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Green Plains Announces Nebraska Clean Sugar Project (Ind. Report)
Green Plains
Date: 2021-01-22
In the Cornhusker State, Omaha-based biorefining specialist Green Plains Inc. and Ospraie Management have announced that recently-acquired Fluid Quip Technologies (Fluid Quip) is engineering and constructing a fully scalable commercial Clean Sugar Technology™ (CST) production facility at the Green Plains York Innovation Center. This technology effectively transforms a dry milling facility into a clean sugar biorefinery where dextrose/glucose replaces ethanol as the primary product.

Co-located on the York, Neb. biorefinery campus, the Green Plains York Innovation Center is comprised of pilot and industrial scale fermentation systems which have been utilized for various functions including sugar-based cellulosic fuel developments, algae production, yeast fermentation processes, as well as antimicrobial scale up for third party customers. The Center also has downstream separation equipment which is ideal for testing enhancements to the CST system, as well as the MSC™ technology. Green Plains expects the initial CST project at the York Innovation Center to begin production by the end Q1.

The York Innovation Center will also function as a platform to further develop Fluid Quip's MSC system to enhance protein concentration levels, increase yields and develop additional high-value proteins and yeasts. (Source: Green Plains, Website PR, 19 Jan., 2021) Contact: Green Plains Inc., Todd Becker, CEO, Phil Boggs, VP, 402.884.8700, phil.boggs@gpreinc.com, www.gpreinc.com; Fluid Quip, 319-320-7709, www.fluidquiptechnologies.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bellulosic,  Biofuel,  Green Plains,  Fluid Quip Technologies,  Ethanol,  Biorefinery,  


Blue Flint Ethanol CCS Test Well Underway (Ind. Report)
Blue Flint Ethanol.Midwest AgEnergy,CCS
Date: 2020-10-16
Following up on our June 22nd coverage, Blue Flint Ethanol, part of Midwest AgEnergy , reports test well drilling for its previously announced "Carbon Zero" carbon capture and storage (CCS) initiative at its corn-ethanol plant in Underwood, McLean County, Wyoming is underway. The roughly $35 million test well is expected to be complete within 6 weeks.

The Blue Flint ethanol plant's roughly 200,000 tpy of carbon emissions are the result of its corn fermentation process which uses enzymes to break down the starch into glucose. Yeast then converts the glucose to ethanol, and C02 is released in the process. (Source: Blue Flint Ethanol, Bismark Tribune, 14 Oct., 2020) Contact: Blue Flint Ethanol, Midwest AgEnergy, Jeff Zuger, CEO, (701) 442-7500, www.midwestagenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Flint Ethanol,  COs,  CCS,  


Novozymes Platform Converts Corn Fiber into Ethanol (Ind. Report)
Novozymes
Date: 2020-09-21
Novozymes today announced the launch of Fiberex, a comprehensive platform based on novel enzymes and yeast strains to convert corn fiber into ethanol. Fiberex is specifically aimed at breaking down tough fibers in the corn, providing producers with greater operational flexibility. The technology converts a low-value by-product into high-value, low-carbon fuel while also enabling the production of significantly more corn oil.

According to the release, Novozymes is the technology leader in fiber conversion, enabling new revenue for biofuels producers from low-carbon credits such as in California and EPA's cellulosic RIN credits. Through Fiberex, Novozymes is collaborating with the biofuel industry to further expand the boundaries of corn-based ethanol -- literally breaking down some of the barriers between what is considered conventional biofuels and advanced biofuels.

Novozymes' Fiberex enzymes are specifically designed to break down this complex matrix -- resulting in more corn oil and converting the fiber into simple sugars that are easily converted into ethanol.

As part of the platform announcement, Novozymes is also launching the first Fiberex products: Fiberex R1, a technology specifically designed to provide maximum ethanol in separate fiber-to-ethanol processes, and Fiberex F1, a cellulase enzyme designed to provide fiber conversion for in-process technologies. Additional solutions, to launch in 2021, are in proof-of-concept trials now, according to the release. (Source: Novozymes, Website PR, 16 Sept., 2020) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP Bioenergy, 646-671-3897 , www.novozymes.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes ,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol,  


Clariant, Chemtex to Collaborate on China Biofuels (Int'l. Report)
Clariant, Chemtex
Date: 2020-08-19
Muttenz, Switzerland-based Clariant AG is reporting a strategic partnership with Chemtex Global Corp. to market and sell Clariant's Sunliquid technology licenses, as well as services and supplies for advanced biofuel plants in China.

In 2017, the State Council of PRC endorsed a new strategic plan to utilize bioethanol converted from agricultural residue as gasoline for motor vehicles. Under the nationwide blending mandate proposed, all gasoline used for motor vehicles will need to contain bioethanol as an additive. Clariant, with its innovative sunliquid technology that offers an efficient process for converting agricultural residues into low-emission, carbon negative biofuel, is fully supporting the rollout of the mandate.

The combined offerings of Clariant and Chemtex will provide a comprehensive package of 2G ethanol technology licenses and Engineering Procurement Construction (EPC) services, enabling customers in China to successfully design, build and operate their own full-scale plants. While Clariant will offer its sunliquid technology licenses, technical services and the supply of starter cultures from its proprietary enzyme and yeast platform, Chemtex will be responsible for engineering, procurement and construction. (Source: Clariant, PR, Chemical Engineering, Aug., 2020) Contact: Clariant, Christian Librera, Head of Business Line Biofuels and Derivatives, Stefanie Nehlsen, Global Trade Media Relations, +41 61 469 63 63, www.clariant.com; Chemtex, Sean Ma, CEO, www.chemtex.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Sunliquid,  Clariant,  Chemtex ,  Biofuel,  


Bulgarian Start-up Licenses Clariant Sunliquid® (Ind. Report)
Clariant
Date: 2020-07-27
Switzerland headquartered specialty chemicals company Clariant reports it has licensed its Sunliquid® cellulosic ethanol technology to Bulgarian start-up Eta Bio. The agreement covers the supply of the license, basic engineering, technical services and a supply of starter cultures from Clariant's proprietary enzyme and yeast platform.

Eta Bio, which was established to construct, own and operate a commercial plant for the production of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural waste, will use Sunliquid technology at a new facility designed to produce 50,000 metric tpy of cellulosic ethanol from roughly 250,000 metric tpy of regionally-sourced wheat straw. (Source: Clariant, Website, 27 July, 2020) Contact: Clariant, Hariolf Kottmann, CEO, Christian Librera, Biofuels and Derivatives, +41 61 469 5111, www.clariant.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Clariant,  Cellulosic Ethanol,  


Novozymes Touts Innova Fit for Ethanol Production (Ind. Report)
Novozymes
Date: 2020-02-14
Danish enzymes and microbes specialist Novozymes is reporting the launch of Innova Fit -- an advanced non-GM yeast that eliminates ethanol production constraints caused by conventional and basic yeasts. According to the release, Innova Fit:
  • Powers through high temperature excursions without sacrificing yield -- Higher yields during fermentation temperature excursions, up to 36 degree C/96 degree F, reducing variability and process upsets.

  • Expands throughput by fermenting high dry solids -- Developed to withstand the rigors of hard running plants, Innova Fit can ferment up to 36 pct dry solids while tolerating high ethanol titers in fermentation.

  • Increases ethanol yield up to 2 pct -- Operating in a wide variety of fermentation times, Innova Fit excels in fermentations between 55 and 65 hours. As a drop-in solution, Fit converts more sugar to ethanol versus other non-GM yeasts to improve plant profitability.

  • May reduce need for yeast nutritional supplements: While many yeasts use urea and yeast food to support fermentation, Innova Fit could significantly reduce these costly inputs.

    Since 2018, Novozymes has released four yeast solutions as part of its Innova platform. Yeast and its development are a strategic growth area where Novozymes will continue working with innovation partners in the industry. Its Innova yeast products are the result of a dedicated development partnership with Microbiogen to bring new yeast technology to the market.

    Australian-based Microbiogen is an industrial biotechnology company specializing in the development of improved, industrial yeast strains, according to the company website. (Source: Novozymes, PR, GreenCar Congress, 11 Feb. 2020) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP Bioenergy Commercial, Peder Holk Nielsen, CEO, Michael Burns, Biorefining Business Development North America,(919) 496-6926, www.novozymes.com; Microbiogen, Geoff Bell, CEO, (02) 9418 3182 geoff.bell@microbiogen.com, www.microbiogen.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Microbiogen,  Novozymes ,  Yeast,  Ethanol,  


  • Woody Biomass-to-Fuels Studied at Purdue Univ. (R&D Report)
    Purdue University Center for Plant Biology
    Date: 2019-11-18
    In West Lafayette, Indiana, researchers at the Purdue University Center for Plant Biology (C3Bio) report their study of ways to increase production of biofuels from non-food biomass has identified lignin, a complex compound in cell walls, blocks access to plant carbohydrates that could be cleaved into sugars and then fermented into biofuels, as one of several barriers to the efficient conversion of that biomass.

    The study notes researchers have found a way of removing lignin and making useful products from it, as well as getting access to plant carbohydrates for production of biofuels. Even with lignin removed, however, the Purdue team had to find ways to break the tightly connected plant cells apart so that chemical catalysts or yeasts used in the biofuel refining process could do their jobs.

    With all the lignin removed through a nickel-carbon catalysis, the research team treated poplar wood particles with trifluoroacetic acid to loosen the tightly packed crystalline cellulose and its aggregation into large bundles in plant cell walls. The trifluoroacetic acid causes the cellulose to swell, making it easier to access the glucose molecules present in the cell walls for fermentation to ethanol -- or using other chemical catalysts discovered by the C3Bio team, the cellulose and other carbohydrates can be converted to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid, which are substrates or precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. (Source: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Plant Biotechnology Journal, AgriNews, 9 Nov., 2019)Contact: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, C3Bio, Prof. Maureen McCann, 765-496-1779, mmccann@purdue.edu, www.purdue.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Woody Biomass,  Purdue University,  


    Gevo, Leaf Resources Ink Joint Development Agreement (Ind. Report)
    Gevo,Leaf Resources
    Date: 2019-09-13
    Englewood, Colorado-based renewable fuels and chemicals manufacturer Gevo, Inc. and Queensland, Australasia-based Leaf Resources, a specialist in converting plant biomass into industrial sugars, are reporting a joint development and commercialization agreement under which Gevo will explore the potential use of cellulosic-derived sugars and glycerol from Leaf Resources and the ability to convert these to hydrocarbon molecules useful as fuels or chemicals.

    Leaf Resources' Glycell Process pre-treatment technology breaks down plant biomass to generate a higher yield of cellulose than conventional approaches. The pretreatment is followed by enzymatic hydrolysis which converts cellulose into cellulosic sugars. The process also yields lignin, hemicellulose and refined glycerol.

    Gevo has developed technology for producing isobutanol from renewable feedstocks using a yeast that has been developed to produce isobutanol and a product recovery technology that continuously removes isobutanol as it is formed. Gevo adds its proprietary yeast to fermentable sugars to convert the sugars to isobutanol. (Source: GEVO, Green Car Congress, 12 Sept., 2019) Contact: Leaf Resources, +61 7 3188 9040, www.leafresources.com.au; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Isobutanol,  Leaf Resources,  GEVO,  Cellulosic,  


    Lallemand, ICC Brazil Partner on Ethanol Yeast Derivatives (Int'l)
    Lallemand, ICC Brazil
    Date: 2019-07-26
    Lallemand is reporting a long-term global partnership with Sao Paulo-based animal nutrition specialist ICC Brazil for the research, development and supply of inactive yeast products and fractions derived from sugarcane ethanol.

    ICC specializes in the production and supply to animal nutrition and pet food customers of secondary yeast derivatives from ethanol, including yeast cell walls, inactive dry yeast, autolyzed and mineral yeasts.

    According to Lallemand, the fermentation of sugarcane molasses or juices generates large quantities of spent yeast co-products that can be harvested and dried. Lallemand Animal Nutrition has expertise in the qualification of the chemical and physical structure of yeast cell wall, introducing new tools such as Atomic Force Microscopy and in vitro models to measure the binding capacities (against pathogens and/or toxins) and immune modulation effects of such products.

    Lallemand notes it has been working on the selection of specific yeast strains that offer unique properties while producing high yields of ethanol.

    The new partnership will secure a dedicated supply from ICC's contracted sugar/ethanol mills of characterized yeast cell wall products and yeast derivatives. (Source: Lallemand Animal Nutrition, PR, Feedstuffs, 22 July, 2019) Contact: Lallemand, Jim Steele, CEO, Angus Ballard, Pres., (815) 721-6165, www.lallemandbds.com; ICC Brazil, www.iccbrazil.com/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Lallemand,  ICC Brazil,  Yeast,  Ethanol,  


    Novozymes Touts New Liquefaction Platform (New Prod. & Tech.)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2019-06-12
    Biofuel technology provider Novozymes reports the launch of Fortiva, a new alpha-amylase technology that helps customers avoid having to choose between maximizing enzyme performance and operational efficiency. In yeast, Force continues to deliver on the promise to quickly bring innovative, robust, and reliable biological solutions to the market from the Innova yeast platform established last year.

    Fortiva is added into liquefaction the same as traditional alpha amylase technologies, but once introduced, it solubilizes more difficult starch than all other amylases on the market

  • It does this through both the efficient operational use of temperature, as well as the enzyme itself, leading to the highest conversion of starch to dextrins in the market and creating the highest returns on investment. Novozymes sees this proven time and again through an average 20 pct reduction in ethanol plants' residual starch.

  • Fortiva advances plant efficiency. The fuel ethanol industry initially operated at high liquefaction temperatures (195F/91C) known to better solubilize starch to dextrins, but during this time, enzyme efficiency was limited and required excessive use of chemicals to enable the high operational temperature. Novozymes advancements in enzyme technology (Liquozyme SC) allowed for the removal of unnecessary chemicals (lime) required but required an operational change to more typical operating liquefaction temperatures seen in the fuel ethanol industry today (185F/85C)

  • Fortiva again allows the ethanol industry to engage very efficient, high temperature liquefactions (195F/91C) while also bringing to market the most advanced alpha amylase to work in this ideal environment, solubilizing more starch without the need for additional chemicals, yielding the highest ethanol production in the market (+1 pct ethanol yield).

    Novozyme's Innova Force targets ethanol plants seeking flexibility to achieve operational targets without sacrificing performance. It allows producers to achieve throughput and yield targets without losing ethanol yield to common stressors, such as high temperature and organic acids. Force gives producers the flexibility to push for yield without compromise, and to choose the format that best fits their operation, dry or cream.

  • Innova Force expresses multiple starch-degrading enzymes for tailored substrate activity, ensuring solubilization and conversion for the lowest residual starch and most optimal fermentation kinetics. Paired with novel glucoamylases, the result is the lowest stress and high performing yeast kinetics and fermentations for exceptional efficiency.

  • Force is proven to handle tough challenges: Exceptional robustness to high ethanol concentrations, high dry solids -- up to 38 pct temperature excursions up to 104 degree F, and lactic acid excursions up to 0.6 pct. Force expresses multiple enzymes to maximize substrate and starch conversion, and is available in two formats (cream and dry) making it the most advanced dry yeast on the market.

  • Force eliminates the need for yeast food (100 pct) required by other yeasts, a $300,000 savings (100+MGY plants). Based on plant trials to date, there is potential for significant urea reduction, up to 75 pct depending on individual plant conditions. For every 500lbs of urea reduced, plants can save approximately $130,000 (100+MGY plant). Innova Force eliminates these hidden costs with its flexibility, robustness, and opportunity to run a plant as needed (high throughput or yield): $500,000 savings in nutrients (urea reduction, and 100 pct elimination of yeast nutrients); $280,000 cost reduction related to poor performing fermentations caused by lack of robustness; 33 pct DS -- plants using advanced yeasts struggle running high dry solids, according to the Novozymes release. (Source: Novozymes, Trade Release, 10 June, 2019) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP, Biofuels Commercial North America, Peder Holk Nielsen, Pres. and CEO, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes,  Ethanol,  Yeast,  


  • ICGEB Touts Novel Yeast Strain to Increase Ethanol Prod. (Int'l)
    ICGEB,Ethanol
    Date: 2019-04-15
    In Delhi, researchers from the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB) are touting Saccharomyces cerevisiae NGY10, a novel yeast strain that they say increases ethanol production by as much as 15.5 pct when glucose or lignocellulose biomass -- rice and wheat straw -- is fermented.

    The research team led by Dr. Naseem A. Gaur from the Yeast Biofuel Group at ICGEB , found the NGY10 strain can be metabolically engineered to ferment both hexose and pentose sugars leading to increased production of ethanol using lignocellulose. This will increase the quantity of ethanol produced from lignocellulose and reduce the cost of ethanol production.

    DBT-ICGEB is an integrated centre for performing cutting-edge basic research and its translation into reality. It thrives upon ICGEB mandate to perform research in the field of molecular biology and biotechnology and will serve as platform for the synthetic biologists to work in diverese bioenergy areas such as microbial engineering, biochemical engineering, algal engineering and systems biology.

    India has targeted 10 pct ethanol-gasoline blend (E10) for moter vehicle fuels by 2022.

    (Source: International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Centre for Advanced Bioenergy Research, Delhi, The Hindu, April, 2019) Contact: DBT-ICGEB, Ajay Kumar Pandey, +91-11-2674-2357 extn:462, barsebrajesh@icgeb.res.in, www. icgeb-bioenergy.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Yeast,  Ethanol,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Yeast,  Ethanol,  


    Diverse Biofeedstock Ethanol Yields Investigated (R&D Report)
    Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
    Date: 2018-11-16
    Biorefineries are picky eaters. They only consume one or two types of plant matter. Researchers at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison processed and experimentally measured ethanol production from five different herbaceous feedstocks. They examined two annuals (corn stover and energy sorghum) along with three perennials (switchgrass, miscanthus, and restored prairie). They determined that a lignocellulosic ethanol refinery could use a range of plant types without having a major impact on the amount of ethanol produced per acre, or per land area.

    Many biorefineries consume one, or sometimes two, feedstocks grown and harvested nearby. The feedstock contains lignocellulose. That chemical is processed and fermented into biofuels or bioproducts. Accepting a variety of feedstocks could improve the refinery's environmental footprint, economics, and logistics. The team's study showed that a lignocellulosic refinery could be relatively agnostic in terms of the feedstocks used.

    Refineries to convert biomass into fuels often rely on just one feedstock. If the refineries could accept more than one feedstock, it would greatly benefit refinery operation. Scientists investigated how five different feedstocks affected process and field-scale ethanol yields. Two annual crops (corn stover and energy sorghum) and three perennial crops (switchgrass, miscanthus, and restored prairie) were pretreated using ammonia fiber expansion, hydrolyzed, and fermented separately using yeast or bacteria.

    Researchers found that both biomass quality and biomass yield affected the amount of ethanol each acre produces. However, the effect differed. Biomass quality was the main driver for the ethanol yields for high-yielding crops, such as switchgrass. Biomass yield was the main driver for the ethanol yields for low-productivity crops, such as corn stover. Therefore, to increase ethanol yield for high-yielding crops, focusing efforts on improving biomass quality or conversion efficiency may be prudent.

    For low-yielding crops, focusing on increasing biomass yield may be the best strategy. When measuring the amount of ethanol produced during fermentation, most feedstocks fell within a similar range, especially when scientists used bacteria to ferment the biomass. In total, the results of this study suggest that a lignocellulosic refinery may use a variety of feedstocks with a range of quality without a major negative impact on field-scale ethanol yields. (Source: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US DOE, 12 Nov., 2018) Contact: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Tim Donohue, Dir., John Greenler, Dir. Outreach, (608) 890-2444, www.glbrc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center,  US DOE,  Biofuel Feedstock,  ,  


    Mascoma, NextFerm, Seal Yeast-for-Ethanol Development Deal (R&D)
    NextFerm , Mascoma
    Date: 2018-09-26
    Israeli headquartered fermentation products producer NextFerm reports it has inked a joint developement agreement with Waltham, Mass.-based Mascoma LLC, a subsidiary of Lallemand Inc. a leading supplier of yeast to ethanol producers.

    Launched in 2015, NextFerm is primarily focused on developing fermentation yeast for the food industry. The company's process can be applied to many areas, including ethanol production, to develop yeast that is better able to cope with temperature or pH changes, for example. Accordingly, the company is now developing a new strain of yeast for Mascoma for use in the ethanol industry. (Source: NextFerm, Ethanol Producer, 25 Sept., 2018) Contact: Mascoma, Kevin Wenger, Exec. VP, www.mascoma.com; NextFerm Technolobies USA, Elzaphan Hotam, CEO, +972 4 666450, 908-376-3086 -- US Office, info@nextferm.com, www.nextferm.com; Lallemand, Jim Steele, CEO, Angus Ballard, Pres., Lallemand Biofuels & Distilled Spirits, www.lallemandbds.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NextFerm ,  Lallemand,  Mascoma ,  Yeast,  Ethanol,  


    Novozymes Touts Bioenergy Segment Growth (Ind. Report)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2018-08-15
    In a just released financial report for the first half of 2018, Novozymes reported 14 pct organic sales growth for its bioenergy segment which accounted for 19 pct of the company's sales during the first half of the year. The company also noted its newly launched Innova Drive yeast product posted good growth in the second quarter. Novozymes also reported that sales of enzymes for biomass conversion declined during the first half of 2018 when compared to the same period of last year.

    Novozymes also noted that organic sales growth for the bioenergy segment is expected to be driven mainly by new product launches and innovation. (Source: Novozymes, AgraNet, Various Media, 14 Aug., 2018) Contact: Novozymes, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes ,  Enzymes,  Bioenergy,  Biofuel,  


    GEVO Adopts DSM eBOOST Yeast for Ethanol Production (Ind. Report)
    GEVO
    Date: 2018-07-03
    Englewood, Colorado-based isobutanol specialist GEVO, Inc. reports it has adopted Netherlands-headquartered Royal DSM's new eBOOST yeast for enhanced ethanol production at its facility in Luverne, MN. eBOOST offers improved yields and enhanced profitability.

    While we are continuing to aggregate demand for isobutanol, jet fuel, and isooctane with a view to building out large capacity for those products, ethanol production is the key to driving profitability in the near term. DSM full-scale application trials of eBOOST demonstrated that the solution increases ethanol yields up to 6 pct and reduces glycerol formation more effectively than other industry-standard yeast products, GEVO says. (Source: GEVO, Green Car Congress, 28 June 2018) Contact:GEVO, Pat Gruber, CEO, (303) 858-3358, info@gevo.com, www.gevo.com; Royal DSM, www.dsm.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Yeast,  Royal DSM,  Ethanol,  


    DOE Announces $40Mn for Bio-Based Research (R&D, Funding)
    Office of Biological and Environmental Research
    Date: 2018-06-20
    In Washington, the US DOE has announced $40 million in funding for 31 projects to advance research in the development of microbes as practical platforms for the production of biofuels and other bioproducts from renewable resources.

    Over the past decade, DOE-supported scientists have identified and modified a wide range of microbial organisms to be "production workhorses" transforming microbes into effective platforms for the generation of fuels and other precursor chemicals from renewable plant feedstocks.

    Organisms under study range from yeast and fungi to cyanobacteria and rare thermophilic microbes that thrive at extremely high temperatures. Products to be produced include biofuels, alcohols and other valuable precursor chemicals with multiple possible downstream applications. In addition to the projects focused on specific microorganisms, approximately one third of the projects are focused on developing and improving the essential imaging tools for this work of characterizing and modifying organisms on a microscopic scale.

    Projects were chosen by competitive peer review under two separate DOE Funding Opportunity Announcements, one for Systems Biology of Bioenergy-Relevant Microbes and another for Bioimaging Research for Bioenergy, both sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Department's Office of Science. Total funding is $40 million for projects lasting three years in duration. (Source: US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, 15 June, 2018) Contact: US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental, Research, https://science.energy.gov/ber

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US DOE,  Biofuel R&D,  Biochemical,  


    BASF, Lallemand Report US Ethanol Market Collaboration (Ind. Report)
    BASF Enzymes, Lallemand Biofuels
    Date: 2018-06-13
    In San Diego, BASF Enzymes and Montral-headquartered Lallemand Biofuels & Distilled Spirits (LBDS) report they've formally entered into a marketing and sales collaboration agreement with the aim to maximize value to customers in the US ethanol market.

    In the collaboration, BASF's enzyme portfolio will be used for applications in liquefaction and fermentation to improve fermentation performance. LBDS will use its TransFerm yeast product line which it claims provides increased ethanol yields and reduces the need for glucoamylase addition.

    The BASF company portfolio is organized into five segments -- chemicals, performance products, functional materials & solutions, agricultural solutions and oil & gas.

    LBDS supplies fermentation ingredients and 'value creating services' to the global fuel ethanol and distilled beverage industries. (Source: BASF, LBDS, PR, Biofuels Int'l, 12 June, 2018) Contact: Lallemand, Jim Steele, CEO, Angus Ballard, Pres., (815) 721-6165, www.lallemandbds.com; BASF Enzymes, Dirk Daems, Drector of Operations, (858)451-8500, https://www.bloomberg.com/profiles/companies/VRNM:US-basf-enzymes-llc, www.basf.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BASF,  Enzymes,  Lallemand Biofuels,  Ethanol,  


    DuPont Launches New Products for Fuel Ethanol (New Prod & Tech)
    DuPont Industrial Biosciences
    Date: 2018-06-06
    Building off the recent launch of its fuel ethanol platform DuPont™ XCELIS™,Wilmigton, Delaware-based DuPont Industrial Biosciences has unveiled three new products designed to increase yields, speed fermentation and reduce energy and chemical consumption:
  • DuPont™ SYNERXIA® THRIVE GX: Next Generation in Yeast for the Fuel Alcohol Industry;
  • DuPont DISTILLASE DXT: Advanced Glucoamylase Blend;
  • DuPont OPTIMASH AX: Xylanase for Enhanced Liquefaction

    The new XCELIS platform also will feature an online partner community for the industry, GRAIN CHANGERS. This online community and innovative product offerings represent a new age for DuPont's XCELIS biorefinery team. By improving performance, efficiency and fuel ethanol yields, XCELIS helps ethanol producers reach their goals with new products, tools and technologies. "These three products are -- quite simply -- game-changers for the fuel ethanol market. Our team has done it once again -- listened to customer needs, engineered cutting-edge enzyme and yeast technologies and worked hand-in-hand with ethanol producers to bring products to market that provide the best possible yields and new options for efficiency," the release says. (Source: DuPont Industrial Biosciences, PR, June, 2018) Contact: DuPont Industrial Biosciences , Judy Underwood, Global Marketing Leader Grain Processing, Wendy Rosen , (650) 284-6429, www.dow-dupont.com, http://biosciences.dupont.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DuPont Industrial Biosciences ,  Ethanol,  Biofuel,  Enzymes,  

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