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Ohio Utilities' Energy Efficiency Programs in Doubt (Ind. Report)
Ohio Energy Efficiency
Date: 2020-03-04
In the Buckeye State, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) last week ruled that the state's energy-efficiency mandates for utilities will begin wrapping up on Sept. 30 and end completely on Dec. 31, 2020, as required under House Bill 6. That includes programs such as reduced-price LED bulbs, rebates on smart thermostats and energy-saving appliances, financial incentives to build energy-efficient homes and businesses, and free energy-efficiency and repair services for low-income households.

With the ruling, Ohio utilities have the option of seeking PUCO approval to voluntarily continue some or all of their energy-efficiency programs beyond 2020, but most haven’t yet decided their course of action.

FirstEnergy, whose subsidiaries provide power to Northeast Ohio and the Toledo area, has announced it will end two programs -- one $75 rebate for smart thermostats, and another that pays money for recycling old appliances.

AEP Ohio, which serves much of Central and Southeast Ohio, plans to continue at least some of its energy-efficiency programs, but has yet to determine the make-up and scope of the programs.

Dayton Power and Light has not yet decided which, if any, of its programs will continue past 2020.

In Southwestern Ohio, Duke Energycurrently offers a variety of energy-efficiency programs, including (among others) rebates for customers who install energy-saving devices, a monitor that offers bill credits to ratepayers who reduce energy usage during high demand periods, and discounted or even free LED lights, which cost anywhere between $1 and $8 per bulb.

As of last year, Ohioans were charged on their electric bills a fee averaging of $3.36 per month to support energy-efficiency programs, as well as programs (such as Duke’s energy monitors) designed to reduce power usage during peak demand times, according to the Ohio Environmental Council Action Fund. That fee, as well as a renewable-energy mandate fee, has been eliminated by House Bill 6 and replaced with a new 85-cent surcharge that goes to bail out two Northern Ohio nuclear power plants owned by FirstEnergy Solutions, which changed its name to Energy Harbor late last month. (Source: Cleveland.com, 3 Mar.,2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Efficiency ,  Energy Efficiency Programs,  


PA Utilities Seek Solar PV Alternative Energy Credits (Ind. Report)
FirstEnergy Corp
Date: 2019-01-23
In the Keystone State, FirstEnergy Corp subsidiaries Pennsylvania Power Company, Pennsylvania Electric Company, and Metropolitan Edison Company, are reportedly seeking the purchase 120,500 Solar PV Alternative Energy Credits (SPAECs) annually over a two-year period. Suppliers will enter into a separate deal and provide the credits in tranches of 500 per year.

The Brattle Group will launch an RfP for the purchase of SPAECs this month. Applications are due by February 5, 2019, and bids due by February 27, 2019. Deliveries of SPAECs are expected this year. (Source: FirstEnergy, Renewables, 21 Jan., 2019) Contact: The Brattle Group, (202 955-5050, (415) 217-1000, www.brattle.com; First Energy, www.firstenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News PV Solar,  Solar Energy Credit,  Brattle Group,  FirstEnergy Corp.,  Solar,  


FirstEnergy Scuttling Ohio, Penna. Coal Power Plants (Ind. Report)
FirstEnergy Solutions
Date: 2018-08-31
In the Buckeye State, Akron-headquartered FirstEnergy Solutions reports it is shuttering its last coal-fired power plants in Ohio and Pennsylvania, as well as its remaining four coal plants by 2022. The three Ohio plants are on the Ohio River in Stratton. Its last Pennsylvania coal plant is in Shippingport. The closures are subject to PJM review.

According to U.S. Energy Information Agency data, the closures will leave about two dozen coal-fired plants operational in Ohio and Pennsylvania. (Source: FirstEnergy Solutions, PR, The Virginian Pilot, AP, 30 Aug., 2018) Contact: First Energy Solutions, Donald Moul, Pres., www.fes.com, www.firstenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News First Energy,  Coal,  Coal-Fired Power,  


FirstEnergy Unloading W.Va Coal-Fired Power Plant (Ind. Report)
FirstEnergy,PJM Interconnection
Date: 2018-02-23
Akron, Ohio-headquartered FirstEnergy reports it will sell or close its 1,300 MW coal-fired Pleasants Power Station in West Virginia next year. To that end, FirstEnergy subsidiary Allegheny Energy Supply has advised PJM Interconnection it plans to "deactivate" the plant. The grid operator must review the potential reliability impacts of closing the plant.

Another FirstEnergy subsidiary Mon Power in West Virginia, had proposed acquiring the plant but the deal was rejected by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and opposed by West Virginia regulators. (Source: FirstEnergy,Feb.21, 2018) Contact: FirstEnergy, Charles Jones, CEO, President www.firstenergy.com; PJM Interconnection, Andrew Ott, CEO, (866) 756-6397 - Media), www.pjm.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News FirstEnergy,  Coal,  PJM Interconnection,  


Ohio Power Sector Leads in Cutting Carbon Output (Ind. Report)
FirstEnergy Corp,US EIA
Date: 2018-01-08
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) website is reporting that Ohio's electric power sector, the state's main source of carbon pollution, cut its carbon pollution from a peak of 132.6 million metric tons in 2005 to 82.6 million metric tons in 2015, while its western neighbor, Indiana trimmed its annual carbon output by 34.9 million metric tons over the same 10-year period.

Akron-based FirstEnergy Corp. played a major role in the reduction. While it has continued to operate its two nuclear plants that don't emit any meaningful carbon, the company closed several coal-fired power plants in Ohio and boosted its use of renewable energy.

The decline is attributed to the advent of cheap shale gas which has caused new natural gas power plants to come online in Ohio and nearby states that sell their power into Ohio on a shared electric power grid. That's all while companies like FirstEnergy have shuttered coal plants that can't compete economically with natural gas-fired plants.

In 2005, approximately 88 pct of Ohio's electric power was coal generated. Today it is closer to 50 pct, according the the EIA. Over 60 generation units at about 20 coal-fired plants have been closed down in Ohio since 2010. (Source: US EIA, Crain's Cleveland Business, Others, Jan., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov; First Energy, www.firstenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Carbon Emissions,  FirstEnergy Corp,  

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