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EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2019-09-30
According to the recently released U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 report, despite renewable energy investment more than tripling globally during the current decade compared to the last 10-year period, most of the power delivered to the world's electric grids during the recent decade was from coal -- still the world's largest source of electricity, providing 38 pct of world electrical generation in 2018, about the same as 1997.

The world spent about $2.6 trillion on renewable energy projects during the decade, over three times the amount spent from 2000 to 2009. Solar PV investments totaled around $1.3 trillion, and onshore and offshore wind investment totaled around $1 trillion. Globally, solar energy capacity increased by 638 GW between 2009 and 2019, while coal-fired capacity increased by 529 GW, wind capacity increased 487 GW, and natural gas capacity increased 436 GW. In 2018, $41 billion was invested in coal worldwide.

China's spending on renewable electricity was the highest in the world at $758 billion from 2000 to the first half of 2019. The US was second with $356 billion, followed by Japan at $202 billion. The European nations spent around $698 billion on wind, solar, and other renewable energy sources, with Germany and the UK spending the most. It is expected that 330 GW of new wind power capacity will come online over the next five years, driven primarily by onshore wind power projects in the US and China. Investments in renewable power capacity in 2018, however, dropped 38 pct in China and by 6 pct in the US, while rising 45 pct in Europe.

The report predicts that electric power demand for coal will fall to 17 pct of total generation by 2050. Moody's Investors Service predicts coal will represent 11 pct of total U.S. power generation by 2030 -- down from 27 pct in 2018. The over 50 pct drop in coal demand from utilities by 2030 implies that coal demand would decline by about 7 pct per year on average over the next 10 years.

Download the US EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 report HERE. (Source: US EIA, Sept., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  


Plant-level U.S. Biodiesel Prod. Capacity Data Released (Ind. Report)
U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-09-16
On September 13, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its first annual U.S. Biodiesel Plant Production Capacity Report. The report includes the total biodiesel production capacity for all operating plants in both million gallons per year (gal/y) and barrels per day (b/d) as of January 1, 2019. The names of the reporting plants are organized by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD). Like the Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Report, EIA plans to update the report annually.

The 2019 U.S. Biodiesel Plant Production Capacity Report shows 102 operating biodiesel plants with 2.6 billion gpy in biodiesel production capacity, or 167,000 bpd. More than half of the nation's biodiesel production capacity is in the Midwest region, led by Iowa, Missouri, and Illinois. Of the top 15 biodiesel-producing states, 9 are located in the Midwest.

U.S.biodiesel production topped 1.8 billion gallons (119,000 bpd) in 2018, implying a 72 pct utilization rate based on the nameplate capacity level recorded at the beginning of 2018.

In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA forecasts that U.S. production of biodiesel will reach about 2.0 billion gallons (128,000 bpd) in 2019, resulting in 77 pct utilization of reported nameplate capacity as of January 1, 2019.

Respondents report the biodiesel production capacity data to EIA on Form EIA-22M, Monthly Biodiesel Production Survey, and EIA publishes the data in the Monthly Biodiesel Production Report. All entities that produce biodiesel that meets ASTM D 6751-07B specifications and is used for commercial purposes within the United States submit Form EIA-22M. Additional data collected on Form EIA-22M include production, sales, stock changes, and feed stock inputs to production. (Source: US EIA Release, Sept., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/petroleum/ethanolcapacity

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel,  U.S. Energy Information Administration,  


EIA Report Issues Biomass 2019-20 Stats, Projections (Ind Report)
US EIA
Date: 2019-06-17
In its just released June Short Term Energy Outlook, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is predicting non-hydropower renewables will provide 11 pct of U.S. power generation in 2019, increasing to 13 pct in 2020.

Non-hydropower renewables provided 10 pct of electricity generation in 2018. Of that total, woody biomass is expected to generate 113,000 MWh per day of electricity this year, increasing to 115,000 MWh per day in 2020. Waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 57,000 MWh per day of electricity in both 2019 and 2020.

In the electric power sector, waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 48,000 MWh per day in both 2019 and 2020. Generation from wood biomass is expected to reach 37,000 MWh per day this year, increasing to 39,000 MWh per day in 2020. Across other sectors, waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 76,000 MWh per day in both 2019 and 2020, with wood biomass used to generate 9,000 MWh per day in both years.

The electric power sector is expected to consume 0.269 quadrillion Btu (quad) of waste biomass this year, increasing to 0.27 quad next year. The sector is also expected to consume 0.221 quad of wood biomass in 2019, increasing to 0.232 quad in 2020. The industrial sector is expected to consume 0.169 quad of waste biomass in both 2019 and 2020, along with 1.439 quad of wood biomass in 2019 and 1.401 quad of wood biomass in 2020. The commercial sector is expected to consume 0.044 quad of waste biomass and 0.084 quad of wood biomass in both 2019 and 2020, while the residential sector is expected to consume 0.492 quad of wood biomass this year, falling to 0.488 quad next year.

Across all sectors, waste biomass consumption is expected to reach 0.482 quad in 2019 and remain at that level into 2020. The consumption of wood biomass is expected to reach 2.238 quad this year, falling to 2.205 quad next year. Biomass capacity in the electric power sector is expected to reach 7,071 MW by the end of this year, including 4,141 MW of waste biomass capacity and 2,930 MW of wood biomass capacity, falling to 7,052 MW by the end of 2020, including 4,080 MW of waste biomass capacity and 2,972 MW of wood biomass capacity. Biomass capacity across other sectors is expected to reach 6,657 MW by the end of 2019, including 866 MW of waste biomass capacity and 5,791 MW of wood biomass capacity. Capacity is expected to fall slightly to 6,649 MW by the end of 2020, including 866 MW of waste biomass capacity and 5,784 MW of wood biomass capacity. (Source: US EIA, June, 2019)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  


U.S. Soybean Oil for Biodiesel Production Rising (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2019-05-10
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the share of total soybean oil consumed as a biodiesel feedstock doubled from the current 15 pct to 30 pct as the total U.S. soybean oil supply grew from about 22.5 billion pounds to nearly 26.0 billion pounds between marketing year 2010-2011 and 2017-2018.

Soybean oil is the most commonly used vegetable oil for biodiesel production, and inputs reached 7.1 billion pounds during the latest soybean oil marketing year which ran from Oct. 1, 2017, to Sept. 30, 2018. Between marketing year 2010-2011 and marketing year 2017-2018, U.S. domestic biodiesel production grew from 700 million gpy to 1.8 billion gpy. The production increase was largely driven by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) biofuel blending mandate. (Source: US EIA, Xinhua, 8 May, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Soybean,  Soybean Oil,  BiodieselBiofuel,  


US Ethanol Exports Up 23 pct in 2018 (Ind. Report)
Ethanol
Date: 2019-04-26
In Washington, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting US ethanol exports jumped by 23 pct in 2018 reaching 112,000 bpd, up from a previous record high of 91,000 bpd in 2017.

According to the EIA, at 33,000 bpd Brazil was the top market for US ethanol, followed by Canada at approximately 23,000 bpd while India ranked third, receiving 10,000 bpd of US ethanol followed by South Korea and the Netherlands. (Source: US EIA, 25 April, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  EIA,  Biofuel,  


NC Solar Power Production Jumps 36 pct in 2018 (Ind. Report)
Duke Energy
Date: 2019-03-20
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) latest data, North Carolina's annual solar power production jumped 36 pct in 2018, firmly placing the Tar Heel State as the nation's 2nd larget solar power producer behind California. By way of comparison, California's annual solar production rose 15 pct and Arizona's and Nevada's outputs each grew 10 pct in 2018. (Source: US EIA, Duke Energy, Compelo, 18 Mar., 2019) Contact: Duke Energy North Carolina, Stephen De May, Pres., www.duke-energy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Solar,  Duke Energy North Carolina,  


EIA Finds Arkansas Slow to Curb CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-03-11
Carbon emissions from the energy sector have been on the decline nationwide, according to a report last week from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. According to the report, Arkansas invested in coal and produced more energy-related carbon emissions but a downward trend in emissions in the state has begun as those investments have shifted to renewable energy and natural gas along with the rest of the nation. Other states had little carbon emissions from electricity generation and had more from the burning of petroleum in manufacturing and from fossil fuels used to heat and cool buildings.

A pending legal settlement in federal court could trigger the closure of the state's two largest coal-fired plants, principally owned and operated by Entergy Arkansas. The utility has opened solar arrays and announced plans for more in recent years, and would be required under the proposed settlement to invest in hundreds more megawatts of renewable energy in coming years. That settlement is being challenged before the Arkansas Public Service Commission.

The EIA ranked Arkansas 17th in the country in the production per capita of carbon dioxide -- about 20 metric tons per person. At its highest point, Arkansas' carbon emissions from energy sources was at 69 million metric tons. That was 2014, a year before the state's use of coal-fired plants declined sharply. (Source: US EIA, Arkansas OnLine, Arkansas Democrat Gazette, 3 Mar., 2019)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov; Entergy Arkansas, www.entergy-arkansas.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  


EIA Expects US Biofuels Stability Through 2020 (Ind. Report Attached)
US EIA
Date: 2019-03-04
In its February 2019 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) the US EIA forecasts US fuel ethanol production will remain near current levels, decreasing slightly in 2019 to 1.04 million bpd and increasing to 1.05 million bpd in 2020.

The report also predicts net imports of biomass-based diesel will stay unchanged. Biomass-based diesel production -- excluding renewable diesel -- was about 120,000 bpd in 2018 and grows to 160,000 bpd in 2020. Total biomass-based diesel consumption will increase from an estimated 134,000 bpd in 2018 to 174,000 bpd in 2020.

Download the EIA report details HERE. (Source: US EIA, 1 Mar., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  Biofuel,  


U.S. Fuel Ethanol Production Falls in February (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-02-11
On February 7th the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported US fuel ethanol production averaged 967,000 bpd in the week to February 1, 2019. This is the lowest since mid-April 2018.

Download the US EIA Biofuels: Ethanol and Biodiesel Explained report HERE.

Access EIA Monthly Reviews HERE. (Source: US EIA, Feb, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration ,  Ethanol,  


Coal Part of the US Grid until 2050, says EIA (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-01-30
According to the US Energy Information Administration's just released 2019 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), coal is here to stay, at least for awhile yet despite recent warnings from top scientists about the urgency of climate action.

Based on projections about trends in energy—from the amount of fossil fuels produced and sold, to the growth of renewable energy, coal is still projected to provide 17 pct of the United States' electricity in 2050. The EIA projections note that natural gas -- a fossil fuel that is less carbon-emitting than coal but still a problem for climate change -- will increase its share of US electricity production from 34 pct to 39 pct.

Download the EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 projects growing oil, natural gas, renewables production report HERE. (Source: EIA, Jan., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  Coal,  


Calif. Q2 Renewable Diesel Supply Tops 100Mn Gal. (Ind. Report)
California ARB
Date: 2018-11-16
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting that in an effort to meet the state's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS), California has increased its net supply of renewable "green" diesel, reaching 100 million gallons during Q2, 2018 -- 10.1 pct of the total diesel supplied to California during the quarter.

Administered by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), LCFS aims to incrementally decrease the carbon intensity of gasoline and diesel fuel by at least 10 pct by 2020 relative to a 2010 baseline.

Under the state's LCFS, petroleum refiners, gasoline and diesel importers, and transportation fuel wholesales are required to either produce low carbon fuels or purchase credits to demonstrate compliance. But while under the RFS, both biodiesel and renewable diesel meet a 50 pct GHG reduction threshold (and are eligible to generate biomass-based diesel RINs), LCFS uses a measurement called carbon intensity (CI).

Renewable diesel generates a large number of credits relative to other fuels because it has some of the largest lifecycle GHG reduction compared to other fuels. The total volume of renewable diesel LCFS credits exceeded ethanol credits for the first time this year, reaching about 870,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalent during the second quarter. (Source: US EIA, Agri-Pulse, 14 Nov., 2018) Contact: CARB, Melanie Turner, Information Officer, (916) 322-2990, melanie.turner@arb.ca.gov, www.arb.ca.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Low Carbon Fuel Standard,  California Air Resources Board,  .Biofuel,  Renewable Fiesel ,  


US Meeting Obama's Climate Targets, Despite Trump (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-10-31
Yesterday, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data confirming that the U.S. power sector's CO2 emissions have dropped 28 pct since 2005, on target with the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan aimed at reducing carbon emissions by 32 pct t by 2030.

The EIA attributes this drop to a declining demand for energy, a move to renewable energy, an abundance of inexpensive natural gas and dropping coal consumption.

According to Union of Concerned Scientists President Kenneth Kimmell, "the trend is expected to continue despite President Donald Trump's efforts."

For your interest, the Obama Clean Power plan can be downloaded HERE. (Source: US EIA, Earther, 29 Oct., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Clean Power Plan,  Carbon Emissions,  


EIA Reports Densified Biomass Fuel Production Stats (Ind. Report)
U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2018-09-17
According to the US EIA's recently released Monthly Densified Biomass Fuel Report, U.S. manufacturers produced approximately 680,000 tons of densified biomass fuel in May, with sales reaching 610,000 tons.

The EIA data was collected from 85 densified biofuel manufacturers but does not include data from facilities with annual production capacities of less than 10,000 tons. The 85 manufacturers have a combined production capacity of 11.82 million metric tpy. Production included 132,432 tons of heating pellets and 549,031 tons of utility pellets. Domestic sales of densified biomass fuel reached 90,000 million tons in May, with an average price of $141.72 per ton. Exports in May reached 520,000 tons, at an average price of $144.48 per ton, according to the report. (Source: EIA, Biomass Mag, Other Media, Sept., 2018)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News U.S. Energy Information Administration,  


Six States Produce 72 pct of U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-08-17
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Iowa, Nebraska, Illinois, Minnesota, Indiana and South Dakota in that order produced 72 pct of the country's total fuel ethanol in 2016 -- 265 million barrels of the total U.S. production amount of 367 million barrels. The top six states are also among the top 10 U.S. producers of corn, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, according to the USDA.

Between 2006 and 2016, fuel ethanol production more than doubled after the Energy Policy Act of 2005 created the Renewable Fuel Standard. By 2010, most of the gasoline sold in the U.S. was blended with 10 pct ethanol.

Among the top six ethanol producing states, Iowa can produce more than 102 million bpy of fuel ethanol for about 19 pct of total U.S. ethanol production. Nebraska's production capacity of more than 50 million barrels of fuel ethanol is the second-highest, followed by Illinois at up to 40 million bpy. Minnesota has an ethanol production capacity of 28 million bpy followed by Indiana and South Dakota at 27 million bpy of ethanol annually. (Source: US EIA, Tax, Business & Politics, 15 Aug., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  EIA,  


EIA Reports Continued US Solar, Wind Growth (Ind. Report)

Date: 2018-08-10
According to the just released Energy Information Administration (EIA) Short Term Energy Outlook, (STEO), although solar generates less electricity than wind power, it is growing faster,

The EIA projects solar generation will go from 211,000 MWh per day in 2017 to 260,000 MWh/d in 2018, a 23 pct increase, and to 290,000 MWh/d in 2019, another 12 pct increase. The latest STEO also cuts the amount of utility-scale solar capacity that the EIA expects to come online in 2019 to 6.3 GW -- a 45 pct drop from the 11.4 GW forecast in last month's STEO.

The EIA reports that wind generation averaged 697,000 MWh per day in 2017 and forecasts that it will rise by 7 pct to 746,000 MWh/d in 2018 and by another 5 pct in 2019 to 782,000 MWh/d. (Source: US EIA, Utility Dive , Various Media, 8 Aug., 2018)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  EIA,  Wind,  Solar,  


U.S. 2017 Coal Consumption Hits Historic Low (Ind. Report)
Coal, US EIA
Date: 2018-08-06
In its Friday daily brief, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) noted that the U.S. power sector consumed 661 million short tons of coal last in 2017, the lowest level since 1983 and the fourth straight year for a decline, the brief stated. The report noted "Electric power sector coal consumption in 2017 was 36 pct lower than in 2008, when U.S. coal production reached its highest level." the report read.

Coal accounts for about 30 pct of total energy used globally and about 40 pct of total electric power generation, the report said. (Source: US EIA, Inforsurhoy, 5 Aug., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  US EIA,  


US Banned MTBE Being Exported (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-07-16
The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that in 2017, the US experted an average of 38,000 bpd of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to primarily Mexico, Chile, and Venezuela.

MTBE was once commonly used as a motor gasoline additive in the United States but was phased out in the late 2000s as a result of water contamination concerns. Since then, fuel ethanol has replaced MTBE as a gasoline additive. In contrast to MTBE, the use of fuel ethanol has been supported by tax subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit and by the Renewable Fuel Standard, which mandates the use of biofuels in the US transportation fuel supply. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, PR, 13 July, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  MTBE,  


600,000 Tons of Densified Biomass Fuel Sold in March (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2018-06-29
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released Monthly (June) Densified Biomass Fuel Report, U.S. manufacturers produced approximately 650,000 tons of densified biomass fuel from 1.27 million tons of raw biomass feedstock in March, with sales reaching 600,000 tons during the month. Production included 147,226 tons of heating pellets and 498,864 tons of utility pellets.

For the report, the EIA collected data from 86 operating manufacturers of densified biomass fuel. The report does not include data from facilities with annual capacities of less than 10,000 tons, which report data annually rather than monthly. The 86 manufacturers that submitted data in February have a combined annual production capacity of 11.79 million tpy.

Domestic sales reached 122,727 tons and averaged $149.22 per ton. Exports in March reached 381,319 tons an averaged $174.32 per ton. Inventories of premium/standard wood pellets reached 225,990 tons in March, up from 217,859 tons in February. Inventories of utility pellets reached 345,615 tons in March, up from 255,172 tons in February. (Source: US EIA, June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Biomass,  


EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
EIA,Energy Efficiency
Date: 2018-06-29
According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Energy Efficiewncy ,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-06-22
According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, 20 June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


Renewables Subsidies Drop as Renewable Energy Grows (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-05-25
According to the EIA' Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2016 Report, federal subsidies for renewable energy -- including renewable generation of electricity -- dropped to $6.7 billion in FY 2016, a 56 pct decline from FY 2013. renewable subsidies in FY 2010 and FY 2013 were approximately $15 billion, more than double FY 2016 levels, as support from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) lessened. Despite the decline, renewable energy continued to receive a large share of total federal energy subsidies, accounting for 46 pct of the FY 2016 total.

In the report, the EIA defines subsidies as funds a government expends, or revenue it foregoes, to encourage or support certain activities. EIA's report includes the following financial activities: direct expenditures, tax expenditures, research and development (R&D), and credit subsidies to recipients of federal loan guarantees.

Tax expenditures provided 80 pct of FY 2016 renewables subsidies. Renewable electricity-related tax expenditures provided nearly 70 pct of FY 2013 renewable electricity subsidies, falling to about half that share in FY 2016. Most of this amount went to commercial wind and solar installations from the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC). The PTC provided an inflation-adjusted tax credit worth 2.4 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2016, while the ITC provided a deduction equal to 30 pct of facility installation costs. EIA estimates the PTC and ITC credits taken in FY 2016 at $1.4 billion and $1.2 billion, respectively.

Nearly all renewable energy direct expenditures for FY 2010, FY 2013, and FY 2016 resulted from provisions of ARRA -- a broad-based set of programs designed to expedite economic recovery, including energy infrastructure. Under ARRA, DOE has invested more than $31 billion since 2009. Much of this funding supported renewable energy projects, but by FY 2016, most provisions of ARRA energy programs had expired. Direct expenditures for renewable energy decreased 90 pct, from nearly $9 billion in FY 2013 to about $1 billion in FY 2016.

Although R&D expenditures are small compared with tax expenditures and direct expenditures, R&D provides the foundation for many energy technology advancements and cost reductions. Federal R&D expenditures for renewable energy were estimated at about $850 million for FY 2010 and FY 2013, but they dropped to about $450 million in FY 2016. Another $296 million in federal loan guarantees was distributed to recipients in FY 2010, but in both FY 2013 and FY 2016, federal loan guarantee subsidies were zero. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, May, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  


Renewable Energy Subsidies Declined in 2016, says EIA (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2018-04-30
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting that federal subsidies for renewable energy -- including biofuels for transportation use and renewable generation of electricity -- fell to $6.7 billion in fiscal year (FY) 2016, a 56 pct fall from FY 2013. Renewable subsidies in FY 2016 were about half the amount for FY 2010 and FY 2013, about $15 billion, as support from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) lessened.

EIA defines subsidies as funds that a government expends or revenue it foregoes to encourage or support certain activities. EIA's report includes direct expenditures, tax expenditures, research and development (R&D), and credit subsidies to recipients of federal loan guarantees.

Tax expenditures provided 80 percent of FY 2016 subsidies for renewables. More than half (51 percent) of the $5.6 billion in renewable tax expenditures went to biofuels which accounted for 77 pct of tax expenditures in FY 2010, but only 31 pct in FY 2013. (Source: US EIA, Grand Island Independent, 28 April, 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Renewable Energy,  Renewable Energy Incentive,  


Rise Expected in 2018 Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-02-12
In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions will increase by 1.8 pct this year then remain stable in 2019. The agency also noted that US energy-related CO2 emissions fell by 14 pct from 2005 to 2017 due in part to a 39 pct decline in coal-related emissions and an 11 pct fall in petroleum related emissions. Natural gas-related emissions, however, increased by 24 pct over that period.

EIA estimates that global energy-related CO2 emissions rose 21 pct between 2005 and 2017 at an annual growth rate of 1.6 percent. The rate is projected to slow to 1 pct in 2018 and remain essentially flat in 2019. (Source: US EIA, Feb., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Carbon Emissions,  


Golden State GHG Emissions Falling, says EIA (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-02-07

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), from 1990 to 2015, California's electric power sector GHG emissions fell by 24 pct, commercial and residential sector emissions declined approximately 14 pct, and industrial emissions sank by 13 pct. Transportation-related emissions decreased from 2007 through 2013 but rose in 2014 and 2015. California's GHG emissions from agriculture and other uses are smaller in magnitude but have more than tripled since 1990.

Overall, the state's total GHG emissions were 2 pct above 1990 levels as of 2015. Approximately 86 pct of the state's GHG emissions were related to energy consumption, according to the EIA. (Source: US EIA, Feb., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News California Carbon Emissions,  US EIA,  


Ethanol Stocks Reach New All-Time High (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-01-26
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting domestic supplies of ethano; hit 23.8 barrels, up 1.057 million on the week and 2.072 million on the year. Production averaged 1.061 million bpd, up 1,000 bpd from the previous week and 11,000 more than last year.

Stocks usually build in winter as fuel blending requirements shift and weekly production has held at record or near record levels over the last several months exceeding USDA projections. (Source: US EIA, Brownfield, 24 Jan., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  


Transportation Sector Leads in US Carbon Emissions (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-01-12
According to the latest U.S. Energy Information Agency (EIA) statistics, transport is now the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. The data shows that, up to 2017, 1.9 billion tonnes of carbon emissions were emitted from the transport sector, while 1.8 billion tonnes came from electric power generation. In total, transport now accounts for 25 pct of all emissions.

The increase can be partly attributed to lower fuel prices in the US, but also to a decline in the use of fossil fuels to generate electricity. Renewable energy also plays a much stronger role in the country's energy mix. The statistics also show that almost half of all new large-scale energy capacity in 2017 came from renewables. (Source: US EIA, Others, 10 Jan., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  Transportation Emissions,  


And the Winner Is! ... EIA Lists Top 10 Biofuel Producing Countries (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2018-01-10
Current world biofuel production is primarily ethanol from corn or sugarcane and biodiesel from soybeans.

Measured in thousands of barrels per day (bpd), the winner is the USA at 940,000 bpd, followed by Brazil at 449,000; Germany 68,000; China 59,000; Argentina 52,000; France 50,000; Indonesia 38,000; Canada 36,000; Thailand 24,000, and Columbia at 17,000 bpd. (Source: US EIA, Jan, 2018)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Biofuel,  


Ohio Power Sector Leads in Cutting Carbon Output (Ind. Report)
FirstEnergy Corp,US EIA
Date: 2018-01-08
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) website is reporting that Ohio's electric power sector, the state's main source of carbon pollution, cut its carbon pollution from a peak of 132.6 million metric tons in 2005 to 82.6 million metric tons in 2015, while its western neighbor, Indiana trimmed its annual carbon output by 34.9 million metric tons over the same 10-year period.

Akron-based FirstEnergy Corp. played a major role in the reduction. While it has continued to operate its two nuclear plants that don't emit any meaningful carbon, the company closed several coal-fired power plants in Ohio and boosted its use of renewable energy.

The decline is attributed to the advent of cheap shale gas which has caused new natural gas power plants to come online in Ohio and nearby states that sell their power into Ohio on a shared electric power grid. That's all while companies like FirstEnergy have shuttered coal plants that can't compete economically with natural gas-fired plants.

In 2005, approximately 88 pct of Ohio's electric power was coal generated. Today it is closer to 50 pct, according the the EIA. Over 60 generation units at about 20 coal-fired plants have been closed down in Ohio since 2010. (Source: US EIA, Crain's Cleveland Business, Others, Jan., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov; First Energy, www.firstenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Carbon Emissions,  FirstEnergy Corp,  


EIA Releases 2017-18 Woody Biomass Heating Forecasts (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-12-15
In its December, 2017 edition of its Short-Term Energy Outlook, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects wood biomass will be used to generate 117,000 MWh per day of electricity this year, falling to 114,000 MWh per day in 2018. Generation from waste biomass is expected to increase, from 57,000 MWh per day this year, to 60,000 MWh per day in 2018.

The electric power sector is projected to consume 0.274 quadrillion Btu (quad) of waste biomass, this year, the industrial sector is expected to consume 0.18 quad of waste biomass and the residential sector -- approximately 2.3 milliuon homes -- is expected to consume 0.385 quad of wood biomass in 2017, increasing to 0.413 quad in 2018. (Source: EIA, Dec., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  US EIA,  


U.S. Solar Output Jumps 47 pct in 2017, say EIA (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Agency
Date: 2017-12-13
According to the US EIA's latest monthly report, US PV output grew grew 47 pct during the first three quarters of 2017, over the same period in 2016. The report notes that every state increased its output from solar energy production with California leading the pack with its 24,877,000 MWh,. Of those top 10 states, Georgia had the highest year-to-year percentage growth, increasing 186 pct from 2016 to 2017, followed by Texas with 165 pct and Utah with 123 pct.

In market segment terms, utility scale growth was twice as high, increasing 58 pct from 2016 to 2017 while the residential sector increased by 32 pct year-over-year. (Source: DOE EIA Electric Power Monthly, Dec. 2017) Contact: EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Solar,  Energy Information Agency,  


EIA Reports US Ethanol Stocks at 6-Month High (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-12-08
The U.S. Energy Information Administration is reporting the U.S. domestic stock level of ethanol increased alongside higher production, while blending demand declined during the week-ended Dec. 1, 2017. Ethanol supply increased 500,000 barrels (bbl) to a 22.5 million bbl six-month high during the week -- up 4.0 million bbl against the comparable week a year ago.

The EIA also reports that refiner and blender net ethanol inputs dropped 37,000 bpd -- 4.0 pct -- to 885,000 bpd, while up 13,000 bpd against the prior year. During the four weeks ended Dec. 1, blending demand for ethanol averaged 911,000 bpd, up 11,000 bpd against the same four weeks in 2016. (Source: US EIA, Various Media, DTN/Progressive Farmer, 6 Dec., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  US EIA,  


Transportation Surpasses Power Generation Emissions (Ind. Report)
EIA
Date: 2017-12-08
According to the US Energy Information Agency (EIA), emissions from the transportation sector -- automobiles, trucks, airplanes, and ships -- now surpasses emissions from the electric power sector.

The increase in transportation emissions is partially due to the steady increase in the number of vehicles on the road and the frequency and length of trips taken.

On the other hand, falling power sector emissions can be partially attributed to the significant growth in the use of natural gas and renewable energy and the decline of "Old King Coal" and other fossil fuels. (Source: US EIA, CleanTechnica, Other Media, Dec., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#electricity

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  


Energy Emissions Expected to Fall in 2017, Increase in 2018, says EIA (Ind. Report)
U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2017-10-18
The U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook forecasts is predicting a drop in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for 2017 but a 2.2 pct bump in 2018. By the end of 2017, annual heating degree days are predicted to be higher than in 2016 and cooling degree days are expected to be lower. Heating and cooling degree days generally show a return to normal temperatures based on the average of the previous 10 years. Because of this, EIA predicts that in 2018, both heating and cooling demand will increase, by 7.5 pct and 2.4 pct, respectively.

In 2018, energy-related CO2 emissions are projected to increase for all three fossil fuels, petroleum, natural gas and coal, totaling 111 million metric tons of additional CO2 emissions.

The EIA expects electric power generation from coal- and natural gas-fired sources to rise by a combined 97 billion kWh. The agency also predicts CO2 emissions from coal to increase by 28 million metric tons and that CO2 emissions from natural gas will increase by 29 million metric tons, which combined makes up 52 pct of the forecasted increased in energy-related emissions for 2018. (Source; EIA, Other, Oct., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News U.S. Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  Climate Change,  


28 pct Increase in World Energy, Increased Renewables Predicted by 2040 (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-09-20
In it International Energy Outlook 2017 report, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that world energy consumption will jump by 28 pct between 2015 and 2040. The report also predicts that renewable energy will be the worlds fastest-growing energy source while the demand for coal will remain flat.

Specifically, the EIA projects that most of the growth in renewables will stem from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and that non-OECD Asia -- China and India -- will drive over 60 pct of the world's total increase in energy consumption during the projected period. The EIA predicts that "renewables are expected to be the fastest-growing energy source" across the projected period, with annual consumption increasing on average by 2.3 pct between 2015 and 2040. Coal's share of global energy consumption is expected to fall from 27 pct in 2015 to 22 pct in 2040. (Source: US EIA, 18 Sept., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/outlooks/ieo

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  Coal,  US EIA,  


EIA 2017, 2018 Ethanol Production Forecasts Increased (Ind. Report)
U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2017-09-15
According to the September edition of the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), the U.S. is now expected to produce 1.03 million bpd of ethanol this year, increasing to 1.04 million bpd in 2018. 2016 production averaged 1 million bpd. In the August STEO, the EIA predicted 2017 ethanol production would average 1.02 million bpd, falling to 1.01 million bpd in 2018.

During Q1 of 2018, ethanol production is expected to be maintained at 1.03 million bpd, increasing to 1.04 million bpd during Q2 and 3 and increasing to 1.05 million bpd during Q4 of 2018.

The EIA's most recent monthly import data shows the U.S. imported 252,000 barrels of ethanol from Brazil in June and exported 2.21 million barrels of ethanol, primarily to Canada, Brazil, and India. (Source: US EIA, Sept., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  


US Biodiesel Production Rising, says US EIA (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Administration
Date: 2017-08-23
According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), US biodiesel production for the month of May, 2017, was 136 million gallons in May 2017, 9 million gallons higher than April 2017, and higher than the years 2016 and 2016. Biodiesel production came from 97 biodiesel plants with a combined capacity of 2.3 billion gpy. The Midwest region remained the heart of the US biodiesel industry, accounting for 69 pct of the US' total production.

1,054 million pounds of feedstocks were used to produce biodiesel in May 2017. Soybean oil remained the most widely used biodiesel fuel stock, with 546 million pounds consumed. Texas remains the biggest biodiesel producing state in the US. Nine biodiesel producers have facilities in the Lone-Star state, with a combined total capacity of 474 million gpy, according to EIA figures. (Source: US EIA, Aug., 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  USEIA,  Biodiesel,  


US EIA Reports April Densified Biomass Fuel Production (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-07-17
According to recently released U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data on the U.S. densified biomass fuel industry, there was nearly 12.71 million tons of capacity in place in April, 2017, including more than 12.09 million tons listed as currently operational or temporarily not in operation. An additional 163,500 tons of capacity is listed as planned or under construction.

The EIA data included 89 operating manufacturers of densified biomass fuel that purchased 810,000 tons of raw biomass feedstock, produced 480,000 tons of densified fuel, and sold 460,000 tons of densified biofuel fuel. Heating pellets accounted for 85,170 tons of production, while utility pellets accounted for 397,456 tons.

Domestically, respondents reported that sales of densified biomass fuel reached 69,290 tons in April, averaging $146.61 per ton. An additional 387,542 tons were exported, averaging $127.98 per ton. (Source: US EIA, 10 July, 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  US EIA,  densified biomass,  


US Ethanol Production Capacity Increasing, say EIA (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-06-30
According to the US EIA's recently released U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Report, U.S. fuel ethanol production capacity reached 15.5 billion gpy at the beginning of 2017. Total capacity of operable ethanol plants increased by approximately 4 pct -- more than 600 million gpy between January 2016 and January 2017.

The report also notes that most of the country's 198 ethanol plants and fuel ethanol production capacity are located in the Midwest region. Total nameplate capacity in the Midwest was 14.0 billion gpy at the beginning of 2017, an increase of about 4 pct -- more than 530 million gpy between January 2016 and January 2017. Actual U.S. production of fuel ethanol reached a total of 14.8 billion gallons in 2016. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, 28 June, 2017) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/petroleum/ethanolcapacity/index.php

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Fuel Etanol,  US EIA,  


US Ethanol Prod. Down to 15.38Bn GPY Rate (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Agency
Date: 2017-06-26
In Washington, US Energy Information Agency figure as analyzed by the Renewable Fuels Association, show that US ethanol production averaged 990,000 bpd -- down 12,000 bpd from the previous week and the lowest in seven weeks. The four-week average for ethanol production fell to 1.003 million bpd for an annualized rate of 15.38 billion gallons. (Source: US EIA, Biofuels Digest, 25 June, 2017)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol news,  Renewable Fuels Association news,  


U.S. Ethanol Prod. Falls to 15.54Bn Gal. Annual Rate (Ind. Report)
Ethanol,Renewable Fuels Association,
Date: 2017-06-14
In Washington, according to US Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, as analyzed by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), US ethanol production averaged 999,000 bpd in April, down 21,000 bpd from the week before and a five-week low. The four-week average for ethanol production decreased to 1.014 million bpd for an annualized rate of 15.54 billion gallons.

Ethanol stocks were 22.0 million barrels, down 3.5 pct from last week to the lowest level since late January. Average weekly gasoline demand plunged 5.1 pct from the previous week's record volume. Gasoline demand tallied at 391.3 million gpd for an annualized rate of 142.8 billion gallons. Refiner/blender input of ethanol fell 4.3 pct to 909,000 bpd. (Source: US EIA, Renewable Fuels Association, June, 2017) Contact: US EIA, www,eia.gov; RFA, Geoff Cooper, Snr. VP, (202) 289-3835, www.ethanolrfa.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Ethanol,  US Ethanol,  Renewable Fuels Association,  ,  


Energy Storage Supplies 4 pct of U.S. Capacity (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-05-26
According to U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, energy storage and renewable fuels other than hydro, wind and solar together provide 4 pct of electric capacity in the U.S.

As of Dec, 31, 2016, 195 utility-scale geothermal units totaling 3.7 GW were in operation, primarily in Northern California. California also leads the nation in hydroelectric pumped storage.

Virginia's Bath County is the site of a 3 GW hydreoelectric pumped storage plant, which is the largest in the nation. All geothermal capacity is located in the western United States, while nearly all currently operating batteries and flywheels were added after 2010. Battery energy storage now totals 540 MW, with half located in California, Illinois and West Virginia. Nearly all of the nation's 44 MW of flywheel storage are located in New York and Pennsylvania. (Source: US EIA, Power Engineering, Others, May, 2017) Contact: US EIA, www,eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Energy Storage,  


EIA Monthly Biodiesel Production Report -- Report Attached (Ind. Report)
EIA
Date: 2017-05-15
U.S. production of biodiesel was 94 million gallons in February 2017 -- 1 million gallons higher than production in January 2017. Biodiesel production from the Midwest region accounted for 71 pct of the United States total. Production came from 95 biodiesel plants with capacity of 2.3 billion gpy.

February 2017 totals included 37 million gallons sold as B-100 and an additional 46 million gallons of B-100 sold in biodiesel blends with petroleum diesel fuel. There were a total of 736 million pounds of feedstocks used to produce biodiesel in February 2017. Soybean oil remained the largest biodiesel feedstock during February 2017 with 369 million pounds consumed.

The Monthly Biodiesel Production Report provides data on operations of the U.S. biodiesel industry as part of EIA's response to section 1508 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

Download the full EIA Monthly Biodiesel Production Report HERE. (Source: US EIA, May, 2017) Contact: US EIA, www,eia.gov

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Wind Generates 8 pct of U.S. Power in 2016 (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2017-05-05
According to US Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics wind energy accounted for 8 pct of the operating electric generating capacity in the U.S. during 2016 -- more than a third of all the nearly 200 GW of new utility-scale electricity generating capacity since 2007.

The EIA attributes the figures to " combination of improved wind turbine technology, increased access to transmission capacity, state-level renewable portfolio standards, and federal production tax credits and grants." Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma, California, and Kansas account for half or more of all new capacity, according to the EIA. (Source: US EIA, May, 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Wind,  


US Biodiesel Prod. Dropped 51Mn Gal. in Jan. 2017 (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Administration
Date: 2017-04-10
The US Energy Information Administration's (EIA) recently published monthly biodiesel production report for January, 2017, found that U.S. biodiesel was 51 million gallons lower than in December 2016. US biodiesel production was 93 million gallons in January 2017, while production in December was 144 million gallons. Month on month, January 2017's production was lower than 2016, which hit 105 million gallons.

January 2015 biodiesel production reached only 73 million gallons, making it the lowest producing month since the start of 2015. December and October 2016 were the joint highest producing months with both peaking at 144 million gallons. (Source: US EIA, Various Media, April, 2017)

More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  Biodiesel ,  


U.S. Biomass-Based Diesel Imports Hit New Heights (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-03-24
According to the US Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook., U.S. imports of biomass-based diesel, including biodiesel and renewable diesel, increased by 65 pct in 2016 to hit a record 916 million gallons. The growth is being credited to increasing Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) targets and the biodiesel blender's tax credit. The biodiesel blender's tax credit has expired several times in the past, most recently expiring at the end of 2014, only to be retroactively reinstated.

U.S. imports of biodiesel, which totaled 353 million gallons in 2015, nearly doubled in 2016 to 693 million gallons. Sixty-four pct of the imports originated from Argentina , followed by Indonesia at 15 pct and Canada with 14 pct.

The report projects biomass-based diesel imports to remain largely flat in 2017 because of the expiration of the blender's tax credit, before increasing in 2018 as a result of increasing RFS targets. Net imports of biomass-based diesel are expected to remain at roughly 800 million gallons in 2017, accounting for approximately one-third of total US biomass-based diesel consumption in 2007, before increasing to around 900 million gallons in 2018. (Source: US EIA, Mar., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Diesel,  EIA,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  US EPA,  


Wind Tops Hydro in U.S. Renewable Energy Capacity (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-03-10
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Monthly for November 2017 Report, almost 9,000 MW of wind capacity was brought online in 2016, surpassing installed hydroelectric capacity for the first time. The EIA report noted that installed wind capacity ended 2016 at 81,312 MW compared with 79,985 MW of hydro.

Despite the shift, the actual power generation from the nation's dams is still expected to be greater than wind output in 3017, due in part to above-normal precipitation on the West Coast.

E There are more than 52,000 individual wind turbines in 41 states and two territories, and Texas leads the nation for installed capacity. The state has three times more wind generating capacity than any other, with more than 20,000 MW. Another 5,400 MW are under construction and 1,300 MW in advanced development, according to the EIA. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Mar., 2017)Contact: U.S. Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Hydropower,  Renewable Energy,  Wind,  


US Ethanol Production Breaks Record Again (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-01-25
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. ethanol production reached a new record the week ending Jan. 13, averaged 1.054 bpd. The previous record, set the week ending Jan. 6, was 1.049 million bpd day. That record replaced the one set the week ending Dec. 30, when production reached 1.043 million bpd.

The U.S. ethanol industry has surpassed the 1 million bpd mark only 26 times, all since November 2015. (Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Hoosier Ag Today, WKKG, Others, 24 Jan., 2017) Contact: U.S. Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol ,  US EIA,  


EIA Foresees Woody Biomass Energy Growth in 2018 (Ind. Report)
Biomass,U.S. EIA
Date: 2017-01-16
In the January edition of its Short-Term Energy Outlook, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is predicting that electric power generation from wood biomass will be at 110,000 MWh per day in 2017, rising to 111,000 MWh per day in 2018. Generation from waste biomass is expected to be at 58,000 MWh per day in both 2017 and 2018.

Specifically, the electric power sector is expected to consume 0.216 quadrillion Btu (quad) of wood biomass this year, increasing to 0.222 quad in 3018. The sector is also expected to consume 0.272 quad of waste biomass in 2017, increasing to 0.273 quad in 2018. The industrial sector is expected to consume 1.23 quad of wood biomass in 2017, maintaining that level through 2018. The sector is also expected to consume 0.195 quad of waste biomass in both 2017 and 2018. The commercial sector is expected to consume 0.078 quad of wood biomass in 2017 and 2018. The sector is also forecast to consume 0.049 quad of waste biomass this year, maintaining that level of consumption into 2018.

The residential sector is expected to consume 0.426 quad of wood biomass in both 2017 and 2018. The EIA also estimates 2.48 million U.S. households will use wood as a primary heating fuel during the 2016-2017 winter, up 1.3 pct when compared to last winter. (Source: US EIA, Jan., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  Energy Information Administration,  


U.S. Net Energy Exporter by 2030s, suggests EIA (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-01-11
According to the US Energy Information Administration's (EIA) just released energy outlook for 2017, renewables generated energy will surpass coal fired power in the U.S. by 2020.

With coal's continued decline, natural gas is becoming the dominant source of energy followed by renewable energy generation. The EIA also foresees the continued growth in US energy production far outstripping a sluggish growth in demand. This pattern will transform the country into a net exporter of energy by the 2030s. (Source: US EIA, ARS Technica, 6 Jan., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  Coal,  US EIA,  


U.S. 2016 Carbon Emissions Fall to 25 year Low (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2017-01-06
According to new report by the U.S. DOE, U.S. carbon emissions in 2016 fell to a 25-year low. For the first six months of 2016 emissions were at 2,530 million metric tons, the lowest for the first half of a year since 1991. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) attributed the drop to mild weather and the shift from coal to cleaner-burning natural gas and renewable energy in U.S. power production. Overall, the winter of 2016 had the fewest heating degree days , when temperatures drop below 65 degrees F. since 1949. (Source: US EIA, Investing.com, 3 Jan., 2017)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  US EIA,  US DOE,  

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