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Purdue Studies Benefits of US Biodiesel (Report Attached)
National Biodiesel Foundation
Date: 2020-01-22
The impacts of U.S. biofuel policy on deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia are found to be insignificant, according to the latest research from leading economic modeling experts at Purdue University. The study looked at concerns from renewable fuel opponents claiming that biofuels are to blame for increased agricultural activity in southeast Asia.

Previous analysis published by U.S. EPA, California Air Resources Board and Argonne National Laboratory have quantified the benefits of using biodiesel in place of fossil fuel because of its significant reduction in GHG emissions. With a quantified reduction in CO2 emissions between 50 and 86 pct lower than petroleum, biodiesel and renewable diesel are experiencing increased use under federal and state policies.

Download the U.S. Biofuel Production and Policy Implications for Land Use Changes in Malaysia and Indonesia study HERE. (Source: Purdue University,National Biodiesel Foundation, Jan., 2020} Contact: National Biodiesel Foundation, 573-635-3893, 573-635-7913 - fax, www.biodieselfoundation.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News National Biodiesel Foundation,  Biodiesel,  


Woody Biomass-to-Fuels Studied at Purdue Univ. (R&D Report)
Purdue University Center for Plant Biology
Date: 2019-11-18
In West Lafayette, Indiana, researchers at the Purdue University Center for Plant Biology (C3Bio) report their study of ways to increase production of biofuels from non-food biomass has identified lignin, a complex compound in cell walls, blocks access to plant carbohydrates that could be cleaved into sugars and then fermented into biofuels, as one of several barriers to the efficient conversion of that biomass.

The study notes researchers have found a way of removing lignin and making useful products from it, as well as getting access to plant carbohydrates for production of biofuels. Even with lignin removed, however, the Purdue team had to find ways to break the tightly connected plant cells apart so that chemical catalysts or yeasts used in the biofuel refining process could do their jobs.

With all the lignin removed through a nickel-carbon catalysis, the research team treated poplar wood particles with trifluoroacetic acid to loosen the tightly packed crystalline cellulose and its aggregation into large bundles in plant cell walls. The trifluoroacetic acid causes the cellulose to swell, making it easier to access the glucose molecules present in the cell walls for fermentation to ethanol -- or using other chemical catalysts discovered by the C3Bio team, the cellulose and other carbohydrates can be converted to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid, which are substrates or precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. (Source: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Plant Biotechnology Journal, AgriNews, 9 Nov., 2019)Contact: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, C3Bio, Prof. Maureen McCann, 765-496-1779, mmccann@purdue.edu, www.purdue.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Woody Biomass,  Purdue University,  


Bio3Gen Touts Wastewater Algae-to-Biofuel Technology (Ind. Report)
Bio3Gen,Purdue University
Date: 2019-04-05
In West Lafayette, Indiana, Purdue University affiliate startup Gen3Bio reports it is advancing a unique way to transform algae used to purify municipal wastewater into specialty bio-based chemicals such as biofuels or bioplastics. The company's "patented enzyme technology breaks open the algae and takes out the sugars, fats and proteins, and converts those into specialty chemicals. It's a way to keep the carbon cycle going by renewing the use of the algae into useful and safe products," according to Bio3Gen founder and CEO Kelvin Okamoto.

Gen3Bio has been accepted into two accelerator programs focused on advancing new environmentally friendly technologies -- the BREW in Milwaukee and Carbontech Labs in San Francisco.

The BREW accelerator, sponsored by The Water Council, focuses on fresh water, wastewater treatment and water treatment technologies.The BREW accelerator offers selected companies $50,000 in funds, connections to office and research space, and access to mentors. At the end of the program in June, Gen3bio, along with the other participants, will pitch their technologies to a panel of investors.

Gen3Bio received assistance from the Purdue Foundry, a startup accelerator that works with any Indiana-based company. The technology is patented and exclusively licensed from the University of Toledo. (Source: Gen3Bio, Purdue News Service, 4 April, 2019) Contact: Gen3Bio, Kelvin Okamoto, kokamoto@gen3bio.com; Purdue Research Foundation, Tom Coyne, (765) 588-1044, tjcoyne@prf.org, www.prf.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio3Gen,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Purdue University ,  

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