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Purdue Studies Benefits of US Biodiesel (Report Attached)
National Biodiesel Foundation
Date: 2020-01-22
The impacts of U.S. biofuel policy on deforestation in Malaysia and Indonesia are found to be insignificant, according to the latest research from leading economic modeling experts at Purdue University. The study looked at concerns from renewable fuel opponents claiming that biofuels are to blame for increased agricultural activity in southeast Asia.

Previous analysis published by U.S. EPA, California Air Resources Board and Argonne National Laboratory have quantified the benefits of using biodiesel in place of fossil fuel because of its significant reduction in GHG emissions. With a quantified reduction in CO2 emissions between 50 and 86 pct lower than petroleum, biodiesel and renewable diesel are experiencing increased use under federal and state policies.

Download the U.S. Biofuel Production and Policy Implications for Land Use Changes in Malaysia and Indonesia study HERE. (Source: Purdue University,National Biodiesel Foundation, Jan., 2020} Contact: National Biodiesel Foundation, 573-635-3893, 573-635-7913 - fax, www.biodieselfoundation.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News National Biodiesel Foundation,  Biodiesel,  


Woody Biomass-to-Fuels Studied at Purdue Univ. (R&D Report)
Purdue University Center for Plant Biology
Date: 2019-11-18
In West Lafayette, Indiana, researchers at the Purdue University Center for Plant Biology (C3Bio) report their study of ways to increase production of biofuels from non-food biomass has identified lignin, a complex compound in cell walls, blocks access to plant carbohydrates that could be cleaved into sugars and then fermented into biofuels, as one of several barriers to the efficient conversion of that biomass.

The study notes researchers have found a way of removing lignin and making useful products from it, as well as getting access to plant carbohydrates for production of biofuels. Even with lignin removed, however, the Purdue team had to find ways to break the tightly connected plant cells apart so that chemical catalysts or yeasts used in the biofuel refining process could do their jobs.

With all the lignin removed through a nickel-carbon catalysis, the research team treated poplar wood particles with trifluoroacetic acid to loosen the tightly packed crystalline cellulose and its aggregation into large bundles in plant cell walls. The trifluoroacetic acid causes the cellulose to swell, making it easier to access the glucose molecules present in the cell walls for fermentation to ethanol -- or using other chemical catalysts discovered by the C3Bio team, the cellulose and other carbohydrates can be converted to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid, which are substrates or precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. (Source: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Plant Biotechnology Journal, AgriNews, 9 Nov., 2019)Contact: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, C3Bio, Prof. Maureen McCann, 765-496-1779, mmccann@purdue.edu, www.purdue.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Woody Biomass,  Purdue University,  


Bio3Gen Touts Wastewater Algae-to-Biofuel Technology (Ind. Report)
Bio3Gen,Purdue University
Date: 2019-04-05
In West Lafayette, Indiana, Purdue University affiliate startup Gen3Bio reports it is advancing a unique way to transform algae used to purify municipal wastewater into specialty bio-based chemicals such as biofuels or bioplastics. The company's "patented enzyme technology breaks open the algae and takes out the sugars, fats and proteins, and converts those into specialty chemicals. It's a way to keep the carbon cycle going by renewing the use of the algae into useful and safe products," according to Bio3Gen founder and CEO Kelvin Okamoto.

Gen3Bio has been accepted into two accelerator programs focused on advancing new environmentally friendly technologies -- the BREW in Milwaukee and Carbontech Labs in San Francisco.

The BREW accelerator, sponsored by The Water Council, focuses on fresh water, wastewater treatment and water treatment technologies.The BREW accelerator offers selected companies $50,000 in funds, connections to office and research space, and access to mentors. At the end of the program in June, Gen3bio, along with the other participants, will pitch their technologies to a panel of investors.

Gen3Bio received assistance from the Purdue Foundry, a startup accelerator that works with any Indiana-based company. The technology is patented and exclusively licensed from the University of Toledo. (Source: Gen3Bio, Purdue News Service, 4 April, 2019) Contact: Gen3Bio, Kelvin Okamoto, kokamoto@gen3bio.com; Purdue Research Foundation, Tom Coyne, (765) 588-1044, tjcoyne@prf.org, www.prf.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio3Gen,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Purdue University ,  


Purdue FLORE Researchers Investigating Alternative Fuels (R&D)
Purdue University
Date: 2018-09-07
Researchers at Purdue University's Fuel Laboratory of Renewable Energy (FLORE) in West Lafayette, Indiana, report they are one of three laboratory's in the US testing the composition of diesel and aviation fuels in an effort to create cost efficient fuels.

According to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), which regulates the development of fuels, testing guidelines it can take up to 5 years' development to approve a fuel. The tests consume thousands of gallons of fuel and cost nearly $30 million, a cost that FLORE hopes to reduce. (Source: Purdue, wlfi.com, 5 Sept., 2018) Contact: Purdue University, FLORE, Gozdem Kilaz, Dir., (765) 494-7486, gkilaz@purdue.edu, www.purdue.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Purdue University,  Biofuel,  Clean Fuel,  


DEFRA OKs £2Mn for UK Peatland Restoration (Int'l Funding)
DEFRA
Date: 2018-05-21
In the UK, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) reports it has approved a £2 million funding application from a partnership of regional organizations for funding the restoration of 1,680 hectares of peatland on Bodmin Moor, Dartmoor and Exmoor.

According to the restoration project leader Morag Angus, of South West Water, "The peatlands of South West England are very important for water quality, carbon storage, biodiversity, cultural history, recreation and farming but they are the most vulnerable in the UK to the impacts of climate change, due to their southerly position. For this reason, they need to be prioritized nationally and restored for the benefit of all and future generations."

Peatlands store vast amounts of carbon in their soils -- about 60-times the amount of carbon that is released annually from fossil fuel burning. One-third of all the soil carbon in the world is in peatland ecosystems even though they cover only 3 pct of the terrestrial land surface, according to a 2015 joint study from Chapman University in California, University of Oregon and Purdue University . (Source: DEFRA, Cornish Times, 20 May, 2018)Contact: DEFRA, www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-environment-food-rural-affairs

More Low-Carbon Energy News DEFRA,  Peatland,  Carbon Storage,  


Spero Energy Scores Bio-Based Products R&D Grant (Funding)
Spero Energy Inc.
Date: 2017-10-09
Purdue Research Park-based Spero Energy Inc. is reporting receipt of $100,000 in USDA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant funding for R&D to increase the availability and competitiveness of biobased products within the agricultural market.

Spero Energy is a Purdue University spin-out pioneer technology provider for the manufacturer of high value renewable chemicals from biomass lignin. The company's patented renewable, biobased chelate molecules are used to bind essential micronutrients and deliver them efficiently to a variety of crops. Effective use of biobased chelates is shown to increase crop production and yields.(Source: Spero Energy, Hoosier Ag, Oct., 2017) Contact: Spero Energy, info@speroenergy.com, www.speroenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Spero Energy,  Bioproduct,  Biofuel,  Bioenergy,  biochemical,  


$15Mn DOE Funding for Integrated Biorefineries R&D (Funding, R&D)
DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office, BETO
Date: 2017-09-22
In Washington, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA are reporting the awarding of as much as $15 million to eight projects seeking to enhance the operations of integrated biorefineries and resolve R&D challenges needed for the "successful scale-up and reliable operations" of integrated biorefineries (IBRs). Other objectives will be to cut capital and operating costs and support the production of advanced or cellulosic biofuels and higher-value bioproducts.

The projects will focus on: continuous handling of solid materials and feeding systems to reactors under various operating conditions; high-value products from waste in an integrated biorefinery; industrial separations within an integrated biorefinery; and analytical modeling of solid materials and reactor feeding systems.

Thermochemical Recovery International Inc, Texas A&M Agrilife Research, White Dog Labs, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the South Dakota School of Mines, Forest Concepts, Clemson University and Purdue University are among the funding recipients. (Source: US DOE, BETO, Renewables Now, Others, 21 Sept., 2017) Contact: US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, https://nifa.usda.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biorefinery,  DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office,  BETO,  


Purdue Granted $19.75Mn for Shale Gas R&D (Funding, R&D)
National Science Foundation,Purdue
Date: 2017-09-15
In West Lafayette, Indiana, the new Purdue University Center for Innovative and Strategic Transformation of Alkane Resources (CISTAR), which begins operating Oct. 1, reports it has received a commitment for nearly $20 million over 5 years in grant funding from the National Science Foundation for development of new technologies to produce fuels from shale gas deposits in the U.S.

The research team's approach to this problem is to convert light hydrocarbons from shale gas into chemicals and transportation fuels using a network of portable, modular processing plants. Essentially, the process would turn gas from the shale into liquid, which could be used as a fuel. The NSF wants to see the technology commercialized at the end of the 10 years, according to the Purdue research team. (Source: Purdue, Center for Innovative and Strategic Transformation of Alkane Resources, Journal & Courier, 12 Sept., 2017) Contact: Purdue University, Center for Innovative and Strategic Transformation of Alkane Resources ,Fabio Ribeiro, Dir., (765) 494-4050, cistar@purdue.edu, https://cistar.us, www.purdue.edu; National Science Foundation, (703) 292-5111, www.nsf.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Purdue University,  Shale Gas,  Alternative Fuel,  National Science Foundation,  

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