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IPCC Report Notable Quotes
IPCC
Date: 2022-05-04
"This is not a fiction or exaggeration. It is what science tells us will result from our current energy policies. We are on a pathway to global warming of more than double the 1.5-degree Celsius limit -- a litany of broken climate promises.” -- United Nations chief Guterres , April, 2022 "It is game over for the fossil fuels that fuelling both wars and climate chaos,." -- Kaisa Kosonen from Greenpeace, April, 2022

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC news,  Climate Change news,  Global Warming news,  


IPCC Report Notable Quotes
IPCC
Date: 2022-05-04
"This is not a fiction or exaggeration. It is what science tells us will result from our current energy policies. We are on a pathway to global warming of more than double the 1.5-degree Celsius limit -- a litany of broken climate promises.” -- United Nations chief Guterres , April, 2022 "It is game over for the fossil fuels that fuelling both wars and climate chaos,." -- Kaisa Kosonen from Greenpeace, April, 2022

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC news,  Climate Change news,  Global Warming news,  


IPCC Report Notable Quotes
IPCC, Greenpeace
Date: 2022-04-25
"This is not a fiction or exaggeration. It is what science tells us will result from our current energy policies. We are on a pathway to global warming of more than double the 1.5-degree Celsius limit -- (it's) a litany of broken climate promises." -- UN General Sec. Antonio Guterres , April, 2022

"It is game over for the fossil fuels that's fueling both wars and climate chaos."-- Kaisa Kosonen, Greenpeace, April, 2022

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres,  Climate Change,  COP26,  


IPCC Report Notable Quotes
IPCC
Date: 2022-04-24
"This is not a fiction or exaggeration. It is what science tells us will result from our current energy policies. We are on a pathway to global warming of more than double the 1.5-degree Celsius limit -- a litany of broken climate promises. -- United Nations chief Guterres , April, 2022

"It is game over for the fossil fuels that fuelling both wars and climate chaos,." -- Kaisa Kosonen from Greenpeace, April, 2022

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC news,  Climate Change news,  


IPCC Report Recognizes Risks of Bioenergy (Editorials & Asides)
IPCC,Natural Resources Defense Council
Date: 2022-04-15
"Recently, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its final new report in a three-part series, prepared over years by hundreds of the world's leading scientists. It sends a very clear and final warning that we must rapidly cut emissions to avert climate disaster. It also emphazises that using bioenergy -- especially the burning of trees -- is a VERY risky way to do this, and may not even work at all.

"The biggest takeaway from this report is that the IPCC has SIGNIFICANTLY reduced the amount of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) it thinks is necessary to achieve net zero. The IPCC assumes that, in the future, bioenergy will be used with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). But it recognizes that even then the climate benefits of BECCS are disputed, and that the environmental risks are clearer than ever. Because of this, it drastically reduces the role of BECCS in its net zero scenarios, predicting that BECCS will remove only 2.5 billion tpy of emissions compared with its previous predictions of up to 16 billion tpy. The report supports this decision with statements such as: "BECCS] may not prove as effective as expected, and its large-scale deployment may result in ecological and social impacts, suggesting it may not be a viable carbon removal strategy in the next 10-20 years.' It also states that 'life-cycle emissions impacts from bioenergy are subject to large uncertainties and could be incompatible with net zero emissions in some contexts.' This all builds off of the second report in the series in which it recognized more risks of bioenergy than ever before.

"It also recognizes the risks of bioenergy more than ever before. Both this report and the one the IPCC released in March highlight the major risks bioenergy can pose to nature -- e.g., desertification, land degradation, biodiversity, food production, and water availability. In 2021, evidence mounted showing the significant impacts of biomass on global biodiversity. For example, information on logging in Estonia's protected areas became so concerning that the Estonian government banned logging in these areas for more than two years. Further, new satellite image analysis shows that logging of forests in the US Southeast has exceeded their growth (contrary to biomass industry claims) and decreased their carbon stocks.

"In its moderated language, which must be signed off by all governments, this is IPCC code for a clear warning that, while its models include BECCS, they are just that -- models. They are not meant to describe reality and do not reflect the significant environmental and climate risks posed by this technology.

"But while the IPCC urges governments to immediately cut emissions, protect forests, and use BECCS only in a very minimal way (if at all), the UK Government plans to do the exact opposite by increasing reliance on large-scale burning of trees for electricity to meet its climate goals. Its 2050 Net Zero Strategy, published in autumn 2021, states that it plans to rely on a significant level of BECCS over the coming decades, which is impossible without destroying global forests or carpeting the UK countryside with bioenergy crops (or both). And the UK is already the world's subsidizer of biomass energy.

"We already know the impacts of both approaches. Drax power station recently published an annual report showing it burns over 8 million tonnes of wood every year. Drax is part of a growing global wood pellet industry driving the destruction of some of the world's forests. And the EU has tried the 'grow fields full of crops for fuel approach,' which actually increased greenhouse gases because it displaced food production, causing deforestation and climate damage elsewhere.

"The best chance for the UK Government to heed the IPCC's warnings? Its new Biomass Strategy -- due out later this year -- must recognize that bioenergy is NOT zero carbon and that it has serious environmental and social impacts. It must stop handing over £2.7 million per day in subsidies to bioenergy generators and refuse to grant new biomass subsidies, instead redirecting these funds to technologies that will actually cut emissions (e.g., wind, solar, home insulation to help lower people's energy bills)." (Source: Natural Resources Defense Council, Elly Pepper, 14 April, 2022) Contact: NEDC, www.brdc.org; IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News Natural Resources Defense Council,  IPCC,  Biomass,  Bioenergy,  BECCS,  CCS,  Carbon Emissions,  DRAX,  ,  


IPCC Report Recognizes Risks of Bioenergy (Editorials & Asides)
IPCC,
Date: 2022-04-14
"Recently, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its final new report in a three-part series, prepared over years by hundreds of the world's leading scientists. It sends a very clear and final warning that we must rapidly cut emissions to avert climate disaster. It also emphasizes that using bioenergy -- especially the burning of trees -- is a VERY risky way to do this, and may not even work at all.

"The biggest takeaway from this report is that the IPCC has SIGNIFICANTLY reduced the amount of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) it thinks is necessary to achieve net zero. The IPCC assumes that, in the future, bioenergy will be used with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). But it recognizes that even then the climate benefits of BECCS are disputed, and that the environmental risks are clearer than ever. Because of this, it drastically reduces the role of BECCS in its net zero scenarios, predicting that BECCS will remove only 2.5 billion tpy of emissions compared with its previous predictions of up to 16 billion tpy. The report supports this decision with statements such as: 'BECCS] may not prove as effective as expected, and its large-scale deployment may result in ecological and social impacts, suggesting it may not be a viable carbon removal strategy in the next 10-20 years.' It also states that '[l]ife-cycle emissions impacts from bioenergy are subject to large uncertainties and could be incompatible with net zero emissions in some contexts.' This all builds off of the second report in the series in which it recognized more risks of bioenergy than ever before.

"It also recognizes the risks of bioenergy more than ever before. Both this report and the one the IPCC released in March highlight the major risks bioenergy can pose to nature (e.g., desertification, land degradation, biodiversity), food production, and water availability. In 2021, evidence mounted showing the significant impacts of biomass on global biodiversity. For example, information on logging in Estonia's protected areas became so concerning that the Estonian government banned logging in these areas for more than two years. Further, new satellite image analysis shows that logging of forests in the US Southeast has exceeded their growth (contrary to biomass industry claims) and decreased their carbon stocks.

"In its moderated language, which must be signed off by all governments, this is IPCC code for a clear warning that, while its models include BECCS, they are just that -- models. They are not meant to describe reality and do not reflect the significant environmental and climate risks posed by this technology.

"But while the IPCC urges governments to immediately cut emissions, protect forests, and use BECCS only in a very minimal way (if at all), the UK Government plans to do the exact opposite by increasing reliance on large-scale burning of trees for electricity to meet its climate goals. Its 2050 Net Zero Strategy, published in autumn 2021, states that it plans to rely on a significant level of BECCS over the coming decades, which is impossible without destroying global forests or carpeting the UK countryside with bioenergy crops (or both). And the UK is already the world's subsidizer of biomass energy.

"We already know the impacts of both approaches. Drax power station recently published an annual report showing it burns over 8 million tpy of wood. Drax is part of a growing global wood pellet industry driving the destruction of some of the world's most precious forests. And the EU has tried the 'grow fields full of crops for fuel approach,' which actually increased greenhouse gases because it displaced food production, causing deforestation and climate damage elsewhere.

"The best chance for the UK Government to heed the IPCC's warnings? Its new Biomass Strategy -- due out later this year -- must recognize that bioenergy is NOT zero carbon and that it has serious environmental and social impacts. It must stop handing over £2.7 million per day in subsidies to bioenergy generators -- and to refuse to grant new biomass subsidies, instead redirecting these funds to technologies that will actually cut emissions (e.g., wind, solar, home insulation to help lower people's energy bills)." (Source: Natural Resources Defense Council, Elly Pepper, 14 April, 2022) Contact: NRDC, www.nrdc.org; IPCC

More Low-Carbon Energy News NRDC news,  IPCC news,  Bioenergy news,  Biomass news,  BESS news,  CCS news,  GHG news,  Deforestation news,  Wood Pellet news,  


"Not Too Late to Stave Off the Climate Crisis" (IPCC Report)
IPCC
Date: 2022-04-11
According to the just released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sith Assesment Report, the world still has time to avoid the most extreme dangers of climate change, but only if nations cut greenhouse gas pollution much faster from nearly every aspect of human activity. The technology and solutions are available to rein in emissions, but the world is rapidly running out of time to deploy them, the report notes.

The 195-member UN IPCC brings together the world's researchers to assess the prevailing science on planetary warming. The new report looks at worldwide efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions and recommends next steps to keep global average temperatures from rising to catastrophic levels.

According to the report, nations and industries need to make faster, deeper cuts to heat-trapping pollution. Average annual greenhouse gasses in the last decade were the highest in human history, which means the world is not on track to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees C. With warming beyond that level, the planet will see increasingly dangerous heat waves, floods and storms that would affect millions of people, especially the most vulnerable.

As a crucial near-term step, "substantial reduction" in the use of fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas would need to happen, the report finds. By 2050, low-carbon energy like solar and wind power will need to supply the majority of the world's energy, the report notes.

Download the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report HERE (Source: UN IPCC, April, 2022) Contact: UN IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Global Warming,  


Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation, Vulnerability (IPCC Report)
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC
Date: 2022-03-04
The latest major report from the Swiss-headquartered Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presents a stark vision of the future if concerted action is not taken to hold global warming in check.

Climate-related threats to species and ecosystems -- including forests and agroforestry landscapes -- particularly in areas of concentrated biodiversity, present a global risk that grows with every tenth of a degree increase of warming.

The potential for resilience will become increasingly limited if the global community does not take urgent action and greenhouse gas emissions do not decline quickly, particularly if global warming of 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels is surpassed, the report says.

Download IPCC Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability report and report details HERE . Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


Future of Biomass: Net Zero, 2050 and Beyond (Editorials & Asides)
Enviva Biomass, IPCC
Date: 2021-12-31
The attached The Future of Biomass: Net Zero, 2050 and Beyond article is from wood pellet manufacturer Enviva Biomass, "the world's largest producer of sustainable wood pellets, a renewable alternative to coal:

"Wood-based bioenergy is part of an all-in renewables strategy to reduce carbon emissions and limit dependence on fossil fuels. The world's leading authority on climate science, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes bioenergy as a renewable energy source that is critical to our low-carbon future. The IPCC also concludes that sustainable forest management is critical to prevent forest conversion to non-forest uses. We need bioenergy both to replace fossil fuels and to keep forests as forests," according to the Enviva.

Download the Enviva The future of biomass: Net Zero, 2050 and Beyond report HERE . (Source: Enviva Biomass, Website PR, 30 Dec., 2021) Contact: Enviva, Exec. VP, Sales and Marketing, Dr. Jennifer Jenkins, VP, Chief Sustainability Officer, (301) 657-5560, www.envivabiomass.com; IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News Enviva,  Biomass Pellet,  Wood Pellet,  Net-Zero Emissions,  Climate Change,  IPCC,  


ExxonMobil, Pertamina Considering CCS, CCUS Opportunities (Int'l.)
ExxonMobil, Pertamina
Date: 2021-11-03
Reporting from COP26 in Edinburgh, Irving, Texas-based petroleum giant ExxonMobil and Indonesian state-owned oil and gas company Pertamina are reporting a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to evaluate the potential for large-scale deployment of low-carbon technologies including carbon capture and storage (CCS), carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) and low-carbon hydrogen in Indonesia.

By jointly examining subsurface data, the companies expect to identify geologic formations suitable to safely store CO2, and the potential for safe, commercially viable utilization of CO2.

ExxonMobil established its Low Carbon Solutions business to commercialize low-emission technologies such as those to be assessed in Indonesia. The business is also pursuing strategic investments in biofuels and hydrogen to bring those lower-emissions energy technologies to scale for hard-to-decarbonize sectors of the global economy. ExxonMobil's Low Carbon Solutions has an equity share in more than 20 new CCS opportunities around the world and plans to invest $3 billion on lower emission energy through 2025.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA) CCS could mitigate as much as 15 pct of global emissions by 2040, and the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates global decarbonization efforts could be twice as costly without wide-scale CCS deployment. (Source: Exxon Mobil, PR 2 Nov., 2021) Contact: ExxonMobil, Media, (972) 940-6007, www.exxonmobil.com; Pertamina, pcc@pertamina.com, www.petramina.com; U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News ExxonMobil,  Pertamina,  CCS,  Hydrogen. CCUS,  


Lowercarbon Capital Raises $800 MN (Ind. Report)
Lowcarbon Capital
Date: 2021-08-30
Lowercarbon Capital, the climate technology-focused fund reports it has closed on raising $800 million.

"Ultimately, we had to wrap up fundraising just a few days after starting and say 'no thanks' to some very flattering offers so we could keep the funds small enough to be collaborative with other investors. I'm mentioning this to encourage any of you looking to start your own climate fund. There is massive unmet demand for climate investments, and humanity's only shot is if we get as many people and as many resources focused on solutions," according to the fund's website release.

"We are thrilled to see how many investors understand the urgency of the climate crisis and are already dedicating their time, as well as their capital, to real solutions. However, to be frank, we were also heartened by those investors who actually don't care that much about the planet and instead are just chasing financial returns. Of course, that's part of our underlying thesis: massive change will happen because these types of investments will pay off for sheer business reasons alone.

"The latest once-only-every-seven-years IPCC report on the state of the climate was indeed bleak, but it also crystallized the opportunities ahead. During a time when it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the news, our companies and the talent involved make us optimistic and proud. Maybe it's time for you to feel the same way about your job and join one of them. Better yet, there has never been a better time to start a company focused on emissions reduction or actively removing carbon already in the atmosphere. The total addressable markets are literally the biggest in history and we have no doubt that multitrillion-dollar market caps are just up ahead." (Source: Lowcarbon Capital, Website, 29 Aug., 2021) Contact: Lowercarbon Capital, Chris Sacca, Partner, www.lowercarboncapital.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lowcarbon Capital,  Low Carbon Energy,  


Hottest Month Ever Recorded, by the Numbers (Ind. Report)
NOAA
Date: 2021-08-16
Following up on our 9th June report, according to new global data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information, July 2021 has earned the unenviable distinction as the world's hottest month ever recorded!

  • Around the globe -- The combined land and ocean-surface temperature was 1.67 degrees F (0.93 of a degree C) above the 20th-century average of 60.4 degrees F (15.8 degrees C), making it the hottest July since records began 142 years ago. It was 0.02 of a degree F (0.01 of a degree C) higher than the previous record set in July 2016, which was then tied in 2019 and 2020.

  • The Northern Hemisphere -- The land-surface only temperature was the highest ever recorded for July, at an unprecedented 2.77 degrees F (1.54 degrees C) above average, surpassing the previous record set in 2012.

  • Regional records -- Asia had its hottest July on record, besting the previous record set in 2010; Europe had its second-hottest July on record-tying with July 2010 and trailing behind July 2018; and North America, South America, Africa and Oceania all had a top-10 warmest July.

  • Extreme heat and global climate change -- With last month's data, it remains very likely that 2021 will rank among the world's 10-warmest years on record, according to NCEI's Global Annual Temperature Rankings Outlook. Extreme heat detailed in NOAA's monthly NCEI reports is also a reflection of the long-term changes outlined in a major report released this week by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change offsite link.

    "Scientists from across the globe delivered the most up-to-date assessment of the ways in which the climate is changing. It is a sobering IPCC report that finds that human influence is, unequivocally, causing climate change, and it confirms the impacts are widespread and rapidly intensifying," according to NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. (Source: NOAA, 13 Aug., 2021) Contact: NOAA, Rick Spinrad, Ph.D., Administrator, www.noaa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NOAA,  Climate Change,  


  • "Act NOW, You Idiots" -- Aussie Green Groups Respond to IPCC Climate Report (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    IPCC
    Date: 2021-08-11
    "No more excuses and no more delays on climate change. This is decision time for every political and business leader in Australia. This is the issue on which you will be judged by history and by the children of Australia, whose futures are on the line.

    "The IPCC Working Group 1 report makes it clear that we are out of control and accelerating towards disaster. Only if we make deep, rapid emissions cuts including the complete phase out of climate-destroying coal, oil and gas do we have a chance of making it to a safer, habitable future powered by clean energy. We could have made emissions cuts decades ago that would have put us on a path to a safer future, but this was blocked by the vested interests of coal, oil and gas and the politicians who have subsidized and protected these big polluters." -- David Ritter, CEO, Greenpeace Australia Pacific.

    The Australian Greens political party noted the IPCC report made it clear the Australian government's current target of reducing emissions by 26 pct -- 28 pct below 2005 levels by 2030 were "a death sentence" and "amounts to criminal negligence" and called on the government to double or even triple its target.

    "Exceeding 1.5 degrees of warming means that we will lose the Great Barrier Reef, have widespread and sustained drought, more extreme weather events, and catastrophic bush fires will become the norm. The rest of the world understands that if we don't do more by 2030, we all go over the climate cliff," the Green Party warned.

    Not to worry! The the Australian Minister for Energy & Emissions Reduction, Angus Taylor, noted the (Australian) government remains committed to achieving net zero emissions "as soon as possible -- preferably by 2050." (Source: Greenpeace Australia Pacific, Various Media, upstream, 10 Aug., 2021) Contact: Greenpeace Australia Pacific, www.greenpeace.org.au

    Editor's Note --Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull recently abandoned planned legislation that would enforce a 26 pct cut in Australia's carbon emissions as agreed in the 2015 Paris Climate accord. The Prime Minister is now planning to control emissions with new regulations rather than legislation.

    The 2015 Paris Agreement was "reluctantly" signed by former Aussie PM Tony Abbott who is best remembered for his colorful description of climate change science as "a load of crap!"

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Australia Climate Change,  


    IPCC Issues Dire Climate Change Report (Editorials & Asides)
    IPCC
    Date: 2021-08-11
    The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report addresses the most up-to-date physical understanding of the climate system and climate change.

    The assessment, after considering the latest advances in climate science and multiple lines of evidence from paleoclimate, observations, process understanding, and global and regional climate simulations, warns dangerous global warming of 1.5C to 2C will be exceeded before the end of the century unless deep cuts in CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions are made.

    The IPCC was created to provide policymakers with regular scientific assessments on climate change, its implications and potential future risks, and to identify adaptation and mitigation options.

    The IPCC does not conduct its own research. IPCC reports are neutral, policy-relevant but not policy-prescriptive and are a key input into the international negotiations to tackle climate change.

    Download The Technical Summary (TS), the full Report Chapters, the Annexes and the Supplementary Materials which remain subject to revisions following the SPM approval HERE. (Source: IPCC, 9 Aug., 2021) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  


    Global CCS Institute 2020 Global Status on CCS (Report Attached)
    Global CCS Institute
    Date: 2020-12-07
    The Melbourne, Australia-headquartered Global CCS Institute's recently released 2020 Global Status on CCS report notes the total capacity of carbon capture and storage (CCS) facilities operating and under development grew by 33 pct world-wide over 2019. The report notes:
  • The CCS facility pipeline continued to grow three years in a row, with global capture and storage capacity nearly doubling within three years and increasing by one-third since 2019;

  • Almost 40 million tpy of CO2 are being captured from 26 commercial CCS facilities currently in operation;

  • Presently 65 commercial CCS facilities are in various stages of development globally;

  • The U.S. presently hosts the highest number of operational CCS facilities globally as well as 12 of the 17 new commercial CCS facilities added to the project pipeline in 2020;

  • The US has some of the most advanced supportive policies for CCS of any country in the world, including the enhanced 45Q tax credit and the California Low-Carbon Fuel Standard;

  • 2020 saw increased ambition and support for CCS in Europe as well. The Norwegian Government announced its green light for the Langskip project.

  • Funding for CCS infrastructure was earmarked in the UK's Spring Budget with the goal of developing several hub and clusters during the decade. Elsewhere in Europe, the first call of EU's €10 billion Innovation Fund for CCS projects, was launched in July, this year;

  • In Asia Pacific, regional collaboration between countries and businesses continued to gather pace in 2020 in order to advance technical understanding and develop regulatory frameworks, with notably Australia and Japan making progress in terms of domestic policies and CCS investments;

  • In a move that will reduce both cost and risks to government and industry, CCS hubs and clusters -- the shared use of CO2 transport and storage infrastructure among companies -- is predicted to support a boom in the adoption of CCS in the coming years;

  • The report echoes findings by the IPCC, which shows that CCS is vital to meet net-zero Paris climate targets.

    Download the Global Status of CCS 2020 report HERE. (Source: Global CCS Institute, Dec., 2020) Contact: Global CCS Institute, Guloren Turan, GM, Brad Page, CEO, +61 3 8620 7300, info@globalccsinstitute.com, www.globalccsinstitute.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Global CCS Institute,  CCS,  


  • CSIRO Maps Forest Regrowth Carbon Capture Potential (Int'l.)
    CSIRO
    Date: 2020-10-09
    In the Land Down Under, CSIRO, Australia's Commonwealth science agency, reports it joined researchers across the globe to produce a 1km resolution map of carbon accumulation potential from forest regrowth. Published in Nature, the study is the first of its kind wall-to-wall global map that highlights forested areas with greatest carbon returns if allowed to regrow naturally.

    The researchers found that average default forest regrowth rates used by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) may have been underestimated by 32 pct.

    Led by the Nature Conservancy, the study redefined international estimates and highlighted the role of natural forest regrowth in carbon accumulation, according to Report co-author and CSIRO Principal Research Scientist Dr. Stephen Roxburgh. "The global study complemented recent Australian work on carbon accumulation rates for planted and naturally regenerating stands of woody biomass across Australia," Roxburgh noted and added climate, rather than past land use, was the most important driver of potential carbon accumulation.

    The study provides an important benchmark to assess the global potential of forest regrowth as a climate mitigation strategy. (Source: CSIRO, Spatial Source, October, 2020) Contact: CSIRO, +61 3 9545 2176, enquiries@csiro.au, www.csiro.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CSIRO,  Carbon Capture,  


    Apple Aims for Carbon-Neutrality by 2030 (Ind. Report)
    Apple
    Date: 2020-08-10
    In its 2020 Environmental Progress Report, multinational technology giant Apple announced a 10-year roadmap to reduce emissions by 75 pct by 2030 while developing innovative carbon removal solutions for the remaining 25 pct of its comprehensive footprint.

    The company notes it is already carbon neutral for corporate emissions worldwide. By achieving the 2030 goal, the company would have brought its entire carbon footprint to net zero 20 years sooner than IPCC targets.

    Apple will implement the following and other measures to meet its carbon-neutral goal:

  • Invest in renewable energy -- Apple will remain at 100 pct renewable energy for its operations -- focusing on creating new projects and moving its entire supply chain to clean power. Apple has commitments from over 70 suppliers to use 100 pct renewable energy for Apple production -- equivalent to nearly 8GW in commitments to power the manufacturing of its products. Once completed, these commitments will avoid over 14.3 million metric tpy of carbon emissions . New and completed projects in Arizona, Oregon, and Illinois bring Apple's renewable capacity for its corporate operations to over 1GW -- equivalent to powering over 150,000 homes a year. Over 80 pct of the renewable energy that Apple sources for its facilities are now from Apple-created projects, benefiting communities and other businesses.

  • Expand investments in energy efficiency -- Apple will identify new ways to lower energy use at its corporate facilities and help its supply chain make the same transition. Through a new partnership with Apple, the US-China Green Fund will invest $100 million in accelerated energy efficiency projects for Apple's suppliers. In 2019, Apple invested in energy efficiency upgrades to over 6.4 million square feet of new and existing buildings, lowering electricity needs by nearly one-fifth and saving the company $27 million.

  • Carbon removal -- Apple is investing in forests and other nature-based solutions around the world to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The company has announced a first-of-its-kind carbon solutions fund to invest in the restoration and protection of forests and natural ecosystems globally.

    In partnership with Conservation International, the company will invest in new projects, building on learnings from existing work like restoring degraded savannas in Kenya and a vital mangrove ecosystem in Colombia. Through its work with The Conservation Fund, the World Wildlife Fund, and Conservation International, the company has protected and improved the management of over 1 million acres of forests and natural climate solutions in China, the US, Colombia, and Kenya.

    Download Apple's 2020 Environmental Progress Report HERE. (Source: Apple, July, 2020) Contact: Apple, www.apple.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Apple,  Carbon Neutral,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Footprint,  


  • Renewables Included in Apple's Carbon-Neutral Goal (Ind. Report)
    Apple
    Date: 2020-07-24
    In its 2020 Environmental Progress Report, multinational technology giant Apple announced a 10-year roadmap to reduce emissions by 75 pct by 2030 while developing innovative carbon removal solutions for the remaining 25 pct of its comprehensive footprint. The company is already carbon neutral for corporate emissions worldwide. By achieving the 2030 goal, the company would have brought its entire carbon footprint to net zero 20 years sooner than IPCC targets.

    To that end, Apple will remain at 100 pct renewable energy for its operations -- focusing on creating new projects and moving its entire supply chain to clean power. Apple has commitments from over 70 suppliers to use 100 pct renewable energy for Apple production -- equivalent to nearly 8GW in commitments to power the manufacturing of its products. Once completed, these commitments will avoid over 14.3 million metric tpy of carbon emissions .

    New and completed projects in Arizona, Oregon, and Illinois bring Apple's renewable capacity for its corporate operations to over 1GW -- equivalent to powering over 150,000 homes a year. Over 80 pct of the renewable energy that Apple sources for its facilities are now from Apple-created projects, benefiting communities and other businesses.

    Download Apple's 2020 Environmental Progress Report HERE. (Source: Apple, July, 2020) Contact: Apple, www.apple.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Apple,  Renewable Energy,  


    Energy Efficiency in Apple's Carbon-Neutral 2030 Plan (Ind. Report)
    Apple
    Date: 2020-07-24
    In its 2020 Environmental Progress Report, multinational technology giant Apple announced a 10-year roadmap to reduce emissions by 75 pct by 2030 while developing innovative carbon removal solutions for the remaining 25 pct of its comprehensive footprint.

    The company is already carbon neutral for corporate emissions worldwide. By achieving the 2030 goal, the company would have brought its entire carbon footprint to net zero 20 years sooner than IPCC targets.

    To that end, Apple will expand investments in energy efficiency and identify new ways to lower energy use at its corporate facilities and help its supply chain make the same transition. Through a new partnership with Apple, the US-China Green Fund will invest $100 million in accelerated energy efficiency projects for Apple's suppliers.

    In 2019, the company invested in energy efficiency upgrades to over 6.4 million square feet of new and existing buildings, lowering electricity needs by nearly one-fifth and saving the company $27 million.

    Download Apple's 2020 Environmental Progress Report HERE. (Source: Apple, July, 2020) Contact: Apple, www.apple.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Apple,  Energy Efficiency,  


    Kamloops Considering Major Climate Change Initiative (Ind. Report)
    IPCC,Kamloops,Climate Change
    Date: 2020-07-13
    In British Columbia, the city of Kamloops (pop. 90,200) city council reports it will this week begin considering a major community climate action plan to address greenhouse gas emissions from three major sources -- transportation, buildings and solid waste. Under the proposed plan, each sector 'must set a course to achieve zero-carbon emissions by 2050 to be congruent with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) direction.'

    The Kamloops community climate action plan proposes the following:

  • Car-light community -- By 2050, 50 pct of trips in Kamloops to be active transportation and transit. Policy options could potentially include low-emissions "superblocks" prioritizing low-emissions vehicles , cycling and walking networks.

  • Zero emissions transportation -- By 2050, 85 per cent of kilometres driven by Kamloops-registered passenger vehicles owners to be zero-emissions vehicles. Immediate actions could include adopting an EV-ready bylaw, planning and budgeting for publicly accessible EV charging and policy review and financing for retrofitting buildings for EV charging.

  • Zero-carbon homes and buildings -- By 2030, all new and replacement heating and hot water systems to be zero emissions. Policy options could include setting targets for zero-carbon new buildings, encouraging low-carbon new buildings, calling for provincial zero-carbon building regulations, incentives for energy efficiency, incentives for energy efficient building materials and a retrofit program for existing buildings.

  • Zero-waste/circular economy -- Kamloops to be a zero-waste community by 2040. Policy options include: creation of a zero-waste research and innovation centre, collection and processing of organic waste, investigation into biofuel production from local organics for city uses such as for heating of civic facilities or fuel for vehicles, requirements for diverting waste and materials from construction and demolition sites. Immediate actions could include a feasibility study for biogas capture from organics collection and policy review to require or encourage building deconstruction and materials be reused.

  • Renewable energy (No target identified) -- Policy options could exploration of community and neighbourhood scale renewable energy systems and storage, support for related R&D. Immediate actions could include exploration of renewable energy opportunities with partners and renewable energy utility opportunities.

  • Zero-carbon civic operations -- Strive to reduce carbon emissions from municipal operations by 40 pct by 2030 and 100 pct by 2050. Policy options could include a corporate energy review, phasing out of fossil fuels in buildings and fleets, support for green commuting, internal carbon pricing and a creative community engagement and marketing plan. Immediate actions could include a corporate energy review, committing all new city buildings to zero carbon, transitioning buildings and fleets to electric/zero emissions and incentives for staff for e-bikes and transit passes.

  • Healthy urban ecosystem -- Increase the city's urban forest canopy cover to 20 pct by 2030 and 30 pt by 2050 to increase forests' carbon storage capacity and support biodiversity, The plan also calls for carbon off-setting linked with biodiversity and conservation and integrating green technologies with infrastructure upgrades.

    The city notes that, in addition to emissions reductions actions already in place, the above efforts could potentially reduce GHG emissions by 538,000 to 556,000 tonnes of CO2 by 2050. In 2019 the city committed to maintain a 1.5 C temperature increase, as set out in the Paris Agreement as well as IPCC targets for emissions to be reduced by between 40 and 60 pct by 2030 or sooner. (Source: City of Kamloops, Civic Web, July, 2020) Contact: City of Kamloops , www.kamloops.civicweb.net; IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  IPCC,  


  • Biodiesel Production as a Renewable Resource for the Potential Displacement of the Petroleum Diesel (IntechOpen Ind. Report Attached)
    Biodiesel
    Date: 2020-07-06
    "In the quest to comply with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on reducing the global temperature to 1.5 -- 2.0 degrees C as a measure to minimize climate change caused by the emission of greenhouse gases from the combustion of fossil fuels, and the need to replace these fossil fuels, biodiesel is being studied as a potential replacement for the conventional petroleum diesel.

    "Biodiesel, among other desired properties, is renewable, biodegradable, sustainable, and emits less particles. It also contains no sulfur, in addition to possessing most of the good characteristics of petroleum diesel. At the moment, more than 95 pct of biodiesel produced globally is obtained from vegetable oil feedstocks, which are usually very expensive and thus, without tax waiver and subsidy, makes biodiesel non-competitive with the petroleum diesel.

    "Based on this, non-edible feedstocks are being investigated. Although, their oil yield is low, studies are carried out to ensure efficient extraction. The economics of the process is considered to determine the most economic variables that impact the profitability of biodiesel production.

    "The global production capacity of biodiesel is expected to reach 12 billion gpy by 2020 with Brazil, the United States , Malaysia, Argentina, Netherlands, Spain, Philippines, Belgium, Indonesia and Germany meeting more than 80 pct of the world demand. Countries like US, China and India are currently experiencing a great growth in the biodiesel market with their respective governments planning to replace about 15 pct of the conventional diesel with biodiesel by 2020.

    Download the Biodiesel Production as a Renewable Resource for the Potential Displacement of the Petroleum Diesel report HERE. (Source: IntechOpen, July, 2020) Contact: IntechOpen Ltd, +44 (0) 203 972 6202, info@intechopen.com, www.intechopen.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel news,  


    Claification -- Woody Biomass, Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    Woody Biomass
    Date: 2020-05-01
    "Mature trees do not stop absorbing carbon. It's just the opposite. Carbon sequestration actually accelerates as a tree grows older. 'Managed forests' is usually code for trees farms full of longleaf pine that are cut [down] frequently and absorb a lot less carbon than mature forests."

    "From an emissions standpoint, the UK would be better off burning coal and leaving those (older) trees standing as long as possible." -- Bill Moomaw, Biomass Energy Researcher, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Source: IPCC, Eco Business, Mongabay, 20 April, 2020)

    A Bioenergy & Alternative Fuels report subscriber noted the following:

    First, the 40 million acres, more or less, of managed southern pine plantations are loblolly pine not longleaf pine. These two pine varieties have important differences in growth rate and ecological values.

    Second, and more much importantly, mature pine forest do not 'accelerate' their storage as they mature. These are privately owned lands and the details of the site and management practices are very important, but the annually growth rate (carbon accumulation) on most pine sites slows after 15-20 years. The TOTAL carbon on the acre/hectare increase, but at a slower annual rate.

    Finally, and completely absent from these discussion that are typically led by scientist or environmental groups who do not have a clear understanding of the on the ground ownership and motivations of private landowners in the southern US, is that without a source of income some of these forest will be converted to some other uses, probably pasture, which has very limited carbon storage potential. In effect these EU experts are trying to shift the costs of carbon sequestration to private landowners. One can argue that if they want to sequester carbon in trees, and take on the additional risk of unplanned, large scale release from fire, disease or hurricane, that is fine, but they should pay the landowner for the carbon and the lost income.

    Editor's Note: We thank our reader for his input and clarification of our report.

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  


    Dane County WI Adopts Community Climate Action Plan (Ind Report)
    Climate Change
    Date: 2020-04-29
    In Wisconsin, Dane County Executive Joe Parisi is touting the 2020 Dane County Climate Action Plan - Today's Opportunity for a Better Tomorrow (CAP) calling for a greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reduction of 50 pct countywide by 2030 with the goal of carbon-neutrality by 2050. The plan's goal to reduce GHG emissions by 50 percent by 2030 exceeds the 45 percent worldwide reduction goal set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2030. CAP climate change emission reduction strategies include:
  • Increase electric vehicles sales (and transition heavy-duty trucks to electricity or renewable natural gas (RNG) vehicles.

  • Reduce vehicle miles traveled by shifting from driving alone to increase use of public transit, carpooling and biking.

  • Cut energy consumption by 2 pct per capita by 2030 by increasing the efficiency of old and new residential and commercial buildings.

  • Process 50 pct of livestock manure in anerobic digesters reducing GHG methane emissions, limiting phosphorus in area lakes and creating a new revenue source for farms.

    CAP notes these actions will result in major economic and health benefits, lead to energy security and great resilience to the harmful impacts of a changing climate, and address racial and economic equality to ensure the benefits of carbon reductions are equitably shared.

    In 2017, Parisi created the Dane County Office of Energy & Climate Change (OECC) to lead public and private efforts across the county to address climate change. The OECC led by its director, Keith Reopelle, created the Council on Climate Change -- a work group of 38 local governments, energy utilities, businesses, and environmental and community organizations that provided input into the development of the CAP to reduce GHG emissions across all 61 cities, towns and villages as well as the private sector. (Source: Dane County Office of Energy & Climate Change, Herald Independent, 26 April, 2020) Contact: Dane County Office of Energy & Climate Change, Keith Reopelle, Dir., www.daneclimateaction.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  


  • Woody Biomass, Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    IPCC
    Date: 2020-04-22
    "Mature trees do not stop absorbing carbon. It's just the opposite. Carbon sequestration actually accelerates as a tree grows older. 'Managed forests' is usually code for trees farms full of longleaf pine that are cut [down] frequently and absorb a lot less carbon than mature forests."

    "From an emissions standpoint, the UK would be better off burning coal and leaving those (older) trees standing as long as possible." -- Bill Moomaw, Biomass Energy Researcher, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Source: Eco Business, Mongabay, 20 April, 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions ,  


    ESA Reports Staggering Greenland, Antarctic Ice Loses (Int'l.)
    European Space Agency
    Date: 2020-03-18
    According to the European Space Agency (ESA), Greenland and Antarctica are losing ice six times faster than in the 1990s -- currently on track with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) worst-case climate warming scenario.

    ESA findings show Greenland and Antarctica lost 6.4 trillion tonnes of ice between 1992 and 2017 -- pushing global sea levels up by 17.8 millimetres. Of the total sea level rise coming from melting polar ice sheets, around 60 pct (10.6 millimetres) was due to Greenland ice losses and 40 pct was due to Antarctica (7.2 millimetres). In just 6 month, the loss of ice from 81 billion tpy in the 1990s to 475 billion tpy in the 2010s. This means that polar ice sheets are now responsible for a third of all sea level rise. (Source: European Space Agency Website, 13 Mar., 2020) Contact: European Space Agency, www.esa.int

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Global Warming,  


    Forest-Woody Biomass Carbon Benefits Stressed (Ind. Report)
    US Industrial Pellet Association
    Date: 2020-02-26
    As previously reported, the Richmond, Virginia-based not-for-profit US Industrial Pellet Association (USIPA) is lauding the National Association of University Forest Resource Programs (NAUFRP) for its letter signed by more than 100 scientists and researchers calling on policymakers to consider key fundamentals related to forest-woody biomass and the benefits of wood energy.

    The letter, which noted that the "carbon benefits of sustainable forest biomass are well established", cites a report from UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC) which notes -- "In the long term, a sustainable forest management strategy aimed at maintaining or increasing forest carbon stocks, while producing an annual sustained yield of timber, fibre or energy from the forest, will generate the largest sustained mitigation benefit. Demand for wood helps keep land in forest and incentivizes investments in new and more productive forests, all of which have significant carbon benefits."

    Reviewing more than 30 years of scientific research on forest biomass utilization, scientists from Yale, Harvard, and Georgia to Washington, Idaho, Berkeley and others identified four fundamentals for science-based decision-making on biomass energy production:

  • The carbon benefits of sustainable forest biomass energy are well established.

  • Measuring the carbon benefits of forest biomass energy must consider cumulative carbon emissions over the long term.

  • An accurate comparison of forest biomass energy carbon impacts with those of other energy sources requires the use of consistent time-frames in the comparison.

  • Economic factors influence the carbon impacts of forest biomass energy. (Source: The US Industrial Pellet Association, 25 Oct., 2019) Contact: The US Industrial Pellet Association, Deth Ginter, Exec. Dir., J. Marcus, (804) 775.5894, JMarcus@theusipa.org, www.theusipa.org; National Association of University Forest Resource Programs, www.naufrp.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Forest Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  


  • IPCC Preparing First Climate Change Stock-Take Report (Int'l.)
    IPCC,UNFCCC
    Date: 2020-02-21
    Reporting from Geneva, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) announced it will consider the outline of the Synthesis Report for the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6 SYR) on 24-28 February 2020 during its 52nd Session to be hosted by UNESCO in Paris.

    The Synthesis Report will present the latest state of climate knowledge to serve as the basis for international negotiations in time for the first global stock-take under the Paris Agreement in 2023.

    The global stock-take is a process under the 2015 Paris Agreement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to take stock of collective progress towards achieving the purpose of the Agreement and its long-term goals. It takes place every five years, with the first one in 2023.

    The outcome of the global stock-take will inform Parties to the Agreement in updating and enhancing, in a nationally determined manner, their actions and support for the goals of the Agreement, as well as enhancing international cooperation for climate action. (Source: IPCC, PR, 20 Feb., 2020) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch; UNFCCC, www.unfccc.int

    More Low-Carbon Energy News UNFCCC,  Paris Climate Agreement,  IPCC,  


    UN Environment Programme Emissions Gap Report 2019 (Report Attached)
    UN Environment Programme
    Date: 2020-02-17
    According to the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) annual Emissions Gap Report, even if all current unconditional commitments under the Paris Agreement are implemented, temperatures are expected to rise by 3.2 degrees C, bringing even wider-ranging and more destructive climate impacts. Collective ambition must increase more than fivefold over current levels to deliver the cuts needed over the next decade for the 1.5 degrees C goal.

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned that going beyond 1.5 degrees C will increase the frequency and intensity of climate impacts.

    The report notes 2020 is a critical year for climate action, with the UN climate change conference in Glasgow aiming to determine the future course of efforts to avert crisis, and countries expected to significantly step up their climate commitments.

    Download the full report HERE. (Source: UN Environment Programme, Dec., 2019) Contact: UN Environment Programme, www.unep.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News UN Environment Programme ,  Climate Chanmge,  Carbon Emissions,  


    INSTAAR Studies Permafrost Thaw, Climate Change (Int'l. Report)
    Climate Change,Colorado Institute of Arctic and Alpine Researc
    Date: 2020-02-10
    A study from the University of Colorado Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) in Boulder has found the possibility of abrupt permafrost thawing will likely occur in less than 20 pct of permafrost frozen land. The study found the evidence is mixed as to whether this not-so-permanent, slowly thawing permafrost has started to vent significant quantities of methane or CO2.

    Global Permafrost covers an area almost equal to Canada and the United States combined, and holds about 1,500 billion tonnes or carbon -- twice as much as in the atmosphere and three times the amount humanity has emitted since the start of industrialization.

    According to the UN's scientific advisory body for climate change, the IPCC, global permafrost areas show a decrease of 24 pct by 2100. The IPPC also notes that 70 pct of permafrost could gradually disappear if fossil fuel emissions continue growing over the next 50 years and release 60 to 100 billion tonnes of carbon by 2300. This is in addition to the 200 billion tonnes of carbon expected to be released in other regions, according to the study. (Source: Arctic and Alpine Research, Nature, AFP, Feb., 2020) Contact: INSTAAR, Merritt Turetsky, (303) 492-6387, (303) 492-3287 - fax, www.colorado.edu › innovate › institute-arctic-and-alpine-research

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  Permafrost,  


    Packard Foundation Warns Put a Brake on Bioenergy by 2050 to Avoid Negative Climate Impacts (Ind. Report)
    Packard Foundation
    Date: 2019-12-09
    According to the newly released Global Change Biology study from the Los Altos, California-based David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the burgeoning bioenergy sector must peak and decline in the next 30 years to alleviate extreme pressure on land. The study researchers assert that projections envisioning the use of biomass from crops, trees or grasses for fuel through 2100 overlook the technology's high carbon footprint and excessive land use.

    An Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report released last year found that many scenarios capable of reducing the threat of climate change relied heavily on bioenergy, predicting that energy from biomass could make up 26 pct of primary energy in 2050 -- up from 10 pct in 2020 -- and predicting that solar and wind combined would likely only account for 22 pct. Those scenarios often relied on significant use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), which involves growing trees across a large area of land to produce wood pellets burned for energy, then capturing and sequestering the carbon emissions. In its analysis, though, the IPCC found significant challenges associated with a high reliance on bioenergy, noting in particular that the vast areas of land required to produce biomass for energy would compete with food production and other human needs.

    The Global Change Biology assessment examine a flurry of recent reports that suggest even more problems with large-scale bioenergy projects reliant on large tracts of land, and also show that more cost-effective alternatives will be available in the coming decades. Pulling from these recent studies, the authors establish three reasons why large-scale bioenergy must and can peak and decline in the next 30 years:

  • Large-scale bioenergy emits carbon. Carbon emissions from bioenergy can be greater in the near-term than emissions from the fossil fuels it is replacing, undermining the assumption that bioenergy is always a relatively low-emission and low-cost form of energy. Burning wood pellets, for example, creates a "double climate problem." Manufacturing and shipping wood pellets entails substantial emissions of fossil CO2, and it can take decades or centuries for harvested areas to return to pre-harvest carbon stocks.

  • Large-scale bioenergy puts a squeeze on land. Land is already a scarce resource, and it will become even scarcer with time due to an increase in the human population and a rise in the appreciation of the conservation value of natural and mostly-natural ecosystems--even if agricultural yields continue to increase. Because land is so limited, we should use it as efficiently as possible for energy production. In contrast to land-intensive bioenergy, the amount of electricity that can be produced from a hectare of land using photovoltaics is at least 50-100 times that from biomass.

  • Large-scale bioenergy is inferior to other solutions. And, by mid-century, land-intensive bioenergy will face fierce competition from superior technologies such as wind and solar energy, the development of efficient storage and other flexibility solutions, and the advent of more effective carbon removal technologies such as direct air capture with carbon storage.

    The assessment comes at a time when the bioenergy industry is ramping up worldwide, with the EU in the lead. Bioenergy currently accounts for 10 pct of the world's energy, and 50 pct of our renewable energy. In the EU, bioenergy accounts for two-thirds of all renewable energy (nearly half from wood). Two-thirds of the EU's "20 pct Renewable Energy by 2020" target depends on bioenergy. And the bloc is also about to greenlight the conversion of five large coal plants to bioenergy plants that burn imported wood pellets from overseas forests.

    Land-intensive electrical power projects in particular are picking up steam as governments and industry leaders seek to transform disused coal factories into new profit centers. Between 2006 and 2015, the production of wood pellets for biomass energy use quadrupled to 26 million tons. Worldwide, demand for globally traded wood pellets destined for use in phased-out coal plants or new dedicated bioenergy plants is expected to rise 250 pct by 2027.

    The study lays out a bioenergy trajectory that policymakers can use to encourage sustainable bioenergy while also opening the door for new technologies to replace land-intensive bioenergy in the very near future. These recommendations include improved accounting of the actual carbon emissions associated with the use of biomass, favoring biomass from waste, residues or land management practices that enhance carbon storage, and providing incentives for energy storage, direct air capture technologies, and low-carbon alternatives to fossil fuels. Above all, the authors argue that bioenergy projects should be avoided if they involve natural forests, such as converting natural forests to bioenergy plantations, or use land best suited for food crops. And the authors caution that claims that bioenergy projects are a zero-carbon form of energy should be met with skepticism.

    The Packard Foundation through 2020, will have awarded nearly $1 billion in grants to reduce carbon emissions, one of the its greatest program commitments in its 55-year history. (Source: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Dec., 2019) Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Walt Reid, Director Conservation and Science Program, Report Author, 650-948-7658, www.packard.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy,  CO2,  CCS,  Biofuels,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • Queensland Coal Emissions Killing Great Barrier Reef (Int'l.)
    Climate Analytics,Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority
    Date: 2019-10-30
    A report from Berlin-based Climate Analytics GmbH notes that Queensland, Australia's current carbon emissions would "virtually guarantee the extinction of most of the Great Barrier Reef" within 12 years if replicated worldwide.

    The report recommends Queensland stop burning coal for power by 2030 to play its part in keeping global heating to 1.5 Celsius under the UN's Paris Agreement targets, agreed to by Australia in 2016. The report also notes hitting the necessary emissions reduction target would spell the end of Queensland thermal coal exports by 2040, as part of a "rapid and almost complete global phase-out" of coal for electric power genearation.

    Queensland is Australia's biggest carbon-emitting state and will blow its total "carbon budget" of 1.2 gigatonnes by 2031 if its CO2 emissions remain at their 2017 rate, the report found.

    The UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has forecast that 70-90 pct of coral reefs worldwide will be lost at a 1.5C rise, with more than 99 per cent lost at 2C. Queensland accounts for 24 pct of Australia's energy and industry emissions and is targeting zero-net emissions by 2050. (Source: Climate Analytics, Australia Broadcasting Corp., 27 Oct., 2019) Contact: Climate Analytics, Bill Hare, Director, +49 (0)30 259229520, www.climateanalytics.org; Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Josh Thomas, CEO, www.gbrmpa.gov.au; Great Barrier Reef Foundation, www.barrierreef.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Analytics,  Carbon Emissions,  Coal,  Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority ,  


    Forest-Woody Biomass Carbon Benefits Stressed (Ind. Report)
    US Industrial Pellet Association
    Date: 2019-10-28
    The Richmond, Virginia-based not-for-profit US Industrial Pellet Association (USIPA) is lauding the National Association of University Forest Resource Programs (NAUFRP) for its letter signed by more than 100 scientists and researchers calling on policymakers to consider key fundamentals related to forest-woody biomass and the benefits of wood energy.

    The letter, which noted that the "carbon benefits of sustainable forest biomass are well established", cites a report from UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change(IPCC) which notes: "In the long term, a sustainable forest management strategy aimed at maintaining or increasing forest carbon stocks, while producing an annual sustained yield of timber, fibre or energy from the forest, will generate the largest sustained mitigation benefit. Demand for wood helps keep land in forest and incentivizes investments in new and more productive forests, all of which have significant carbon benefits."

    Reviewing more than 30 years of scientific research on forest biomass utilization, scientists from Yale, Harvard, and Georgia to Washington, Idaho, Berkeley and others identified four fundamentals for science-based decision-making on biomass energy production:

  • The carbon benefits of sustainable forest biomass energy are well established.

  • Measuring the carbon benefits of forest biomass energy must consider cumulative carbon emissions over the long term.

  • An accurate comparison of forest biomass energy carbon impacts with those of other energy sources requires the use of consistent time-frames in the comparison.

  • Economic factors influence the carbon impacts of forest biomass energy. (Source: The US Industrial Pellet Association, 25 Oct., 2019) Contact: The US Industrial Pellet Association, Deth Ginter, Exec. Dir., J. Marcus, (804) 775.5894, JMarcus@theusipa.org, www.theusipa.org; National Association of University Forest Resource Programs, www.naufrp.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  US Industrial Pellet Association ,  Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet,  


  • IRENA Future of Wind Report (Ind. Report Attached)
    IRENA
    Date: 2019-10-23
    Decarbonization of the energy sector and the reduction of carbon emissions to limit climate change is at the heart of the International Renewable Energy Agency's (IRENA'S) energy transformation roadmaps. The attached roadmaps examine and provide an assertive yet technically and economically feasible pathway for the deployment of low-carbon technology towards a sustainable and clean energy future.

    The first is an energy pathway set by current and planned policies. The second is a cleaner climate-resilient pathway based largely on more ambitious, yet achievable, uptake of renewable energy and energy efficiency measures, which limits the rise in global temperature to well below 2 degrees C and closer to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels and is aligned within the envelope of scenarios presented in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degree C.

    This report outlines the role of wind power in the transformation of the global energy system based on IRENA's climate resilient pathway, specifically the growth in wind power deployments that would be needed in the next three decades to achieve the Paris climate goals.

    Download the IRENA report HERE, (Source: IRENA, Oct., 2019) Contact: IRENA, www.irena.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IRENA,  Wind,  IPCC,  


    CAP Issues Framework for 100 pct Clean Future by 2050 (Ind. Report)
    Center for American Progress
    Date: 2019-10-11
    The Washington-based Center for American Progress (CAP) has released a framework for how the U.S. could cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 43 pct below 2005 levels by 2030 -- consistent with the IPCC's special report on 1.5 degrees C of warming -- and set the U.S. on a path to net-zero emissions by 2050. To that end, the report calls for strong economy-wide targets; sets specific sector-by-sector benchmarks for success; estimates the emission reductions these would deliver; and discusses how to spur the rest of the world to follow along.

    The report lays out how we can build the 100 pct Clean Future in two parts. First, it highlights successful climate action by governors and legislatures in nine states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico that have committed to 100 pct clean goals. CAP recommends building on that success at the national level by embracing three key pillars from some of those states: an ambitious 100 pct clean target; a worker-centered approach to ensure good paying, quality jobs; and a plan that is committed to reductions in legacy pollution that has disproportionately affected economically disadvantaged communities and communities of color.

    The second part of the report considers emissions by sector and recommends achievable benchmarks to guide a sustained, concerted, and urgent policy program to achieve a 100 pct Clean Future by 2050:

  • At least 65 pct of electricity must come from clean sources by 2030 and 100 pct no later than 2050.

  • Car and SUV sales must reach 100 pct zero-emission by 2035, and vehicle miles traveled in urban areas must be reduced 18 pct below baseline.

  • All new buildings and appliances must be electric and highly efficient by 2035.

  • The nation must invest at least $120 billion in agriculture by 2030, more than doubling conservation, research, and renewable energy funding.

  • We must cut manufacturing emissions 15 pct by 2030 and set in motion a technology agenda for deep decarbonization.

  • We must protect 30 pct of America's lands and oceans by 2030 and deploy climate-smart agricultural practices on 100 million acres, building toward a gigaton of new carbon sequestration by 2050.

    CAP offers policy recommendations to accomplish these benchmarks and deliver additional emission reductions throughout the report, including a combination of sector-specific deployment policies, direct federal spending, a broad price on carbon pollution, and mandatory emissions reductions in communities historically overburdened by pollution.

    Download the A 100 Percent Clean Future report HERE.

    Download CAP fact sheet HERE. (Source: Center for American Progress, PR, Oct., 2019) Contact: Center for Amercian Progress, Neera Tanden, CEO, Sam Hananel, 202-478-6327, www.americanprogress.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Center for American Progress,  Climate Change,  Clean Energy,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • UK Park Stresses Peatland's Role in Climate Change Fight (Int'l.)
    Exmoor,Carbon Sequestration
    Date: 2019-10-07
    In the UK, the Exmoor National Park Authority has this week declared a climate emergency and agreed to work towards being a carbon neutral Authority by 2030. The Authority also agreed to sign on to the Devon Climate Declaration, alongside 25 other organizations, and to join forces with both Devon and Somerset County Councils to formulate carbon plans that meet or exceed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) targets.

    The Exmooor National Park Authority noted it has already cut its carbon emissions by 30 pct by: improving energy efficiency within Authority-owned buildings; installing renewable energy along with a scheme to facilitate installation of 73 new renewable energy systems in local communities, farms and houses across Exmoor; the restoration of nearly 2,500 hectares of peatland in the National Park through the Exmoor Mires Partnership, with plans to extend this to at least 3,000 hectares.

    Peatlands are the UK's single most important terrestrial carbon store, containing 20 times more carbon than all UK forests. A functioning bog absorbs around 0.87 tpy of carbon per hectare year while dry peatland releases CO2 -- degraded peat in England is emitting an estimated 11 million tpy of CO2. (Source: Exmoor National Park Authority, Somerset County Gazette, 6 Oct., 2019) Contact: Exmoor National Park Authority, +44 1398 323665, www.exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Peatland,  CO2,  Carbon Sequestrartion,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    Solar, Wind Now Cheaper Than Coal, says IPPC (Ind. Report)
    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    Date: 2019-09-30
    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) order to keep global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees C over pre-industrial averages within this century -- the goal set by the Paris climate agreement -- the entire world would have to transition to 100 pct clean energy by the middle of the century -- a lofty goal. But up until now, clean energies haven't bee cost competitive in a market flooded with cheap natural gas, coal, and oil. But now, renewables that one needed financial incentives to be adopted at any serious scale, have fallen in price to the point that no government subsidies are required.

    Download the report HERE. Source: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Yahoo Finance, 26 Sept., 2019) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,  Renewable Energy,  Solar,  Wind ,  


    Amazon Rainforest CO2 Capacity Investigated (Ind. Report)
    LBNL, US DOE
    Date: 2019-08-21
    The US DOE Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and an international team of researchers addressing the "Amazon Forest Response to CO2 Fertilization Dependent on Plant Phosphorus Acquisition," has raised the issue and asked the question, "How long will the Amazon rainforest continue to act as an effective carbon sink?"

    The study, published August 5 in the journal Nature Geoscience, found that accounting for phosphorus-deficient soils reduced projected CO2 uptake by an average of 50 pct in the Amazon, compared to current estimates based on previous climate models that did not take into account phosphorus deficiency. The Amazon Basin is critical to help mitigate climate change due to its trees absorbing around a quarter of the CO2 released each year from the burning of fossil fuels.

    According to Berkeley Lab research scientist and study co-author Jennifer Holm, "Most predictions of the Amazon rainforest's ability to resist climate change are based on models that have outdated assumptions; one of those is that a sufficient supply of nutrients such as phosphorus exist in soils to enable trees to take in additional CO2 as global emissions increase," said . "But in reality the ecosystem is millions of years old, highly weathered, and therefore depleted of phosphorus in many parts of the Amazon."

    Agriculture, forestry, and other types of land use account for 23 pct of human-caused GHG emissions, yet at the same time natural land processes absorb the equivalent of almost a third of CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry, according to the recently released International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report on land and climate interactions. (Source: DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, PR, Eureka Alert, 20 Aug., 2019) Contact: US DOE Office of Science, energy.gov/science; LBNL, Jennifer Holm, Research Scientist and Study Co-author, www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-holm-265600b, www.lbl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LBNL,  Rainforest,  CO2,  Carbon Sink,  Climate Change,  


    Burning Sustainably Managed Forest Woody Biomass Increases CO2 Pollution for 40+ Years, SELC Report Finds (Ind. Report)
    Southern Environmental Law Center
    Date: 2019-08-14
    A new report by Spatial Informatics Group, LLC (SIG), commissioned by the Southern Environmental Law Center (SELC) and the National Wildlife Federation, takes a closer look at the carbon profile of wood pellets produced at Drax's three U.S. wood pellet mills.

    The report found that the accumulated emissions of burning wood pellets from these U.S. mills to produce electricity in the UK increases carbon pollution in the atmosphere for more than 40 years -- well beyond the time-frame identified by the IPCC as critical for carbon reduction.

    Download the report details HERE. (Source: Southern Environmental Law Center, 12 Aug., 2019) Contact: Southern Environmental Law Center, www.southernenvironment.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  Carbon Emissions,  Southern Environmental Law Center,  


    Land is Part of the Climate Solution -- IPCC Report (Ind. Report)
    IPCC,Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    Date: 2019-08-12
    According to the attached Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, "land is already under growing human pressure and climate change is adding to these pressures." At the same time, keeping global warming to well below 2 degrees C can be achieved only by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors including land and food, the IPCC report notes.

    The report will be a key scientific input into forthcoming climate and environment negotiations, such as the Conference of the Parties of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (COP14) in New Delhi, India in September and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Santiago, Chile, in December.

    The report notes that better land management can contribute to tackling climate change, but is not the only solution. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors is essential if global warming is to be kept to well below 2 degrees C, if not 1.5 degrees C.

    The IPCC assessments provide all levels of government with scientific information that can be used to develop climate policies and in international negotiations to tackle climate change.

    The IPCC, the world body for assessing the state of scientific knowledge related to climate change, its impacts and potential future risks and possible response options.

    Download the UN IPCC Land is Part of the Climate Solution report HERE. (Source: UN IPCC, 8 Aug., 2019) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Global Waming,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Notable Data, Facts and Statistics
    IPCC
    Date: 2019-08-09
    According to the IPCC, on average, the global temperature has already risen about 1 degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels. This year -- 2019 -- is on track to be the third-hottest on record globally, according to Climate Central. 2018 was the fourth warmest, behind 2016 (the warmest), 2015, and 2017.

    Last year was also the hottest year on record for the world's oceans. Alarmingly, the air temperature over land is rising twice as fast as the global average, and has already risen more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, according to the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). (Source: IPCC, Aug., 2019) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Global Waming,  


    28 Major Corporations Set New Level of Climate Ambition (Int'l. Report)
    UN Global Compact,Science Based Targets initiative
    Date: 2019-07-24
    In a joint press release from the United Nations Global Compact, the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) and the We Mean Business have committed themselves to more ambitious climate targets aligned with limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degree C above pre-industrial levels and reaching net-zero emissions by no later than 2050. The joint commitment from the coalition 28 companies with a total market capitalization of $1.3 trillion heeds the most recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which warned of catastrophic consequences should global warming exceed 1.5 degree C.

    Participating companies include: Acciona, AstraZeneca, Banka BioLoo, BT, Dalmia Cement Ltd., Eco-Steel Africa Ltd., Enel, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Iberdrola, KLP, Levi Strauss & Co., Mahindra Group, Natura &Co, Novozymes, Royal DSM, SAP, Signify, Singtel, Telefonica, Telia, Unilever, Vodafone Group PLC and Zurich Insurance, amongst others, collectively representing over one million employees from 17 sectors and more than 16 countries. (Source: UN Global Compact, PR, COMTEX, 23 July, 2019) Contact: UN Global Compact, (212) 907-1301, www.unglobalcompact.org; Science Based Targets Initiative, +44 (0) 20 3818 3916, Sarah.Savage@cdp.net, www.sciencebasedtargets.org; We Mean Business Coalition, Kristen King, (904) 608- 1745 kristen@wemeanbusinesscoalition.org www.wemeanbusinesscoaltion.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Science Based Targets initiative,  UN Global Compact,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    "Climate Change: A Hoax to Weaken the U.S." (Opinions & Asides)
    Climate Change
    Date: 2019-05-27
    The following appeared in a recent edition of the Exponemt Telegram newspaper in Clarksburg, West Virginia. The article and the opinions expressed in the article DO NOT represent those of LC Energy Publications.

    "We know that the Earth is warming; years ago it was covered in ice. Several times since it has gone through periods of being encapsulated in ice!!! Fifty-five thousand years old samples drawn from Antarctic core drills indicate the Earth was 2% warmer than it is today. The reason for this is that the proximity between the sun and the Earth is in a constant state of flux., "The United Nations has propagated an agenda that has a goal of establishing income equality between all countries. To reach that objective, they have decided on the 'Robin Hood' approach -- rob from the rich and give to the poor. Guess who the villain is -- that's right, the USA. How do they accomplish this? They develop a 'Chicken Little' narrative and generate a villain -- that rich country whose people live in luxury.

    "Please humor me while we address the UN's narrative. They repeatedly reiterate that 97 pct of the scientists say that the earth is warming and it is caused by humans and the use of 'fossil fuels.' In 1988, The UN formed a committee, The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, (IPCC) 11,944 scientists were questioned. Of those, 66.4 pct (7,930) said they did not believe that was true. Of the other 4,014, 1,344 said they did not know leaving 2,670 that agreed, which is 22 pct, not 97 pct. That is the first big lie!!! The question I have is: How many of those 22 pct have a parochial interest in the warming equation? Bear in mind that our government spent $22 billion in 2016 to have this warming theory authenticated, with most going to academics.

    "Next, let's address the fossil fuel cause. 70.9 pct of the Earth's surface consists of ocean water. The National Oceanographic Survey Department states that the average depth of the ocean is 12,100 feet, which means there are 351,600,000,000,000,000,000 gallons of water in the ocean.

    "Salt water weighs 8.5 lbs. per gallon. One pound of water uses 1 BTU to raise the temperature 1 degree Fahrenheit. All countries combined in 2015 produced 9 billion tons of coal. The heat factor of the Pittsburgh seam of coal is 12,000 BTU. Using the 35/65 pct factor with 35 pct used to generate electricity and 65 pct lost to the stack gases, allowing for 0 pct dissipated to the land masses or the atmosphere, all heat being transferred to the ocean, it would take 21,610 years to raise the temperature of the ocean 1 degree Fahrenheit!

    "We (the U.S.) are the only industrialized country that has cut CO2 emissions since 2005. Following is a list of coal-fired power plants in several other countries: Europe has 480 and is building 27 more; Turkey- 56 and building 93; South Africa-79, building 24; India- 589, building 446; Philippines- 19, building 60; South Korea- 58, building 26; Japan- 90, building 45; China- 2363, building 1171; and the USA- 359, building 0 . Totals: 4,075 existing and 1,892 under construction not including Russia, North Korea and Eastern Europe, with most of their electric generation being coal fired.

    "My fellow Americans, the most outrageous hoax that has ever been attached to any group of people since the beginning of mankind is attempting to be heaped on the United States of America -- all in the interest of taxing this country into oblivion. They are trying to do what two World Wars, communism and socialism could not accomplish, but it is being condoned and sanctioned from within by progressive liberals who apparently have had lobotomies, or missed a good chance, and our own politicians who gush with delight at the unending stream of $$$$ coming from this potential 'Cash Cow'"! (Source: WCWV, Exponent Telegram, 26 May, 2019) Contact: Exponemt Telegram, Mr. Phil Southern, (800) 982-6034, www.wvnews.com/theet/news

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Coal,  

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