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US Ethanol Production Slowly Rising (Ind. Report)
Ethanol,U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2020-05-22
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. ethanol production and use continues to slowly rebound following sharp declines in March and April due to market impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ethanol production for the week ending May 15 was up nearly 8 p ct while weekly ethanol ending stocks fell by more than 2 pct, EIA data shows.

The data shows U.S. ethanol U.S. ethanol production averaged 663,000 bpd the week ending May 15, up from an average of 617,000 barrels per day the previous week. Production was down 409,000 bpd when compared to the same week of last year, and down 416,000 bpd when compared to the volume of ethanol produced during the final week in February, before COVID-19 began to impact U.S. fuel markets. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, 20 May, 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol news,  U.S. Energy Information Administration news,  


U.S. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions, 2018 Report (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-12-09
The recently released U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2018 Report examines economic trends and changes in fuel mix that influence energy-related CO2 emissions in the U.S. As a result, most of the CO2 emissions being discussed are the result of fossil fuel combustion or their use in the petrochemical and related industries, the report states.

In the short term, energy-related CO2 emissions are influenced by the weather, fuel prices and disruptions in electricity generation. In the long term, CO2 emissions are influenced by public policy, reduced costs and improved efficiencies of new technology, demand-side efficiency gains and economic trends, according to the report.

A major factor in recent reductions in the carbon intensity of electric generation in the U.S. is the reduced generation of electricity using coal while increasingly using natural gas. Natural gas emits less CO2 for the same amount of electricity generated, and non-carbon generation (including renewables), which do not emit the gas.

Between 2005 and 2018, EIA has calculated that cumulative U.S. C02 emissions reductions attributable specifically to shifts from coal to natural gas and to non-carbon generation totaled 4,621 million metric tons (MMmt). Of this total, 2,823 MMmt resulted from decreased use of coal and increased use of natural gas; 1,799 MMmt resulted from decreased use of coal and increased use of non-carbon generation sources.

Between 2005 and 2017, total U.S. electricity generation increased by almost 4 pct while related C02 emissions fell by 27 pct. During the same period, fossil fuel electricity generation declined by roughly 9 pct, and non-carbon electricity generation increased by 35 pct.

Download the U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2018 Report HERE. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, 14 Nov., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  CO2 Emissions,  Natural Gas Emissions,  Climate Change,  


EIA Data Questions RFS "Hardship" Waivers Effect on Ethanol Demand (Ind. Report)
EIA
Date: 2019-10-04
As previously reported, ethanol industry proponents have petitioned the EPA to cease issuing Small Refinery "Hardship" Exemptions (SREs) allowable under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). The ethanol industry is trying to convince the EPA that the waivers are hurting their business and, therefore, the agency should stop issuing them.

Month-over-month, official government data tells a very different story. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the ethanol blend rate has remained within normal statistical variation, despite the flood of "hardship" waivers. EIA data shows:

  • The overall physical ethanol consumption for Q1 2019 (the most recent, complete data available) is higher than it was in 2018.

  • The average ethanol blend rate was higher in Q1 2019 (10.21 pct) than in Q1 2018 (10.09 pct).

  • In February 2019, the ethanol blend rate was 10.53 percent -- the highest in the 12 months preceding. And the March 2019 ethanol blend rate was 10.18 percent -- higher than the March 2018 blend rate of 9.75 percent.

    These blend rates have been stable for the past few years, underscoring the truth that ethanol demand is premised partially on the RFS, partially on demand for clean octane and partially on other factors -- not SREs.

    Similarly, when it comes to mid-level ethanol blends like E15, there is no data indicating that SREs are reducing demand. E15 and other mid-level ethanol blend sales have been growing all year and, in the case of E15, sales are higher at this point than they were last year, according to the Minnesota Bio-Fuels Association.

    As previously noted, "hardship waivers" were intended for refineries producing 75,000 bpd or less and suffered "disproportionate economic hardship" from the costs of RFS compliance. The waiver frees the refineries from an obligation to provide the EPA with biofuels credits proving compliance. Under the now vanquished administrator Greg Pruitt's direction, the EPA handed out 54 exemptions over two years and not a single request for an exemption was denied. (Source: American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM), EIA, Business & Industry Connection, 3 Oct., 2019) Contact: AFPM, Derrick Morgan, Snr, VP, (202) 586-8800, www.afpm.org; EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS,  "Hardship" Waiver,  Ethanol.Ethanol Blend,  EIA,  


  • US Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Expected to Fall (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-07-17
    The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reported to be forecasting a 2.2 pct decrease in CO2 emissions for 2019, due primarily to fewer emissions from coal consumption while natural gas CO2 emissions increase and petroleum CO2 emissions remain virtually unchanged.

    For the remainder of 2019, EIA expects relatively mild forecast temperatures will keep energy demand and resulting energy-related CO2 emissions below 2018 levels. Accordingly, the agency forecasts CO2 emissions from coal will decrease by 169 million metric tonnes (MmMmt) in 2019, the largest decrease in CO2 emissions from coal since 2015.

    On the other hand, natural gas CO2 emissions are projected to rise by 53 Mmmt, largely due to forecast changes in the electric power generation mix as natural gas continues to grow as the most prevalent electricity generation fuel. Power generation consumes nearly 92 pct of the coal used in the U.S..

    EIA also projects CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption, which have risen every year for past six years, will be virtually flat in 2019. Petroleum accounted for 45 pct of energy-related CO2 emissions in 2018. (Source: Energy Information Administration, Kallanish Energy, 15 July, 2019) Contact: Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Dioxide Emissions,  EIA,  


    US Ethanol Exports Up 23 pct in 2018 (Ind. Report)
    Ethanol
    Date: 2019-04-26
    In Washington, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting US ethanol exports jumped by 23 pct in 2018 reaching 112,000 bpd, up from a previous record high of 91,000 bpd in 2017.

    According to the EIA, at 33,000 bpd Brazil was the top market for US ethanol, followed by Canada at approximately 23,000 bpd while India ranked third, receiving 10,000 bpd of US ethanol followed by South Korea and the Netherlands. (Source: US EIA, 25 April, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  EIA,  Biofuel,  


    U.S. Fuel Ethanol Production Falls in February (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-02-11
    On February 7th the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported US fuel ethanol production averaged 967,000 bpd in the week to February 1, 2019. This is the lowest since mid-April 2018.

    Download the US EIA Biofuels: Ethanol and Biodiesel Explained report HERE.

    Access EIA Monthly Reviews HERE. (Source: US EIA, Feb, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration ,  Ethanol,  


    Coal Part of the US Grid until 2050, says EIA (Ind. Report)
    US Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-01-30
    According to the US Energy Information Administration's just released 2019 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), coal is here to stay, at least for awhile yet despite recent warnings from top scientists about the urgency of climate action.

    Based on projections about trends in energy—from the amount of fossil fuels produced and sold, to the growth of renewable energy, coal is still projected to provide 17 pct of the United States' electricity in 2050. The EIA projections note that natural gas -- a fossil fuel that is less carbon-emitting than coal but still a problem for climate change -- will increase its share of US electricity production from 34 pct to 39 pct.

    Download the EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 projects growing oil, natural gas, renewables production report HERE. (Source: EIA, Jan., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  Coal,  


    Badger State Burned More Coal in 2017 than 2016 (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2019-01-16
    According to recently released US Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, Wisconsin burned approximately 7 pct more coal in 2017 than 2016 to provide better than half of the Badger State's energy that year.

    Since the most recent data period,coal-powered plants in Pleasant Prairie, Sheboygan and Green Bay have been shutter and replaced with natural gas and renewable energy.

    The Wisconsin Public Service Commission( WPSC) notes that the state's coal consumption has decreased by 28 pct since its peak in 2005, and overall emissions have dropped 20 pct. (Source: WPSC, University of Wisconsin, Wisc. Public Radio, 14 Jan., 2019) Contact: The Wisconsin Public Service Commission, 608-266-5481, https://psc.wi.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  Carbon Emissions,  


    EIA Oct. Short-Term Energy Outlook --Renewables, CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
    EIA
    Date: 2018-11-09
    In 2017, the US Energy Information Administration EIA estimates that U.S. wind generation averaged 697,000 MWh per day (MWh/d). EIA forecasts that wind generation will rise by 8 pct to 750,000 MWh/d in 2018 and by a further 6 pct to 793,000 MWh/d in 2019.

    Solar power generates less electricity in the U.S. than wind power but continues to grow at a faster rate. EIA expects solar generation will rise 26 pct from 211,000 MWh/d in 2017 to 267,000 MWh/d in 2018 and jump 14 pct to 305,000 MWh/d in 2019.

    After falling by 0.8 pct in 2017, EIA forecasts that U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions will rise by 2.2 pct in 2018 -- largely due to higher natural gas consumption because of a colder winter and a warmer summer than in 2017. Emissions are expected to to fall 1.1 pct in 2019, as forecast temperatures are forecast to return to normal.

    Download the full EIA report HERE. Source: EIA, Oct. 2018) Contact: EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Renewables,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Renewables,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Sunnova Expanding Solar Lease, Loan Options in Illinois (Ind Report)
    Sunnova Energy
    Date: 2018-08-24
    Houston, Texas-headquartered residential solar and energy storage service provider Sunnova Energy reports it is expanding into the state of Illinois, starting with its 25-year solar lease options and quickly adding solar loan products. With the addition of Illinois, Sunnova now operates in 23 U.S. states and territories.

    According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), Illinois currently only generates 0.7 pct of its electricity from solar. While he Illinois Power Agency aims to source 25 pct of the state's energy from renewables by 2025, the state is currently ranked 33rd among states in terms of solar growth. (Source: Sunnova Energy, CleanTechnica, 22 Aug., 2018) Contact: Sunnova Energy, (281) 985-9900, www.sunnova.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Sunnova Energy,  Solar,  


    US Banned MTBE Being Exported (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-07-16
    The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that in 2017, the US experted an average of 38,000 bpd of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to primarily Mexico, Chile, and Venezuela.

    MTBE was once commonly used as a motor gasoline additive in the United States but was phased out in the late 2000s as a result of water contamination concerns. Since then, fuel ethanol has replaced MTBE as a gasoline additive. In contrast to MTBE, the use of fuel ethanol has been supported by tax subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit and by the Renewable Fuel Standard, which mandates the use of biofuels in the US transportation fuel supply. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, PR, 13 July, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  MTBE,  


    EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
    EIA,Energy Efficiency
    Date: 2018-06-29
    According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

    Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

    Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

    Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Energy Efficiewncy ,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


    Aloha State Pledges Carbon Neutrality by 2045 (Reg & Leg)
    Hawaii
    Date: 2018-06-22
    The Hawaiian State Legislature has inked legislation committing to 100 pct renewable energy and to becoming carbon neutral by 2045. The legislature also committed to eliminate fossil fuels in ground transportation by 2045, and that the rise in sea levels be considered when proposed developments projects are being scrutinised. Hawaii reportedly could be hit by $19 billion in damage due to rising sea levels, according to the Hawaii Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation report. The legislation has been described as "just plain common sense."

    Hawaii is the ninth lowest producer of energy-related CO2 emissions among the 50 US states, according to the US Energy Information Administration. It is also a member of the United States Climate Alliance, a group of state governors that have agreed to abide by the 2015 Paris climate agreement. (Source: Various Media, Compelo, June, 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Neutral,  Carbon Emissions,  


    EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-06-22
    According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

    Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

    Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

    Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, 20 June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


    Renewables Subsidies Drop as Renewable Energy Grows (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-05-25
    According to the EIA' Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2016 Report, federal subsidies for renewable energy -- including renewable generation of electricity -- dropped to $6.7 billion in FY 2016, a 56 pct decline from FY 2013. renewable subsidies in FY 2010 and FY 2013 were approximately $15 billion, more than double FY 2016 levels, as support from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) lessened. Despite the decline, renewable energy continued to receive a large share of total federal energy subsidies, accounting for 46 pct of the FY 2016 total.

    In the report, the EIA defines subsidies as funds a government expends, or revenue it foregoes, to encourage or support certain activities. EIA's report includes the following financial activities: direct expenditures, tax expenditures, research and development (R&D), and credit subsidies to recipients of federal loan guarantees.

    Tax expenditures provided 80 pct of FY 2016 renewables subsidies. Renewable electricity-related tax expenditures provided nearly 70 pct of FY 2013 renewable electricity subsidies, falling to about half that share in FY 2016. Most of this amount went to commercial wind and solar installations from the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC). The PTC provided an inflation-adjusted tax credit worth 2.4 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2016, while the ITC provided a deduction equal to 30 pct of facility installation costs. EIA estimates the PTC and ITC credits taken in FY 2016 at $1.4 billion and $1.2 billion, respectively.

    Nearly all renewable energy direct expenditures for FY 2010, FY 2013, and FY 2016 resulted from provisions of ARRA -- a broad-based set of programs designed to expedite economic recovery, including energy infrastructure. Under ARRA, DOE has invested more than $31 billion since 2009. Much of this funding supported renewable energy projects, but by FY 2016, most provisions of ARRA energy programs had expired. Direct expenditures for renewable energy decreased 90 pct, from nearly $9 billion in FY 2013 to about $1 billion in FY 2016.

    Although R&D expenditures are small compared with tax expenditures and direct expenditures, R&D provides the foundation for many energy technology advancements and cost reductions. Federal R&D expenditures for renewable energy were estimated at about $850 million for FY 2010 and FY 2013, but they dropped to about $450 million in FY 2016. Another $296 million in federal loan guarantees was distributed to recipients in FY 2010, but in both FY 2013 and FY 2016, federal loan guarantee subsidies were zero. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, May, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  


    Golden State GHG Emissions Falling, says EIA (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-02-07

    According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), from 1990 to 2015, California's electric power sector GHG emissions fell by 24 pct, commercial and residential sector emissions declined approximately 14 pct, and industrial emissions sank by 13 pct. Transportation-related emissions decreased from 2007 through 2013 but rose in 2014 and 2015. California's GHG emissions from agriculture and other uses are smaller in magnitude but have more than tripled since 1990.

    Overall, the state's total GHG emissions were 2 pct above 1990 levels as of 2015. Approximately 86 pct of the state's GHG emissions were related to energy consumption, according to the EIA. (Source: US EIA, Feb., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News California Carbon Emissions,  US EIA,  


    Maine Halts New Wind Projects (Ind. Report)
    Wind
    Date: 2018-02-02
    Last week in Augusta, Maine's Republican Governor Paul LePage issued a temporary stoppage on all new wind energy projects in Western and Coastal Maine. The moratorium will have a negative impact on the 14 proposed project in Maine but will exempt the preexisting Mars Hill wind farm in northern Maine. LePage reportedly sees wind turbines as a threat to his state's tourism industry, due to their size and appearance.

    According to the Portland Press, wind power accounted for only 0.4 pct of Maine's electric power production in the summer of 2007, and jumped to nearly 25 pct by summer 2017. In 2016, Maine wind turbines generated three-fifths of all utility-scale wind power in New England, according to US Energy Information Administration data. (Source: University of Maine, Maine Campus, 29 Jan., 2018)Contact: Gov. Paul Page, www.maine.gov/governor

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Wind,  Maine Wind,  


    28 pct Increase in World Energy, Increased Renewables Predicted by 2040 (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2017-09-20
    In it International Energy Outlook 2017 report, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that world energy consumption will jump by 28 pct between 2015 and 2040. The report also predicts that renewable energy will be the worlds fastest-growing energy source while the demand for coal will remain flat.

    Specifically, the EIA projects that most of the growth in renewables will stem from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and that non-OECD Asia -- China and India -- will drive over 60 pct of the world's total increase in energy consumption during the projected period. The EIA predicts that "renewables are expected to be the fastest-growing energy source" across the projected period, with annual consumption increasing on average by 2.3 pct between 2015 and 2040. Coal's share of global energy consumption is expected to fall from 27 pct in 2015 to 22 pct in 2040. (Source: US EIA, 18 Sept., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/outlooks/ieo

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  Coal,  US EIA,  


    US Biodiesel Production Rising, says US EIA (Ind. Report)
    US Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2017-08-23
    According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), US biodiesel production for the month of May, 2017, was 136 million gallons in May 2017, 9 million gallons higher than April 2017, and higher than the years 2016 and 2016. Biodiesel production came from 97 biodiesel plants with a combined capacity of 2.3 billion gpy. The Midwest region remained the heart of the US biodiesel industry, accounting for 69 pct of the US' total production.

    1,054 million pounds of feedstocks were used to produce biodiesel in May 2017. Soybean oil remained the most widely used biodiesel fuel stock, with 546 million pounds consumed. Texas remains the biggest biodiesel producing state in the US. Nine biodiesel producers have facilities in the Lone-Star state, with a combined total capacity of 474 million gpy, according to EIA figures. (Source: US EIA, Aug., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  USEIA,  Biodiesel,  

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