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Soil Carbon Sequestration Investigated (Ind. Report)
Carbon Sequestration
Date: 2020-03-23
According to a new study authored by Dr. Doborah Bossio of the Nature Conservancy and University of California-Davis, repairing, protecting and properly managing the ecosystem and the earths soil, the soil can absorb roughly 5.5 billion tpy CO2. The study found the soil's total potential carbon sequestration to be 23.8 gigaton of carbon dioxide -- an average of 5.5 billion tpy -- 40 pct of this potential is left to leave the existing land to itself.

According to Bassio, "Much of the ongoing destruction in these ecosystems is the footprint of expanding agriculture. In other words, slowing or stopping this expansion is a very important strategy. So the restoration of the soil will be of great benefit to humanity. In this way, the quality of water, food production and resistance of crops will increase. The incentive structure in agriculture should be directed from payments to ecosystem services, food, water, climate and biodiversity, Bassio added. (Source: SOMAG, 22 Mar., 2020)Contact: UC Davis, Dr, Deborah Bassio, www.asi.ucdavis.edu/people/deborah-bossio; UC Davis, www.ucdavis.edu; Nature Conservancy,(703) 841-5300, www.nature.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Soil Carbon,  UC Davis,  Nature Conservancy,  ,  


Sutdy Examines Farming as CO2 Absorber (Ind. Report)
University of Virginia
Date: 2019-12-11
A recently released study from the University of Virginia notes that farming, agriculture and other land practices presently contribute around 11 gigatons to CO2 emissions per year -- roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. However, the study argues that the land could actually be converted into an absorber of carbon, given the right conditions.

Among the measures recommended by the study were richer countries transitioning to plant-based diets and reducing food waste, while aiding poorer nations to curb deforestation and restore degraded land. If a concerted global effort was made, land could be absorbing three gigatons of carbon by 2050, turning one of our biggest liabilities into a helping hand in the fight against climate change. The study also recommends:

  • 95 pct reduction in deforestation and land degradation by 2050. This would include more robust conservation policies in developing tropical countries, as well as the conversion of coastal wetlands into protected areas and the prohibition of peatland burning.

  • 25 pct reduction in agricultural emissions by 2050. This would include introducing synthetic or organic fertilizers, enhancing the water-agriculture interface in places where rice cultivation is a primary industry and managing emissions from fermentation and manure.

  • 50 pct adoption of plant-based diets by 2050. This would involve encouraging a healthier diet through consumer campaigns and governmental policies, as well as the development of new foodstuffs to entice unconvinced consumers.

  • 50 pct reduction of current level of food waste by 2050. This would involve tightening up gaps in the supply chain, improving consumer awareness through advertising campaigns and enhancing refrigeration and distribution capabilities in the developing world.

  • Restoration of forests, coastal wetlands and drained peatlands. This would involve financing ecosystem services, improving in local and national conservation policies and investing in restoration practices.

  • Improving forestry and agroforestry management. This would include optimising current forestation conservation process and integrating agroforestry into lands currently used for agriculture and grazing.

  • Enhancing soil carbon sequestration capabilities. This would include controlling soil erosion, reducing tillage of the land and restoring degraded soils, as well as the application of biochar where appropriate.

  • Deploying bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in developed countries. This would involve investing into the research and development of BECCS technologies and deploying them in relevant sites. (Source: University of Virginia, Environmental Technology, 1 Dec., 2019) Contact: University of Virginia, Stephanie Roe, Environmental Researcher, Report Lead Author, 434-924-7761, www.evsc.as.virginia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon,  Carbon Storage,  


  • Finger Lakes Climate Fund Touts Carbon Offsets Project (Ind Report)
    Finger Lakes Climate Fund
    Date: 2019-10-14
    In the Empire State, the Ithaca-based Finger Lakes Climate Fund is touting an online carbon offsetting calculator program that allows donors to estimate their carbon pollution and pay a corresponding amount to support local clean energy, energy efficiency and climate related projects.

    The Finger Lakes Climate Fund works to promote clean energy projects in the Finger Lakes area while strengthening the regional economy while offsetting greenhouse gas emissions from buildings or travel.

    Carbon offset donations are used for grants to fund energy efficiency projects and renewables that would not otherwise be possible in low-to-moderate income households in the Finger Lakes region. These grants help pay for insulation, air sealing, energy efficient heating equipment such as heat pumps and pellet stoves, solar panels, and other upgrades to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

    The Finger Lakes Climate Fund is also investigating other cost-effective local carbon offset projects such as soil carbon farming. (Source: Finger Lakes Climate Fund, Yale Climate Connection, Oct., 2019) Contact: Finger Lakes Climate Fund, www.fingerlakesclimatefund.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon OffsetsEnergy Efficiency,  Renewables,  GHG,  Climate Change,  


    GEVO Trialing LocusAG Technology to Amplify Soil Carbon Sequestration (Ind Report)
    GEVO
    Date: 2019-08-02
    Englewood, Colorago-headquartered biobutanol and biofuels specialist GEVO Inc. is reporting a partnership with Locus Agricultural Solutions® (LocusAG) to trial a new technology to improve the capture of soil carbon, reduce applied nitrogen fertilizer needs and improve crop yields.

    LocusAG's Rhizolizer® line of fresh, non-GMO soil probiotic treatments have been used to treat 40,000 commercial agriculture acres across several crops, with positive results in improving crop productivity, crop quality, vigor and sustainability. Treatments are now being tested on Gevo's 30-acre farm co-located at its Luverne, MN ethanol facility.

    According to LocusAG, the treatments have the potential to amplify crop soil carbon sequestration by up to an additional 3 to 6 metric tpy of CO2 equivalents per acre while increasing crop yields and grower profits. (Source: GEVO, PR, Newswire, 31 July, 2019) Contact: LocusAG, Paul Zorner, CEO, www.LocusAG.com; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    Aussie Study says Soil Condition Key to Carbon Storage (Int'l)
    Curtin University
    Date: 2019-06-05
    In the Land Down Under, a just released study from Curtin University in Western Australian has found that the rate at which carbon is stored and released from soil differs vastly depending on a range of factors, across different regions and continents.

    "Regionally, the effect of climate on soil carbon storage is dependent on interactions with soil properties, mineralogy and topography. In some regions, climate does not play a role. This shows the need for localized assessments of soil carbon dynamics and a more effective approach to carbon management at local scales."

    "To slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases and help mitigate global warming, a better understanding of the factors controlling soil organic carbon storage, its composition and its vulnerability to loss is needed," lead researcher Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel said. (Source: Curtin University, Xinhua, 4 June, 2019) Contact: Curtin University, Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel, +61 8 9266 9266, Fax: +61 8 9266 3131, www.curtin.edu.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


    $1Bn Added to Australian Emissions Reduction Fund (Int'l Report)
    Australia Climate Change
    Date: 2019-02-22
    Reporting from Canberra, the Australian liberal coalition government Environment Minister Melissa Price has announced a more than $1 billion addition to the government's Emissions Reduction Fund, which has been depleted from an initial $2.5bn to about $226 million.

    The new funds will cover a tree-planting and soil carbon improvement effort while offering practical benefits for farmers and regional communities, according to the releae. (Source: Australia Environment Minister Melissa Price, The Australian, 22 Feb., 2019) Contact: Australia Environment Minister Melissa Price, www.aph.gov.au/Senators_and_Members/Parliamentarian?MPID=249308

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Australia Clime Chamge,  


    Midwest Perennial Grasses Biofuel Feedstocks Investigated (R&D)
    University of Minnesota
    Date: 2019-01-30
    In ongoing research to discover the ideal growing conditions for alternative biofuels feedstocks, researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Biological Science are investigating the advantages and environmental implications of perennial grasses on abandoned and degraded agricultural land on the US upper mid-western prairies.

    A potential benefit of perennial grasses is tied to their deep root systems. According to researchers, deeper root systems -- as opposed to those seen in annual crops like corn -- are able to store large amounts of carbon below ground that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. However, because perennial grasses on marginal lands can have low yields due to less fertile soil, researchers examined ways to maximize growth of the grasses without negative effects on the environment.

    In the 10-year study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers utilized 36 plots at an abandoned agricultural site in the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve to plant 32 species of prairie and savanna plants that are native to Minnesota. In 2007, researchers divided the plots into several groups and assigned them a combination of two treatments: water addition (i.e., irrigated or non-irrigated) and nitrogen fertilization (i.e., 0 g/m2, 7 g/m2, 14 g/m2). Over the next decade, researchers found that:

  • moderate treatments (irrigation and 7 g/m2 of nitrogen) had the best biomass yields and soil carbon storage, while having negligible effects on the stability, diversity and nutrient loss to groundwater;
  • compared with the control (non-irrigated and no additional nitrogen), moderate treatments resulted in almost twice the yield and soil carbon storage and -- if the plants were converted into bioenergy to displace fossil fuels -- it would result in twice the greenhouse gas savings;
  • compared with the moderate treatment, the more intensive treatment (irrigation and 14 g/m2 of nitrogen) had 30 percent lower greenhouse gas savings, 10 times greater nitrate leaching and 120 pct greater loss in plant diversity.

    Compared with corn ethanol, researchers found biomass yield from the best performing native prairie grasses was moderately lower -- six tons per hectare versus the average corn yield of eight tons per hectare in the U.S.. However, researchers found that because of lower nitrogen use and larger amounts of soil carbon storage, the native prairies would result in higher overall greenhouse gas savings when converted to bioenergy.

    The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research program and the Global Climate and Energy Project. (Source: University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences, PR, 28 Jan., 2019) Contact: College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota, Prof. David Tilman, Prof. Clarence Lehman, Lead Researcher, 612-625-5734 Fax: 612-624-6777, lehman@umn.edu, cbs.umn.edu; Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, www.cedarcreek.umn.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel Feedstock,  


  • Riparian Forest Carbon Storage Potential Explored (Ind. Report)
    Point Blue Conservation Science
    Date: 2018-11-14
    New Research from Petaluma, California-based Point Blue Conservation Science and Santa Clara University has concluded that riparian ecosystems and stream-side forests store "significant amounts of carbon." Accordingly, the report notes the the restoration of degraded forests is a critical strategy for addressing global climate change.

    The research, led by Dr. Kristen Dybala, found that the average amount of carbon stored in mature streamside forest rivals the highest estimates for tropical or boreal forests. The average values for mature streamside forests range from 168 to 390 tons of carbon per acre in the trees alone.

    Researchers also found that, on average, soil carbon can be expected to more than triple when converting from an un-forested site to a mature stream-side forest. With trees, it can take 40-90 years for these changes to come into full effect, and more than 115 years for soil carbon.

    The report notes new tools and funding sources are emerging to help plan for and implement effective stream-side forest restorations. Countries around the world have pledged to restore degraded forests under the Bonn Challenge, a global commitment to restore forests as a climate mitigation strategy.

    "Point Blue advances conservation of birds, other wildlife, and ecosystems through science, partnerships, and outreach. Our highest priority is to reduce the impacts of habitat loss, climate change, and other environmental threats while promoting nature-based solutions for wildlife and people, on land and at sea," according the the Point Blue website. (Source: Point Blue Conservation Science, Public Release, Nov., 2018) Contact: Point Blue Conservation Science, pointblue@pointblue.org, www.pointblue.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Climate Change,  CO2 Emissions,  Point Blue Conservation Science,  


    NETs Offer CO2 Removal Potential, Report Notes (Ind. Report)
    National Academies of Science, Engineering
    Date: 2018-11-09
    A new report from the Washington, DC-headquartered National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine has concluded that a substantial research initiative should begin as soon as possible to learn more about the impacts, limitations and scalability of Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs).

    According to the report, NETs , which remove CO2 directly from ambient air or enhance natural carbon sinks, could be scaled up to capture and store a significant amount of global carbon emissions, but not enough to prevent a global temperature increase of more than 2 degrees C. More research is needed to understand how to overcome existing constraints on the technologies, such as high costs and energy requirements, according to the report.

    The report highlights two NETs -- direct air capture (DAR) and mineralization using chemicals and reforestation, changing agricultural practices to enhance soil carbon storage, using biomass produce electricity with CCS and enhancing the amount of carbon stored in coastal ecosystems. In addition to mitigating climate change, NETs could open an untapped market, the report notes. (Source: National Academies of Science, Engineering, Engineering News Record, Nov., 2018)Contact: National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, 202-334-2000, www.nationalacademies.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Capture,  Carbon Dioxide,  


    Apple Supporting Carbon Sequestration through Mangrove Restoration (Ind. Report)
    Mangrove, Apple
    Date: 2018-09-17
    Smart Phone juggernaut Apple reports it is investing an undisclosed sum in a project in Colombia to restore mangroves and sequester as much as 17,000 metric tons (18,739 tons) of carbon dioxide in two years. That’s equal to the emissions that the fleet of vehicles updating Apple Maps will produce over the coming decade, according to the Apple release.

    Beyond cutting the amount of carbon dioxide we put into the atmosphere, scientists show that we will also need to pull carbon dioxide from the air to avoid catastrophic climate change. There are six so-called “negative-emissions technologies” that can help us get there: afforestation and reforestation; enhanced weathering (using minerals that capture carbon dioxide); soil carbon (tweaking the crops and forests we currently grow to absorb more carbon); biochar (using a special kind charcoal as to trap carbon dioxide); BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, which requires capturing carbon dioxide produced by burning biomass like wood and then burying it underground); and DAC (direct air capture, which involves the use of machines that are essentially trees on steroids to suck carbon dioxide from the air and bury it underground).

    Among those negative-emissions technologies, mangrove restoration would be classed as reforestation. The Conservation International project would cover an area of 17,000 hectares (42,000 acres) in the Sinu river delta. The NGO will use the money raised for the project to help the 12,000 people in the community who use the mangroves for food, firewood, and livelihoods. Conservation International believes the carbon offsets will provide financial security to the region and develop sustainable ways to support tourism and fisheries.

    (Source: Apple, PR, Sept., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration news,  Apple news,  Mangrove news,  


    UK Report Calls for Fast Greenhouse Gas Action (Int'l Report)
    Royal Academy of Engineering
    Date: 2018-09-17
    In the UK, The Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) have released a joint report outlining a plan of action which could help the UK lead the way in deploying technologies to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

    The report makes various recommendations that would allow the UK to achieve its target of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 and identifies and assesses technologies available that might allow emissions removal goals to be reached. It considers not only the UK, but the global picture and how these technologies might be deployed alongside each other to achieve global carbon removal by 2100 as per the Paris Agreement.

    Technologies discussed include ready-to-deploy methods as well as more speculative methods. Ready-to-deploy, land-based methods such as such as forestation, habitat restoration, and soil carbon sequestration could be quickly applied, but unfortunately these will become saturated within the century. Furthermore, these approaches alone will only allow the UK to achieve around one quarter of the target GGR required to reach net-zero emissions.

    Development of speculative methods, such as direct air capture, bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and low-carbon concrete, is vital if sufficient GGR is to be achieved, the report says.

    Download the Greenhouse Gas Removal Report HERE. (Source: THE Royal Society, Royal Academy of Engineering, Chemical Engineer, Sept., 2018) Contact: Royal Academy of Engineering, www.raeng.org.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  



    Date: 2018-09-17
    Apple’s newest smartphones may not have received all-round praise, but its latest environmental initiative surely should. On Friday (Sep. 14), the world’s most valuable company said it is investing an undisclosed sum in a project in Colombia to restore mangroves and sequester as much as 17,000 metric tons (18,739 tons) of carbon dioxide in two years. That’s equal to the emissions that the fleet of vehicles updating Apple Maps will produce over the coming decade.

    “Mangroves live at the edge of the land and sea, providing local communities with coastal protection, habitat for their fisheries, and a wealth of biodiversity,” according to Conservation International, an NGO that’s leading the mangrove restoration project. “These and other ocean wetlands store up to 10 times the carbon per unit area as terrestrial forests, making them a vital ally in the fight against climate change.” A 2016 study of 3,000 deforested mangrove patches found that most of them were being cut down for the use of growing rice, palm trees, or expanding fisheries.

    Beyond cutting the amount of carbon dioxide we put into the atmosphere, scientists show that we will also need to pull carbon dioxide from the air to avoid catastrophic climate change. There are six so-called “negative-emissions technologies” that can help us get there: afforestation and reforestation; enhanced weathering (using minerals that capture carbon dioxide); soil carbon (tweaking the crops and forests we currently grow to absorb more carbon); biochar (using a special kind charcoal as to trap carbon dioxide); BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, which requires capturing carbon dioxide produced by burning biomass like wood and then burying it underground); and DAC (direct air capture, which involves the use of machines that are essentially trees on steroids to suck carbon dioxide from the air and bury it underground).

    Among those negative-emissions technologies, mangrove restoration would be classed as reforestation. The Conservation International project would cover an area of 17,000 hectares (42,000 acres) in the Sinu river delta. The NGO will use the money raised for the project to help the 12,000 people in the community who use the mangroves for food, firewood, and livelihoods. Conservation International believes the carbon offsets will provide financial security to the region and develop sustainable ways to support tourism and fisheries.

    Earlier this year, Apple also announced that all of its electricity use in 45 countries is powered by 100% renewable energy. Some of the success of such environmental shifts are down to the lower cost of renewable energy, but much credit also goes to environmental campaigns like Greenpeace’s Click Clean that hold tech companies to account on their sustainability promises. That said, there’s still a long way to go if Apple plans to cut emissions from all its energy use. (Source: Apple, PR, Sept., 2018)


    Grassland Carbon Credits Fund Carbon Sinks (Ind. Report)
    Environmental Defense Fund
    Date: 2018-08-31
    In San Francisco, the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) is reporting the sale of the first listed grassland carbon credits that will allow the Southern Plains Land Trust to restore and preserve two Colorado ranches that sequester 8,000 metric tpy of soil.

    The EDF facilitated the development and sale of the credits with the help of a Conservation Innovation Grant from the USDA. Natural Capital Partners purchased the credits on behalf of its client Microsoft, which began a carbon neutrality program in 2012.

    Grassland carbon credits reward landowners for retaining soil carbon and avoiding the emissions associated with converting grasslands into croplands. Grassland projects also provide ecosystem benefits such as habitat for threatened species.

    The Climate Action Reserve's Grassland Project Protocol uses biogeochemical modeling and emissions factors to quantify carbon that would be released from the soil if the land were tilled. (Source: EDF, Aug., 2018) Contact: Environmental Defense Fund, www.edf.org; Southern Plains Land Trust, https://southernplains.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Environmental Defense Fund news,  Carbon Credit news,  Carbon Sink news,  


    Arctic Carbon Cycle Speeding Up, NASA Study Finds (Ind. Report)
    Carbon Emissions
    Date: 2018-08-08
    A study from researchers at the NASA JPL in Pasadena, California has found that carbon in Alaska's North Slope spends about 13 pct less time locked in frozen soil than it did 40 years ago. According to the report, warming temperatures are exposing the arctic frozen soil carbon to microbial decomposition which is in turn releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at an increasing rate, possibly due to the region's rapid warming and climate change.

    The finding indicates that the carbon cycle in this region is speeding up and releasing carbon at a pace more associated with a North American boreal forest. As the temperature increases, the amount of time carbon stored in the Arctic soil also decreases. Consequently, the balance between these two dynamics will determine whether Arctic ecosystems will ultimately remove or add atmospheric carbon dioxide in the future climate," the latter being the study's most likely conclusion. (Source: NASA JPL, 14U News, 4 Aug., 2018) Contact: NASA JPL, Anthony Bloom, of NASA JPL, www.jpl.nasa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  Global Warming,  


    Tundra Carbon Absorption, Release Gap Widening (Ind. Report)
    NOAA Barrow Observatory
    Date: 2018-07-30
    Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Barrow Observatory in Alaska have reported a steady increase in atmospheric carbon and a similarly steady increase in temperature, with seasonal variations over the last 40 years. In the four decades of atmospheric monitoring, carbon levels in the atmosphere have increased by 80 ppm, with 400 ppm reached in 2012.

    The last time there was such a large increase in atmospheric carbon, the rise of 80 ppm occurred much more gradually, over a period of 5,000 or 6,000 years, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Barrow Observatory.

    (Source: NOAA Barrow Observatory, Arctic Today, 27 July, 2018) Contact: NOAA Barrow Observatory, Bryan Thomas, www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/obop/brw

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Grassland Carbon Credits Fund Carbon Sinks (Ind. Report)
    Environmental Defense Fund,
    Date: 2018-07-18
    In San Francisco, the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) is reporting the sale of the first listed grassland carbon credits that will allow the Southern Plains Land Trust to restore and preserve two Colorado ranches that sequester 8,000 metric tpy of soil.

    The EDF facilitated the development and sale of the credits with the help of a Conservation Innovation Grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Natural Capital Partners purchased the credits on behalf of its client Microsoft, which began a carbon neutrality program in 2012.

    Grassland carbon credits reward landowners for retaining soil carbon and avoiding the emissions associated with converting grasslands into croplands. Grassland projects also provide ecosystem benefits such as habitat for threatened species.

    The Climate Action Reserve's Grassland Project Protocol uses biogeochemical modeling and emissions factors to quantify carbon that would be released from the soil if the land were tilled. Offsets are then generated for preserved belowground soil carbon, avoided use of nitrogen-based fertilizers and avoided use of carbon-emitting machinery for crop cultivation. (Source: EDF, 17 July, 2018) Contact: Environmental Defense Fund, www.edf.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Environmental Defense Fund,  USDA,  Carbon Credit,  


    Trump Finds a Kindred Spirit in Former Aussie PM Tony Abbott (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Tony Abbott,Trump,Climate Change
    Date: 2018-07-03
    In the Land Down Under, former Liberal Prime Minister Tony Abbott, the prime minister who signed Australia on to the Paris Climate Agreement, now says Australia should pull out of the treaty to end "the emissions obsession that's at the heart of our power crisis."

    In a recent speech to a group of "climate skeptics", Abbott, who is perhaps best remembered for his comment "climate change is a load of CRAP", now says he wouldn't have signed up to the Paris treaty had he known the US would withdraw from it.

    In his speech, Abbott noted: "I didn't anticipate how agreeing to emissions that were 26 pct lower in 2030 than in 2005 would subsequently become a linear progression of roughly equal cuts every year over the next decade." "As long as we remain in the Paris agreement -- which is about reducing emissions, not building prosperity -- all policy touching on emissions will be about their reduction, not our well-being. It's the emissions obsession that's at the heart of our power crisis and it's this that has to end for our problems to ease."

    Other oft repeated Abbott comments include:

    "There are respectable arguments for an ETS but the one Labor (the then governing party) has in mind could easily be expensive and futile. I am wary of a system which creates new vested interests - which an ETS will do. I suspect that a straight carbon tax or charge could be more transparent and easier to change if conditions change or our understanding of the science changes." -- Tony Abbott, ,July 10, 2009

    "I am confident, based on the science we have, that mankind does make a difference to climate, almost certainly the impact of humans on the planet extends to climate." -- Tony Abbott, May 27, 2010 "We do not believe in artificially imposing a carbon price on consumers. There will be no carbon price on consumers under a (my) Coalition government." Tony Abbott, July 19, 2010.

    "Now, we do have policy out there. We've had it out there since February. It basically goes -- it involves going to the market and buying abatements through soil carbon, through tree planting, through businesses that are prepared to change their processes to less emitting ones. It will reduce our emissions by five percent by 2020, so we will achieve our targets. Now, that's our commitment. It's doable. It's deliverable." -- Tony Abbott,16 August, 2010

    "Yeah, look, I never said it (climate change) was a myth. I once used some colourful language describing the so-called settled science of climate change but look, climate change is real, humanity does make a contribution to it and we've got to take effective action against it. I mean, that's my position and that's always been my position but I've never been in favour of a carbon tax or an emissions trading scheme." -- Tony Abbott, July, 2011

    (Source: Various Media, Guardian, 3 July, 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Paris Climate Agreement,  Trump,  Climate Change,  Tony Abbott,  


    Aussie Study Values Inland Wetlands Carbon Storage Stocks (Int'l)
    Deakin University
    Date: 2018-06-27
    In the Land Down Under, researchers from the Deakin School of Life and Environmental Sciences' Blue Carbon Lab are reporting that Victoria state's inland wetlands lock away the annual emissions of 185,000 people. Victoria has about 530,000 hectares of inland wetlands, which include marshes, peatlands, pools and lakes, making up about 2.33 pct of the state's land area. The figure is part the state's first tally of its valuable environmental resources which came to three million tpy of CO2.

    In total, the researchers estimated Victoria's inland wetlands had a soil carbon stock of 68 million tons, worth about $6 billion under Australia's most recent carbon price.

    According to lead researcher Dr Paul Carnell, "While a lot more is known about how trees suck up and store carbon, freshwater wetlands can actually sequester 20 to 40 times more carbon than forests on dry land."

    The study was funded by the Victoria Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology. (Source: Deakin University, PR, 26 June 2018) Contact: Deakin University, Dr Paul Carnell, Lead Researcher, +61 3 924 43902, paul.carnell@deakin.edu.au, www.deakin.edu.au: Blue Carbon, http://bluecarbonlab.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Blue Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  


    DEFRA OKs £2Mn for UK Peatland Restoration (Int'l Funding)
    DEFRA
    Date: 2018-05-21
    In the UK, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) reports it has approved a £2 million funding application from a partnership of regional organizations for funding the restoration of 1,680 hectares of peatland on Bodmin Moor, Dartmoor and Exmoor.

    According to the restoration project leader Morag Angus, of South West Water, "The peatlands of South West England are very important for water quality, carbon storage, biodiversity, cultural history, recreation and farming but they are the most vulnerable in the UK to the impacts of climate change, due to their southerly position. For this reason, they need to be prioritized nationally and restored for the benefit of all and future generations."

    Peatlands store vast amounts of carbon in their soils -- about 60-times the amount of carbon that is released annually from fossil fuel burning. One-third of all the soil carbon in the world is in peatland ecosystems even though they cover only 3 pct of the terrestrial land surface, according to a 2015 joint study from Chapman University in California, University of Oregon and Purdue University . (Source: DEFRA, Cornish Times, 20 May, 2018)Contact: DEFRA, www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-environment-food-rural-affairs

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DEFRA,  Peatland,  Carbon Storage,  


    Notable Quotes from Former Aussie PM Tony Abbott
    Tony Abbott
    Date: 2018-01-05
    "The science of human-caused climate change is 'CRAP." -- Tony Abbott, Sept., 2009

    "I am confident, based on the science we have, that mankind does make a difference to climate, almost certainly the impact of humans on the planet extends to climate." -- Tony Abbott, May 27, 2010

    "There are respectable arguments for an ETS but the one Labor (the then governing party) has in mind could easily be expensive and futile. I am wary of a system which creates new vested interests - which an ETS will do. I suspect that a straight carbon tax or charge could be more transparent and easier to change if conditions change or our understanding of the science changes." -- Tony Abbott, ,July 10, 2009

    "We do not believe in artificially imposing a carbon price on consumers. There will be no carbon price on consumers under a (my)Coalition government." Tony Abbott, July 19, 2010

    "Now, we do have policy out there. We've had it out there since February. It basically goes -- it involves going to the market and buying abatements through soil carbon, through tree planting, through businesses that are prepared to change their processes to less emitting ones. It will reduce our emissions by five percent by 2020, so we will achieve our targets. Now, that's our commitment. It's doable. It's deliverable." -- Tony Abbott,16 August, 2010

    "Yeah, look, I never said it (climate change) was a myth. I once used some colourful language describing the so-called settled science of climate change but look, climate change is real, humanity does make a contribution to it and we've got to take effective action against it. I mean, that's my position and that's always been my position but I've never been in favour of a carbon tax or an emissions trading scheme." -- Tony Abbott, July, 2011

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Tax,  Tony Abbott,  Australia Carbon Tax,  Climate Change,  


    WSU Studies Soil Carbon Sink Capacities (R&D)
    Washington State University, Marc Kramer
    Date: 2017-11-13
    According to an international research team headed by Associate Research Scientist Marc G, Kramer at Washington State University, soil minerals approximately one foot beneath the earth surface could hold up to three times as much carbon as is found in the atmosphere. However, proper management of the soil is needed to reduce the levels of CO2 in the air, according to an international team of researchers.

    More than half the carbon stored in soil is more than 1 foot beneath the surface, and at that depth the organic matter in the soil is almost entirely associated with minerals. Studying samples from China and Puerto Rico, the team found that mineral interactions rather than microbial activity was influencing carbon and nitrogen storage levels. (Source: Washington State Univ., Science Alert, 11 Nov., 2017) Contact: Washington State University, Marc Kramer, marc.kramer@wsu.edu, //labs.wsu.edu/kramerlab/marc-g-kramer

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Soil Carbon,  Carbon Sink,  CO2,  Carbon Dioxice,  


    CGIAR Addressing Soil Carbon, Climate Change (Ind. Report)
    Global Soil Partnership
    Date: 2017-08-23
    According to the Global Soil Partnership (GSP), soil carbon could help mitigate significant greenhouse gas emissions, while also supporting food production and adaptation to climate change. As such, soil carbon could be crucial to meeting the Paris Agreement goal to limit global warming to below 2 degrees as well as Sustainable Development Goals related to food security and climate. However, we still lack the knowledge needed to sustainably manage soil for carbon, the GSP adds.

    On June 19, 30 CGIAR scientists, representing seven CGIAR Centers and six CGIAR Research Programs (CRPs), exchanged recent research findings and identified priorities for a future research agenda on soil carbon and climate change. CGIAR's current soil carbon and climate change work includes:

  • Improving understanding of the factors and underlying mechanisms that drive changes in soil carbon and critical soil functions;
  • Examining agronomic practices that improve soil health, agricultural productivity or socio-economic benefits affect soil carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change adaptation;
  • Investigating the relationships among forests, soils, water and climate;
  • Analyzing the effects of land use change on soil carbon stocks, including loss of soil carbon through deforestation and land degradation, and the potential for soil carbon sequestration through restoration of degraded soils;
  • Assessing the extent of peatland soils globally and estimating current carbon stocks in peatlands;
  • Supporting policy to avoid loss of carbon from peatlands, forestlands and wetlands;
  • Developing standardized methods and metrics for assessing soil carbon and its dynamics, especially as an indicator of ecosystem health, at plot and landscape scales;
  • Facilitating the Land Degradation Surveillance Framework Network, which now has 200 sites and 30,000 reference points in the global tropics, mostly openly accessible data. (Source: CGIAR, World AgroForestry Center, Aug., 2017) Contact: 4p1000, http://4p1000.org; Global Soil Partnership, www.fao.org/global-soil-partnership/en; CGIAR, www.cgiar.org

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