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DTU Increases Biomass Biofuel Production (New Prod. & Tech)
DTU
Date: 2020-07-10
In a recent Technical University of Denmark (DTU) synfuel research project, researchers succeeded in combining two known technologies -- thermal gasification of biomass and electrolysis that is utilized for the production of biofuel -- can produce more biofuel from the same amount of biomass, according to a DTU release.

An electrolysis cell (solid oxide electrolysis cell, SOEC) developed jointly by DTU and Haldor Topsoe is used for electrolysis. In an SOEC, electricity from e.g. wind turbines is used to split water into its two constituents -- oxygen and hydrogen. The oxygen can be utilized in a thermal gasification process, where a biomass such as straw is broken down at high temperature. This creates synthesis gas -- a mixture of mainly hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The gas mixture can be used in the production of methanol when the hydrogen produced by the electrolysis is added. Methanol can be used directly as fuel or catalytically upgraded to more familiar fuels used in ships and aircraft.

"In Synfuel, we have improved the two in technologies in several areas, and we've demonstrated that we can achieve higher utilization rates by combining the two technologies than when they run separately. We derive far more biofuel from the biomass resources and at the same time we can use surplus power from e.g. wind turbines to make fuel for heavy transport," says Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, Synfuel project manager and Head of Section at DTU Energy.

The Synfuel project was supported by Innovation Fund Denmark. Haldor Topsoe, Orsted, Energinet.dk, MIT, Aalborg University, Chalmers University of Technology, INSA Lyon, TU Berlin, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and others participated in the project. (Source: DTU, 10 July, 2020) Contact: DTU Professor Peter Vang Hendriksen, +45 46 77 57 25, pvhe@dtu.dk, www.dtu.dk

More Low-Carbon Energy News DTU,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  Syngas,  


Repsol Planning Green Hydrogen SynFuels Plant (Int'l.)
Repsol
Date: 2020-06-15
Madrid-based Spanish integrated energy company Repsol SA reports it is collaborating with Saudi Aramco and will construct a 10-MW, green-hydrogen plant to produce synthetic fuels at its Port of Bilbao refinery. The €60 million ($67.5 million) project is part of a larger €80-million decarbonization project that will include a carbon-capture project and a fuel-from- municipal waste plant. The project is expected to be completed and operational in 2024.

Repsol's TechLab and Aramco have signed a memorandum of understanding to carry out the technological development of the project, which will combine green hydrogen generated from renewable sources with CO2 emissions from the refinery as raw materials. This will produce 3.6 million lpy of transportation fuel. (Source: Repsol SA, PR, S&P Global, 15 June, 2020) Contact: Repsol SA, Josu Jon Imaz, CEO, (+34) 91 753 8100, 91 753 8000, sacportal@repsol.com, www.repsol.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Repsol,  Synfuel,  Alternative Fuel,  Green Hydrogen,  Hydrogen,  Carbon Capture,  


Sino-Dutch Researchers Tout Cleaner Coal-to-Liquid Fuel (Int'l)
Eindhoven University of Technology
Date: 2018-11-28
In Beijing, the National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands are touting a breakthrough which they claim cuts and captures the CO2 emissions and improves the financial viability of coal to liquid (CTL) fuels.

The key is a new type of catalyst to be used in the Fischer-Tropsch reactor, the part of the process in which carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted into liquid hydrocarbons. In the CTL process coal is first converted to syngas -- a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen -- and then to a liquid. Some of the CO is taken out of the syngas by converting it to CO2, in a process called water-gas shift. The researchers discovered that the CO2 release is triggered because the iron-based catalysts in the reactor are not pure. Accordingly, the researchers developed an alternative catalyst using a type of iron carbide -- epsilon iron carbide -- which they say generates almost no CO2 at all. Any that is been produced can be easily removed at the water-gas shift stage.

The researchers expect the new catalyst will play a role in the future energy and basic chemicals industry. The feedstock will not be coal or gas, but waste and biomass. Syngas will continue to be the central element, as it is also the intermediate product in the conversion of these new feedstocks. (Source: National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy Cosmos, Oct., 2018)Contact: National Institute of Clean-and-Low-Carbon Energy, www.nicenergy.com/en; Eindhoven University of Technology, www.tue.nl/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News Alternative Fuel,  Synfuel,  

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