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DRAX Advancing Planned Bioenergy CCS Project (Int'l. Report)
DRAX
Date: 2021-03-03
In the UK, Yorkshire-based woody biomass power producer DRAX Group reports it plans to used bioenergy with carbon capture and ctorage (BECCS) to remove millions of tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere and create a negative carbon footprint for the company.

The planned project is subject to its application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) -- a process which takes around two years to complete. If approved construction on the first of two 8 million tpy BECCS units could get underway in 2024.

As we reopoert in Dec. 2020, an Imperial College London report for DRAX Electric Insights found the UK's electricity grid has decarbonised faster than other countries in the last decade and that renewable power has grown six-fold in the last 10 years, helping the UK cut its carbon intensity by 58 pct -- double the reduction seen in other major economies over the 2010-2120 period. The report also noted coal-fired power generation dropped from 30 pct to just 2 pct with renewables rising simultaneously from 8 pct to supplying 42 pct of the UK's electricity over the last decade.

The shift to renewables means individual UK households have cut reduced their CO2 emissions by .75 tpy, according to the report. (Source: DRAX, PR, Yorkshire Post, Mar., 2021) Contact: DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 (0) 1757 618381, www.drax.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Bioenergy,  CCS,  BECCS,  


Novel Biofuel Recovery Process Investigated (New Prod. & Tech.)
Imperial College London
Date: 2021-01-20
In the UK, Imperial College London, Livingstone Group researchers, in collaboration with BP, report development of a cost-effective and energy-efficient membrane-based extraction method that reduces energy requirements by 25 pct and produces ten times more transportation biofuel with more than 99.5 pct purity.

Researchers chose 2-ethyl-hexanol (2EH) as the extractant based on several attractive properties including water-immiscibility, high boiling point, low viscosity, and high partition coefficient for the target product. A high partition coefficient of extractant increases the effective driving force of membrane-based extraction and improves productivity. Additionally, 2EH is inexpensive and readily available.

The membrane separates the fermentation broth from the extractant 2EH, which is highly selective but toxic to microorganisms. Alcohol product can be extracted through the membrane keeping the alcohol concentration low at the fermentation broth, preventing toxicity and promoting biofuel production. Furthermore, the membrane enables continuous production leading to increased productivity compared to conventional techniques.

Imperial College is further developing the technology by scaling up membrane fabrication and immobilizing microorganisms, working to reduce the thin-film layer to improve extraction rate and investigating the effects of temperature on the extractant. (Source: Imperial College London, PR, Chem Engineer, Jan., 2021) Contact: Imperial College London, Andrew Livingston, Professor of Chemical Engineering, +44 (0)20 7589, 5111www.imperial.ac.uk/livingston-group

More Low-Carbon Energy News Imperial College London,  Biofuel,  


UK Fast-Tracking Grid Decarbonization (Int'l. Report)
DRAX
Date: 2020-12-02
In the UK, aa report conducted by Imperial College London for Drax Electric Insights has found the UK's electricity grid has decarbonised faster than other countries in the last decade. The report notes renewable power has grown six-fold in the last 10 years, helping the UK cut its carbon intensity by 58 pct -- double the reduction seen in other major economies over the 2010-2120 period.

Over the last decade, coal-fired power generation dropped from 30 pct to just 2 pct with renewables rising simultaneously from 8 pct to supplying 42 pct of the UK's electricity. The shift to renewables means UK households have each reduced their CO2 emissions by .75 tpy, according to the report. (Source: DRAX, DRAX Electric Insights, Imperial College London, PR, 30 Nov., 2020) Contact: Imperial College London, Dr Iain Staffell, i.staffell@imperial.ac.uk, www.imperial.ac.uk: DRAX, Richard Peberdy, +44(0)1757 618381, www.drax.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  


UK Energy Sector Carbon Emissions in Rapid Decline (Int'l. Report)
Imperial College London
Date: 2020-02-19
A recently released report from Imperial College of London has found that levels of carbon emissions generated from power consumption in the UK fell by almost two-thirds in the last decade -- the fastest rate of decarbonisation in the world.

The research, conducted in partnership with research and insights company, Drax Insights, notes that emissions from power consumption dropped by a massive 14 pct in 2019, driven by the falling use of fossil fuels and increases in renewables which was eight-times higher in 2019 than in 2010 - with the combined capacity of wind, solar, biomass and hydro having grown six-fold over the since 2010, from 5.2GW to 38.5GW. An 8 pct drop in energy demand was also a factor.

In the last decade power sector emissions fell from 161 million tonnes in 2010 to 54 million metric tonnes in 2019. (Source: Imperial College London, Smart Energy, 17 Feb., 2020) Contact: Imperial College London, www.imperial.ac.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  UK Carbon Emissions,  


Biorefining Startup Chrysalix Technologies Scores Funding (Int'l)
Chrysalix Technologies,Imperial College London
Date: 2019-12-13
Imperial College London reports its spin-out company Chrysalix Technologies has been awarded €2.3 million in grant funding from the European Innovation Council's Accelerator programme as well as additional investment from the European Investment Bank (EIB) and others investors.

Chrysalix Technologies BioFlex process uses waste wood and agricultural by-products as well as sustainably grown biomass to produce bioplastics, biofuels, biomaterials and greener chemicals. The process separates the different naturally occurring chemical components of wood, which are lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses. Once isolated individually, these components can then be used for a variety of applications such as as bio-chemicals, precursors for plastics or as new materials themselves , according to the company website. (Source: Chrysalix Technologies, Imperial College London, PR, 12 Dec., 2019) Contact: Imperial College London, www.imperial.ac.uk; Chrysalix Technologies, Twitter: @ChrysalixTech, info@chrysalixtechnologies.com, www.chrysalixtechnologies.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Imperial College London,  ,  Biorefining,  


Imperial College London Researchers Enhance Bioprocessing for Biofuels Production (Int'l Report)
Imperial College London
Date: 2018-11-26
In the UK, according to an Imperial College London study aimed at enhancing bioprocessing for cheap and environmentally friendly production of biofuels, plant-based biomass can be broken down 30 times faster than it is usually done.

In the study, the glucosidase enzyme that helps break down the complex carbohydrates present in biomass was modified the chemical structure of the enzyme to let it withstand heat of up to 137 degree C so that it can be used in ionic liquids instead of the usual water. The scientists found that the combined effect of heat resistance and solubility in ionic liquids increased the glucose output 30-fold. If the technique is taken up on a large scale, fuel-related carbon emissions could fall by 80-100 per cent.

According to researcher Dr. Alex Brogan, "We've made bioprocessing faster, which will require less equipment and will reduce carbon footprint. One major advantage of this will be increased biofuel production -- potentially helping biofuels become more widespread as a result. Furthermore, this alteration can be applied to a wide variety of enzymes, for various applications such as making fuels from waste and recycling plastics, thereby making bioprocessing more efficient." (Source: Imperial College London, Coherent Times, 24 Nov., 2018)Contact: Imperial College London, Department of Chemical Engineering, Dr. Alex Brogan, +44 (0) 20 7594 9028, www.alexbrogan.co.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Imperial College London,  Biofuel,  

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