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Air France Touts Climate Impact Reduction Plans (Int'l. Report)
Air France
Date: 2019-10-02
In an effort to counteract its climate impact, French carrier Air France reports it will offset 100 pct of the carbon emissions of its 500-odd daily internal flights by 2020, finance projects that support tree planting, forest protection and the global shift to low-carbon energy. The airline will also ban single-use plastics such as cutlery from local flights as from January, 2020, and start separating and recycling waste from October.

The airline industry's carbon emissions, which at 285 grammes of CO2 emitted per kilometre travelled by each passenger, far exceed all other modes of transport, according to the European Environment Agency. Heavy duty transportation -- freight trucking, shipping and aviation -- represent more then 10 pct of global greenhouse gas emissions, says the World Resources Institute, a research body. (Source: Air France, AFP, The Local, 1 Oct., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Aviation Emissions,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


Total EU GHG Emissions Increase Slightly (Int'l. Report)
European Environment Agency
Date: 2019-05-31
According to the European Environment Agency's (EEA) Annual European Union Greenhouse Gas Inventory 1990-2017 and inventory report 2019 the EU's total greenhouse gas emissions -- including international aviation -- rose by 0.7 pct in 2017 compared with 2016. From 1990 to 2017, the EU reduced its net GHG emissions by 21.7 pct and is therefore still exceeding its 20 pct Paris Climate Accord reduction target set for 2020.

In reaching these levels, less coal was used for heat and electric power production but this was offset by higher industrial and transport emissions, the latter increasing for the fourth consecutive year.

The report notes EU GHG emissions have decreased since 1990 as a combined result of policies, economic and structural factors and, on average, milder winters. The largest emission cuts have been made in the energy sector, due to efficiency improvements, increased use of renewables and a less carbon intensive mix of fossil fuels. -- more gas, and less coal and oil. Energy efficiency and renewable energy will continue to play a key role in cutting future emissions and helping the EU achieve its 40 pct reduction target by 2030. (Source: European Environment Agency, Various Media, Eurasia Review, 30 May, 2019) Contact: European Environment Agency, www.eea.europa.eu.

More Low-Carbon Energy News European Environment Agency ,  Carbon Emissions,  


EU Parliamentarians Back New Vehicle CO2 Emissions Limits (Int'l)
EU
Date: 2019-03-29
Meeting in Brussels, Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) and Eurepean Union (EU) ministers are reporting agreement on a 37 pct higher target to reduce EU fleet-wide emissions for new cars by 2030, compared to the European Commission's (EC) proposed 30 pct target. The legislation also sets a 31 pct CO2 reduction target for new vans by 2030.

The new legislation demands that the full life-cycle of emissions from cars should be assessed at EU level. The Commission will also have to consider a common methodology for the assessment and consistent data reporting, by no later than 2023. If appropriate, legislation should follow.

Transport is the only sector in the EU that did not record any significant decline in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions since 1990. Figures from the European Environment Agency show that of all means of transport in the EU, road transport generates the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions -pct of the EU's total GHG emissions. (Source: European Parliament News, 27 Mar., 2019) Contact: EP News, +32 2 28 40922, envi-press@europarl.europa.eu, www.europarl.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News EU Parliament,  Vehicle Emissions,  Transportation Emissions,  


EU Renewable Energy Progress Adoption Slows (Ind. Report, Int'l)
European Environment Agency
Date: 2018-11-28
In a just released report, the European Environment Agency (EEA) notes that the EU's progress towards increasing the use of renewable energy and improving energy efficiency is slowing and putting its ability to meet its 2020 and 2030 targets at risk.

According to the report, renewable energy, such as wind and solar, accounted for a 17.4 pct share of gross final energy consumption in the EU last year -- up from 17.0 pct in 2016. This indicates that the EU remains on track to reach its target of a renewables share of 20 pct by 2020, although at a slower rate of growth. Preliminary EEA data for 2017 showed 20 member states were on track to reach their individual targets on renewable energy by 2020, a drop from 2016 when 25 countries were on track.

On energy efficiency, both primary and final energy consumption were above the trajectory needed to reach targets 2020. The continued growth in energy consumption, particularly in transport but also in other sectors, made achieving the 2020 target increasingly uncertain, the report said.

Download the full report HERE (Source: European Environment Agency, Reuters, 26 Nov., 2018) Contact: European Environment Agency, www.eea.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News European Environment Agency,  Energy Efficiency,  Renewable Energy,  Energy Efficiency,  Energy Consumption,  


EU's GHGs Dip While Transport Emission Rise (Int'l Report)
European Environment Agency
Date: 2018-06-01
According to the European Environment Agency's (EEA) Annual European Union Greenhouse Gas Inventory 1990-2016 total greenhouse gas emissions in the European Union (EU) decreased by 0.4 pct in 2016. The slight drop is attributed to the use of less coal for electric power and heat despite an increase in transport emissions for the third consecutive year.

From 1990 to 2016, the EU has reduced its net greenhouse gas emissions by 22.4 pct , surpassing its 20 pct reduction target by 2020. These figures include emissions from international aviation, which are covered by EU targets but not accounted in national totals under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Emissions in the residential and commercial sector also increased because the winter of 2016 was slightly colder than the winter of 2015.

EU greenhouse gas emissions have decreased since 1990 as a combined result of policies, economic factors and, on average, milder winters, the EEA analysis shows. The largest emission cuts have been made in the energy sector, due to energy efficiency improvements, an increased use of renewables and a less carbon intensive mix of fossil fuels -- more gas, less coal and oil. (Source: European Environment Agency, May, 2018) Contact: European Environment Agency, www.eea.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News European Environment Agency,  EU Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


ePURE Comments on EU-EP Climate Change, Biofuels Policy (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
ePURE
Date: 2017-11-29
"One thing should be clear to everyone: the European Union (EU) needs to do something to improve its efforts in the fight against climate change -- and quickly. That's because just as often as a new position on EU biofuels policy gets staked out, another reminder arises that Europe is falling behind in its commitments to de-carbonizing transport.

"The latest news comes from the European Environment Agency, which reported this month that GHG emissions have risen for the third year in a row in the EU. Everyone from European Commission VP, Maros Sefcovic, to environmental lobby groups, is warning that we need to do more.

"By proposing a low-emissions fuel blending obligation of just 6.8 pct by 2030, starting from 1.5 pct in 2021, it would leave most of the transport energy mix taken up by fossil fuels.

"Yet, at the same time, they are proposing policies that would achieve less. The EC wants to reduce all crop-based biofuels -- even the ones like renewable European ethanol that deliver high GHG savings with low risk of adverse impact to almost nothing by 2030. And by proposing a low-emissions fuel blending obligation of just 6.8 pct by 2030, starting from 1.5 pct in 2021, it would leave most of the transport energy mix taken up by fossil fuels.

The European Parliament's various committees have been weighing in with their opinions over the last couple of months. The environment committee, the lead panel on the biofuels file, wants to go even further than the Commission, and phase out crop-based biofuels entirely by 2030.

"The transport committee could not find agreement on the environment committee language and ended up rejecting its own draft opinion on the legislation. This week the industry, research and energy committee and lead on the entire Renewable Energy Directive, will vote. Even traditional political groups are divided on the issue.

"The swirl of differing opinions means the RP may not have a clear line on this important issue going into plenary vote in January (2018). But it is not too late for MEPs to find common ground and move closer to what EU Member States want and have articulated coherently in their draft position: build on the success of the existing framework, leave in place the 7 percent cap on crop-based biofuels, and promote advanced biofuels and renewable electricity in addition to, not at the expense of, existing solutions." (Source: ePure, Politico, 23 Nov., 2017) Contact: European Renewable Ethanol Assoc. (ePURE), Emmanuel Desplechin, Sec. Gen., +32 2 657 6679, info@epure.org, www.epure.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News ePURE,  Biofuel,  EU,  


EU ETS Emission Permit Surplus Slipping (Int'l Report)
EU ETS
Date: 2016-10-21
According to the just released European Environment Agency's annual Trends and projections in the EU ETS in 2016 -- The Emissions Trading System in Numbers report on the EU's emissions cap and trade system, the surplus of CO2 emission allowances in the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) began declining in 2015 -- the first significant decrease since unused allowances started accumulating in 2008.

According to the report, postponing the auctioning of 300 million allowances in 2015 contributed to reducing by 17 pct the surplus of 2.1 billion emission allowances that had accumulated in the system since 2008. The surplus, which is equivalent to one year's worth of CO2 emissions in the EU ETS, keeps allowance prices low and offers a limited incentive for the more expensive options needed to decarbonize the European economy in the long term.

EU ETS covered GHG emissions fell 24 pct between 2005 and 2015 and are now below the cap set for 2020. The decrease was mostly driven by changes in the type of fuels used for power generation (less hard coal and lignite fuels and a jump in renewables). Emissions from the other industrial activities covered by the EU ETS have also decreased since 2005, but have remained stable in recent years.

According to projections available from EU Member States, emissions under the EU ETS will continue to decrease with the current policies and measures in place, although at a much slower pace than between 2005 and 2015. As many as 13 EU Member States project increases in their ETS emissions up to 2030. These projections do not all account for recent policy developments to address the current surplus -- a market stability reserve -- and the proposal for a steeper annual decline of the overall number of allowances from 2021 onwards, in order to put the ETS on track to achieve a 43 pct cut in emissions by 2030 compared to 2005, as a contribution to the EU's 40 pct reduction target for total EU emissions by 2030 compared to 1990. (Source: EU Release, Oct., 2016)

More Low-Carbon Energy News EU ETS,  GHGs,  Carbon Emissions,  

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