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Avantium selects Netherland Location for FDCA Plant (Int'l Report)
Avantium
Date: 2020-01-13
In the Netherlands, Amsterdam-based renewable chemicals specialist Avantium is reporting it will build its furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) bioplastic flagship plant at Chemie Park Delfzijl, the Netherlands. The $30 million, five-kiloton facility will be constructed near Avantium's pilot biorefinery, producing glucose and lignin from non-food biomass. The plant is expected to be completed in 2023. (Source: Avantium, PR, Website, 8 Jan., 2019) Contact: Avantium, Tom van Aken , CEO, +31 (0)20 586 8080, www.avantium.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Avantium ,  Bioplastic,  


Biorefining Startup Chrysalix Technologies Scores Funding (Int'l)
Chrysalix Technologies,Imperial College London
Date: 2019-12-13
Imperial College London reports its spin-out company Chrysalix Technologies has been awarded €2.3 million in grant funding from the European Innovation Council's Accelerator programme as well as additional investment from the European Investment Bank (EIB) and others investors.

Chrysalix Technologies BioFlex process uses waste wood and agricultural by-products as well as sustainably grown biomass to produce bioplastics, biofuels, biomaterials and greener chemicals. The process separates the different naturally occurring chemical components of wood, which are lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses. Once isolated individually, these components can then be used for a variety of applications such as as bio-chemicals, precursors for plastics or as new materials themselves , according to the company website. (Source: Chrysalix Technologies, Imperial College London, PR, 12 Dec., 2019) Contact: Imperial College London, www.imperial.ac.uk; Chrysalix Technologies, Twitter: @ChrysalixTech, info@chrysalixtechnologies.com, www.chrysalixtechnologies.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Imperial College London,  ,  Biorefining,  


Biorenewable Deployment Consortium IDs Biobased Renewables Trends (Ind. Report)
Biorenewable Deployment Consortium
Date: 2019-12-11
In Richmond, Virginia, the Biorenewable Deployment Consortium (BDC), which tracks global developments in the biobased Industries, reports it has identified the following key trends that have emerged over the last decade:

1. The development of biobased products will vary widely by region on a worldwide basis, and national policy will continue to be a driver of emerging industries,

2. Conversion of waste streams to value added products is a trend that will continue,

3. The US will continue to be a leader in the use of biofuels, on a percentage basis,

4. The relatively recent communication of the environmental impact of spent plastic has caused a public awareness that now pushes the development of sustainable replacements,

5. The use and value of lignin will emerge this decade.

For additional detail, please request full text from ehorn@biorenewabledc.org at the Biorenewable Deployment Consortium.

Since 2006 , BDC has become a highly respected 501(c)(3) organization and has worked to bring together like-minded companies to share ideas and partner to deploy bio-processes that can be economic in the long run without government subsidy, by investigating new processes, being a resource, brokering partnerships, and holding two forums a year for its members, where leading edge information from various bio-companies is shared and tours are made of bio-facilities. BDC recognizes the need for low cost feedstock, cost effective measures such as integration of processes, high value products, and good management to achieve the economics needed for success. (Source: Biorenewable Deployment Consortium, PR, 9 Dec., 2019) Contact: Biorenewable Deployment Consortium , Eric Horn, Exec. Dir., ehorn@biorenewabledc.org, www.biorenewabledc.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biorenewable Deployment Consortium ,  


Danish Collaboration Investigating Maritime Biofuel (Int'l.)
NORDEN
Date: 2019-12-09
In Denmark, Hellerup-headquartered global "tramp" shipping company NORDEN A/S and Kvasir Technologies, a spin-off from the Technical University of Denmark, report they are are testing a plant-based biofuel as part of a joint industry initiative aimed at developing Danish expertise in environment-friendly low-carbon maritime shipping fuels.

Kvasir Technologies is focused on transforming biomass lignin and using it in fuel production. As part of the joint project, a full-scale test of Kvasir's fuel will be conducted on one of NORDEN's vessels to better understand the characteristics of biofuel and prove its suitability as a future maritime fuel,

In September 2018, NORDEN was the first to conduct a test voyage on a large ocean-going vessel powered by CO2 neutral biofuel. (Source: Norden, Bunkerspot, 6 Dec., 2019) Contact: Kvasir Technologies, +45 22 11 07 75, www.kvasirtechnologies.com NORDEN, Henrik Rojel, Fuel Efficiency and Decarbonisation Manager, +45 33 15 04 51, www.ds-norden.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Marine Biofuel,  Maritime Biofuel,  


Woody Biomass-to-Fuels Studied at Purdue Univ. (R&D Report)
Purdue University Center for Plant Biology
Date: 2019-11-18
In West Lafayette, Indiana, researchers at the Purdue University Center for Plant Biology (C3Bio) report their study of ways to increase production of biofuels from non-food biomass has identified lignin, a complex compound in cell walls, blocks access to plant carbohydrates that could be cleaved into sugars and then fermented into biofuels, as one of several barriers to the efficient conversion of that biomass.

The study notes researchers have found a way of removing lignin and making useful products from it, as well as getting access to plant carbohydrates for production of biofuels. Even with lignin removed, however, the Purdue team had to find ways to break the tightly connected plant cells apart so that chemical catalysts or yeasts used in the biofuel refining process could do their jobs.

With all the lignin removed through a nickel-carbon catalysis, the research team treated poplar wood particles with trifluoroacetic acid to loosen the tightly packed crystalline cellulose and its aggregation into large bundles in plant cell walls. The trifluoroacetic acid causes the cellulose to swell, making it easier to access the glucose molecules present in the cell walls for fermentation to ethanol -- or using other chemical catalysts discovered by the C3Bio team, the cellulose and other carbohydrates can be converted to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and levulinic acid, which are substrates or precursors for liquid hydrocarbon fuels. (Source: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Plant Biotechnology Journal, AgriNews, 9 Nov., 2019)Contact: Purdue Center for Plant Biology, C3Bio, Prof. Maureen McCann, 765-496-1779, mmccann@purdue.edu, www.purdue.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Woody Biomass,  Purdue University,  


Maersk, Partners Developing Lignin-Ethanol Marine Fuel (Int'l Report)
Maersk,Copenhagen University,
Date: 2019-11-01
Maritime shipping giant Maersk reports it is working with Copenhagen University, Wallenius Wilhelmsen, BMW Group, H&M Group, Levi Strauss & Co. and Marks & Spencer to explore a blend of lignin and ethanol (LEO) fuel for sustainable shipping.

Lignin is isolated in large quantities as a by-product of lignocellulosic ethanol and pulp and paper mills. Copenhagen University is currently running the laboratory-scale development of LEO marine fuel with the project aiming to move into phase II -- testing the fuel on actual vessel engines -- in the second quarter of 2020. Following a successful phase II, phase III will begin -- the scaling up of LEO fuel production. (Source: Maersk, Container Management, Oct., 2019) Contact: Maresk, Soren Toft, CEO, www.maerskline.com; Copenhagen University, www.ku.dk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Maersk,  Ethanol,  Lignin,  Biofoul,  Marine Biofuel,  


ExxonMobil, IIT Madras Ink Biofuel Research Collaboration (Int'l)
IIT Madras,ExxonMobil
Date: 2019-10-14
India's IIT Madras is reporting a five-year joint-research agreement with Houston-headquartered oil industry giant ExxonMobil Research in Energy and Biofuels (EMRE). The agreement is focused on biofuels, data analytics, gas conversion and transport. EMRE is the research and engineering arm of ExxonMobil Corporation.

The project aims to deconstruct rice straw effectively, bagasse and other biomass varieties of Indian origin to produce sugars, which will directly feed into ExxonMobil's bio-conversion platform; convert the lignin present in biomass to valuable phenols using novel catalysts, and evaluate the environmental and economic implications of performing such conversions at scale.

India is the world's 3rd largest agro-residues producer with the surplus potential of over 230 million tpy after China and Brazil. India's huge biofuel potential is expected to be realized shortly with the Government of India's plan to grow the biofuel industry into a $15.6 billion economy, according to the release. (Source: IIT Madras, Exxon Mobil, Contact: IIT Madras, Dr. R. Vinu, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, www.che.iitm.ac.in

More Low-Carbon Energy News IIT Madras,  ExxonMobil,  Biofuel,  


Aviva Launches Climate Transition European Equity Fund (Int'l.)
Aviva Investors
Date: 2019-09-13
In the UK, London-headquartered Aviva Investors is reporting the launch of its Climate Transition European Equity Fund that will focus on the transition to a low-carbon economy. The new fund has received €100 million seed investment from Aviva France.

The fund will invest in companies that derive revenues from goods and services that address climate change mitigation and adaptation, and companies aligning their business models with a warmer, low-carbon world. It will not invest in stocks exposed to coal, unconventional fossil fuels, Arctic oil and gas production, or thermal coal electricity generation. (Source: Aviva Investors, City Wire, 12 Sept., 2019) Contact: Aviva Investors, Euan Munro, CEO, www.avivainvestors.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Aviva Investors,  LowCarbon Energy,  


Associations Call for Canadian Clean Fuel Strategy (Ind. Report)
Wood Pellet Association of Canada
Date: 2019-09-13
Advanced Biofuels Canada, Canadian Biogas Association, Canadian Gas Association, Electric Mobility Canada and Wood Pellet Association of Canada are forecasting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of over 50 million metric tons (Mt) per year by 2030 through greater production and use of renewable energy in Canada.

Collectively, the associations say they represent technologies that can, with the right policy measures in place, exceed the proposed federal Clean Fuel Standard's objective of 30 Mt of annual GHG emission reductions by 2030.

To that end, the associations are calling on the Canadian federal government to adopt a Clean Fuel Strategy by 2020. The strategy would include setting a clear path to clean and renewable fuel use by 2030 by: establishing clear market signals for clean fuels and electric vehicles; aligning clean and renewable fuel regulations to meet targeted clean fuel and EV use; establish clean fuel program funding to support clean and renewable fuel production capacity and infrastructure investments, and support EV adoption; and Support research and development programs to maintain Canadian leadership in clean fuel technologies and innovation. (Source: Wood Pellet Association of Canada, Biomass Mag., Sept., 2019) Contact: Wood Pellet Association of Canada, www.pellet.org; Canadian Biogas Association, (613) 822-1004, www.biogasassociation.ca; Advanced Biofuels Canada, Ian Thompson, Pres., (604) 947-0040, ithomson@advancedbiofuels.ca, www.advancedbiofuels.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Advanced Biofuels Canada,  Canadian Biogas Association,  Wood Pellet Association of Canada,  Clean Fuel,  Biofuel,  


Gevo, Leaf Resources Ink Joint Development Agreement (Ind. Report)
Gevo,Leaf Resources
Date: 2019-09-13
Englewood, Colorado-based renewable fuels and chemicals manufacturer Gevo, Inc. and Queensland, Australasia-based Leaf Resources, a specialist in converting plant biomass into industrial sugars, are reporting a joint development and commercialization agreement under which Gevo will explore the potential use of cellulosic-derived sugars and glycerol from Leaf Resources and the ability to convert these to hydrocarbon molecules useful as fuels or chemicals.

Leaf Resources' Glycell Process pre-treatment technology breaks down plant biomass to generate a higher yield of cellulose than conventional approaches. The pretreatment is followed by enzymatic hydrolysis which converts cellulose into cellulosic sugars. The process also yields lignin, hemicellulose and refined glycerol.

Gevo has developed technology for producing isobutanol from renewable feedstocks using a yeast that has been developed to produce isobutanol and a product recovery technology that continuously removes isobutanol as it is formed. Gevo adds its proprietary yeast to fermentable sugars to convert the sugars to isobutanol. (Source: GEVO, Green Car Congress, 12 Sept., 2019) Contact: Leaf Resources, +61 7 3188 9040, www.leafresources.com.au; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Isobutanol,  Leaf Resources,  GEVO,  Cellulosic,  


NewEnergyBlue Licenses Inbicon Low-Carbon Fuel Tech. (Ind. Report)
Inbicon,NewEnergyBlue
Date: 2019-08-12
NewEnergyBlue LLC reports acquisition of exclusive rights to Inbicon bio-conversion technology throughout the Americas and will first employ it to turn North Dakota wheat straw into a high-value, carbon-neutral automotive fuel. The technology license was purchased from Denmark-based Orsted which developed the technology over 15 years at a cost exceeding $200 million.

NewEnergyBlue plans to construct a series of biomass refineries across grain belts and sugar-growing regions to process agricultural residues -- wheat straw, cornstalks, sugar bagasse and others -- into a high-octane advanced ethanol that's more than 100 pct below the carbon baseline of grain ethanol -- more than 140 pct below gasoline.

Using Inbicon technology , NewEnergyBlue's refinery utilizes high-pressure steam followed by an enzyme bath to break down the biomass fibers into sugars and lignin that are valuable for making liquid and solid biofuels. The company expects groundbreaking for its Spiritwood, North Dakota refinery in 2020. (Source: NewEnergyBlue, PR, 12 Aug., 2019) Contact: NewEnergyBlue LLC, Thomas Corle, CEO, Roger Moore, Brand Manager, (717) 626-0557, www.newenergyblue.com; Inbicon, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inbicon

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Biomass,  Low Carbon Fuel,  


Stora Enso Investing in Hard Carbon Lignin Pilot (Int'l.)
Stora Enso
Date: 2019-07-29
Helsinki-headquartered Finnish pulp and paper manufacturer Stora Enso reports it is investing €10 million to build a pilot facility to produce bio-based carbon materials based on lignin at its Sunila Mill in Finland.

The investment in making carbon materials for energy storage further strengthens Stora Enso's opportunities to replace fossil-based and mined raw materials as well as to connect sustainable materials to ongoing technology innovations, according to Stora Enso.

With the new investment, Stora Enso will pilot the processing of lignin -- the main building block of trees -- into a hard carbon intermediate for electrode materials. This lignin will be converted into hard carbon anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with properties similar to graphite. Construction of the pilot facility is slated to get underway before the year end for completion by early 2021.

Stora Enso has been producing lignin industrially at its 50,000 tpy Sunila Mill in Finland since 2015.(Source: Stora Enso, Green Car Congress, 28 July, 2019)Contact: Stora Enso, Patricia Oddshammar, Head of bio-composites, Juan Carlos Bueno, EVP, +55 11 3065 5223, www.storaenso.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Stora Enso,  Lignin,  Hard Carbon,  Energy Storage,  


Stora Enso Investing in Lignin for Energy Storage Pilot (Int'l.)
Stora Enso
Date: 2019-07-29
Helsinki-headquartered Finnish pulp and paper manufacturer Stora Enso reports it is investing €10 million to build a pilot facility to produce bio-based carbon materials based on lignin for energy storage applications

With the new investment, Stora Enso will pilot the processing of lignin -- the main building block of trees -- into a hard carbon intermediate for electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries with properties similar to graphite. Construction of the pilot facility is slated to get underway before the year end for completion by early 2021. Stora Enso has been producing lignin industrially at its 50,000 tpy Sunila Mill in Finland since 2015.(Source: Stora Enso, Green Car Congress, 28 July, 2019)Contact: Stora Enso, Patricia Oddshammar, Head of bio-composites, Juan Carlos Bueno, EVP, +55 11 3065 5223, www.storaenso.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Stora Enso news,  Lignin news,  Energy Storage news,  


Attis Creating NY Ethanol Plant Green Tech Campus (Ind Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2019-06-07
Following up on our previous coverage, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc. reports its recently acquired Sunoco LP's nameplate 100-million gpy corn ethanol plant and grain malting operation in Fulton, New York, will become the centerpiece of its proposed Green Tech Campus. The company will focus on byproduct optimization of the corn ethanol plant and the new production of advanced biofuels and biobased products while also looking to generate "green" power, thus reducing the overall carbon footprint of the Fulton campus and taking advantage of valuable carbon credits to increase the site's profitability.

Attis plans to immediately begin the process of deploying its patented biorefinery technology to further diversify the biofuel and biobased product manufacturing at the campus. Attis will convert extracted locally sourced woody biomass pulp into cellulosic fuels and lignin into bioplastics, carbon fiber and advanced biofuels like renewable diesel and jet fuel.

Attis also aims to improve the quality and volume of co-products currently being produced at the Fulton ethanol plant by implementing its patented and licensed corn oil extraction technology that will almost double the current corn oil production yields at the plant and provide an augmented revenue stream. (Source: Attis Industries, DTN, June, 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries,  Ethanol,  Sunoco LP,  


Spero Renewables Announces DOE BETO R&D Funding (Ind. Report)
Spero Renewables
Date: 2019-05-06
CORRECTION -- The following article appeared in our 22nd April editions with contact errors which are herein corrected. We regret any inconvenience our error may have caused.

Goleta, California-based Spero Renewables LLC, a Green chemistry company, is reporting a $1.6 million cooperative agreement with the US DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to develop and scale-up production of the company's patented SPERLU technology that produces polymers from wood pulp and similar plant-based sources.

The grant is part of a recently announced $80 million DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) initiative supporting 36 bioenergy R&D projects. In addition to biobased products, projects include renewable hydrocarbon fuels and power from non-food Biomass and waste feedstocks.

Spero's SPERLU™ technology converts biomass lignin, a waste byproduct of cellulosic ethanol production that is expensive to remediate, into valuable, environmentally friendly polymers and plastics. The resulting polymers are renewable, free of off-gassing emissions, and formaldehyde-free as opposed to current polymers that come from petrochemicals and are manufactured with formaldehyde, according to the company's website.

According to the company website, "Spero Energy is a technology developer for the production of high value renewable and natural molecules from biomass. The company's novel extractive technology for the manufacture of natural ferulic acid is a game changer for the production of natural vanilla. Spero's one-step lignin conversion (SPERLU™) is key to realizing a fully integrated biorefinery." (Source: Spero Renewables LLC, Spero Website, 19 April, 2019) Contact: Spero Renewables LLC, Mahdi Abu-Omar, Ph.D. Chemistry, Pres., Joe Ramelli, VP Business Dev., (805) 696-2199 x 2001, joe@sperorenewables.com, US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE BETO,  Spero Renewables,  


Nordfuel Bioethanol Plant to Use SEKAB E-Technology (Int'l Report)
Nordfuel
Date: 2019-04-24
The biorefinery Nordfuel reports it is scheduled to construct a €150 million soft wood residues bioethanol and biofuel plant next to the Haapavesi thermal power plant 120 kilometres south of Uleaborg in Northern Finland.

The new facility will utilize Swedish clean-tech company SEKAB E-Technology's Celluapp platform to extract cellulose sugars and lignin from forest or agricultural residues for processing into biofuels or renewable chemical products. The technology can be used in new biorefineries or to develop existing facilities.

The new Nordfuel biorefinery will produce bioethanol and biogas for the transport sector and lignin to fuel the 390-MW power plant in Haapavesi. (Source: Norfuel, April, 2019) Contact: Norduel, Antti Vilkuna, CEO, +358 (0)44 0220 919, antti.vilkuna@nordfuel.fi, http://nordfuel.fi/en/biorefinery

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Biofuel,  Nordful Bioethanol,  


MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative Awarded $750,000 (Funding)
MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative
Date: 2019-03-20
In the Bay State, the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative is reporting receipt of $750,000 in grant funding from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation for a research project that aims to create an online database assessing the carbon intensity of financial institutions. The database would be available to educate and inform U.S. businesses, foundations, universities, and the general public, and possibly consumers , on aligning their choice of banks, investment targets, and insurance companies with sustainability practices, including climate change mitigation. Currently, no standards, databases, or mechanisms exist to assess the full range of financial services firms' carbon intensity.

The research project's ultimate goal is to drive the re-allocation of capital away from carbon-intensive activities to lower-carbon assets in order to significantly reduce emissions and adverse impacts on the environment and of climate change.

The shared vision of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative is to limit global warming emissions to keep global average temperature increase below 3.6 degrees F (2 degrees C) above pre-industrial levels, to protect the planet from climate change and promote human prosperity and health. The International Energy Agency (IEA) has calculated that to have an 80 pct chance of attaining this 3.6 degrees F limit, an additional $36 trillion in clean energy investment would be needed between 2014 and 2050 -- about $1 trillion per year more than is currently invested. (Source: MIT Sloan School of Management, PR, Mar., 2019) Contact: MIT Sloan School of Management, Jason Jay, Director of the MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, www.mitsloan.mit.edu; MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative, mitsloan.mit.edu/sustainability; William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Marilyn Waite, Program Officer, www.hewlett.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News MIT Sloan Sustainability Initiative ,  


Swiss Environment Minister Calls for Climate Change Solidarity (Int'l)
Climate Change
Date: 2019-03-06
In a recent interview, Simonetta Sommaruga, the incoming Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication minister, called for the country to unite to tackle climate change and stressed the need for urgent action on road and air transportation and aligning the financial sector with climate priorities.

The minister noted that politicians should stop burying their heads in the sand in the face of climate change and stop fooling themselves and the population. “When the cows run out of water or the harvest fails, you can't pretend that everything is in order. Doing nothing costs money, she asserted, pointing to the costs of damage from avalanches, fires, and floods. We should stop seeing climate protection as something that only costs", she noted to illustrate her point.

In December 2017, the Swiss Federal Council adopted revisions to the Federal Act on the Reduction of CO2 Emissions (CO2 Act) to help it achieve its commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement. But, in December 2018, the House of Representatives rejected the proposal after conservative-right parties weakened the revisions including removing a domestic CO2 emissions target. (Source: Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication, SWI SwissInfo.ch, 3 Mar., 2019) Contact: Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communication, Simonetta Sommaruga, Minister, +41 58 462 55 11, www.admin.ch/gov/en/start/departments/department-of-environment-transport-energy-communications-detec.html

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


New Energy Blue Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Advancing (Ind. Report)
New Energy Blue
Date: 2018-12-10
In Spiritwood, North Dakota, New Energy Blue LLC reports it is near completion of engineering and permitting on a $150 million plant project that would t plant would process 33 tph of biomass -- wheat straw, corn stover , barley straw -- into 16 million gpy of cellulosic ethanol for the California market. The plant will also produce also produce 110,000 tpy of lignin -- an organic polymer found in the rigid cell walls of plants. The New Energy Blue plant expects to build near the Spirit AgEnergy corn-ethanol plant, and to begin production in 2021. Midwest AgEnergy will manage to New Energy Blue plant.

New Energy Blue is working through a firm in New York City to issue renewable bonds at the end of their development period. North Dakota has $300 million in tax-free renewable municipal bonds that could be used for projects that turn a "waste material," in this case residue, to a "special need renewable product," such as fuel and power, according to New Energy Blue. (Source: New Energy Blue LLC, AgWeek, 10 Dec., 2018) Contact: New Energy Blue LLC, Stephen Rogers, Pres., 717.626.0557, www.newenergyblue.com; Spiritwood,MidwestAgEnergy Group, www.midwestagenergygroup.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Spiritwood ,  Cellulosic Ethanol,  ,  


Attis Industries Launches Bio-Based Technologies Video (Ind. Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2018-11-07
Milton, Georgia-based Attis Industries, Inc. is reporting the launch of a video series on the technologies and bio-based products offered under the company's Innovations division. The video discusses the current inefficiencies in biomass processing and how the Company is taking the next steps to double the biofuel output from biomass.

The transcript of the video states in part: "Our [processing] outputs include pulp and a unique form of high purity lignin. While the pulp can be used in traditional pulp and paper markets or to produce cellulosic ethanol, it's this high purity form of lignin that allows Attis to substantially increase the value and products made from biomass. For every 1.0 pound of cellulosic ethanol produced, Attis is able to recover about 1.3 pounds of high purity lignin. This is an alarming amount of highly concentrated carbon, captured from carbon dioxide and stored by photsyntheisis in plants, that has been overlooked for decades. Attis plans to convert its lignin into transportation fuels such as gasoline, diesel and/or jet fuel which could double the fuel output of biomass, or to convert the lignin into various materials such as plastics, adhesives or carbon fiber."

Link to video HERE. (Source: Attis Industries, Inc. PR, 5 Nov., 2018) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Attis Industries ,  Bioplastic,  Biofuel,  Bio Technologies,  


Biorenewable Deployment Consortium's Raleigh Fall Forum Update (Conference, Ind. Report)
Biorenewable Deployment Consortium
Date: 2018-10-31
The Biorenewable Deployment Consortium (BDC) Fall Forum was held in Raleigh, N.C. on October 9-10 and was combined with a visit to the Velocys' Microchannel Fisher-Tropsch pilot plant that is integrated with the ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) Biomass Gasification and Gas Clean-up system at TRI's Advanced Development Center in Durham. Velocys has announced the commercial "Bayou Fuels" project for Natchez, MS. The project will combine the two companies' technologies to convert locally sourced waste woody biomass into transportation fuel.

The Forum boasted record attendance, including a diverse group of international members and guests. Discussions included updates from leading bio-process companies on new processes and commercial advances that can add value to the forest products industry. Highlights of the Forum included commercial progress of nanotechnology presented by keynote Sean Ireland, VP, Business Development for Fiberlean Technologies; evolutionary value added technologies for the chemical recovery cycle and soap removal / tall oil production; commercial progress of wood to bioproducts from Velocys, Ensyn, and Red Rock; and commercial progress for lignin conversion to end products.

USDA Administrator Bette Brand attended the meeting and tour. "The USDA recognizes the importance of the partnership between government and private industry designed to bridge the early financial issues of start-up companies in the biorenewable area that we believe will help improve economies in rural communities," said Ms. Brand ommented. Meeting attendees participating in USDA programs included Velocys, Ensyn, Red Rock Biofuels, REG, and American Biocarbon.

Masood Akhtar, President of BDC commented, "In BDC's view, it is important for the government to be confident in the companies they financially assist, and the scale up requirements of the USDA have been critical to the success of new start up companies." "The success of the BDC meeting is due to a combination of the mission of the organization, the make-up and participation of the membership and guests, and the ingenuity and progress of the entrepreneurial management teams in the up and coming bio-industry," Akhtar concluded. (Source: BDC, PR, Oct., 2018) Contact: BDC, Ben Thorp, Chairman, (804) 743-3105, Ben.Thorp@biorenewabledc.org, www.biorenewabledc.org; Velocys, Jeff McDaniel, VP, (614) 733-3300, jeff.mcdaniel@velocys.com, www.velocys.com; ThermoChem Recovery International, Chris Doherty, VP, (410) 525-2400, cdoherty@tri-inc.net, www.tri-inc.net

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biorenewable Deployment Consortium,  Velocys,  ThermoChem Recovery International ,  


Texas A&M Awarded $2.2 Mn for Biofuel R&D (R&D, Funding)
Texas A&M
Date: 2018-10-15
In College State, Texas A&M AgriLife Research is reporting receipt of $2.2 million in grant funding from grant from the U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office to support investigation of waste products used in lignocellulosic biofuel production, turning them into valuable agents used in producing commercial products such as biodiesel and asphalt binding agents.

According to Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and project leader Dr. Joshua Yuan, "The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass has been around for many years, but many of the waste products can not be commercialized due to the configuration of these biorefineries. What we are trying to accomplish is developing a streamlined process where the biomass waste at these refineries can be fractionated to produce lipids for biodiesel, asphalt binder modifier and quality carbon fiber. All of these bioproducts can add great value to the economy and enhance their market value."

Yuan noted that lignocellulose bioconversion refineries burn off 60 pct of the lignin produced. Utilizing this lignin offers incentives such as improving the efficiencies of a biorefinery, reducing costs and lowering emissions. The work will include developing an integrated biorefinery program or "a blueprint for future biorefinery development," Yuan added. (Source: Texas A&M AgriLife Research, PR, Oct., 2018) Contact: Dr. Joshua Yuan, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Dr. Joshua Yuan, Dir. Synthetic and Systems Biology Hub, people.tamu.edu/~syuan, www.tamu.edu; US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy

More Low-Carbon Energy News Texas A&M,  US DOE BETO,  lignocellulosic ,  biofuel,  


Notable IPCC Report Quotes Duly Noted
IPCC
Date: 2018-10-10
"It's like a deafening, piercing smoke alarm going off in the kitchen. We have to put out the fire." -- Erik Solheim, Exec. Dir., UN Environment Programme

"Even if it is technically possible, without aligning the technical, political and social aspects of feasibility, it is not going to happen. To limit warming below 1.5 C, or 2 C for that matter, requires all countries and all sectors to act." -- Glen Peters, Center for International Climate Research in Oslo.

"The report paints a very gloomy picture. Time is of the essence and there must be action behind the political ambitions if we are to succeed in slowing down climatic change to a manageable level." -- Lars Lilleholt, Denmark Climate Minister

"We are at a crossroads. The next 10--15 years will be critical." -- Jens Mattias Clausen, Climate & Climate Advisor, Greenpeace. (Source: CPH Post, 8 Oct., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  Paris Climate Agreement,  


Sargasso Seaweed Biogas Production Explored in Yucatan (R&D)
Center for Cientific Research of Yucatan
Date: 2018-09-05
Mexican researchers from the Center for Cientific Research of Yucatan (CICY) are reporting the development of a method to produce biogas (methane) from sargasso seaweed, a brown macroalgae, that commonly and increasingly washes up on the beaches of Yucatan and the Mexican Caribbean.

Researchers from the CICY Renewable Energy Unit collected sargassum, removed the sand and salt, dehydrated it to put it in contact with the fungus Trametes hirsuta, a local microorganism isolated from rotting wood and capable of degrading lignin in these algae.

During the process the fungus breaks down the walls of structures of the macroalgae to leave cellulose and unicellulose which will later pass to a reactor, in which, with the help of climatic conditions and an inoculum (bacterial consortium) will convert the sargasso into methane gas. (Source: CICY, Notimex, September 3, 2018) Contact: Center for Cientific Research of Yucatan, Raul Tapia Tussel, Researcher, Dr. Manuel Martinez Estevez, Director, +999 942 83 30, Ext.353, docencia@cicy.mx, www.cicy.mx

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biogas,  Algae,  Methane,  


Sasol Opposes Proposed South African Carbon Tax (Int'l Report)
Sasol
Date: 2018-08-22
Johannesburg, South Africa-headquartered Sasol has estimated that the state's proposed 120 Rand per ton Carbon Tax Bill would cost the company 1 billion Rand ($70,330,389 US) a year and would be detrimental to growth and would do little to reduce carbon emissions. The draft legislation, which was originally tabled in 2015, is aimed at aligning the South Africa with the Paris Agreement.

The South African Treasury expects the carbon tax to help reduce emissions and help restructure the economy to be less emissions-intensive. The bill is currently before a Parliamentary committee.

Sasol is an international integrated chemicals and energy company that leverages its technologies and expertise in 33 countries. The company develops and commercialises technologies, and builds and operates world-scale facilities to produce a range of high-value product stream, including liquid fuels, chemicals and low-carbon electricity. (Source: Sasol, Fin24, 20 Aug., 2018) Contact: Sasol, Stephen Cornell, Pres., CEO, +27 10 344 5000, www.sasol.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Sasol,  Carbon Tax,  South Africa Carbon Tax,  


Avantium Opening Netherlands Pilot Biorefinery (Int'l Report)
Avantium,
Date: 2018-07-03
In Amsterdam, Avantium reports it will open a pilot biorefinery next month in Delfzijl, Netherlands, for its Zambezi technology to convert plant-based non-food biomass feedstock to high purity industrial sugars and lignin.

Avantium's technologies use renewable carbon sources instead of fossil resources. The industrial sugars are used in chemistry and fermentation processes to produce a broad range of durable materials, while lignin is used in energy generation.

The Netherlands province of Groningen is supporting the pilot biorefinery with subsidy of €1.8 million. The pilot is slated to be commissioned on 13th July. (Source: Avantium, BP&R, 2 July, 2018) Contact: Avantium, Tom Van Aken, CEO, +31 (0)20 586 8080 www.avantium.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Avantium,  Biomass,  Biorefinery,  


RenFuel Touting LIGNOL® Drop-In Biofuel (Ind. Report)
RenFuel
Date: 2018-06-18
RenFuel AB, a producer of lignin oil (LIGNOL) from lignin in "black liquor" waste from the pulp industry, is touting LIGNOL® which can be mixed to any degree with fossil gasoline, diesel and kerosene aviation fuel thus providing tangible solutions to reduce CO2 emissions from fuels.

LIGNOL can be refined in conventional refineries to produce renewable gasoline and diesel, and can be distributed in existing distribution channels as a drop-in fuel for all types of current combustion engines.

The finished LIGNOL oil product has a greenhouse gas reduction of about 90 pct compared to equivalent fossil oil. Sockholm-headquartered RenFuel is a 2012 Uppsala University spin-out with 15 patent "families" and patents in over 40 countries. (Source: RenFuel AB, PR, Government Europa, June, 2018) Contact: RenFuel AB, +46 70 680 94 30, info@renfuel.se, www.renfuel.se

More Low-Carbon Energy News RenFuel.Lignin,  Biofuel,  Drop-in Biofuel,  


China, World Green Building Councils Promoting Chinese Programs (Int'l Report)
World Green Building Council,China Green Building Council
Date: 2018-06-13
The World Green Building Council (WorldGBC) reports it is partnering with China Green Building Council (China GBC) to improve and increase green building practices, cut carbon emissions and promote building sustainability in the world's largest building construction market. China is currently adding up to two billion square metres of building per year, and growing fast.

The partnership aims to see the World GBC work with the China GBC in much the same way as it would work with an established Green Building Council. As part of the partnership, China GBC has committed to introducing a nearly net zero standard to its Three Star program, aligning with the WorldGBC's Advancing Net Zero project.

Indoor air quality is another key component of the partnership, with the China GBC keen to get involved with the Better Places for People project, which focuses on the health benefits of green buildings.

China is projected to have the second-highest level of growth in green building activity over the next three years, behind Brazil, according to Dodge Data and Analytics. (Source: World Green Building Council, The Fifth Estate, April, 2018) Contact: China Green Building Council, chinagreenbuildings.blogspot.com; World Green Building Council, Terri Willis, CEO, www.worldgbc.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News World Green Building Council,  


Sandia Scientists Convert Plant Lignin into Biochemicals (R&D)
Sandia National Laboratories
Date: 2018-05-21
In San Francisco, Sandia National Laboratories scientists are touting new technology based on bio-engineered bacteria that can make it economically feasible to produce chemicals from renewable plant sources -- lignin. Lignin is the component of plant cell walls that gives them strength. It is brimming with energy but getting to that energy is so costly and complex that the resulting biofuel can't compete economically with other forms of transportation energy. Once broken down, lignin can be converted into nylon, plastics, pharmaceuticals and other valuable products.

"For years, we have been researching cost-effective ways to break down lignin and convert it into valuable platform chemicals," Sandia bioengineer Seema Singh said. "We applied our understanding of natural lignin degraders to E. coli because that bacterium grows fast and can survive harsh industrial processes," she added in the work published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America,. (Source: Sandia National Laboratories, IANS, Quint, 19 May, 2018) Contact: Sandia National Laboratories, Seema Singh, Bioengineering, (925) 294-4551, www.jbei.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Seema-Singh_CV_JBEI.pdf

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lignin,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Renewable Fuel,  Sandia National Laboratories,  


Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Refocuses (Ind. Report)
Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
Date: 2018-02-19
The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports it has embarked on a new mission develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.

GLBRC originally focused on corn stover ethanol production and developing perennial plants like switchgrass and miscanthus as biofuel feedstocks. Now, GLBRC goal is centered on designing advanced biofuels, such as isobutanol. These "drop-in" fuels could be used to replace gasoline without engine modification. By engineering bioenergy crops to enhance their environmental and economic value, and conducting research to generate multiple products from plant biomass, these advancements could optimize the bioenergy field-to-product pipeline.

GLBRC scientists and engineers are also improving the yield and processing traits of dedicated bioenergy crops for cultivation on marginal, or non-agricultural, land. With smart management, these crops have the potential to benefit the ecosystem, help mitigate climate change, and provide farmers with an additional source of revenue.

GLBRC is focused on enabling a new and different biorefinery, one that is both economically viable and environmentally sustainable. Realizing this goal will mean increasing the efficiency of biomass conversion and generating a mix of specialty biofuels and environmentally-friendly bioproducts, from as much of a plant's biomass as possible. One such discovery, breaks down lignin's six-carbon rings -- the "aromatics" -- into individual components. Traditionally sourced from petroleum, aromatics are used in a wide variety of products, including plastic soda bottles, Kevlar, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals, and are essential components of jet fuel. (Source: University of Wisconsin Madison, GLBRC, PR, 18 Feb., 2018) Contact: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Tim Donohue, Dir., John Greenler, Dir. Outreach, (608) 890-2444, www.glbrc.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center,  University of Wisconsin Madison,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Ethanol,  Bioplastics,  


Meridian, Generex Seal Corn Ethanol Byproducts Deal (Ind. Report)
Meridian Waste Solutions,Attis Innovations
Date: 2018-02-12
Further to our Jan. 12, coverage, Atlanta-based Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc. reports it has inked a strategic partnership with Alpharette, Georgia-based Genarex LLC, to develop a range of agricultural waste based bioadditives for the plastics market.

According to Meridian, the US corn ethanol industry produces about 50 million tpy of distillers dried grains(DDGs) which Genarex's technology converts into a polymerized material branded as Bylox. This material is claimed to have a high value as a functional filler in numerous plastic formulations.

Attis Innovations, a wholly owned subsidiary of Meridian Waste Solutions Inc., recovers lignin from the byproduct stream of biomass processing industries, such as pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol. The recovered lignin is said to be unique in that it is a melt flowing biomaterial that is low cost and acts as a polymerized biofiller in applications such as plastics, adhesives and transportation fuels. .(Source: Meridian, WMW, 10 Feb., 2018) Contact: Meridian Waste Solutions, Jeff Cosman, CEO, (917) 658-7878, www.amsnt.comwww.MWSinc.com; Attis, www.attisinnovations.com; Genarex LLC, (470) 253-1616, info@generex.com, https://ca.linkedin.com/company/genarex-inc, www.generex.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Genarex,  Meridian Waste Solutions,  Bioplastic,  Ethanol,  Attis Innovations,  


BRD, Alkol BioTech Ink EUnergyCane Supply LoI (Ind. Report)
Bio Refinery Development,Alkol BioTech
Date: 2018-01-19
Bio Refinery Development BV (BRD) reports the signing of a letter of intent (LOI) with London-based Alkol Biotech for the supply of up to 500,000 tpy of EUnergyCane, a sugarcane variety, to be used as feedstock at a proposed biorefinery.

Alkol Biotech adapts plant varieties to grow in colder and drier climates, offering better resistance to pests and diseases, along with higher productivity. The first crop it is developing is EUnergyCane, a sugarcane variety.

BRD is a commercialization partner in Bioforever (BIO-based products from FORestry via Economically Viable European Routes), a consortium of 14 companies in Europe that aims to build a biorefinery to produce products normally sourced from oil. The consortium includes Avantium, Borregaard, Royal DSM, Green Biologics and MetGen. The consortium is addressing several pre-treatment technologies for the production of intermediates, such as cellulose, C5 and C6 sugars, lignin and humins. The consortium aims to create conversion routes from the intermediates to a variety of building blocks and end products, such as carbon binders, butanol, resin acid, enzymes and furan dicarboxylic acid (FDCA), and to demonstrate lignocellulosic value chains at pre-industrial scale for some final products.(Source: BRD, PR, Alkol Biotech, Jan., 2018) Contact: Bio Refinery Development BV, Anton Robek, CEO, +31 62 00 16964, amfrobek@brdbv.com, www.brdbv.com; Alkol BioTech Ltd., +44 20 3475 8387, www.alkolbiotech.co.uk; Bioforever, www.bioforever.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio Refinery Development,  Biomass,  Alkol BioTech,  Bioforever,  Biomass,  


Meridian Awarded $3Mn for Lignin Conversion Tech R&D (Funding)
Meridian Waste Solutions,USDA
Date: 2018-01-12
Atlanta-based Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc., an integrated, non-hazardous solid waste services and innovative technology company, is reporting receipt of $3 million in grant funding from the USDA to support the commercialization of patented and patent-pending lignin conversion and refining technologies owned by Meridian's subsidiary, Attis Innovations, Inc. -- the combination of recent transactions with American Science and Technology Corp. and Advanced Lignin Biocomposites LLC.

The U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office has consequently identified the need for technologies to be developed for the efficient use of lignin as a key target for accelerating the growth of the U.S. bioeconomy.

To address this challenge, a team comprising Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee's Center for Renewable Carbon, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, the Natural Resource Research Institute, Long Trail Sustainability, and Attis' research and development unit, American Science and Technology Corporation, presented the U.S. Department of Agriculture with a pathway based on Attis' technology to allow biorefineries to compete with petroleum. That pathway relies on Attis' patented and patent-pending AST-Organosolv process to fractionate biomass into cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, followed by the conversion of cellulose and hemicellulose into biofuel (butanol), and the conversion of lignin into acrylonitrile-butadiene-lignin (ABL Resin) using technology developed and patented by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and licensed to Attis. (Source: Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc., PR, Accesswire, 8 Jan., 2018) Contact: Meridian Waste Solutions, Jeff Cosman, CEO, (917) 658-7878, Attis, www.MWSinc.com; Attis, www.attisinnovations.com, www.amsnt.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Innovations,  lignin Meridian Waste Solutions,  MSW,  Municipal Solid Wastes,  USDA,  


NIFA Invests in Integrated Biorefinery Optimization (Ind. Report)
USDA,NIFA,Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance
Date: 2018-01-08
In the nation's Capital, the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) reports it has awarded a grant to improve biorefinery technologies through the Integrated Biorefinery Optimization (IBO) program which is coordinated and co-funded jointly between NIFA and the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office. The funding comes from NIFA's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) which addresses challenges in food and agricultural sciences through research, extension, and education.

Through IBO, the grant will fund research totaling $2,994,429 at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. The project proposes to develop and commercialize solvent fractionated lignins to polymeric products for their potential market in building and construction sectors. The proposed research is intended to develop integrated pathways for the extraction of value-added polymeric products from lignin waste/under-valued stream from biorefinery.

NIFA has invested in a range of projects to expand the regional biofuel and bioproduct industries and foster the scientific corps and workforce that support the bioeconomy. One recent example is a five-year investment to the Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance (NARA) which has advanced research into biofuels and biochemicals, fostered the Northwest regional biofuel industry and helped educate tomorrow’s workforce on renewable energy. (Source: USDA, NIFA, PR, 4 Jan., 2018) Contact: USDA, NIFA, www.nifa.usda.gov/Impacts; NARA, Washington State University, (509) 335-5581, www.nararenewables.org, www.wsu.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance,  USDA,  NIFA,  Biorefining,  Biofuel,  


$3.9Mn Funding for Bacteria Biofuels Production R&D (R&D Funding)
Washington University
Date: 2017-12-13
Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis report receipt of $3.9 million in grant funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop bacteria that manufacture renewable biofuels from non-food plants or microbes. The grant supports research in five Washington University labs as well as Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

The researchers are studying Rhodococcus opacus, a bacteria originally discovered growing on toxic compounds outside a chemical plant. These bacteria thrive on these toxic compounds, using them as a source of food for the production of biofuels that not compete with the food supply.The researchers will engineer microbes to make biofuels from lignin, millions of tons of which are generated yearly from paper making and lignocellulose-based biofuel industries. Currently, the value of lignin is restricted to its application as a fuel for on-site boiler operations. (Source: Washington University St. Louis, PR, 11 Dec., 2017) Contact: Washington University St. Louis, Diane Duke Williams, Associate Director for Media Relations, (314) 286-0111, williamsdia@wustl.edu, www.wustl.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Cellulosic,  Bacteria,  Ethanol,  Biofuel R&D,  


Attis Innovations Plans Biomass Processing Facility (Ind. Report)
Attis Innovations,American Science Technology
Date: 2017-12-08
Atlanta-based Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc. reports that its wholly-owned subsidiary, Attis Innovations -- formerly Meridian Innovations -- has initiated commercialization plans for it first biomass processing facility and has begun evaluating locally available woody biomass feedstocks for conversion into pulp, cellulosic sugars, and AST's unique melt-flowing lignin. The company is also . assessing potential locations for its first 60,000-tpy production facility in Minnesota .

Attis holds an exclusive license to American Science Technology Corporation's (AST) patents and AST's biomass processing facility in Wausau, WI. (Source: : Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc., PR, 5 Dec., 2017) Contact: Attis Innovations, (917) 658-7878, ir@meridianwastesolutions.com, www.attisinnovations.com, Meridian Waste Solutions, Jeff Cosman, CEO, www.MWSinc.com; American Science Technology, www.amsnt.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Innovations,  Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  American Science Technology,  


CDP Report Takes Chemical Giants to Task on CO2 Emissions (Intl)
CDP
Date: 2017-10-18
Despite making progress on climate risks, the chemical industry is failing to meet the goals outlined by the Paris Agreement, says a new report by CDP. Catalyst for Change analyses 22 of the largest global chemical companies -- including AkzoNobel, DuPont, BASF and Dow Chemical -- with a total market capitalization of $650 billion and responsible for a quarter of all emissions of the sector at 276 million metric tpy of CO2 emissions. According to the report, rapid process innovations will be required in order for chemical companies to have any chance of aligning with the below 2-degree goal set out by the Paris agreement.

The chemical sector is responsible for an eighth of global industrial CO2 emissions. Despite the industry's ability to innovate on low carbon, it will struggle to fully de-carbonize if it doesn't make rapid and significant changes to its own highly polluting processes, the CDP report claims. The CDP report notes that the sector is still providing climate change solutions on the product side and is profiting from the low carbon transition, with around 20 pct of revenues coming from these products. representing close to $83 billion in revenues.

Download an executive summary of the CDP Catalyst for Change report HERE. (Source: CDP. Sustainable Brands,, 9 Oct., 2017) Contact: CDP, Paul Simpson, CEO, +44 (0) 20 3818 3946, www.cdp.net

More Low-Carbon Energy News CDP,  Paris Climate Agreement,  Paris Climate Accord,  CDP,  


AVAPCO, BYOGY, Petron Tout Biorefinery Partnership (Ind. Report)
AVAPCO, BYOGY, Petron Scientech
Date: 2017-10-11
The US DOE reports Phase 1 of the American Process Company (AVAPCO) Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts project to co-produce full replacement renewable jet fuel, gasoline, diesel and Bioplus® nanocellulose from woody biomass in an integrated biorefinery at AVAPCO's site in Thomaston, Georgia, is underway.

The project is intended to demonstrate that co-production of high volume commodity fuels and low volume, high value co-products enables profitable biorefineries at commercial scale. ABBA integrates the biorefinery value chain by converting woody biomass to cellulose and cellulosic sugars, which are then converted to cellulosic biojet and nanocellulose.

The project received $3.7 million support from the US DOE Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower program , the scope of which includes definition engineering, permitting and financing activities. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project will be eligible for up to $45 million in additional DOE support for project construction and operations.

The project will utilize AVAPCO's AVAP technology for co-production of biomass-derived lignocellulosic sugars, cellulosic ethanol, cellulosic butanol, nanocellulose, and lignin to demonstrate the conversion of cellulosic ethanol to ethylene. The Byogy Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) processing facility has been relocated to the Thomaston site as part of the project to convert the bio-ethylene to full replacement biofuels.

Petron Scientech Inc., headquartered in Princeton, New Jersey, is a Technology development, Design & Engineering and Consulting company licensing technology for the conversion of renewable ethanol to bioEthylene and further conversion of Ethylene to various derivatives including bioEthylene Oxide, bioGlycols, and other chemicals used in a wide range of day-to-day renewable plastics. (Source: AVAPCO, PR, 10 Oct., 2017) Contact: Byogy Renewables, Kevin Weiss CEO, (408) 800-7704, admin@byogy.com, www.byogy.com; AVAPCO, American Process Inc. , Kim Nelson, PhD, (4040 872-8807, ext 213, knelson@americanprocess.com, www.americanprocess.com; Petron Scientech, Yogendra Sarin, Pres. & CEO , (609) 919-0204, www.petronscientech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News AVAPCO,  BYOGY,  Petron Scientech,  Aviation Biofuel,  Jet Biofuel,  


Spero Energy Scores Bio-Based Products R&D Grant (Funding)
Spero Energy Inc.
Date: 2017-10-09
Purdue Research Park-based Spero Energy Inc. is reporting receipt of $100,000 in USDA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant funding for R&D to increase the availability and competitiveness of biobased products within the agricultural market.

Spero Energy is a Purdue University spin-out pioneer technology provider for the manufacturer of high value renewable chemicals from biomass lignin. The company's patented renewable, biobased chelate molecules are used to bind essential micronutrients and deliver them efficiently to a variety of crops. Effective use of biobased chelates is shown to increase crop production and yields.(Source: Spero Energy, Hoosier Ag, Oct., 2017) Contact: Spero Energy, info@speroenergy.com, www.speroenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Spero Energy,  Bioproduct,  Biofuel,  Bioenergy,  biochemical,  


Big Apple Aims for Carbon Neutrality by 2050 (Ind. Report)
New York City
Date: 2017-10-06
In the Empire State, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio's office has released a plan that aligns the city with with the Paris Climate agreement limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C. The Mayor's plan calls for the city to cut emissions by 80 pct below 2005 levels by the middle of the century and for the city to offset all remaining carbon pollution by 2050.

The plan, which focuses on specific actions including a greater reliance on renewable energy, covers building codes, energy production, energy management and efficiency, as well as significant measures to encourage the adoption of electric vehicles and clean transportation.

Download Aligning New York City with the Paris Climate Agreement HERE. (Source: City of New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Various Media, Oct., 2017) Contact: NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio, www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor

More Low-Carbon Energy News New York City,  Carbon Neutral,  Carbon Neutrality,  Mayor Bill De Blasio,  


DOE BETO Announces Fourth MEGA-BIO Award (Ind. Report)
DOE BETO,Michigan State University
Date: 2017-08-04
The U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has announced it will award a fourth project -- up to $1.8 million -- under the MEGA-BIO: Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels Funding Opportunity. In August 2016, BETO selected three projects for an initial round of funding. The total funding for the four MEGA-BIO awards is $13.1 million.

Michigan State University was selected to manage the fourth project, which will work in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and MBI International to optimize a two-stage process for deconstruction of biomass into two clean intermediate streams: sugars for the production of hydrocarbon fuels and lignins for the production of multiple value-added chemicals and as a feedstock for renewable bichemicals.

All four projects are supporting the development of biomass-to-hydrocarbon biofuels conversion pathways that can produce variable amounts of fuels and/or products based on external factors, such as market demand. Producing high-value bioproducts alongside cost-competitive biofuels has the potential to support a positive return on investment for a biorefinery through converting biomass to where it is most impactful. Producing value-added coproducts is an approach to achieving DOE's strategic goal of producing hydrocarbon fuels at $3 per gasoline gallon equivalent. (Source: US DOE, 2 Aug., 2017) Contact: BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; US DOE EERE, http://energy.gov/eere

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biochemical,  BETO,  DOE EERE,  Biochemical,  Biofuel,  


ORNL Biofuels, Bioproducts R&D Receives Funding (Ind. Report)
ORNL
Date: 2017-07-19
The US DOE reports it has chosen the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Center for Bioenergy Innovation (CBI) as one of four bioenergy centers to receive funding to advance a new bio-based economy with the production of fuels and other products directly from nonfood biomass. The DOE will provide a total of $40 million in initial funding for the four centers in Fiscal Year 2018, with plans for a total five years of funding.

CBI will focus on the creation of high-yielding biofuel feedstock plants, using genetic studies to accelerate the domestication of perennial plants. CBI will create biocatalytic methods for high-yield production of advanced biofuels that can be blended with existing transportation fuels. The Center will also study ways to develop valuable byproducts from lignin left over after biomass processing.

CBI will work with partners from the University of Georgia, NREL, Dartmouth College, GreenWood Resources, MIT, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, University of California-Riverside, University of Colorado-Boulder, Penn State and others. (Source: US DOE, ORNL, 17 July, 2017) Contact: ORNL Center for Bioenergy Innovation, Gerald Tuskan, (865) 576-8141, tuskanga@ornl.gov, www.ornl.gov; US DOE Office of Science, http://science.energy.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News ORNL,  Biofuel Feedstock,  


Berkeley Joint BioEnergy Institute Funding Renewed (Funding)

Date: 2017-07-19
The US DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), reports it has been selected as one of four DOE Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) to share in $40 million DOE funding in support of biofuels and bioproducts R&D. The funding is part of the the Office of Biological and Environmental Research within DOE's Office of Science.

JBEI was among three BRCs established by DOE a decade ago to accelerate fundamental research in advanced, next-generation biofuels, and to make such technology cost-effective and widely available. The other two centers were the BioEnergy Science Center, led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison in partnership with Michigan State University.

To date, JBEI research has yielded 672 peer-reviewed publications, 85 licenses, 23 patents, and five startups. JBEI has contributed to many scientific achievements, including: engineering bioenergy crops to increase sugar-containing polymers and decrease lignin in plant cell walls; developing an affordable and scalable ionic liquid pretreatment technology; developing microbial routes for the conversion of biomass-derived sugars into advanced, "drop-in" blendstocks for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. (Source: JBEL, PR, 17 July, 2017) Contact: LBL, www.lbl.gov; DOE Office of Science, science.energy.gov


Maritime Organizations Call for IMO to Set CO2 Targets (Int'l)
IMO,International Maritime Organization
Date: 2017-06-26
The International Maritime Organization (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee reports it will meet in July to develop a strategy for the reduction of the sector's CO2 emissions aligning the international shipping sector response to the 2015 Paris Agreement's call for ambitious contributions to combat climate change.

INTERCARGO, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and INTERTANKO have proposed that the IMO maintain international shipping's annual total CO2 emissions below 2008 levels to reduce CO2 emissions per ton of cargo transported one kilometer by at least 50 pct by 2050, compared to 2008.

The international shipping industry was not included in the Paris Climate Accord although the industry is responsible for transporting about 90 pct of global trade and 2.2 pct of the world's annual man-made CO2 emissions. (Source: Maritime Exec., Various Others, 22 June, 2017)Contact: International Chamber of Shipping, Esben Poulsson, Chairman, +44 20 7090 1460, www.ics-shipping.org; International Maritime Organization, Stefan Micallef, Director of Marine Environment Division, +44 (0) 20 7735 7611, www.imo.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News International Maritime Organization,  IMO,  Maritime Emissions,  


Giant Reed Leaf Biofuel Feedstock Potential Studied (R&D)
University of Tuscia
Date: 2017-06-09
Researchers at the University of Tuscia in Italy are investigating Giant Reed (Arundo donax) as a potential energy crop for use in biofuels production. The researchers used RNA sequencing to characterize giant reed's leaf transcriptome. The highly productive, fast-growing reed is highly adaptable to marginal land.

The transcriptome was characterized to search for homologous transcripts of genes involved in important metabolic pathways, such as lignin and cellulose biosynthesis. Homologous transcripts of genes involved in stomatal development and those related to stress-associated proteins (SAPs) were also identified.

This study provides the first available leaf transcriptome for giant reed. These data will be highly useful for studying the mechanisms underlying its extreme adaptability. The identification of homologous transcripts of metabolic pathways also offers a platform for genetic improvement. (Source: Global Knowledge Center on Crop Biotechnology, International Service for the Aquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications SEAsiaCenter (ISAAA), 7 June, 2017) Contact: University of Tuscia, +39 0761 3571, http://www.unitus.it

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel Feedstock,  


Enzyme Used to Recycle Biofuel Production Waste (Ind. Report)
Sandia National Laboratories
Date: 2017-05-03
In California, researchers at the US DOE Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) and Sandia National Laboratories are reporting their investigations into the use of a protein found in common soil bacteria to recycle industrial and agricultural wastes.

The work, being conducted at the Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBI), targets LigM for its role in breaking down aromatic pollutants such as aryl compounds, a common waste product from industrial and agricultural practices, into something of value.

LigM is utilised by the soil bacterium Sphingomonas to metabolize aryl compounds derived from lignin, the stiff, organic material that gives plants their structure. In biofuel production, aryl compounds are a byproduct of the breakdown of lignin. Many of the pathways leading to the breakdown of lignin involve demethylation, which is often a critical precursor to any additional steps in modifying lignin-derived aryl compounds.

The researchers found that half of the LigM enzyme was homologous to known structures with a tetrahydrofolate-binding domain that is found in simple and complex organisms alike. The other half of LigM's structure was said to be completely unique, providing a starting point for determining where its aryl substrate-binding site is located.

Study lead author Amanda Kohler, JBEI postdoctoral researcher at Sandia, noted that LigM is an attractive demethylase for use in aromatic conversion because it is a simple, single-enzyme system. LigM is also able to maintain its functionality over a broad temperature range.(Source: Berkeley Lab, National Academy of Science, WMW, 2 May, 2017) Contact: LBL Berkeley, Sandia National Lab, Amanda Koehler, (530) 902-8670, ACKohler@lbl.gov, www.lbl.gov; Sandia National Lab., www.sandia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Enzyme,  Sandia National Lab,  Lingin ,  


Aussie Bio-Manufacturing Hub in Planning Stages (Int'l. Report)
VTT,CSIRO,Australian Paper
Date: 2017-03-31
In the Land Down Under, Federation University, Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), the Australia Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), and Melbourne-based Australian Paper Co. are reported to be advancing plans to create a bio-manufacturing hub in the Latrobe Valley.

The venture, which could create thousands of jobs and stimulate hundreds of millions of dollars of investment, aims to use Australian Paper's existing 50 MW biomass plant at the Maryvale mill to form the core of a bio-manufacturing facility. This bio-refinery would use lignin extracted from trees to produce high-tech, renewable bio-products.

Subject to the findings of a $2.7 million concept feasibility study, a $20 million pilot plant would be constructed in 2020 follows in 2022 by a $100 million full-scale bio-refinery. A critical part of the plan is the immediate establishment of a research centre, a BioCore, with Federation University, VTT and CSIRO. The research center is expected to cost approximately $15 million. (Source: Australian Paper, Gippsland Times, 28 May, 2017) Contact: VTT, Kati Koponen, +358 40 4878123, kati.koponen@vtt.fi, www.vtt.fi; Australian Paper, +613 8540 2300, www.australianpaper.com.au; CSIRO, Karl Rodrigues, Energy Director, enquiries@csiro.au, www.csiro.au

More Low-Carbon Energy News CSIRO,  VTT,  Bio Products,  Bioenergy,  


Ann Arbor Plans 2030 District Participation (Ind. Report)
2030 District
Date: 2017-02-15
Property owners and managers in Ann Arbor, Michigan are seeking to join the 2030 District program, a unique private-public partnership formed with the goal of a 50 pct reduction in energy usage, water consumption and transportation emissions.

Ann Arbor's 2030 District, currently categorized as "emerging," recently received a $15,000 grant from Architecture 2030 and Summit Foundation as a match to various local commitments. Ann Arbon's 2030 District aims to build the founding membership of property owners and managers, professional service providers and community stakeholders for an official 2030 District launch by the end of 2017. The Ann Arbor district also plans to begin hosting events to showcase local and regional high-performing projects while aligning buildings with the technical assistance necessary to monitor of their energy use. The new district will also leverage the private sector in meeting Ann Arbor's Climate Action Plan goal of cutting carbon emissions 25 pct by 2025 and 90 pct by 2050.

Albuquerque, Austin, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Grand Rapids, Ithaca, Loas ANgeles, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Portland Me., San Francisco, Stamford, Seattle and Toronto are all 2300 District participant cities. (Source: mLive, 13 Feb., 2017) Contact: 2030 District, www.2030districts.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News 2030 District,  Energy Consumption,  Energy Benchmarking ,  


Waste Biomass Valorization Research Awarded €2Mn (R&D, Funding)
Imperial College London
Date: 2017-01-30
In the UK, Roberto Rinaldi FRSC, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London has won a €2 million European Research Council Consolidator Grant to support his research and development of new chemical technologies for the valorization of agricultural residues, switchgrass, straw, and other waste biomass.

Rinaldi's research is centered around lignin, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass which is poorly utilized despite making approximately 20-30 pct of the mass of every tree or plant. The ERC grants are one of the top funding schemes available to researchers in Europe. (Source: Imperial College London, PR, Jan. 23, 2017) Contact: Imperial College London, Roberto Rinaldi, www.imperial.ac.uk/people/r.rinaldi-sobrinho; European Research Council, https://erc.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Imperial College London,  

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