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Blue Hydrogen Found Worse for Climate than Fossil Fuels (Alt. Fuel)
Cornell
Date: 2021-08-16
Blue hydrogen, an energy source that involves obtaining hydrogen by using methane in natural gas, is usually described as a "low-carbon option for generating electricity, powering vehicles, and even heating buildings." But researchers from Stanford and Cornell universities found that blue hydrogen's carbon footprint is more than 20 pct greater than that generated by natural gas or coal and around 60 pct higher than burning diesel oil for heat and causes more harm to the climate than conventional fossil fuels

"Blue hydrogen provides no benefit. We suggest that blue hydrogen is best viewed as a distraction, something than may delay needed action to truly decarbonize the global energy economy, in the same way that has been described for shale gas as a bridge fuel and for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in general."

"In the past, no effort was made to capture the carbon dioxide byproduct of gray hydrogen, and the greenhouse gas emissions have been huge. Now the industry promotes blue hydrogen as a solution, an approach that still uses the methane from natural gas, while attempting to capture the byproduct CO2", study co-author Robert Howarth noted.

The vast majority of hydrogen (96 pct) is generated from fossil fuels, particularly from steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas, but also from coal gasification. In SMR, heat, and pressure are used to convert the methane in natural gas to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The hydrogen so produced is often referred to as "gray hydrogen" -- this type is responsible for 6 pct of all-natural gas consumption globally, the study notes.

Blue hydrogen is produced using the same reforming process that is used to create other types of hydrogen, but the CO2 that would ordinarily be released is captured and stored underground. As of 2021, there were only two blue-hydrogen facilities globally that used natural gas to produce hydrogen on a commercial scale, according to the study.

The full study is available HERE. (Source: Cornell University, PR, Aug., 2021) Contact: Cornell University, Robert Howarth, Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, (607) 255-6175, howarth@cornell.edu, www.eeb.cornell.edu/howarth

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Hydrogen,  Alternative Fuel. Climate Change,  


Solar EV Startup Touts $48Mn Funding Round (Ind. Report)
Lightyear
Date: 2021-03-17
In the Netherlands, solar electric vehicle startup Lightyear is reporting it largest funding roud to date -- $48 million led by Zero Point Holding B.V. -- which will be used to support their growth and path towards the first customer deliveries of the company's first electric vehicle called the Lightyear One by the end of this year.

Lightyear One uses 5 square meters of integrated solar cells in the vehicles roof and hood and an efficient powertrain, high yield solar roof and an optimized thermal management system. for electric vehicles. The cells function independently, meaning they produce a higher yield compared to conventional solar cells, according to Lightyear. The Lightyear One can drive up to 55km (34 miles) per day on solar power alone.

Lightyear teamed up with Silicon Valley-based company SunPower Corporation, integrating the company's Maxeon solar cells onto conductive back sheet technology developed by Dutch life sciences company DSM. SunPower is an energy company that designs and manufactures crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells and solar panels based technology invented at Stanford University in California. (Source: Lightyear, PR, Mar., 2021) Contact: Lightyear, Lex Hoefsloot, CEO, www.lightyear.one

More Low-Carbon Energy News Solar,  


TOTAL, Partners Tout Next-Gen. CO2 Storage Simulator (Int'l. Report)
TOTAL,Stanford University,LLNL
Date: 2020-11-10
Paris-headquartered energy major Total , US DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University have released GEOSX, an open source simulator for large-scale geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage.

GEOSX was developed using advanced new technologies in high-performance computing and applied mathematics and aims to improve the management and safety of geological CO2 repositories. Its computing performance is unmatched to date. The open-source nature of GEOSX aims to ensure a high level of transparency, sharing and community support to pave the way for the large-scale development of Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) technologies.

GEOSX is the first major outcome of the five-year FC-MAELSTROM research project launched in 2018 by Total, Stanford University School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, and LLNL. It draws on each partner's 20-plus years of expertise in simulation and high-performance computing research. GEOSX, www.geosx.org. (Source: TOTAL, PR, 10 Nov., 2020) Total Marie-Noelle Semeria, Total's Chief Technology Officer Media Relations: +33 1 47 44 46 99 l presse@total.com l @TotalPress Investor Relations: +44 (0)207 719 7962 l ir@total.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Stanford University news,  TOTAL news,  LLNL news,  CCS news,  Carbon Emissions news,  Carbon Storage news,  


Global Methane Emissions Hit Record High (Ind. Report)
Methane Emissions,Stanford University
Date: 2020-07-17
A report from Stanford University has found global methane emissions have risen to the highest levels on record. Between 2000 and 2017, levels of the potent greenhouse gas barreled up toward pathways that climate models suggest will lead to 3 -- 4 degrees Celsius of warming before the end of this century.

In 2017, the last year when complete global methane data are available, the Earth's atmosphere absorbed nearly 600 million tons of methane which is 28 times more powerful than CO2 at trapping heat over a 100-year span.

More than half of all methane emissions now come from human activities. Annual methane emissions are up 9 pct -- 50 million tpy -- from the early 2000s, when methane concentrations in the atmosphere were relatively stable. In terms of warming potential, adding this much extra methane to the atmosphere since 2000 is akin to putting 350 million more cars on the world's roads or doubling the total emissions of Germany or France.

Throughout the study period, agriculture accounted for roughly two-thirds of all methane emissions related to human activities; fossil fuels contributed most of the remaining third. However, those two sources have contributed in roughly equal measure to the increases seen since the early 2000s.

Methane emissions from agriculture rose to 227 million tons in 2017, up nearly 11 pct from the 2000 -- 2006 average. Methane from fossil fuel production and use reached 108 million tons in 2017, up nearly 15 pct from the earlier period.

Methane emissions rose most sharply in Africa and the Middle East; China; and South Asia and Oceania, which includes Australia and many Pacific islands. Each of these three regions increased emissions by an estimated 10 to 15 million tpy during the study period. The U.S. followed close behind, increasing methane emissions by 4.5 million tons, mostly due to more natural gas drilling, distribution and consumption, the report notes. (Source: Stanford University News, 14 Jul, 2020) Contact: Stanford University, Rob Jackson, Department of Earth System Science, (650) 497-5841, rob.jackson@stanford.edu, www.stanford.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Methane Emissions,  Stanford University,  Climate Change,  


Glasgow Monitoring GHG Emissions in Real-Time (Int'l. Report)
University of Strathclyde
Date: 2020-06-29
In the UK, scientists from the University of Strathclyde, in cooperation with the City of Glasgow , are installing a network of 25 sensors to monitor CO2 and other greenhouse gases -- carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and PM2.5.T -- as part of a trial to provide Glasgow City Council with real-time information on emissions sources and level citywide. Glasgow is aiming for carbon neutrality by 2030.

Results of the monitoring will be shared with the leaders of other global cities at a virtual conference in November, and will be presented at the COP26 environmental summit to encourage other cities to establish sensor networks.

The emission monitoring program is part of the Global Environmental Monitoring and Measurement (GEMM) project, a collaboration between the University of Strathclyde, Stanford University, the University of California at Berkeley (UC Berkeley), The Optical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the Met Office and the National Physical Laboratory. (Source: University of Strathclyde Glasgow, PR, 27 June, 2020) Contact: University of Strathclyde Glasgow, www.strath.ac.uk; Global Environmental Monitoring and Measurement (GEMM) project, www.gemminitiative.org/en-us

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emission,  GHG,  Greenhouse Gas,  


Stanford, DEWA Collaborate on Solar Energy R&D (R&D, Int'l)
DEWA,Stanford University
Date: 2019-08-07
In the UAE, the Dubai Electricity & Water Authority (DEWA) reports it's Research and Development Center will collaborate with California's Stanford University on radiation cooling to improve the efficiency and performance of solar panels. The research will include the utilization of autonomous robots in monitoring and maintaining solar power plants, and the use of artificial intelligence (AI) to forecast the performance and production of photovoltaic solar plants in the short term.

The DEWA R&D Centre, situated at the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, also has renewable and alternative energy co-operation agreements with the U.S. DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre, as well as the United Arab Emirates University and Khalifa University.

The UAE National Strategy for Artificial Intelligence 2031 aims to position the UAE as a global leader in AI by 2031; the Dubai Clean Energy Strategy 2050 aims to diversify the country's energy mix and provide 75 pct of Dubai's total power output from clean sources by 2050. (Source: DEWA, MEP Middle East, Stanford, DEWA, Aug., 2019) Contact: DEWA, Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, MD and CEO, www.dewa.gov.ae; Stanford, www.stanford.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News DEWA,  Solar,  Stanford,  PV,  


Stanford Leads Pac-12 in EPA Green Power Challenge (Ind. Report)
Stanford
Date: 2019-05-17
In California, Stanford University reports it recently topped the list of participating Pac-12 schools in the U.S. EPA 2018-19 College and University Green Power Challenge. The Challenge tracks collegiate athletic conferences with the highest combined green power usage in the nation. According to the EPA, participating colleges in the Pac-12 conference produced a total of nearly 284 million kWh last academic year, with Stanford leading the way at nearly 160 million kWh of renewable energy.

Stanford's green power production currently makes up 57 pct of the school's electric power consumption -- sufficient power for more than 15,000 homes. In 2021, a second solar power generation station is scheduled to come online, bringing the university’s renewable energy portfolio to 100 pct. (Source: Stanford Daily, 14 May, 2019) Contact: Stanford University, www.stanford.edu; EPA Green Power Challenge, www.epa.gov/greenpower/college-and-university-challenge

More Low-Carbon Energy News Green Power,  Renewable Energy,  


Malta Raises $26Mn forThermal Energy Storage System (Ind. Report)
Malta Inc.
Date: 2019-01-04
Boston-based electro-thermal energy storage specialist Malta Inc.reports it has raised $26 million to commercialize a heat pump energy storage system invented by the Nobel Physics laureate Professor Robert Laughlin of Stanford University, California.

Malta Inc. is looking to commercialize the heat pump energy storage system that uses electricity to drive a heat pump which converts the electrical energy into molten salt thermal energy by creating a temperature differential.

Malta Inc. will work with industry partners including Sweden-based heat exchange manufacturer Alfa Laval, Hong Kong-based Concord New Energy Group and US-based Breakthrough Energy Ventures LLC (led by Microsoft founder Bill Gates), to make this technology cost-effective. (Source: Malta Inc., Hudrocarbons 21, 3 Dec., 2019) Contact: Malta Inc., https://x.company/projects/malta

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy STorage,  Malta Inc.,  


Stanford Planning 100 pct Solar Energy by 2021 (Ind. Report)
Recurrent Energy
Date: 2018-12-05
In the Golden State, Stanford University is reporting a second solar-generating plant that is slated for construction within the next three years will complete the university's transition to clean power and further shrink campus greenhouse gas emissions.

To that end, Stanford has contracted with Recurrent Energy for an 88-MW solar photovoltaic plant to be constructed in central California, near Lemoore. The plant is scheduled to go online in late 2021. The new solar plant, to be known as Stanford Solar Generating Station #2, is projected to reduce GHG emissions to 80 pct below peak levels four years ahead of the university's long-range plan.

California enacted legislation earlier this year that requires electricity to be 100 pct carbon-free by 2045. (Source: Stanford University, Dec., 2018)Contact: Stanford University, E.J. Miranda, University Communications: (650) 724-9161, ejmirand@stanford.edu, www.stanford.edu; Recurrent Energy, (415) 675-1500, www.recurrentenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Solar,  Recurrent Energy,  


Oil-Gas Majors Launch Fugitive Methane Gas Project (Ind Report)
Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers
Date: 2018-11-16
On the Canadian prairies, Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and the Explorers and Producers Association of Canada are reporting the joint launch of the Fugitive Emissions Management Program Effectiveness Assessment (FEMP EA) Program,, a large-scale applied research project focused on methane leak detection, quantification and repair.

FEMP EA is funded by more than 400 oil and gas producers through Alberta Upstream Petroleum Research Fund.

Project objectives and design have been informed by a review of over 100 studies conducted by Stanford University. The project is expected to be completed in 12 months. (Source: JWN, Nov. 14, 2018) Contact: Alberta Upstream Petroleum Research Fund, www.auprf.ptac.org; Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada, (403) 218-7700, www.ptac.org; Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, www.capp.ca target=_blank>Methane Emissions,  

More Low-Carbon Energy News Methane,  Methane Emissions,  

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