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Bluesource Offering Ag Practices Carbon Credits Program (Ind. Report)
Bluesource, Locus Agricultural Solutions
Date: 2022-01-05
Salt Lake City-headquartered environmental services and carbon finance markets specialist Bluesource is touting its new Regenerative Agriculture Program that gives the agricultural industry opportunities to gain value from carbon reduction and sequestration practices while addressing the challenge of climate change.

The Bluesource Regenerative Agriculture Program is now underway through two collaborating partnerships on an initial 320,000 acres of U.S. farmland. A $5 million investment by Green Star Royalties, subsidiary of Star Royalties Ltd finances Bluesource's ability to provide upfront payments to farmers enrolling in the CarbonNOW® carbon farming program developed by Solon, Ohio-headquartered Locus Agricultural Solutions (Locus AG).

Bluesource verifies the sequestered soil carbon and is marketing the associated carbon credits in the voluntary carbon market. It is estimated that this initial project will mitigate over 500,000 metric tpy of CO2e. (Source: Bluesource, Website PR, 17 Dec., 2021) Contact: Bluesource, 801 322 4750 , www.bluesource.com;Locus Agricultural Solutions, (888) 331-5008, info@locusag.com, www.locusag.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Credits.,  Carbon Capture,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Seqestration,  


Deveron Launches Agriculture Carbon Platform (New Prod.& Tech.)
Deveron
Date: 2021-09-22
Toronto, Ontario-based agriculture digital services and insights provider Deveron Corp. is reporting the launch of its agricultural carbon services platform to provide a scalable and streamlined process of collecting, analyzing, and sharing in-field soil carbon data to support the development of carbon programs.

The platform, which eliminates a number of bottlenecks impeding the current market for agriculture carbon, enables the creation of reliable and credible carbon credits. The platform leverages the company's growing network of trained and dedicated soil technicians across North America to ensure consistency of sampling, provides single chain of custody from the farm to the lab in a digital platform, and ensures soil data integrity and security. (Source: Deveron, Website PR, 21 Sept., 2021) Contact: Deveron, David MacMillan, CEO, www.deveronuas.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Deveron,  Carbon Credit,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Crop,  Carbon Emissions,  


Canada Invests in Prairie Preservation, CO2 Storage (Ind. Report)

Date: 2021-07-30
In Ottawa, the Canadian Minister of Environment and Climate Change, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, announced more than $25 million in funding from the Nature Smart Climate Solutions Fund in 2021--2022 to conserve, restore, and enhance critical wetlands and grasslands, protect biodiversity and sequester carbon. The funding recipients include:
  • Ducks Unlimited Canada will receive up to $19.28 million over three years for projects to conserve and restore wetland and grassland habitats in the Prairies, including the restoration of croplands to grasslands. These lands will capture and store carbon, while providing a range of other ecological benefits.

  • Nature Conservancy of Canada will receive up to $4.05 million over three years for projects to retain and restore carbon stocks by conserving, restoring, and enhancing management of Prairie grasslands and wetlands; and

  • Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation will receive up to $2.4 million over three years for projects to conserve, restore, and enhance management of threatened grasslands and wetlands in order to store carbon while providing a range of other benefits for local communities in the agricultural zone of southwestern Manitoba, including improving water quality and supporting wildlife habitat.

    Collectively, these projects are projected to conserve up to 30,000 hectares; restore up to 6,000 hectares; and contribute to the enhanced management of up to 18,000 hectares of wetlands, grasslands, and riparian areas.

    The Government of Canada is investing $4 billion over the next ten years (2021--2031) in the Natural Climate Solutions Fund, which supports activities to build a more resilient economy and a healthier, greener future. Activities include: 2 Billion Trees Commitment, led by Natural Resources Canada ($3.19 billion); Nature Smart Climate Solutions, led by Environment and Climate Change Canada ($631 million); and Agricultural Climate Solutions, led by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada ($185 million). (Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada, PR, 23 July, 2021) Contact: Environment and Climate Change Canada, www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  Soil Carbon,  


  • Carbon Capture Shield, Inc - Reversing Climate Change Through Land Stewardship (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Carbon Capture Shield
    Date: 2021-07-09
    "What if it was possible to not only eliminate the entire human Carbon footprint, but also eliminate the use of toxic pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides (saving the bees); eliminate the use of inorganic chemical fertilizers (protecting our waterways); increase soil health and resilience (buffering against disease, drought, and flood) while improving the size, yield, and nutrient density of crops grown in such living soil (with as much as 500 pct increase in yield); all while creating a global network of smallholder farmers and connecting them to a corresponding global market of conscious consumers?

    "This is the express goal of (Washington, DC-based) Carbon Capture Shield, Incorporated; a Delaware C-Corp formed in 2021, by a team with decades of experience in global farming, renewable energy, and government contracting: To shift 1 billion acres of farmland to Regenerative Agriculture by 2030. According to co-founder and President, Darryl J. Nicke II, 'Antibiotics have saved millions of lives but they also cause many problems by upsetting the natural balance of microorganisms that live in our gut. Probiotics can reverse and even completely cure many diseases caused by such imbalances. Similarly, herbicides, pesticides, and even chemical fertilizers have destroyed the natural balance of life in the soil. By supplementing and restoring that natural balance, you return Earth's Surface to its natural healthy state. This is Earth's natural defense against human activity and pollution. This is Earth's Carbon Capture Shield.'

    "With a clear vision, they have begun Phase 01 of a 10-year, multi-phase plan to transform the way humans care for our shared home, starting in your own backyard - literally. Americans dump more than 60 million ppy of pesticides on their lawns. Fourteen of the most used lawn pesticides are neurotoxins and suspected carcinogens, yet this is where our children play. Not only that, but lawn fertilizers are also a major source of water pollution. The EPA reports that pollution from fertilizers is "one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems." This does not even consider the dire effects on bees, butterflies, and other pollinators who visit these toxic home gardens.

    "Numerous solutions have been found by farmers and researchers all around the planet, and Carbon Capture Shield aims to "bring these solutions home" to anyone with a lawn - by introducing a line of lawn and garden products that are non-toxic and protect the environment while fertilizing your soil and helping the microcosmos of Living Soil.

    "Phase 01 will supply education and solutions for anyone with a lawn, in the form of edutainment and consumer products. Carbon Capture Shield has launched this initiative to educate and empower both farmers and consumers! Using their ability to create engaging media to inspire an avid base of conscious consumers, they will then use this market demand to encourage wary farmers into adopting the protocols of Regenerative Agriculture, and thereby restore the environment through promoting and upholding stewardship by all landholders, large and small." (Source: Carbon Capture Shield Inc., PR, 8 July, 2021) Contact: Carbon Capture Shield Inc., Darryl J. Nicke II, Pres., 407 603 6417, djnicke@carboncaptureshield.com, www.carboncaptureshield.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Capture,  Carbon Capture Shield,  Soil Carbon,  CCS,  Climate Change,  Carbon Footprint,  


    ARENA CCS, Blue Hydrogen Funding Nixed (Int'l. Report)
    ARENA
    Date: 2021-06-23
    Yesterday in Canberra, the Australian Senate rejected a government regulation that would have allowed the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) to invest in blue hydrogen projects andcarbon capture and storage (CCS).

    If passed into law, the regulation would have enabled ARENA to support: energy efficiency projects, carbon capture technologies, blue hydrogen from gas using CCS, energy storage technologies to back up renewable energy and technologies that reduce emissions from aluminium and steel, and soil carbon. (Source: ARENA, The Conversation, 22 June, 2021) Contact: ARENA, Darren Miller, CEO, +61 2 6243 7773, arena@arena.gov.au, www.arena.gov.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  ARENA,  Blue Hydrogen,  


    Carbon Removal Specialist Boomitra Raises $4Mn (Ind. Report)
    Boomitra
    Date: 2021-06-23
    Silicon Valley, California-headquartered Boomitra. -- fka ConserWater -- a technology start-up working on removal of atmospheric carbon by using artificial intelligence in agriculture, reports having raised $4 million from Yara Growth Ventures, the VC arm of fertiliser major Yara International. Other investors include Chevron Technology Ventures, Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo, Tom Steyer and Kat Taylor.

    Boomitra's satellite and Artificial Intelligence-based technology directly measures soil carbon levels without using sensors or soil sampling which enables soil carbon sequestration to be scaled on a global level. It also enables farmers worldwide to participate and increase their incomes, according to the company.

    Boomitra operates an international soil carbon market, where corporations and governments are able to get the lowest-cost internationally certified carbon removal credits and farmers are incentivised to increase soil organic carbon, sequestering CO2.

    Boomitra works with ground partners across more than 2 million acres in countries such as Mexico, Kenya and India and is in the process of generating and certifying more than 10 million tonnes of carbon removal this year. (Source: Boomitra, PR, Website, 22 June, 2021) Contact: Boomitra, Aadith Moorthy, CEO, info @ boomitra .com, www.boomitra.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Removal,  Soil Carbon,  Boomitra,  


    Carbon180 Unveils Carbon Removal Policy Roadmap (Report Attached)
    Carbon 180
    Date: 2021-05-14
    Washington-based climate not-for-profit Carbon180 has published a series of recommendations for Congress to catalyze the next wave of transformation in carbon removal -- a widely overlooked but invaluable pathway for meeting global climate goals.

    These recommendations aim to accelerate further development in the space by mobilizing a combination of research, development and demonstration (RD&D), deployment incentives, infrastructure and regulations over the next 1-3 years.

    In this policy roadmap, Carbon180 is calling on Congress to fulfill a series of actions across sectors to drive this industry forward, including:

  • LAND-BASED APPROACHES -- Land-based carbon removal approaches, many of which are relatively inexpensive and already being deployed, can provide myriad environmental and economic co-benefits. Congress has the opportunity to utilize an integrated approach to assessing and deploying these solutions and build a durable and equitable carbon removal economy in Forestry, Soil Carbon, Marine "blue carbon" and Environmental Justice.

  • TECH-BASED APPROACHES -- Technologies that pull carbon out of the atmosphere have the potential to remove gigatons of CO2 create hundreds of thousands of jobs, and contribute significantly to economic growth in Direct Air Carbon Capture, Geologic Storage, Federal Procurement, Emerging Solutions and Environmental Justice.

  • CROSS-SOLUTION APPROACHES -- Carbon removal solutions have traditionally been developed and deployed in silos but with a host of opportunities and challenges across the industry, it is crucial to develop federal policy that utilizes expertise across federal agencies including : Cross-Agency Collaboration, BECC Deployment Roadmap and Environmental Justice.

    Congressional attention and funding around carbon removal solutions has gained significant momentum over the last five years and especially in the last 12 months. The 2020 Omnibus Bill delivered historic wins for carbon removal and both the SCALE Act and the REPLANT Act, introduced in the first four months of the 117th Congress, signal a promise to accelerate land- and tech-based solutions. Alongside the continued support from the Biden administration and private sector leaders, including Stripe, Shopify, and Microsoft, carbon removal is positioned to grow into a booming industry. Congress now has the opportunity to solidify US leadership on climate and elevate carbon removal as a climate solution mainstay.

    Download the Carbon180 reports and recommendations HERE. (Source: Carbon180, PR, May, 2021) Contact: Carbon180, Erin Burns, Exec. Dir., policy@carbon180.0rg, www.carbon180.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  CCS,  


  • First4Milk Soil Carbon, Sustainability Project Launched (Int'l.)
    First Milk, Neste, Agricarbon
    Date: 2021-03-31
    In the UK, milk producer First Milk is touting the First4Milk project which establishes a comprehensive and scientifically robust soil carbon baseline for First Milk farms. The project will see high intensity, field-by-field soil carbon stock quantified across 40 farms, with the intention to extend this to 100 First Milk farms by the end of 2021.

    The initial phases of the project are being conducted in partnership with Nestlé, which is supporting this as part of its climate journey roadmap, building robust scientific data, with partners, to effectively drive progress in carbon reduction through its supply chain. The First4Milk sustainability programme aims to sequester 100,000 tpy of carbon in soils by 2025 and net-zero carbon emissions by 2040. (Source: First Milk, Website PR, 30 Mar., 2021) Contact: First Milk, www.firstmilk.co.uk; Agricarbon, + 34 957422099, + 34 957422168, info@agriculturadeconservacion.org, www.agricarbon.eu: Neste UK, Robin Sundaram, Responsible Sourcing Manager, www.neste.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Soil Carbon news,  Neste news,  Agricarbon news,  


    Marin Carbon Project Seeks to Slow Effects of Climate Change for Farmers (Ind. Report)
    Marin Carbon Project
    Date: 2021-02-01
    In the Golden State, response to the rapid pace of global climate change, the Marin Carbon Project (MCP) seeking to enhance carbon sequestration in rangeland, agricultural, and forest soils through applied research, demonstration and implementation in Marin County.

    To that end, the project is using compost, fertilizer and planting to increase the amount of carbon in the soil and has helped set up 200 carbon sequestration projects at 60 different Marin County farms.

    The Marin Carbon Project's vision is for the county's landowners and land managers to serve as stewards of soil health and to undertake carbon farming in a manner that can improve on-farm productivity and viability, enhance ecosystem functions and stop and reverse climate change. (Source: Marin Carbon Project, PR, NBC Bay Area, 28 Jan., 2021) Contact: Marin Carbon Project, www.marincarbonproject.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  Soil Carbon,  


    Irish Soil Carbon Observatory to Monitor Emissions (Int'l. Report)
    Ireland Soil Carbon
    Date: 2020-11-20
    In Dublin, the Irish Minister for Agriculture, Food and Marine, reports the Department is investing in the establishment of a National Agricultural Soil Carbon Observatory to monitor carbon emissions and removals across a range of Irish soils.

    The National Agricultural Soil Carbon Observatory will comprise up to 10 "Flux Towers" on agricultural systems across a range of soil types adding value to existing projects including; the industry co-funded SignPost farms and the Agricultural Catchments Programme. The Observatory will place Ireland at the forefront of EU carbon sequestration research and will enable Ireland to:

  • better quantify and model soil carbon emissions and sinks from agricultural land;

  • enable mitigation measures to increase carbon sequestration to be included in the national inventory;

  • participate in the EU ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System) network:

  • enable Ireland to benefit from the 2018 EU Effort Sharing Regulation. (Source: Gov. of Ireland, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, PR, 19 Nov., 2020) Contact: Ireland, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, www.agriculture.gov.ie

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage news,  CO2 news,  Carbon Emissions news,  Soil Carbon news,  


  • Australia to Invest $18Bn in Low Emission Tech. (Int'l. Report)
    ARENA,Australia
    Date: 2020-09-28
    In the Land Down Under, Ministry for Energy and Emissions Reduction reports the Australian government expects to invest $18 billion in new low emission technologies over the next ten years to reduce carbon emissions. The ministry also released the government's first Low Emission Technology Statement aimed at making new technologies cost-competitive with existing technologies.

    To that end, the new plan aims to: reduce the production cost of hydrogen; lower the cost of long duration battery storage systems; reduce the price of soil carbon measurement; decrease the cost of carbon capture storage (CCS) to under $20/ton; cut the production cost of low emission aluminum and for low emission steel; and others.

    Accordingly, the government will establish a Technology Investment Framework and invest around $1.9 billion in a new energy technology package and complete its Long Term Emission Reduction Strategy before the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26).

    As previously reported, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) recently received $1.62 billion in government funding to enhance the utilization of low emission technologies to cut emissions across the chain. (Source: Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, ARENA, Mercom India, 27 Sept., 2020) Contact: Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, Hon Angus Taylor, +02 6277 7120, angus.taylor.mp@aph.gov.au www.minister.industry.gov.au; ARENA, Ivor Frischknecht, CEO, +61 2 6243 7773, arena@arena.gov.au, www.arena.gov.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ARENA,  Corbon Emissions,  


    ARPA-E Commits $16.5Mn for Biofuels Supply Chain Tech. (R&D)
    ARPA-E
    Date: 2020-09-04
    In Washington, the US DOE Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) is reporting $16.5 million in funding for six projects as part of the Systems for Monitoring and Analytics for Renewable Transportation Fuels from Agricultural Resources and Management (SMARTFARM) program. These projects will develop technologies that bridge the data gap in the biofuel supply chain by quantifying feedstock-related GHG emissions and soil carbon dynamics at the field-level. These technologies will allow for improved efficiency in feedstock production and enable new ag-sector carbon removal and management opportunities.

    SMARTFARM teams will work to design and develop systems to quantify feedstock production life cycle GHG emissions at the field level reliably, accurately, and cost-effectively. Selected projects are capable of delivering a positive return on investment when field-level carbon emissions reductions are connected to associated biofuel carbon markets. The program also focuses on potential economic benefits to feedstock producers and future carbon management markets, potentially complementing yield-based revenues with incentives for input efficiency and restorative practices. This focus will also help to lay the groundwork for market structures to shift away from national averages and toward lower uncertainty field-based estimates for incentivizing efficiency and other services.

    Working to make the biofuel supply chain carbon-negative through the removal or sequestration of carbon would greatly improve biofuel's economic and environmental benefits. Achieving reductions in carbon emissions also encourages feedstock producers to adopt new technologies and practices to quantify their impact. SMARTFARM teams are working to develop robust quantification methods through these awards so that management practices can be linked to environmental and economic outcomes simultaneously.

    Download SMARTFARM projects funding recipients and details HERE (Source: ARPA-E, Website PR, Sept., 2020) Contact: ARPA-E, Lane Genatowski, Dir., www.arpa-e.energy.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ARPA-E,  Biofuel,  Renewable Fuels,  


    Foundation for Climate Restoration Comments on Bipartisan CCS Legislation (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Foundation for Climate Restoration
    Date: 2020-08-10
    "This is a momentous occasion for the climate restoration movement. I commend the U.S. Senators Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), and Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) on their bipartisan legislation to research and develop carbon capture and sequestration technologies. This is a necessary step that the Foundation for Climate Restoration (FCR) has been advocating for, and we are pleased to see a commitment to robust research and development of these technologies from both sides of the aisle.

    "The trillion tons of excess carbon in our atmosphere are the main driver of climate change. Therefore, even with net-zero emissions, which is critically important, we are not addressing 95 pct of the problem. Carbon capture technologies that remove this excess CO2, paired with uses for the captured carbon that are permanent, scalable, and financeable, must be our foremost commitment. This is critical to restoring a healthy, pre-industrial level of atmospheric carbon.

    The CREATE Act of 2020 recognizes the importance of research and development of carbon capture and sequestration through direct air capture, enhanced carbon mineralization, bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration, forest restoration, soil carbon management, and direct ocean capture. These avenues of capture and sequestration have enormous potential to remove the excess carbon dioxide from our atmosphere and restore a safe and healthy climate. We are thus thrilled at the bipartisan effort to mobilize and scale these restorative technologies. Removal of atmospheric carbon, in concert with net-zero emissions, will safeguard the planet and ensure its survival for future generations."

    (signed) Rick Parnell, CEO, Foundation for Climate Restoration (Source: Foundation for Climate Restoration, PR, Aug., 2020) Contact: Foundation for Climate Restoration, Rick Parnell, CEO, (650) 906-3016, www.f4cr.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Foundation for Climate Restoration,  Carbon Emissions,  CCS,  Climate Change,  


    NZ Freshwater Reforms to Lead to Major Emissions Reductions (Int'l.)
    Carbon Emissions
    Date: 2020-06-05
    In Wellington, the New Zealand Government's wide-ranging freshwater reforms and land-use policies -- including afforestation of farmland -- "has the potential to result in substantial annual net emissions reductions," according to recently released Cabinet papers.

    "The majority of emissions reductions are through sequestration and are a result of anticipated land-use change primarily due to the interaction of the sediment proposal and the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS). It is expected that a portion of hill country pasture will be converted to forestry between 2025 and 2050, as afforestation is a cost-effective option for achieving the sediment bottom line. The maximum amount that could profitably be converted is estimated at 600,000 hectares. However, on-farm mitigations through [freshwater farm plans] will play a role and contribute to achieving the sediment bottom line without changing land use, so it is uncertain how much contribution land-use change will make. Depending on the degree to which new sediment requirements are met with afforestation, three different emissions reductions scenarios were drawn up," according to the papaers.

    Even the most conservative scenario found a reduction of 35 million tonnes of CO2 or the equivalent amount of another greenhouse gas (Mt CO2e) by 2050. The most optimistic emissions reduction scenario for the freshwater reform package projected a sink of 97.2 Mt CO2e. New Zealand's annual gross emissions are around 80 Mt CO2e. Excluding the sediment policy, the freshwater package is still estimated to present impressive reductions, on the order of four million tonnes of CO2e by 2050, the papers note. (Source: Newsroom NZ, June, 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aforestation. Reforestation,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Sink,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Soil Carbon Sequestration Investigated (Ind. Report)
    Carbon Sequestration
    Date: 2020-03-23
    According to a new study authored by Dr. Doborah Bossio of the Nature Conservancy and University of California-Davis, repairing, protecting and properly managing the ecosystem and the earths soil, the soil can absorb roughly 5.5 billion tpy CO2. The study found the soil's total potential carbon sequestration to be 23.8 gigaton of carbon dioxide -- an average of 5.5 billion tpy -- 40 pct of this potential is left to leave the existing land to itself.

    According to Bassio, "Much of the ongoing destruction in these ecosystems is the footprint of expanding agriculture. In other words, slowing or stopping this expansion is a very important strategy. So the restoration of the soil will be of great benefit to humanity. In this way, the quality of water, food production and resistance of crops will increase. The incentive structure in agriculture should be directed from payments to ecosystem services, food, water, climate and biodiversity, Bassio added. (Source: SOMAG, 22 Mar., 2020)Contact: UC Davis, Dr, Deborah Bassio, www.asi.ucdavis.edu/people/deborah-bossio; UC Davis, www.ucdavis.edu; Nature Conservancy,(703) 841-5300, www.nature.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Soil Carbon,  UC Davis,  Nature Conservancy,  ,  


    Sutdy Examines Farming as CO2 Absorber (Ind. Report)
    University of Virginia
    Date: 2019-12-11
    A recently released study from the University of Virginia notes that farming, agriculture and other land practices presently contribute around 11 gigatons to CO2 emissions per year -- roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. However, the study argues that the land could actually be converted into an absorber of carbon, given the right conditions.

    Among the measures recommended by the study were richer countries transitioning to plant-based diets and reducing food waste, while aiding poorer nations to curb deforestation and restore degraded land. If a concerted global effort was made, land could be absorbing three gigatons of carbon by 2050, turning one of our biggest liabilities into a helping hand in the fight against climate change. The study also recommends:

  • 95 pct reduction in deforestation and land degradation by 2050. This would include more robust conservation policies in developing tropical countries, as well as the conversion of coastal wetlands into protected areas and the prohibition of peatland burning.

  • 25 pct reduction in agricultural emissions by 2050. This would include introducing synthetic or organic fertilizers, enhancing the water-agriculture interface in places where rice cultivation is a primary industry and managing emissions from fermentation and manure.

  • 50 pct adoption of plant-based diets by 2050. This would involve encouraging a healthier diet through consumer campaigns and governmental policies, as well as the development of new foodstuffs to entice unconvinced consumers.

  • 50 pct reduction of current level of food waste by 2050. This would involve tightening up gaps in the supply chain, improving consumer awareness through advertising campaigns and enhancing refrigeration and distribution capabilities in the developing world.

  • Restoration of forests, coastal wetlands and drained peatlands. This would involve financing ecosystem services, improving in local and national conservation policies and investing in restoration practices.

  • Improving forestry and agroforestry management. This would include optimising current forestation conservation process and integrating agroforestry into lands currently used for agriculture and grazing.

  • Enhancing soil carbon sequestration capabilities. This would include controlling soil erosion, reducing tillage of the land and restoring degraded soils, as well as the application of biochar where appropriate.

  • Deploying bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in developed countries. This would involve investing into the research and development of BECCS technologies and deploying them in relevant sites. (Source: University of Virginia, Environmental Technology, 1 Dec., 2019) Contact: University of Virginia, Stephanie Roe, Environmental Researcher, Report Lead Author, 434-924-7761, www.evsc.as.virginia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon,  Carbon Storage,  


  • Finger Lakes Climate Fund Touts Carbon Offsets Project (Ind Report)
    Finger Lakes Climate Fund
    Date: 2019-10-14
    In the Empire State, the Ithaca-based Finger Lakes Climate Fund is touting an online carbon offsetting calculator program that allows donors to estimate their carbon pollution and pay a corresponding amount to support local clean energy, energy efficiency and climate related projects.

    The Finger Lakes Climate Fund works to promote clean energy projects in the Finger Lakes area while strengthening the regional economy while offsetting greenhouse gas emissions from buildings or travel.

    Carbon offset donations are used for grants to fund energy efficiency projects and renewables that would not otherwise be possible in low-to-moderate income households in the Finger Lakes region. These grants help pay for insulation, air sealing, energy efficient heating equipment such as heat pumps and pellet stoves, solar panels, and other upgrades to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

    The Finger Lakes Climate Fund is also investigating other cost-effective local carbon offset projects such as soil carbon farming. (Source: Finger Lakes Climate Fund, Yale Climate Connection, Oct., 2019) Contact: Finger Lakes Climate Fund, www.fingerlakesclimatefund.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon OffsetsEnergy Efficiency,  Renewables,  GHG,  Climate Change,  


    GEVO Trialing LocusAG Technology to Amplify Soil Carbon Sequestration (Ind Report)
    GEVO
    Date: 2019-08-02
    Englewood, Colorago-headquartered biobutanol and biofuels specialist GEVO Inc. is reporting a partnership with Locus Agricultural Solutions® (LocusAG) to trial a new technology to improve the capture of soil carbon, reduce applied nitrogen fertilizer needs and improve crop yields.

    LocusAG's Rhizolizer® line of fresh, non-GMO soil probiotic treatments have been used to treat 40,000 commercial agriculture acres across several crops, with positive results in improving crop productivity, crop quality, vigor and sustainability. Treatments are now being tested on Gevo's 30-acre farm co-located at its Luverne, MN ethanol facility.

    According to LocusAG, the treatments have the potential to amplify crop soil carbon sequestration by up to an additional 3 to 6 metric tpy of CO2 equivalents per acre while increasing crop yields and grower profits. (Source: GEVO, PR, Newswire, 31 July, 2019) Contact: LocusAG, Paul Zorner, CEO, www.LocusAG.com; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    Aussie Study says Soil Condition Key to Carbon Storage (Int'l)
    Curtin University
    Date: 2019-06-05
    In the Land Down Under, a just released study from Curtin University in Western Australian has found that the rate at which carbon is stored and released from soil differs vastly depending on a range of factors, across different regions and continents.

    "Regionally, the effect of climate on soil carbon storage is dependent on interactions with soil properties, mineralogy and topography. In some regions, climate does not play a role. This shows the need for localized assessments of soil carbon dynamics and a more effective approach to carbon management at local scales."

    "To slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases and help mitigate global warming, a better understanding of the factors controlling soil organic carbon storage, its composition and its vulnerability to loss is needed," lead researcher Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel said. (Source: Curtin University, Xinhua, 4 June, 2019) Contact: Curtin University, Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel, +61 8 9266 9266, Fax: +61 8 9266 3131, www.curtin.edu.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


    $1Bn Added to Australian Emissions Reduction Fund (Int'l Report)
    Australia Climate Change
    Date: 2019-02-22
    Reporting from Canberra, the Australian liberal coalition government Environment Minister Melissa Price has announced a more than $1 billion addition to the government's Emissions Reduction Fund, which has been depleted from an initial $2.5bn to about $226 million.

    The new funds will cover a tree-planting and soil carbon improvement effort while offering practical benefits for farmers and regional communities, according to the releae. (Source: Australia Environment Minister Melissa Price, The Australian, 22 Feb., 2019) Contact: Australia Environment Minister Melissa Price, www.aph.gov.au/Senators_and_Members/Parliamentarian?MPID=249308

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Australia Clime Chamge,  


    Midwest Perennial Grasses Biofuel Feedstocks Investigated (R&D)
    University of Minnesota
    Date: 2019-01-30
    In ongoing research to discover the ideal growing conditions for alternative biofuels feedstocks, researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Biological Science are investigating the advantages and environmental implications of perennial grasses on abandoned and degraded agricultural land on the US upper mid-western prairies.

    A potential benefit of perennial grasses is tied to their deep root systems. According to researchers, deeper root systems -- as opposed to those seen in annual crops like corn -- are able to store large amounts of carbon below ground that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. However, because perennial grasses on marginal lands can have low yields due to less fertile soil, researchers examined ways to maximize growth of the grasses without negative effects on the environment.

    In the 10-year study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers utilized 36 plots at an abandoned agricultural site in the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve to plant 32 species of prairie and savanna plants that are native to Minnesota. In 2007, researchers divided the plots into several groups and assigned them a combination of two treatments: water addition (i.e., irrigated or non-irrigated) and nitrogen fertilization (i.e., 0 g/m2, 7 g/m2, 14 g/m2). Over the next decade, researchers found that:

  • moderate treatments (irrigation and 7 g/m2 of nitrogen) had the best biomass yields and soil carbon storage, while having negligible effects on the stability, diversity and nutrient loss to groundwater;
  • compared with the control (non-irrigated and no additional nitrogen), moderate treatments resulted in almost twice the yield and soil carbon storage and -- if the plants were converted into bioenergy to displace fossil fuels -- it would result in twice the greenhouse gas savings;
  • compared with the moderate treatment, the more intensive treatment (irrigation and 14 g/m2 of nitrogen) had 30 percent lower greenhouse gas savings, 10 times greater nitrate leaching and 120 pct greater loss in plant diversity.

    Compared with corn ethanol, researchers found biomass yield from the best performing native prairie grasses was moderately lower -- six tons per hectare versus the average corn yield of eight tons per hectare in the U.S.. However, researchers found that because of lower nitrogen use and larger amounts of soil carbon storage, the native prairies would result in higher overall greenhouse gas savings when converted to bioenergy.

    The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research program and the Global Climate and Energy Project. (Source: University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences, PR, 28 Jan., 2019) Contact: College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota, Prof. David Tilman, Prof. Clarence Lehman, Lead Researcher, 612-625-5734 Fax: 612-624-6777, lehman@umn.edu, cbs.umn.edu; Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, www.cedarcreek.umn.edu

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