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Hottest Month Ever Recorded, by the Numbers (Ind. Report)
NOAA
Date: 2021-08-16
Following up on our 9th June report, according to new global data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information, July 2021 has earned the unenviable distinction as the world's hottest month ever recorded!

  • Around the globe -- The combined land and ocean-surface temperature was 1.67 degrees F (0.93 of a degree C) above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees F (15.8 degrees C), making it the hottest July since records began 142 years ago. It was 0.02 of a degree F (0.01 of a degree C) higher than the previous record set in July 2016, which was then tied in 2019 and 2020.

  • The Northern Hemisphere -- The land-surface only temperature was the highest ever recorded for July, at an unprecedented 2.77 degrees F (1.54 degrees C) above average, surpassing the previous record set in 2012.

  • Regional records -- Asia had its hottest July on record, besting the previous record set in 2010; Europe had its second-hottest July on record-tying with July 2010 and trailing behind July 2018; and North America, South America, Africa and Oceania all had a top-10 warmest July.

  • Extreme heat and global climate change -- With last month's data, it remains very likely that 2021 will rank among the world's 10-warmest years on record, according to NCEI's Global Annual Temperature Rankings Outlook. Extreme heat detailed in NOAA's monthly NCEI reports is also a reflection of the long-term changes outlined in a major report released this week by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change offsite link.

    "Scientists from across the globe delivered the most up-to-date assessment of the ways in which the climate is changing. It is a sobering IPCC report that finds that human influence is, unequivocally, causing climate change, and it confirms the impacts are widespread and rapidly intensifying," according to NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. (Source: NOAA, 13 Aug., 2021) Contact: NOAA, Rick Spinrad, Ph.D., Administrator, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NOAA,  Climate Change,  


  • May 2021 CO2 Emissions Rise to Record High (Ind. Report)
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Date: 2021-07-07
    Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego are reporting atmospheric carbon dioxide -- by far the most abundant human-caused greenhouse gas -- peaked for 2021 in May at a monthly average of 419 ppm, the highest level since accurate measurements began 63 years ago.

    While the year-to-year increase of 1.8 ppm in the May CO2 peak was slightly less than previous years, CO2 measurements for the first five months of 2021 showed a 2.3 ppm increase over the same five months of 2020, close to the average annual increase from 2010 to 2019.

    According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), Covid-induced lock downs in 2020 led to a 5.8 pct decline in global energy-related CO2 emissions, the largest annual percentage decline since World War II. However, with the opening up of lock downs and pandemic-induced restrictions loosened, global CO2 emissions started climbing again. The IEA notes CO2 emissions will see a rise of 1.5 billion tonnes -- the second-largest annual increase ever -- in 2021. (Source: NOAA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, June., 2021) Contact: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 858-534-3624, www.scripps.ucsd.edu; NOAA, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration news,  Carbon Emissions news,  


    May 2021 CO2 Emissions Rise to Record High (Ind. Report)
    Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,Scripps Institution of Oceanography
    Date: 2021-06-09
    Scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego are reporting atmospheric carbon dioxide -- by far the most abundant human-caused greenhouse gas -- peaked for 2021 in May at a monthly average of 419 ppm, the highest level since accurate measurements began 63 years ago.

    While the year-to-year increase of 1.8 ppm in the May CO2 peak was slightly less than previous years, CO2 measurements for the first five months of 2021 showed a 2.3 ppm increase over the same five months of 2020, close to the average annual increase from 2010 to 2019.

    According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), Covid-induced lock downs in 2020 led to a 5.8 pct decline in global energy-related CO2 emissions, the largest annual percentage decline since World War II. However, with the opening up of lock downs and pandemic-induced restrictions loosened, global CO2 emissions started climbing again. The IEA notes CO2 emissions will see a rise of 1.5 billion tonnes -- the second-largest annual increase ever -- in 2021. (Source: NOAA, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, June., 2021) Contact: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 858-534-3624, www.scripps.ucsd.edu; NOAA, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration news,  Scripps Institution of Oceanography news,  Carbon Emissions news,  Climate Change news,  


    Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    NOAA
    Date: 2021-06-09
    "We are adding roughly 40 billion metric tons of CO2 pollution to the atmosphere per year.

    "That is a mountain of carbon that we dig up out of the Earth, burn, and release into the atmosphere as CO2 -- year after year. If we want to avoid catastrophic climate change, the highest priority must be to reduce CO2 pollution to zero at the earliest possible date." -- Pieter Tans, NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory, June, 2021, www.moaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NOAA,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Biden Budget Proposes $36Bn for Climate Change Fight (Ind. Report)
    Biden
    Date: 2021-06-02
    In Washington on Friday 27 May, US president Joe Biden released his proposed budget for fiscal year 2022 calling for more than $36 billion to fight climate change -- $14 billion more than the 2021 figure.

    The budget proposes $4 billion for climate change research and $7 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as well as a $2 billion investment aimed "putting welders, electricians, and other skilled laborers to work building clean energy projects." The budget also earmarks $6.5 billion in loans for clean energy, energy storage and transmission projects in rural communities.

    The funding would include $10 billion or more, a up roughly 30 pct from 2021, for clean energy innovation across non-defense agencies. (Source: The White House, PR, 27 May, 2021)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change news,  Biden news,  Renewable Energy news,  


    Biden Climate Change Budget Supports Clean Energy (Ind. Report)
    Biden, Climate Change
    Date: 2021-06-02
    In Washington on Friday 27 May, US president Joe Biden released his proposed budget for fiscal year 2022 calling for more than $36 billion to fight climate change, $14 billion more than the 2021 figure.

    The budget proposes $4 billion for climate change research and $7 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The budget also earmarks $6.5 billion in loans for clean energy, energy storage and transmission projects in rural communities with $2 billion earmarked for "putting welders, electricians, and other skilled laborers to work building clean energy projects." The funding would also include $10 billion or more, up roughly 30 pct from 2021, for clean energy innovation across non-defense agencies. (Source: The White House, PR, 27 May, 2021)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Renewable Energy,  Clean Energy,  Biden,  


    Notable NOAA Quote -- Emissions Reduction Progress
    NOAA
    Date: 2021-04-09
    "Progress in emissions reductions is not visible in the CO2 record. We continue to commit our planet -- for centuries or longer -- to more global heating, sea level rise, and extreme weather events every year.

    "If humans were to suddenly stop emitting CO2, it would take thousands of years for our CO2 emissions so far to be absorbed into the deep ocean and atmospheric CO2 to return to pre-industrial levels." -- Pieter Tans, Senior Scientist, NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory, June, 2020, www.research.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NOAA,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    CO2, Methane Emissions Surged in 2020 (NOAA Ind. Report)
    NOAA
    Date: 2021-04-09
    In Washington, just released research from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found carbon dioxide and methane -- which is nearly 30 times more potent at trapping heat within the atmosphere than CO2 -- emissions surged in 2020.

    Research data collected at remote NOAA sampling locations indicated the global surface average for CO2 was 412.5 parts per million last year -- a 2.6 ppm increase. The global increase rate constituted the fifth-highest on record for a single year, after 1987, 1998, 2015 and 2016, according to NOAA. Atmospheric methane's annual increase for 2020 was 14.7 parts per billion, the largest in the 37 years NOAA has measured it. (Source: NOAA Research News, Website PR, 7 Apr., 2021) Contact: NOAA, oar.communications@noaa.gov, www. research.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Mathane,  NOAA,  


    Orsted, NOAA to Share Mid-Atlantic Offshore Wind Data (Ind. Report)
    Orsted, NOAA
    Date: 2021-04-07
    In Washington, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is reporting a first-of-its-kind agreement with Orsted Wind Power North America LLC, under which NOAA will have access to physicial and biological data from Orsted-leased waters (subject to U.S. jurisdiction). This agreement paves the way for future data-sharing agreements with other developers, as the wind energy industry grows. NOAA will be able to look at air and water quality and emissions, meteorology, coastal currents and waves, hydrographic mapping, and physical oceanography.

    Orsted is behind the Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind Project as well as the Skipjack Wind Farm, one of two planned for the waters off Ocean City. The company plans to install nearly 3,000 megawatts of wind energy projects in the U.S. between now and 2026. (Source: NOAA, PR, 5 Apr., 2021) Contact: Orsted Offshore North America, David Hardy, CEO,, Allan Bodskov Andersen, IR, +45 99 55 79 96, alban@orsted.dk, www.orsted.dk; NOAA, Ben Friedman, Acting Administrator, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Orsted,  NOAA,  Offshore Wind,  


    Orsted, NOAA to Share Mid-Atlantic Offshore Wind Data (Ind. Report)
    Orsted, NOAA
    Date: 2021-04-06
    In Washington, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is reporting a first-of-its-kind agreement with Orsted Wind Power North America LLC, under which NOAA will have access to physicial and biological data from Orsted-leased waters (subject to U.S. jurisdiction). This agreement paves the way for future data-sharing agreements with other developers, as the wind energy industry grows. NOAA will be able to look at air and water quality and emissions, meteorology, coastal currents and waves, hydrographic mapping, and physical oceanography.

    Orsted is behind the Coastal Virginia Offshore Wind Project as well as the Skipjack Wind Farm, one of two planned for the waters off Ocean City. The company plans to install nearly 3,000 megawatts of wind energy projects in the U.S. between now and 2026. (Source: NOAA, PR, 5 Apr., 2021) Contact: Orsted Offshore North America, David Hardy, CEO NOAA, Ben Friedman, Acting Administrator, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Orsted news,  NOAA news,  Offshore Wind news,  


    Climate Science Denier Appointed to NOAA Post (Ind. Report)
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    Date: 2020-09-16
    The Trump administration has appointed long-time climate change skeptic David Legates to help run the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the federal agency charged with producing "much of the climate research funded" by the government.

    David Russell Legates is an American climatologist and professor of geography at the University of Delaware. He is the former Director of the Center for Climatic Research at the same university and a former Delaware state climatologist. He is also known for suggesting "an outcome of burning fossil fuels would be a more habitable planet for humans" and similar comments.

    Legates is affiliated with the Heartland Institute, a partially fossil fuel industry funded free-market think tank that claims human-caused climate change is not a serious threat. (Source: NPR, Various Media, NOAA, 14 Sept., 2020) Contact: NOAA, David Legates, (301) 713-1208, david.legates@noaa.gov, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ,  


    Notable Quote -- Emissions Reduction Progress
    NOAA
    Date: 2020-06-10
    "Progress in emissions reductions is not visible in the CO2 record. We continue to commit our planet -- for centuries or longer -- to more global heating, sea level rise, and extreme weather events every year.

    "If humans were to suddenly stop emitting CO2, it would take thousands of years for our CO2 emissions so far to be absorbed into the deep ocean and atmospheric CO2 to return to pre-industrial levels." -- Pieter Tans, Senior Scientist, NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory, June, 2020

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NOAA news,  CO2 news,  Carbon Emissions news,  


    Atmospheric Methane Levels Hit Record High (Ind. Report)
    NOAA
    Date: 2020-04-13
    A preliminary estimate from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found that levels of atmospheric methane, a relatively short-lived heat-trapping gas roughly 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide, have hit an all-time high.

    In 2019, the concentration of atmospheric methane reached nearly 1875 ppb, the highest level since record-keeping began in 1983. 2019 also saw the second-largest single-year leap in two decades.

    The NOAA analysis notes "methane emissions primarily come from natural sources, like wetlands, and man-made sources, like farms and oil and gas wells. In wetlands, microbes excrete methane, an issue that humans can do little about. On farms, cows and sheep belch methane -- a problem that people can address by raising fewer livestock. The easiest way to stem methane pollution, however, is to limit its release from oil and gas drilling sites."

    Methane levels were more or less flat from the late 1990s to the early 2000s. They began to rise after 2006 thanks, at least in part, to more oil and gas drilling. Their recent uptick threatens the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement, as scientists had assumed that methane concentrations would stay level and then drop off when they projected how countries would meet their climate targets.

    Download the NOAA Trends in Atmospheric Methane HERE. (Source: NOAA, Nexus Media, Jeremy Deaton, 12 April, 2020) Contact: NOAA, (301) 713-1208, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Methane,  NOAA,  GHG,  Climate Change,  Atmospheric Methane,  


    Global Ozone Efforts Help Mitigate Southern Jet Stream Climate Damage, NOAA Study Finds (Int'l. Report)
    Montreal Protocol,NOAA
    Date: 2020-04-01
    A recently released study from NOAA Chemical Science Department has found international cooperation in ozone-depleting chemicals helps to normalize the southern jet framework after decades of social instability. Scientists say the results show that governments have the ability to recover a damaged climate system if they act quickly and harmoniously to resolve the issue.

    The southern jet stream is a strong wind that forms the southern hemisphere, especially in summer and weather patterns. By 2000, it had returned to its natural course. It moved south in Antarctica to the latitude of every decade, affecting the paths of storms and rains in South America, Africa, the Middle East, and Australia.

    Previous research has proven that this is mainly due to ozone layer deficiency due to synthetic chemical compounds such as ozone damaging CFCs, and HCFCs, which are found in refrigerators, aerosols and other industrial processes were phased out in 1987. The study found that the Montreal Protocol has halted the southern route of the jet stream since the year 2000 and it may begin to change as the ozone layer starts to close. Dept. 2019 satellite imagery revealed that the annual peak of the ozone hole was 16.4 million square kilometres, the smallest since 1982.

    Ozone restoration is not sufficient to normalize the Southern Hemisphere climate, as other industrial emissions, such as carbon dioxide and methane, are harmful to the environment. There is a battle between increasing CO2 and ozone recovery. That is why we see a decline. Previous studies have reported that ozone holes have a chimney effect that emits some heat from the atmosphere, which means the Antarctic is warmer than the North. (Source: NOAA Chemical Science Dept. tenreports, 28 Mar., 2020) Contact: NOAA Chemical Sciences, Antara Banerjee, Study Author, 303-497-6455, antara.banerjee@noaa.gov, www.esrl.noaa.gov/csd

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Montreal Protocol,  Ozone Depletion,  Climate Change,  NOAA,  


    Atmospheric GHG Concentrations Hit Another High (Ind. Report)
    Global Atmosphere Watch
    Date: 2019-12-02
    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Greenhouse Gas Bulletin is reporting globally averaged concentrations of CO2 reached 407.8 parts per million (PPM) in 2018, up from 405.5 ppm in 2017. Methane and nitrous oxide also surged by higher amounts than during the past decade.

    The increase in CO2 from 2017 to 2018 was close to that observed from 2016 to 2017 and just above the average over the last decade. Global levels of CO2 crossed the symbolic and significant 400 ppm benchmark in 2015.

    Additionally, since 1990, there has been a 43 pct increase in total radiative forcing -- the warming effect on the climate -- by long-lived greenhouse gases. CO2 accounts for about 80 pct of this, according to figures from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Annual Greenhouse Gas Index. (Source: WMO, Nov., 2019) Contact: WMO, Clare Nullis, Media,, +41 79 709 13 97, cnullis@wmo.int, www.wmo.int; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ,  Global Atmosphere Watch,  


    Alaska's Temperature Soaring, Sea Ice Disappearing (Ind. Report)
    Climate Change,NOAA
    Date: 2019-08-19
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is reporting July, 2019 was Alaska's warmest month on record as well as the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880.

    The state's average temperature in July was 14.5 degrees -- 3 degrees above average and 0.4 higher than the previous warmest month of July 2004. Anchorage, the state's largest city, soared to 32.22 degrees for the first on the 4th of July, 2019.

    As a sign of things to come, sea ice off Alaska's north and northwest shore and other Arctic regions retreated to the lowest level -- 7.6 million square kilometres -- ever recorded for July, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Centre at the University of Colorado. By way of comparison, the previous high sea ice loss was the size of South Carolina in July in 2012. (Source: NOAA, New Daily, AAP, 18 Aug., 2019) Contact: Alaska Division of Forestry, (907) 269-8463, Tim Mowry, forestry.alaska.gov; University of Alaska Fairbanks International Arctic Research Centre, Brian Brettschneider, Climate Researcher, (907) 474-2484, www.uaf-iarc.org; NOAA, Benjamin Friedman, (301) 713-1208, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  NOAA,  


    800,000 Year High Atmospheric CO2 Levels in 2019 (Ind. Report)
    Climate Change
    Date: 2019-08-19
    In May, 2019, the Mauna Loa Observatory NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Hawaii reported atmospheric CO2 levels at 415.26 ppm, marking a historic precedent in the last 800,000 years. The Observatory also noted there is now more CO2 on the planet than ever since the dawn of humanity,

    The last time the planet came close to matching the climate of today was during the Pliocene Epoch when the Arctic was covered in trees instead of ice and sea levels were roughly 20 meters higher than today, according to Tech Wire (Source: Mauna Loa Observatory, Various Media, Journal Pioneer, 14 May, 2019) Contact: Mauna Loa Observatory, (808) 933-6965, www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/obop/mlo

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Dioxide news,  COs news,  Climate Change news,  


    800,000 Year High Atmospheric CO2 Levels Recorded (Ind. Report)
    Mauna Loa Observatory
    Date: 2019-05-15
    Data from the Mauna Loa Observatory NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory in Hawaii has recorded atmospheric CO2 levels at 415.26 ppm, marking a historic precedent in the last 800,000 years, since before the evolution of homo sapiens. There is more CO2 on the planet than ever since the dawn of humanity, according to a Hawaii observatory.

    According to Tech Wire, the last time the planet came close to matching the climate of today was during the Pliocene Epoch when the Arctic was covered in trees instead of ice and sea levels were roughly 20 meters higher than today.(Source: Mauna Loa Observatory, Various Media, Journal Pioneer, 14 May, 2019) Contact: Mauna Loa Observatory, (808) 933-6965, www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/obop/mlo

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  Climate Change,  

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