc. has signed a letter of intent to introduce LanzaTech sustainable ethanol made from captured-carbon emissions into Coty's perfume and fragranced products.

    LanzaTech captures industrial emissions -- carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide produced in steel manufacturing -- and processes the waste gases into a new, more sustainable source of ethanol.

    Ethanol is a core ingredient in fragrance products, enabling the efficient dispersion of the scent. (Source: LanzaTech, PR, Website, 3 Mar., 2021) Contact: LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LanzaTech,  Ethanol,  


    DTU Researching Biomass Alternative Fuels (Int'l., R&D)
    Technical University of Denmark
    Date: 2020-12-07
    The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Lyngby is working with the Synfuel Project on a way to efficiently convert biomass and wind energy into green methanol. This methanol can then be used as fuel for ships. It can also be used to replace diesel and kerosene after processing.

    Through this project, the university is offering a solution for storing energy from biomass and wind sources. It can then be used to make fuel for aircraft and ships, among other things. This technology is being developed with funding from the Innovation Fund Denmark.

    According to DTU chemical engineering researcher Jesper Ahrenfeldt, the Synfuel project uses hydrogen in a Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell (SOEC) to make a liquid fuel. Synthesis gas is a mixture consisting of hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide that is released during the gasification of biomass. Straw was used for this in this project. (Source: technical University of Denmark, PR, 6 Dec., 2020) Contact: Denmark Innovation Fund, www.innovationsfonden.dk/en; DTU Energy, Synfuels Project, Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, +45 46 775 725, pvhe@dtu.dk, www.dtu.dk/english, www.synfuel.dk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DTU,  Synfuel,  Alternative Fuel,  


    DTU Researching Biomass Alternative Fuels (Int'l., R&D)
    Technical University of Denmark
    Date: 2020-12-06
    The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Lyngby is working with the Synfuel Project on a way to efficiently convert biomass and wind energy into green methanol. This methanol can then be used as fuel for ships. It can also be used to replace diesel and kerosene after processing. Through this project, the university is offering a solution for storing energy from biomass and wind sources. It can then be used to make fuel for aircraft and ships, among other things. This technology is being developed with funding from the Innovation Fund Denmark. According to DTU chemical engineering researcher, researcher Jesper Ahrenfeldt of DTU Chemical Engineering The Synfuel project uses the hydrogen in a Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell (SOEC) to make a liquid fuel.” Synthesis gas is mixed with hydrogen which is then converted into fuel. Synthesis gas is a mixture consisting of hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide that is released during the gasification of biomass. Straw was used for this in this project. The entire process is powered by wind energy. (Source: technical University of Denmark, PR, 6 Dec., 2020) Contact: Denmark Innovation Fund, www.innovationsfonden.dk/en; DTU Energy, Synfuels Project, Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, +45 46 775 725, pvhe@dtu.dk, www.dtu.dk/english, www.synfuel.dk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Technical University of Denmark news,  


    Growth Energy Pushes CARB to Encourage Biofuels (Opinions & Asides)
    Growth Energy
    Date: 2020-08-10
    In a letter to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Growth Energy's Regulatory Affairs VP Chris Bliley called for the agency to expand the use of higher biofuel blends to make California's fuel mix more environmentally sustainable.

    According to Growth Energy, "Higher ethanol blends can be immediately deployed in existing vehicles to achieve immediate greenhouse gas reductions, reduce harmful air toxics, and reduce consumer costs at the pump. In fact, biofuels like ethanol have generated more than 75 percent of LCFS credits. Additionally, even with room to further improve greenhouse gas lifecycle modeling, CARB recognizes the significant improvement in ethanol's carbon intensity. As has been researched by the University of California -- Riverside and the University of Illinois, the use of more ethanol and ethanol-blended fuel reduces air toxics such as carbon monoxide, benzene, and other harmful particulates.'

    Download Growth Energy's full comments HERE. Source: Growth Energy,CStore Decisions, Aug., 2020) Contact: Growth Energy, Chris Bliley, Senior VP Regulatory Affairs, www.growthenergy.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Growth Energy news,  Biofuel news,  CARB news,  


    DTU Increases Biomass Biofuel Production (New Prod. & Tech)
    DTU
    Date: 2020-07-10
    In a recent Technical University of Denmark (DTU) synfuel research project, researchers succeeded in combining two known technologies -- thermal gasification of biomass and electrolysis that is utilized for the production of biofuel -- can produce more biofuel from the same amount of biomass, according to a DTU release.

    An electrolysis cell (solid oxide electrolysis cell, SOEC) developed jointly by DTU and Haldor Topsoe is used for electrolysis. In an SOEC, electricity from e.g. wind turbines is used to split water into its two constituents -- oxygen and hydrogen. The oxygen can be utilized in a thermal gasification process, where a biomass such as straw is broken down at high temperature. This creates synthesis gas -- a mixture of mainly hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The gas mixture can be used in the production of methanol when the hydrogen produced by the electrolysis is added. Methanol can be used directly as fuel or catalytically upgraded to more familiar fuels used in ships and aircraft.

    "In Synfuel, we have improved the two in technologies in several areas, and we've demonstrated that we can achieve higher utilization rates by combining the two technologies than when they run separately. We derive far more biofuel from the biomass resources and at the same time we can use surplus power from e.g. wind turbines to make fuel for heavy transport," says Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, Synfuel project manager and Head of Section at DTU Energy.

    The Synfuel project was supported by Innovation Fund Denmark. Haldor Topsoe, Orsted, Energinet.dk, MIT, Aalborg University, Chalmers University of Technology, INSA Lyon, TU Berlin, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and others participated in the project. (Source: DTU, 10 July, 2020) Contact: DTU Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, +45 46 77 57 25, pvhe@dtu.dk, www.dtu.dk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DTU,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  Syngas,  


    Glasgow Monitoring GHG Emissions in Real-Time (Int'l. Report)
    University of Strathclyde
    Date: 2020-06-29
    In the UK, scientists from the University of Strathclyde, in cooperation with the City of Glasgow , are installing a network of 25 sensors to monitor CO2 and other greenhouse gases -- carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and PM2.5.T -- as part of a trial to provide Glasgow City Council with real-time information on emissions sources and level citywide. Glasgow is aiming for carbon neutrality by 2030.

    Results of the monitoring will be shared with the leaders of other global cities at a virtual conference in November, and will be presented at the COP26 environmental summit to encourage other cities to establish sensor networks.

    The emission monitoring program is part of the Global Environmental Monitoring and Measurement (GEMM) project, a collaboration between the University of Strathclyde, Stanford University, the University of California at Berkeley (UC Berkeley), The Optical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the Met Office and the National Physical Laboratory. (Source: University of Strathclyde Glasgow, PR, 27 June, 2020) Contact: University of Strathclyde Glasgow, www.strath.ac.uk; Global Environmental Monitoring and Measurement (GEMM) project, www.gemminitiative.org/en-us

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emission,  GHG,  Greenhouse Gas,  


    U.S. Treasury, IRS Regulations Help Businesses Claim Carbon Capture Credits (Ind. Report, Reg. & Leg.)
    Carbon Capture
    Date: 2020-06-01
    In Washington, the US Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service this week issued proposed regulations to help businesses understand how legislation passed in 2018 may benefit those claiming carbon capture credits. The proposed regulations provide guidance regarding two new credits for carbon oxide captured using equipment originally placed in service on or after February 9, 2018, allowing up to: $50 per metric ton of qualified CO2 for permanent sequestration, and up to $35 for Enhanced Oil Recovery purposes.

    Neither of these new credits is subject to a limitation on the number of metric tons of qualified carbon oxide captured. The new law also expanded carbon capture to include "qualified carbon oxide". Prior to the change in law, carbon capture was limited to a total of 75,000,000 metric tons of qualified carbon oxide.

    The proposed regulations address procedures to determine adequate security measures for the geological storage of qualified carbon oxide, exceptions to the general rule for determining who the credit is attributable to, procedures for a taxpayer to make an election to allow third-party taxpayers to claim the credit, standards for measuring utilization of qualified carbon oxide and rules for credit recapture.

    In Notice 2020-12, the IRS provides guidance to help businesses determine when construction has begun on a qualified facility or on carbon capture equipment that may be eligible for the carbon capture credit. This notice provides broad guidance in lieu of taxpayers requesting private letter rulings in this area.

    In Revenue Procedure 2020-12, the IRS creates a safe harbor for the allocation rules for carbon capture partnerships similar to the safe harbors developed for partnerships receiving the wind energy production tax credit and the rehabilitation credit. The safe harbor simplifies the application of carbon capture credit rules to partnerships able to claim the credit. (Source: US IRS, US Treasury Dept., MyChesCo, 30 May, 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Oxide,  Carbon Monoxide,  CO2,  Carbon Capture,  CCS,  Carbon Credit,  


    NASA, USask Tout Newly Developed Green Fuel (New Prod & Tech)
    NASA,University of Saskatchewan
    Date: 2020-04-27
    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is reporting the developement and testing of a new technology which turns waste into "green" fuel for possible use on the International Space Station and in long term space missions.

    Developed in a recent collaboration with researchers at the University of Saskatchewan (USask), the high-quality fuel gas mixture is made from crop and forestry residues, food waste, cattle manure, petroleum, and petrochemical waste.

    Consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, the syngas can be used as a cheaper alternative to fossil fuels, green diesel and other applications. (Source: NASA, Gasworld, 24 April, 2020) Contact: NASA, www.nasa.gov; University of Saskatchewan, Sonil Nanda,Chemical and Biological Engineering Research Associate, Ajay Dalai, Canada Research Chair of Bio-Energy and Environmentally Friendly Chemical Processing, 306-966-4768, ajay.dalai@usask.ca, www.usask.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Syngas,  NASA,  Green Fuel,  University of Saskatchewan,  Ajay Dalai,  


    FPT Industrial Investigating Macauba Palm Biodiesel (Int'l, R&D)
    FPT Industrial
    Date: 2020-03-06
    FPT Industrial a global engine and powertrain brand of CNH Industrial N.V. reports it is invested in and exploring the possible use of Macauba Palm, which is common to Brazil, the Caribbean and South Florida, for the production of biodiesel transportation fuel.

    FPT Industrial's research was conducted at the Technical Center in Betim, Southeast of Brazil, with the main focus on its application as a fuel for agricultural tractors. Tests for trucks and buses, as well as power generators, are planned for the future. The tests produced biodiesel that met the standards established by the National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels (ANP).

    The testing project was carried out in partnership with the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais (PUC Minas), the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) and Bchem Biofuels, using a FPT Industrial N67 Tier 3 engine fitted to Case IH and New Holland Agriculture tractors. During the tests, mixtures of 10 pct and 20 pct of Macauba biodiesel were used. The results showed performance and consumption comparable to Brazilian commercial diesel, with a reduction trend in terms of carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. (Source: FPT, CNH Industrial, PR Mar.,2020) Contact: FPT CNH Industrial, www.fptindustrial.com/global/en, www.cnhindustrial.com/en-us/Pages/homepage.aspx

    More Low-Carbon Energy News FPT Industrial,  Palm Oil,  Palm Biodiesel,  


    UN: Greenhouse Gasses Reach Record High

    Date: 2019-11-29
    Atmospheric levels of climate-changing greenhouse gases hit a record high in 2018, “with no sign of a slowdown, let alone a decline,” the World Meteorological Organization said. In a report released Monday, the WMO said despite international pledges made under the Paris Agreement, the levels of carbon monoxide, methane and nitrous oxide all surged by higher amounts in 2018 than average for the past decade. The global average of carbon dioxide concentration reached 407.8 parts per million in 2018, up from 405.5 parts per million in 2017, the U.N. agency said. The concentration of methane was the highest recorded since 1998 while the levels of nitrous oxide, which is responsible for eroding the ozone layer was the highest ever recorded. "This continuing long-term trend means that future generations will be confronted with increasingly severe impacts of climate change, including rising temperatures, more extreme weather, water stress, sea level rise and disruption to marine and land ecosystems," according to a summary of the report. The report was released ahead of next month’s global climate summit in Madrid. “It is worth recalling that the last time the Earth experienced a comparable concentration of carbon dioxide was 3-5 million years ago," WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said. At the time, the Earth's temperature was as much as 5 degrees warmer and sea levels were as much as 65 feet higher than they are now, he said. (Source: WMO, VOA News 26 Nov., 2019)


    WMO Warns of Record CO2 Levels -- Canada Falling Behind (Int'l.)
    World Meteorological Organization
    Date: 2019-11-27
    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) reports world wide CO2 and other greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere are at a record high and still rising faster than ever with no sign of slowing down.

    In a report released Monday, the WMO said despite international pledges made under the Paris Climate Agreement (COP 15), the levels of carbon monoxide, methane and nitrous oxide all surged by higher amounts in 2018 than average for the past decade. The global average of carbon dioxide concentration reached 407.8 parts per million in 2018, up from 405.5 parts per million in 2017, the U.N. agency said. The concentration of methane was the highest recorded since 1998 while the levels of nitrous oxide, which is responsible for eroding the ozone layer was the highest ever recorded. The report was released ahead of next month's global climate summit in Madrid.

    This follows the overwhelming scientific consensus delivered earlier this month that the Earth is indeed facing a climate emergency. Over 11,000 scientists world wide, including 409 from Canada, signed a letter pleading for world leaders to take the crisis seriously, for the wealthy to change their habits and for those in denial to accept that global warming is human driven.

    Specific to Canada, Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has committed Canada to reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 and to reduce CO2 levels by 30 pct by 2030. In December 2018, Climate Change Canada projected Canada's total emissions by 2030 are only on track to be 19 pct below 2005 levels. (Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada,Various Media, Nov., 2019) Contact: Environment and Climate Change Canada, (800) 668-6767, www.canada.ca › environment-climate-change; World Meteorological Organization, www.public.wmo.int/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News World Meteorological Organization,  Climate Change,  ,  


    OxEon Energy Among DOE Bioenergy Grant Recipients (Funding)
    OxEon Energy.
    Date: 2019-10-21
    Last week's US DOE report of $73 million in total grant funding for 35 bioenergy R&D projects included Salt Lake City area-based OxEon Energy Llc.

    OxEon is proposing an efficient method of producing biofuel from dairy-yogart manufacturing process biological wastes from a yogurt plant in Idaho. OxEon instruments will break down biogas released by decomposing waste into carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas, the building blocks of hydrocarbons, then put these blocks together into usable hydrocarbon fuels.

    OxEon Energy LLC was started in 2017 and has had significant success in attracting commercial, state, and federal government business utilizing its core capabilities in energy transformation technologies. The company expects further growth in its core technologies of high temperature electrolysis, hydrocarbon reforming, synthetic fuel production and power generation by high temperature fuel cells, according to the company website. (Source: OxEon Energy Llc, Utah Public Radio, 16 Oct., 2019)Contact: OxEon Energy, Lynn Frost, CEO, 801-677-3000, www.oxeonenergy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Biogas,  


    Miami Business School Scores LEED Gold Certification (Ind. Report)
    US Green Building Council
    Date: 2019-08-21
    Coral Gables and West Palm Beach, FL: (August 19, 2019) In the Sunshine State, the Miami Business School, located on the University of Miami Coral Cables campus, is reporting receipt of US Green Building Council LEED Gold Certification for Existing Building Operations & Maintenance (EBOM). The project is the first LEED v4.1 OM higher-education building in the State.

    Energy deficiency and sustainable design features of the 163,885 square foot facility include:

  • the building is 30 pct more energy efficient than the national average of university college buildings;

  • more than 90 pct LED lighting, in-room air quality sensors, audio/visual and tele-presence technology, and automatic window shading;

  • an average of 60 pct of the waste generated is recycled and/or reused;

  • a comprehensive carbon-footprint assessment of student and faculty transportation was completed to help meet transportation needs;

  • indoor air-quality testing was conducted to quantify levels of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide and other harmful chemicals. (Source: Miami Business School, University of Miami, Florida Trends, 19 Aug., 2019)Contact: USGBC, Mahesh Ramanujam, Pres., CEO, (202) 552-1500, www.usgbc.org; Miami Business School, University of Miami, 305-284-4643, www.bus.miami.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US Green Building Council,  LEED Certification,  


  • LanzaTech Announces $72Mn Novo Holdings Investment (Int'l, Funding)
    LanzaTech,Novo Holdings
    Date: 2019-08-09
    Next generation fuels producer LanzaTech is reporting Novo Holdings will invest $72 million in the company in a Series E financing. The new funds will be used to expand LanzaTech's carbon recycling platform and for commercialization of its Carbon Smart™ products.

    Novo Holdings A/S is the Novo Nordisk Foundation's wholly owned holding company for Novo Nordisk A/S and Novozymes A/S.

    Lanzatech's gas fermentation technology uses special microbes to recycle residual gases containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen into ethanol. The company's product portfolio includes additional biochemicals besides ethanol, such as chemical specialties and intermediates that can be used as raw materials in other chemical production processes. The technology is also said to be potentially suitable for treating and recycling waste streams in the chemical industry and for municipal waste disposal, according to the company. (Source: LanzaTech, PR, Biofuels Int'l., 7 Aug., 2019) Contact: Novo Holdings, +45 3527 6500, www.novoholdings.dk; LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LanzaTech,  Novo Holdings,  


    Dominion Offers Home Energy Efficiency Assessments (Ind. Report)
    Dominion Energy Ohio
    Date: 2019-05-22
    Dominion Energy Ohio reports it is providing home energy efficiency assessments to residential customers for $50, as part of its Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program.

    The offered program, which is targeted to damp and drafty -- often older -- homes with wildly fluctuating temperatures, identifies high utility usage and similar issues as ways to assist and correct the unfavorable conditions. The program can also provide a rebate of up to $1,250 for completion of program recommendations. The program can also provide discounted NEST Thermostat E units, carbon monoxide detectors, showerheads, faucet aerators, and water heater pipe wrap and other energy efficient improvements and services. (Source: Dominion Energy Ohio, Energy Insider, 21 May, 2019) Contact: Dominion Energy Ohio, Jim Eck, VP & GM of Ohio & West Virginia Distribution, www.dominionenergy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Dominion Energy Ohio,  Energy Efficiency,  


    Anellotech Bio-TCat Hits Commercially-Targeted Yields (Ind Report)
    Anellotech
    Date: 2019-05-08
    Pearl River, New York-based renewable chemicals, bioplastics and fuels from non-food biomass producer Anellotech reports its patented Thermal Catalytic Biomass Conversion technology -- Bio-TCat -- has achieved commercially-targeted yields in its TCat-8 pilot unit in Silsbee, Texas during six months of continuous process operations.

    Bio-TCat technology produces a mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene (AnelloMate BTX), which are bio-based and chemically identical to petroleum-derived counterparts. Bio-TCat technology also produces AnelloMate Distillate, a heavier aromatics product that can be upgraded into a high-quality biofuels blendstock for jet or diesel transportation fuel using conventional refinery processing. Cellulosic ethanol or hydrogen can be made from Bio-TCat's carbon monoxide co-product by using third-party technology.

    Anellotech is planning construction of its first commercial plant and is engaging in partnership and funding discussions with existing and new strategic partners. The plant will be capable of processing 500 bone-dry tonnes/day of loblolly pine wood into 40,000 tpy of products including benzene, toluene, xylenes, and C9+ aromatics to use as fuels or for production of bio-based plastics for packaging and consumer products. (Source: Anellotech, PR, GreenCar Congress, 7 May, 2019) Contact: Anellotech Inc., David Sudolsky, Pres., (845) 735-7700, DSudolsky@anellotech.com, www.anellotech.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Anellotech ,  


    Oakland Fleet Opts for Neste Renewable Diesel (Ind. Report)
    Neste
    Date: 2019-04-24
    In the Golden State, the City of Oakland and Helsinki-headquartered Neste report they are partnering to turn used restaurant cooking oils and residues into renewable diesel for use in the city's transport fleet.

    According to a release, switching from petroleum diesel to renewable diesel reduces harmful emissions, reduces fuel costs and allows the city's oldest and most polluting vehicles to "go clean". The fuel is compatible with all diesel engines and cuts engine nitrogen oxides emissions by 9 pct, carbon monoxide emissions by 24 pct and fine particulate matter emissions by 33 pct. The switch to renewable diesel will also help the city fleet cut its greenhouse gas emissions by a total of 74 pct compared to fossil fuel-based diesel. (Source: Neste, Energy Live, 23 April, 2019)Contact: Neste, +358 10 458 4128, www.neste.com, Jeremy Baines, VP Sales, (713)407-4400, usa@neste.com, www.NesteMY.com; City of Oakland Fleet Office, www.oaklandca.gov/staff/richard-battersby

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Neste,  Renewable Diesel,  Alternative FUel,  


    Flanders Commits €400Mn to CCS, CCU Initiative (Int'l Report)
    Arcelor Mittal
    Date: 2019-03-25
    Reporting from Antwerp, the Flemish government reports the approval of a plan to spend €400 million over the next 20 years in an effort to manage carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions and to become climate neutral by 2050. The plan calls for a reduction in fossil fuels consumption while implementing carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) of CO2 that is still being produced. Although CCS and CCU technology is not new it is expensive, and there is no related income from CCS for climate protection.

    The Flemish government is interested in CCU, an example of which is a pilot project launched in Ghent last week between steel producer Arcelor Mittal and chemicals manufacturer Dow, to split the carbon monoxide and CO₂ from steel production and use the CO₂ to produce bio-ethanol, a renewable energy source.

    In another example, energy provider Engie has joined with waste incinerator Indeval to use CO2 capture to produce ethanol in Antwerp. (Source: Various Media, Brussels Times, Apr, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Arcelor Mittal,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Storage,  CCS,  


    IEA Confirms Ethanol's Role in Cutting Air Pollutants (Ind. Report)
    ePure,IEA
    Date: 2019-02-13
    In a recent report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) found that blending ethanol in petrol has an immediate impact on reducing emissions of harmful air pollutants from today's cars. The report also notes that E85 is one of the best overall performers in terms of reducing NOx and PM emissions in modern and older cars. The report adds that ethanol use reduces tailpipe emissions of carbon monoxide Accordingly, the report supports the need for higher ethanol blends as EU countries struggle to achieve their decarbonization targets.

    Other studies have demonstrated the role of ethanol in reducing emissions in heavy duty vehicles, notably through ED95 blend in dedicated engines. Comparing natural gas, diesel and ED95, the French environment agency ADEME indicated that ED95 vehicles were the best solution to reduce CO and NOx emissions and improve energy efficiency. And, on a full lifecycle analysis, ED95 reduced CO2 emission by more than 88 pct compared to diesel. (Source: IEA, ePure, 22 Jan., 2019) Contact: ePure, www.epure.org; International Energy Agency, Dr. Fatih Birol, Exec. Dir., +33 1 40 57 65 00, www.iea.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News International Energy Agency,  ePure,  Biofuel,  Ethanol,  


    Sino-Dutch Researchers Tout Cleaner Coal-to-Liquid Fuel (Int'l)
    Eindhoven University of Technology
    Date: 2018-11-28
    In Beijing, the National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands are touting a breakthrough which they claim cuts and captures the CO2 emissions and improves the financial viability of coal to liquid (CTL) fuels.

    The key is a new type of catalyst to be used in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor, the part of the process in which carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted into liquid hydrocarbons. In the CTL process coal is first converted to syngas -- a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen -- and then to a liquid. Some of the CO is taken out of the syngas by converting it to CO2, in a process called water-gas shift. The researchers discovered that the CO2 release is triggered because the iron-based catalysts in the reactor are not pure. Accordingly, the researchers developed an alternative catalyst using a type of iron carbide -- epsilon iron carbide -- which they say generates almost no CO2 at all. Any that is been produced can be easily removed at the water-gas shift stage.

    The researchers expect the new catalyst will play a role in the future energy and basic chemicals industry. The feedstock will not be coal or gas, but waste and biomass. Syngas will continue to be the central element, as it is also the intermediate product in the conversion of these new feedstocks. (Source: National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy Cosmos, Oct., 2018)Contact: National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy, www.nicenergy.com/en; Eindhoven University of Technology, www.tue.nl/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Alternative Fuel,  Synfuel,  


    Japan Launches Greenhouse Gas Monitoring Satellite (Int'l)
    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
    Date: 2018-10-29
    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) are reporting the launch and earth orbit entry of a Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT-2) on Monday from the Tanegashima Space Centre on Tanegashima island.

    The GOSAT-2 satallite, which was developed and manufactured by Mitsubishi Electric, will orbit the earth at an altitude of 613 kilometres to gather data on methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. The satellite will also monitor air pollution by measuring levels of particulate matter such as PM 2.5.

    The satellite will play "a major role in monitoring the impact of climate change and human activities on the carbon cycle and is expected to contribute to climate science and climate change related policies," Mitsubishi Electric said in a statement. Source: Mitsubishi Electric, AAP, SBS News, 29 Oct., 2018) Contact: Aerospace Exploration Agency, global.jaxa.jp;Mitsubishi Electric, www.mitsubishielectric.com/en/contact/index.html

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GHG,  Greenhouse Gas,  Mitsubishi Electric,  


    BASF Invests in Waste Gas-to-Ethanol Firm LanzaTech (Ind. Report)
    LanzaTech,BASF
    Date: 2018-10-03
    German chemicals juggernaut BASF reports it has invested an undisclosed sum in Chicago, Illinois headquartered LanzaTech, a biotech company using special microbes to recycle waste gas streams.

    LanzaTech's gas fermentation technology recycles residual gases containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen into ethanol. By re-using waste streams instead of incinerating them, industrial companies are said to be able to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

    BASF Venture Capital GmbH was founded in 2001 with the aim of generating new growth potential for BASF by investing in new companies and funds. (Source: BASF, WMW, 1 Oct., 2018)Contact: BASF Venture Capital GmbH, www.basf-vc.de; LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.co

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LanzaTech,  BASF,  Ethanol,  


    enVerde Planning Organic Waste- to-Syngas Demo Plant (Ind. Report)
    enVerde
    Date: 2018-09-10
    Minneapolis-based enVerde LLC reports it is seeking funds to construct a demonstration plant using its catalytically-driven, thermochemical technology would process organic waste such as livestock manure, food manufacturing detritus, and most carbon-based materials including plastic, into synthetic fuel, oil, and char materials that can be used as energy or chemical sources.

    enVerde technology reduces the energy required to transform waste materials into clean energy and chemicals and can be used to power generators, boilers, and other systems. It can also be refined into "green" versions of more traditional fuels such as gasoline and diesel fuel.

    With enVerde's process, waste is gasified without any combustion or incineration. The output is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen "syngas" which can be used as fuel or made into various chemicals. Compared to common methods of syngas production, enVerde's catalytic technology uses considerably less energy and requires much less capital, according to company CEO Dave Goebel, former CEO of Maryland-based New Generation Biofuels. (Source: EnVerde, Star Tribune, 8 Sept., 2018) Contact: EnVerde LLC Dave Goebel,CEO, info@enVerdeLLC.com, www.enverdellc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Syngas,  

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