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Notable Quote from the Land Down Under
Climate Change
Date: 2019-09-30
"You (Australia) are the keepers of an extraordinary section of the surface of this planet, including the Barrier Reef, and what you say, what you do, really, really matters,"

"And then you suddenly say: 'No it doesn't matter ... it doesn't matter how much coal we burn ... we don't give a damn what it does to the rest of the world." -- Sir David Attenborough, an English broadcaster and natural historian commenting on Australia's attitude to addressing climate change. (Source: Business Insider Australia, Sept., 2019) Contact: Sir David Attenborouhj, www.imdb.com/name/nm0041003

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  Great Barrier Reef,  Australia Climate Change,  


Great Barrier Reef "Very Poor" Outlook Due to Climate Change (Int'l)
Great Barrier Reef
Date: 2019-09-04
In the Land Down Under, Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is reporting the Great Barrier Reef's long-term outlook has been dropped from "poor" to "very poor" due to the effects of climate change. The Authority's report calls for urgent action on climate change and other threats to the Great Barrier Reef, the largest such reef in the world.

Rising sea temperatures and marine heat waves are doing the most damage to the reef's health, and if nothing is done to stop the current rate of global warming, the reef will be irreparably damaged, the report notes. Beside climate change, the reef is also suffering due to coastal development, direct human use, such as illegal fishing, and land-based run-off from agriculture.

On 30th April, 2018, we reported the Australian federal government is allotting $500 million -- the largest single environmental protection package in the nation's history -- to help protect the Great Barrier Reef from climate change and other treats.

The government will partner with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation in an agreement worth $444 million to mitigate the effects of climate change. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and The Department of the Environment and Energy will also receive $56 million in additional funding. $100 million will be used for reef restoration science and $40 million will be spent for monitoring the health of the reef system.

In a recently published study, researchers revealed the extent of damage caused by global warming on the reef system. Investigations showed that two successive heat waves killed nearly half of the corals in the most pristine part of the Great Barrier Reef. (Source: The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, New Scientist, Sept., 2019) Contact: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Josh Thomas, CEO, www.gbrmpa.gov.au; Great Barrier Reef Foundation, www.barrierreef.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Barrier Reef,  Climate Change,  


Juwi to Install Australian Solar-plus-Storage System (Int'l)
Juwi AG
Date: 2018-09-19
Worrstadt, Germany-based renewable energy developer Juwi AG reports it has inked an engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract with Australia's University of Queensland for the execution of a hybrid solar-plus-storage project at a marine research station on Heron Island, the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia.

The high penetration solar, battery hybrid power solution consists of a 500-kW rooftop installation and a 0.6-MWh vanadium flow battery, integrated with diesel generators that use a microgrid control system. Operations are scheduled to start in mid-2019. (Source: Juwi AG, 18 Sept., 2018) Contact: Juwi AG, Dave Manning, Global Head of Hybrid Energy, Christian Hinsch, Communications, +49 (0) 6732. 96 57-1201, +49 (0) 172. 67 949 12, hinsch@juwi.de, www.juwi.de; Australia University of Queensland, //www.uq.edu.au

More Low-Carbon Energy News Juwi AG,  Solar,  Energy Storage,  


Aussies Commit $500Mn to Save Great Barrier Reef (Int'l)
Climate Change,Great Barrier Reef Foundation
Date: 2018-04-30
In the Land Down Under, the Australian federal government is allotting $500 million -- the largest single environmental protection package in the nation's history -- to help protect the Great Barrier Reef from climate change and other treats.

The government will partner with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation in an agreement worth $444 million to mitigate the effects of climate change. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and The Department of the Environment and Energy will also receive $56 million in additional funding. $100 million will be used for reef restoration science and $40 million will be spent for monitoring the health of the reef system.

In a recently published study study, researchers revealed the extent of damage caused by global warming on the reef system. Investigations showed that two successive heat waves killed nearly half of the corals in the most pristine part of the Great Barrier Reef. (Source: Great Barrier Reef Foundation, Tech Times, 29 April, 2018) Contact: Great Barrier Reef Foundation, www.barrierreef.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


Coral Reefs Gone by 2100 without CO2 Emission Reductions (Int'l)
UNESCO,United States National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration
Date: 2017-06-26
The just released UNESCO World Heritage Centre assessment of global climate change impacts on World Heritage coral reefs has found that over the past three years rising ocean temperatures have subjected 21 of 29 World Heritage reefs to severe and/or repeated heat stress, and caused some of the worst bleaching ever observed at the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) and others. The study predicts that all 29 coral-containing World Heritage sites would cease to exist as functioning coral reef ecosystems by the end of this century under a business-as-usual emissions scenario.

Mass bleaching is caused by rising water temperatures associated with climate change. It only takes a spike of 1-2 degrees C to cause bleaching, and carbon emissions have caused a 1 degree C increase in global surface temperature since pre-industrial times, according to the study. Coral communities typically take 15 to 25 years to recover from mass bleaching.

The assessment was developed with satellite data from the United States National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Coral Reef Watch and received support from Agency Francaise pour la Biodiversite -- he French Agency for Biodiversity. (Source: UNESCO, 23 June, 2017) Contact: Francaise pour la Biodiversite, www.afbiodiversite.fr; United States National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration, www.noaa.gov; UNESCO, en.unesco.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Coral Reef,  Climate Change,  Global Warming,  

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