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sPURE Touts European Ethanol's Emissions Reduction (Int'l)
ePURE
Date: 2019-09-11
The European renewable ethanol association ePURE reports in 2018 its members produced 5.81 billion litres of ethanol. 82 pct of which was used as fuel, which resulted in average greenhouse gas (GHG) savings of over 71 pct, compared to petrol. Of the remaining ethanol volumes, 9 pct was used in industry, with another 9 pct was used in food and beverages. ePURE members also produces 5.55 million tonnes distillers dried grain (DDGs) co-products for livestock feed.

Of the total volume of ethanol produced in 2018, The GHG-reducing performance of European ethanol increased for the seventh consecutive year. According to ePURE, "The emissions-reduction performance of EU ethanol continues to improve at a time when transport decarbonization is of critical importance. As Europe's leaders work to respond to voters' concerns about climate change and EU Member States struggle to meet their renewables targets, they should not overlook a homegrown solution that delivers results right now. Ethanol reduces emissions from today's car fleet and will be important for decarbonizing the vehicles that what will continue to be prevalent on Europe's roads for a long time." (Source: ePURE, 5 Sept., 2019) Contact: ePURE, Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. General, +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Carbon Emissons,  Ethanol,  


EU Dumps 9.5 pct Duty on US Ethanol Imports (Int'l Report)
uropean Commission
Date: 2019-05-17
In Brussels, the Europen Union Commission reports it has ended a 9.5 pct anti-dumping duty on U.S. imports. The European Union Commission reports it has canceled a 2013, 9.5 pct ethanol anti-dumping duty against imports from the United States. In ending the duty, the Commission concluded that "removing the duty would not increase the likelihood of dumping of U.S. ethanol on the EU market" and noted "it found no evidence that U.S. ethanol exports have increased because of lack of growing domestic demand and not because of growing demand in other countries."

The 9.5 pct duty was originally imposed as a result of a complaint filed by the EU's largest ethanol producer group, European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePure). (Source: EUROPA - EU Newsroom, DTN Progressive Farmer, 16 May, 2019)Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org; European Commission, https://ec.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  European Commission,  Ethanol,  ePure,  


ePURE Comments on EU Draft Regarding Palm Oil Use (Opinins, Editorials & Asides)
ePure
Date: 2019-02-18
The European Renewable Ethanol Association (ePURE) secretary general Emmanuel Desplechin has responded to the EU Commission's draft surrounding high risk indirect land-use change (ILUC) biofuels and the shift of focus away from unsustainable sources of palm oil.

The draft details curbing any biofuels with a high ILUC-risk and its amount of consumption in 2019 within the Member States. The EU also outlined an ambitious goal of reducing any high-risk biofuel's contribution to 0 pct by 2030.

"Directive (EU) 2018/2001 also calls for a specific limit to conventional biofuels, bioliquids and biomass fuels with high ILUC-risk and for which a significant expansion of the production area into land with high carbon stock is observed, in the amount of their level of consumption in each Member State in 2019," the draft stated. "Starting from 31 December 2023, their contribution should be gradually reduced to 0 pct by 2030 at the latest."

Despite the draft's promising changes to the uses of palm oil, ePure argues that the draft would still 'allow imported feedstock that violates spirit of RED II agreement.'

"Making an exception for feedstock produced by smallholders isn't just allowing high-ILUC-risk biofuels such as palm oil into Europe through the back door, it's allowing it through the front door. The hard-won compromise reached on RED II couldn't have been clearer in its message that Europe should phase out biofuels associated with the significant deforestation and peatland drainage that has defined most palm oil expansion."

"Low-ILUC-risk biofuels certified as such could escape from the phase-out, but these were clearly defined as either produced through improved agricultural practices or from unused land. By inventing a third, alternative criterion for smallholders, the Commission is making a mockery of the agreed RED II compromise," Desplechin claims. (Source: ePURE, Feb., 2019) Contact: ePURE Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePure,  Palm Oil,  Biodiesel,  


IEA Confirms Ethanol's Role in Cutting Air Pollutants (Ind. Report)
ePure,IEA
Date: 2019-02-13
In a recent report, the International Energy Agency (IEA) found that blending ethanol in petrol has an immediate impact on reducing emissions of harmful air pollutants from today's cars. The report also notes that E85 is one of the best overall performers in terms of reducing NOx and PM emissions in modern and older cars. The report adds that ethanol use reduces tailpipe emissions of carbon monoxide Accordingly, the report supports the need for higher ethanol blends as EU countries struggle to achieve their decarbonization targets.

Other studies have demonstrated the role of ethanol in reducing emissions in heavy duty vehicles, notably through ED95 blend in dedicated engines. Comparing natural gas, diesel and ED95, the French environment agency ADEME indicated that ED95 vehicles were the best solution to reduce CO and NOx emissions and improve energy efficiency. And, on a full lifecycle analysis, ED95 reduced CO2 emission by more than 88 pct compared to diesel. (Source: IEA, ePure, 22 Jan., 2019) Contact: ePure, www.epure.org; International Energy Agency, Dr. Fatih Birol, Exec. Dir., +33 1 40 57 65 00, www.iea.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News International Energy Agency,  ePure,  Biofuel,  Ethanol,  


Palm Oil Still in EU Transportation Fuel Mix (Int'l Report)
ePure
Date: 2019-02-13
Reporting from Brussels, the European Commission (EC) reports it has gone most of the way toward banning the use of unsustainable palm oil in EU transport, but it hasn't quite closed the deal. Instead of acting on the RED II agreement and removing "high-ILUC-risk" biofuels from the 28-member trading bloc's transport mix, it has left a door open, according to a release.

"Making an exception for feedstock produced by smallholders isn't just allowing high-ILUC-risk biofuels such as palm oil into Europe through the back door, it's allowing it through the front door," said Emmanuel Desplechin, Secretary General of ePURE, the European renewable ethanol association. "The hard-won compromise reached on RED II couldn't have been clearer in its message that Europe should phase out biofuels associated with the significant deforestation and peatland drainage that has defined most palm oil expansion."

"Low-ILUC-risk biofuels certified as such could escape from the phase-out, but these were clearly defined as either produced through improved agricultural practices or from unused land. By inventing a third, alternative criterion for smallholders, the EC is making a mockery of the agreed RED II compromise," the ePure Secretary General added.

European renewable ethanol is made from European feedstock and delivers high greenhouse-gas reduction and is not associated with deforestation. Its use cuts GHG emissions by more than 70 pct on average compared to fossil petrol. (Source: ePure, EC, Feb., 2019) Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Palm Oil,  Biodiesel ,  ePure,  Biofuel,  


Advanced Biofuels "Not Yet Viable", Study Warns (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
Ethanol Europe Renewables Ltd
Date: 2018-02-09
Research conducted by Ireland-based Ethanol Europe Renewables Ltd. has found that less than 1 pct of projected capacity for advanced biofuel production worldwide has become reality, and warns policy makers against placing "too much hope in the fledgling technology."

"Advanced biofuels are not yet viable, are not rising at all, and have accumulated losses of billions in failed projects," the research says, adding that the "myth of the advanced biofuel industry survives on a long-run campaign of misinformation by promoters of advanced biofuels technologies. Contrary to statements from promoters of advanced biofuels, in the European Union, advanced biofuels production capacity is not growing steadily and there are not several examples showcasing this development," the report adds.

European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePIRE) Secretary General Emmanuel Desplechin has called for an analysis of the "real data" from the International Energy Agency (IEA) which says biofuels consumption in the transport sector must triple by 2030 in order for the world to keep global warming well below 2 degree C, the target in the Paris Agreement. "It stressed that two-thirds of that increase should come from advanced biofuels and notably from cellulosic ethanol, and also points out that first-generation biofuels also have an important contribution to make while the massive scale-up of advanced technology is underway," Desplechin concluded. (Source: Ethanol Europe Renewables Ltd., Euractiv, 7 Feb., 2018) Contact: Ethanol Europe Renewables Ltd., administrator@eerl.com, www.eerl.com; (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Ethanol Europe Renewables Ltd,  Advanced Biofuel,  Cellulosics,  Biofuel,  ePure,  


EU Considers Zero Palm Oil in Transport Fuels (Reg & Leg, Int'l)
EU, ePURE
Date: 2018-01-10
EURACTIV is reporting that EU parliamentarians (MEPs) are considering a complete phase out of palm oil in transport fuels by 2021. The proposal, which has garnered support from the biggest political groups in the European Parliament, would be a victory for environmentalists who have long warned against the deforestation and other damage caused by palm oil.

A 2016 EU-funded study found that biodiesel produced from palm oil was three times more polluting than traditional diesel. In 2017, MEPs voted on a resolution urging the European Commission to phase-out the use of vegetable oils in biofuels by 2020. They also called for a single certification scheme to guarantee only sustainably produced palm oil enters the EU market.

According to the ethanol trade group ePURE Secretary General Emmanuel Desplechin."The (European) Parliament needs to send a clear message that not all biofuels are created equal. It is time for the European Parliament to put into law the resolution on palm oil it adopted last spring and stop promoting the use of palm oil and derivatives in biofuels. Crucially, ethanol is not responsible for any of the concerns associated with palm oil cultivation,"

The proposed ban on palm oil still faces hurdles however, starting with a political agreement from the 28 EU member states, which will be required to finalise the adoption of the revised renewable energy directive.

There are still concerns however that the EU's bioenergy policy might lead to deforestation -- especially when it comes to "solid biomass" that is sometimes burned to generate electricity. The EC's sustainability criteria for biomass includes imports of wood pellets from Canada and the US, which are produced from round trees and are shipped to Europe for burning in power plants. . (Source: EC, EURACTIV, 9 Jan., 2018) Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Palm Oil,  Biodiesel,  ePURE,  


ePURE Comments on EU-EP Climate Change, Biofuels Policy (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
ePURE
Date: 2017-11-29
"One thing should be clear to everyone: the European Union (EU) needs to do something to improve its efforts in the fight against climate change -- and quickly. That's because just as often as a new position on EU biofuels policy gets staked out, another reminder arises that Europe is falling behind in its commitments to de-carbonizing transport.

"The latest news comes from the European Environment Agency, which reported this month that GHG emissions have risen for the third year in a row in the EU. Everyone from European Commission VP, Maros Sefcovic, to environmental lobby groups, is warning that we need to do more.

"By proposing a low-emissions fuel blending obligation of just 6.8 pct by 2030, starting from 1.5 pct in 2021, it would leave most of the transport energy mix taken up by fossil fuels.

"Yet, at the same time, they are proposing policies that would achieve less. The EC wants to reduce all crop-based biofuels -- even the ones like renewable European ethanol that deliver high GHG savings with low risk of adverse impact to almost nothing by 2030. And by proposing a low-emissions fuel blending obligation of just 6.8 pct by 2030, starting from 1.5 pct in 2021, it would leave most of the transport energy mix taken up by fossil fuels.

The European Parliament's various committees have been weighing in with their opinions over the last couple of months. The environment committee, the lead panel on the biofuels file, wants to go even further than the Commission, and phase out crop-based biofuels entirely by 2030.

"The transport committee could not find agreement on the environment committee language and ended up rejecting its own draft opinion on the legislation. This week the industry, research and energy committee and lead on the entire Renewable Energy Directive, will vote. Even traditional political groups are divided on the issue.

"The swirl of differing opinions means the RP may not have a clear line on this important issue going into plenary vote in January (2018). But it is not too late for MEPs to find common ground and move closer to what EU Member States want and have articulated coherently in their draft position: build on the success of the existing framework, leave in place the 7 percent cap on crop-based biofuels, and promote advanced biofuels and renewable electricity in addition to, not at the expense of, existing solutions." (Source: ePure, Politico, 23 Nov., 2017) Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Biofuel,  EU,  


EC Study Highlights Ethanol Blend Benefits (Ind. Report)
ePURE,Ethanol
Date: 2017-08-30
In Brussels, the European Commission has just released the attached report highlighting the benefits of higher ethanol blends in gasoline. The study, conducted by ICF for the Commission's Directorate-General for Climate, assessed the impact of higher levels of bio components in transportation fuels and found that increased ethanol blends would result in reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). For example, ethanol blends reduce emissions of HC/CO/PM by 5 to 20 pct compared to petrol with no ethanol. The study also found that compared to current blending levels, the use of higher ethanol blends will not result in adverse evaporative emissions impacts in petrol, a higher level of renewable ethanol in petrol boosts boosting engine performance and efficiency while cutting emissions.

Access the full study HERE. (Source: ePURE, PR, 29 Aug., 2017) Contact: ePURE, Robert Wright, Sec. Gen, +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Ethanol,  


Advanced Biofuels Support on the Rise in Europe (Int'l)
ePURE
Date: 2017-01-27
European Strategy for Low-Emission Mobility, a new EuroPulse opinion poll conducted by German survey firm Dalia on behalf of the ethanol industry association (ePURE), the vast majority of Europeans believe that food-based biofuels should be promoted by the EU but should also be gradually phased out and replaced with "advanced" cellulosic biofuels.

Last November, the European Commission proposed the phase out to phase-out conventional biofuels by 2020. The decision was driven by a growing public opinion against first generation biofuels processed from food, particularly from crops such as sugar beet, corn, and wheat. A European Commission survey in 2010 found that approximately 72 pct of Europeans believed that biofuels should be encouraged and 20 pct held the opposite view. (Source: ePURE, EurActiv.com, Jan., 2017) Contact: ePURE, Robert Wright, Sec. Gen, 011 +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  ePURE,  Cellulosic Biofuel,  Advanced Biofuel,  

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