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IBM Aims for Net-Zero GHG Emissions by 2030 (Ind. Report)
IBM
Date: 2021-02-19
IBM is reporting it aims to reach net-zero CO2 emissions by 2030 and will have reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 65 pct by 2025 compared to its 2010 emission levels. IBM notes its net-zero target is "based on the energy the company can actually consume, not on the purchase of unrelated, un-bundled renewable energy certificates."

The company also notes it will procure 75 pct of its worldwide electric power from renewable energy sources by 2025, and hit 90 pct renewable consumption by 2030. The company also plans to use carbon capture by 2030 to remove emissions in "an amount which equals or exceeds the level of IBM's residual emissions" or those emissions IBM still produces after exhausting all avenues to reduce is greenhouse emissions.

As we reported on 15 July, 2020, IBM, a Founding Member of the Climate Leadership Council, reduced its operational CO2 emissions by 39.7 pct since 2005, well ahead of its goal of a 40 pct reduction in CO2 emissions by 2025. The company also noted 47 pct of the electricity it consumed in 2019 came from renewable sources, keeping the company on track to get 55 pct of its electricity from renewables by 2025. (Source: IBM, PR, ZD Net, 17 Feb., 2021)Contact: IBM, www.ibm.com/us-en

More Low-Carbon Energy News IBM,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Net-Zero Emissions,  


IBM Trumpets CO2 Emissions Reduction Success (Ind. Report)
IBM,Climate Leadership Council
Date: 2020-07-15
IBM, a Founding Member of the Climate Leadership Council, reports it has reduced its operational CO2 emissions by 39.7 pct since 2005, well ahead of its goal of a 40 pct reduction in CO2 emissions by 2025. The company also notes 47 pct of the electricity it consumed in 2019 came from renewable sources, keeping the company on track to get 55 pct of its electricity from renewables by 2025. (Source: IBM Sustainability Report, July, 2020) Contact: IBM, www.ibm.com/us-en; Climate Leadership Council, Greg Bertelsen, www.clcouncil.org;

More Low-Carbon Energy News IBM,  Carbon Emissions,  Renewable Energy,  Climate Leadership Council,  


ExxonMobil Contributes $1Mn to Promote Carbon Tax (Ind. Report)
EXXON, Climate Leadership Council
Date: 2019-12-09
The Americans for Carbon Dividends (ACD) political action group is reporting Houston-headquartered oil industry giant ExxonMobil Corp. has made a $1 million donation to ADC's lobbying campaign to promote a U.S. tax on CO2 emissions, a central factor in global warming. The contribution came less than a month after the oil giant agreed to contribute $100 million to oil companies' efforts to develop technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The ADC aims to spend $5 million on an initial lobbying campaign to win support for the tax, said , senior vice president at the group. PAC is looking to build legislative support for its carbon tax. It proposes an initial $40 a ton tax on carbon dioxide that would increase over time, with the money raised to be returned to consumers. The PAC has raised $1 million each from Exelon Corp, First Solar Inc and the American Wind Energy Association and expects to reach its goal of a $5 million in coming months. (Source: Exxon, Denton Daily, Reuters, 8 Dec., 2019) Contact: Climate Leadership Council, Greg Bertelsen, www.clcouncil.org; Americans for Carbon Dividends, www.afcd.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Leadership Council,  Exxon,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


IBM Climate Change Policy Supports Early Climate Action and Carbon Tax (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
IBM
Date: 2019-12-06
"IBM has stated for more than a decade that climate change is a serious concern that warrants meaningful action on a global basis. Notwithstanding many important efforts, this remains the case today. The Earth's climate is warmer now than it was before the onset of the modern industrial era, and the increased temperature presents significant adverse risks which cannot be ignored. Greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide fuel this warming. According to scientists, the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere is now greater than it has been for the last several hundred thousand years. Compounding this circumstance is the fact that carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for quite a long time after having been emitted.

"Some may debate how this happened, but that doesn't change the need to address it. Although our collective use of fossil fuels for energy has enabled remarkable economic development, the use of fossil fuels has also resulted in substantial emissions of carbon dioxide, and the cost of these emissions has not been reflected in the price of energy. As a matter of policy, this should change.

"IBM is no newcomer to the realm of climate change. In 2017, we reaffirmed our support for the 2015 Paris Agreement to limit global warming to below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels. Our commitment to the Paris Agreement builds on a long history of leadership in this space. In 1992 IBM helped the U.S. EPA launch the ENERGY STAR program. In 1994 we began to voluntarily disclose carbon dioxide emissions associated with IBM's consumption of energy and have done so annually now for 26 years. And in 2015, IBM was one of the first signatories to the American Business Act on Climate Pledge to demonstrate our support for the Paris Agreement.

"Performance is a key measure of commitment. IBM has reduced the carbon dioxide emissions associated with our consumption of energy by 32 pct since 2005. We are on track to achieve our goal of a 40 pct reduction by 2025, a rate consistent with what scientists say is needed to limit warming to between 1.5 and 2.0 degrees C. Energy conservation has been -- and remains -- a key ingredient for this. IBM continues to rigorously conserve energy equal to at least 3 pct of its annual consumption, something we have done for decades. Reducing consumption, when possible, is preferable to purchasing offsets.

"Responsible companies should also make transparent commitments regarding their consumption of renewable energy. Today, 38 pct of the global electricity IBM consumes comes from renewable sources, and we aim to increase this to 55 pct by 2025. Importantly, IBM does not rely upon the purchase of unbundled Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) to offset its consumption of electricity from fossil fuels and thereby claim the company is a certain 'percent renewable.' Transparency matters in the transition away from carbon-based fuels, which is why our reporting about the use of renewables reflects our actual physical and matched consumption of renewable electricity.

"Climate change is real, and that is why IBM supports a responsible plan to tax carbon emissions. It is also why IBM supports the Paris Agreement and is on track as a company to reduce emissions associated with our consumption of energy consistent with what scientists say is needed. And it is why we are making transparent our own use of renewable energy and aiming to increase that use substantially.

"The enormity of the challenge requires more than business as usual. Putting a price on carbon emissions requires a plan in which economies will keep growing, but in a way that addresses the risks of a changing climate. We believe the Climate Leadership Council plan is the best way to secure agreement for action, and IBM will work to build support for it with elected officials, corporate colleagues, and our fellow citizens." (Source: IBM-The Weather Company (an IBM company), 2 Dec., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News IBM,  Carbon Tax,  Climate Change,  


Microsoft Joins Climate Leadership Council (Ind. Report)
Climate Leadership Council
Date: 2019-05-03
Following up on our 17th April coverage, Microsoft reports it has joined the Climate Leadership Council. The Climate Leadership Council was founded by former secretaries of state James Baker and George Shultz, renowned scientist Stephen Hawking, BP, ExxonMobil, and Shell, General Motors and others. Membership includes 3500+ economists, 27 Nobel laureates and 15 former Chairs of the Council of Economic Advisers.

According to the organization's website, The founding Members of the Climate Leadership Council believe that America needs a consensus climate solution that bridges partisan divides, strengthens our economy and protects our shared environment."

The Council's carbon dividends solution embodies the conservative principles of free markets and limited government. It also offers an equitable, popular and politically-viable way forward, paving the way for a much-needed bipartisan climate breakthrough. The Council's carbon dividends program is based on four interdependent pillars:

  • A gradually rising and revenue-neutral carbon tax;
  • Carbon dividend payments to all Americans, funded by 100 pct of the revenue;
  • The rollback of carbon regulations that are no longer necessary; and
  • Border carbon adjustments to level the playing field and promote American competitiveness.

    Alongside a growing carbon tax, the Climate Leadership Council wants to rollback carbon regulations that are no longer necessary and pay these carbon taxes back to citizens in the form of dividends. The group also plans to push for rising carbon taxes in replacement of other climate legislation while protecting its members from historic climate damage payments, according to its website.

    Microsoft recently committed to a $15 per ton internal carbon tax and announced that its campus will soon be run with 100 pct carbon-free electricity. It also ramped up its data center plans to run on 70 pct renewable by 2023. (Source: Microsoft, Climate Leadership Council, WinBuzzer, 2 May, 2019) Contact: Climate Leadership Council, www.clcouncil.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Leadership Council,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Tax,  


  • Microsoft Aiming for 100 pct Renewable Energy (Ind. Report)
    Microsoft
    Date: 2019-04-17
    Redmond, Washington-based tech giant Microsoft reports the unveiling of new sustainability plans to shift its data centers to 75 pct renewable energy by 2023 rising to 100 pct within the next decade. The company is also launching a new initiative to encourage recycling of data center assets using artificial intelligence (AI) and other techniques.

    Additionally, Microsoft plans to nearly double its 2012 "internal carbon tax" to $15 per metric ton as part of the effort. The "internal carbon tax" is based on projected carbon emissions from each part of the company -- everything from carbon use in buildings to transportation. The tax produces about $30 million annually for a fund Microsoft uses to invest in energy improvements. The company also plans to join the Climate Leadership Council and advocate for carbon pricing nationwide as part of the new sustainability push. (Source: Microsoft, GeekWire, 16 April, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Microsoft,  Renewable Energy,  


    Harvard Economists Join Baker-Schultz Climate Change Policy Plan (Ind. Report)
    Harvard Climate Leadership Council
    Date: 2019-02-27
    The Harvard Crimson is reporting more than 3,300 economists, including 27 Nobel Laureates, four former Federal Reserve Chairs, 15 former Chairs of the Council of Economic Advisers, and two former Secretaries of the Treasury, and several Harvard professors and affiliates, have inked the Economists' Statement on Carbon Dividends calling for a bipartisan climate change solution.

    The economists are specifically supporting the Baker-Schulz plan authored by former Republican U.S. Secretaries of State James Baker and George Schultz in 2017. The statement comprises four main pillars: gradually increasing a carbon fee; returning all proceeds from the fee to Americans via dividends; instituting border carbon adjustments; and eliminating regulations that are no longer necessary upon the fee's enactment. The Economists' Carbon Dividends Plan aims to be a first step in solving climate change through a carbon tax based on basic economic principles. (Source: Climate Leadership Council, Harvard Crimson, 25 Feb., 2019) Contact: Harvard Climate Leadership Council, www.clcouncil.org; Tackling Climate Change, Harvard University, www.harvard.edu/tackling-climate-change; Climate Leadership Council, www.clcouncil.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Tax,  Climate Leadership Council,  

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