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Blue Flint Ethanol CCS Test Well Underway (Ind. Report)
Blue Flint Ethanol.Midwest AgEnergy,CCS
Date: 2020-10-16
Following up on our June 22nd coverage, Blue Flint Ethanol, part of Midwest AgEnergy , reports test well drilling for its previously announced "Carbon Zero" carbon capture and storage (CCS) initiative at its corn-ethanol plant in Underwood, McLean County, Wyoming is underway. The roughly $35 million test well is expected to be complete within 6 weeks.

The Blue Flint ethanol plant's roughly 200,000 tpy of carbon emissions are the result of its corn fermentation process which uses enzymes to break down the starch into glucose. Yeast then converts the glucose to ethanol, and C02 is released in the process. (Source: Blue Flint Ethanol, Bismark Tribune, 14 Oct., 2020) Contact: Blue Flint Ethanol, Midwest AgEnergy, Jeff Zuger, CEO, (701) 442-7500, www.midwestagenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Flint Ethanol,  COs,  CCS,  


Novozymes Platform Converts Corn Fiber into Ethanol (Ind. Report)
Novozymes
Date: 2020-09-21
Novozymes today announced the launch of Fiberex, a comprehensive platform based on novel enzymes and yeast strains to convert corn fiber into ethanol. Fiberex is specifically aimed at breaking down tough fibers in the corn, providing producers with greater operational flexibility. The technology converts a low-value by-product into high-value, low-carbon fuel while also enabling the production of significantly more corn oil.

According to the release, Novozymes is the technology leader in fiber conversion, enabling new revenue for biofuels producers from low-carbon credits such as in California and EPA's cellulosic RIN credits. Through Fiberex, Novozymes is collaborating with the biofuel industry to further expand the boundaries of corn-based ethanol -- literally breaking down some of the barriers between what is considered conventional biofuels and advanced biofuels.

Novozymes' Fiberex enzymes are specifically designed to break down this complex matrix -- resulting in more corn oil and converting the fiber into simple sugars that are easily converted into ethanol.

As part of the platform announcement, Novozymes is also launching the first Fiberex products: Fiberex R1, a technology specifically designed to provide maximum ethanol in separate fiber-to-ethanol processes, and Fiberex F1, a cellulase enzyme designed to provide fiber conversion for in-process technologies. Additional solutions, to launch in 2021, are in proof-of-concept trials now, according to the release. (Source: Novozymes, Website PR, 16 Sept., 2020) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP Bioenergy, 646-671-3897 , www.novozymes.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes ,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol,  


CUHK Generates Biocatalysts for Biodiesel Prod. (New Prod & Tech)
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Date: 2020-06-26
In Hong Kong, supported by the Research Grants Council and the Innovation and Technology Fund, researchers at Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) are reporting development of a novel method for extracting enzymes from bacteria, which lowers the production cost and opens a new avenue for the enzymatic production of biodiesel.

Enzymes can act as a catalyst to produce biodiesel while generating less waste and requiring lower temperatures than traditional base catalysts. Enzymes are presently too expensive to compete with base catalysts because enzymes require tedious purification procedures and subsequent immobilization to be easily recycled and reused, according to the CUHK research report.

According to Dr. Bradley Heater, the lead author of the paper, "The real elegance of this technology is that the bacteria cells do all the hard work of producing the catalyst -- all we have to do is separate the crystals from the cell debris. Currently, we can use this method to produce an enzyme that converts waste cooking oil to biodiesel, but we should be able to trap other enzymes to perform different chemistry as well." (Source: Chinese University of Hong Kong, BioSpectrum Asia, 25 June, 2020) Contact: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Dr. Bradley Heater, Report Author, Prof. Michael Chan, +852 3943 1487, michaelchan88@cuhk.edu.hk, www.cuhk.edu.hk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel,  Enzymes,  


DTU IDs CO2 Capturing Enzymes (Int'l. R&D, New Tech & Prod.)
Technical University of Denmark,
Date: 2020-06-08
Researchers at the Technical University of Denmark, DTU Bioengineering report they have identified a number of enzymes that can capture CO2 and transform it into sustainable chemicals with the use of electricity from the wind turbines. The specific enzymes can effectively convert carbon dioxide into formic acid and then into methanol.

The DTU Bioengineering scientists contend that Denmark can become a market leader if there is a high production of the particular enzymes.

According to the researchers, 200 tonnes of the enzyme can capture one million tpd of CO2. A new technology needs to be developed to produce enzymes on a large scale, the DTU release notes. (Source: DTU Bioengineering , CPH Post, 6 June, 2020) Contact: DTU Bioengineering, (+45) 4525 2600 , info@bio.dtu.dk, www.bioengineering.dtu.dk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Methanol,  Carbon Capture,  CO2,  


Alliance BioEnergy's Next-Gen CTS 2.0 Underway (Ind Report)
Alliance BioEnergy
Date: 2020-04-10
In the Sunshine State, Palm Beach Gardens-based Alliance BioEnergy Plus Inc. reports construction is underway on its new 4th generation Cellulose-to-Sugar (CTS 2.0) prototype.

CTS 2.0 can convert virtually any plant material -- grasses, wood, paper, farm waste, yard waste, forestry products, fruit casings, nut shells, and the cellulosic portion of municipal solid waste -- into sugars and subsequently into biofuels, and bioplastics, without the use of enzymes or liquid acids. CTS stands for Cellulose to Sugar. The cellulose is converted into sugar and lignin. The sugar is further converted into bio-ethanol and other biofuels; the lignin may be further converted into bioplastics. The company notes that biofuel originating from the CTS process will receive the generous D3 cellulosic Renewable Fuel Credits (RINs) which are currently $1.40/gallon of ethanol. (Source: Alliance Bioenergy, PR, 9 April, 2020) Contact: Alliance Bioenergy Plus, Inc., Ben Slager, CEO, Ben.slager@alliancebioe.com; www.Alliancebioe.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Cellulosic,  Biomass,  Alliance BioEnergy,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  


Novozymes Touts Innova Fit for Ethanol Production (Ind. Report)
Novozymes
Date: 2020-02-14
Danish enzymes and microbes specialist Novozymes is reporting the launch of Innova Fit -- an advanced non-GM yeast that eliminates ethanol production constraints caused by conventional and basic yeasts. According to the release, Innova Fit:
  • Powers through high temperature excursions without sacrificing yield -- Higher yields during fermentation temperature excursions, up to 36 degree C/96 degree F, reducing variability and process upsets.

  • Expands throughput by fermenting high dry solids -- Developed to withstand the rigors of hard running plants, Innova Fit can ferment up to 36 pct dry solids while tolerating high ethanol titers in fermentation.

  • Increases ethanol yield up to 2 pct -- Operating in a wide variety of fermentation times, Innova Fit excels in fermentations between 55 and 65 hours. As a drop-in solution, Fit converts more sugar to ethanol versus other non-GM yeasts to improve plant profitability.

  • May reduce need for yeast nutritional supplements: While many yeasts use urea and yeast food to support fermentation, Innova Fit could significantly reduce these costly inputs.

    Since 2018, Novozymes has released four yeast solutions as part of its Innova platform. Yeast and its development are a strategic growth area where Novozymes will continue working with innovation partners in the industry. Its Innova yeast products are the result of a dedicated development partnership with Microbiogen to bring new yeast technology to the market.

    Australian-based Microbiogen is an industrial biotechnology company specializing in the development of improved, industrial yeast strains, according to the company website. (Source: Novozymes, PR, GreenCar Congress, 11 Feb. 2020) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP Bioenergy Commercial, Peder Holk Nielsen, CEO, Michael Burns, Biorefining Business Development North America,(919) 496-6926, www.novozymes.com; Microbiogen, Geoff Bell, CEO, (02) 9418 3182 geoff.bell@microbiogen.com, www.microbiogen.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Microbiogen,  Novozymes ,  Yeast,  Ethanol,  


  • Novozymes Touts New Liquefaction Platform (New Prod. & Tech.)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2019-06-12
    Biofuel technology provider Novozymes reports the launch of Fortiva, a new alpha-amylase technology that helps customers avoid having to choose between maximizing enzyme performance and operational efficiency. In yeast, Force continues to deliver on the promise to quickly bring innovative, robust, and reliable biological solutions to the market from the Innova yeast platform established last year.

    Fortiva is added into liquefaction the same as traditional alpha amylase technologies, but once introduced, it solubilizes more difficult starch than all other amylases on the market

  • It does this through both the efficient operational use of temperature, as well as the enzyme itself, leading to the highest conversion of starch to dextrins in the market and creating the highest returns on investment. Novozymes sees this proven time and again through an average 20 pct reduction in ethanol plants' residual starch.

  • Fortiva advances plant efficiency. The fuel ethanol industry initially operated at high liquefaction temperatures (195F/91C) known to better solubilize starch to dextrins, but during this time, enzyme efficiency was limited and required excessive use of chemicals to enable the high operational temperature. Novozymes advancements in enzyme technology (Liquozyme SC) allowed for the removal of unnecessary chemicals (lime) required but required an operational change to more typical operating liquefaction temperatures seen in the fuel ethanol industry today (185F/85C)

  • Fortiva again allows the ethanol industry to engage very efficient, high temperature liquefactions (195F/91C) while also bringing to market the most advanced alpha amylase to work in this ideal environment, solubilizing more starch without the need for additional chemicals, yielding the highest ethanol production in the market (+1 pct ethanol yield).

    Novozyme's Innova Force targets ethanol plants seeking flexibility to achieve operational targets without sacrificing performance. It allows producers to achieve throughput and yield targets without losing ethanol yield to common stressors, such as high temperature and organic acids. Force gives producers the flexibility to push for yield without compromise, and to choose the format that best fits their operation, dry or cream.

  • Innova Force expresses multiple starch-degrading enzymes for tailored substrate activity, ensuring solubilization and conversion for the lowest residual starch and most optimal fermentation kinetics. Paired with novel glucoamylases, the result is the lowest stress and high performing yeast kinetics and fermentations for exceptional efficiency.

  • Force is proven to handle tough challenges: Exceptional robustness to high ethanol concentrations, high dry solids -- up to 38 pct temperature excursions up to 104 degree F, and lactic acid excursions up to 0.6 pct. Force expresses multiple enzymes to maximize substrate and starch conversion, and is available in two formats (cream and dry) making it the most advanced dry yeast on the market.

  • Force eliminates the need for yeast food (100 pct) required by other yeasts, a $300,000 savings (100+MGY plants). Based on plant trials to date, there is potential for significant urea reduction, up to 75 pct depending on individual plant conditions. For every 500lbs of urea reduced, plants can save approximately $130,000 (100+MGY plant). Innova Force eliminates these hidden costs with its flexibility, robustness, and opportunity to run a plant as needed (high throughput or yield): $500,000 savings in nutrients (urea reduction, and 100 pct elimination of yeast nutrients); $280,000 cost reduction related to poor performing fermentations caused by lack of robustness; 33 pct DS -- plants using advanced yeasts struggle running high dry solids, according to the Novozymes release. (Source: Novozymes, Trade Release, 10 June, 2019) Contact: Novozymes, Brian Brazeau, VP, Biofuels Commercial North America, Peder Holk Nielsen, Pres. and CEO, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes,  Ethanol,  Yeast,  


  • ICM Announces Brazilian Ethanol Plant Supply Contract (Int'l)
    ICM
    Date: 2019-01-21
    Colwich, Kansas-headquartered agricultural and biofuels process technology provider ICM Inc. reports the inking of an agreement with Usimat Destilaria de Alcool Ltda (Usimat) to implement ICM's proprietary technologies at Usimat's plant in Campo de Julio, Mato Grasso (MT) in Brazil. ICM will provide an ethanol process improvement package, and a distillation, dehydration and evaporation (DD&E) package system to improve the plant's overall efficiency and biomass usage.

    Usimat will also deploy ICM's Selective Milling Technology (SMT) and Base Tricanter System (BTS) to improve ethanol and corn oil recovery yields while reducing enzymes and chemical usage. In total, the ICM technologies packages will increase ethanol, corn oil, and DDG yields, and provide operational efficiencies. (Source: ICM, Bioenergy, 18 Jan., 2019) Contact: Usimat, Marcos Altenburger, CEO, www.novacana.com/usinas_brasil/fabrica/usina-usimat; ICM Inc., David VanderGriend, CEO, (316) 796-0900, www.icminc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ICM,  ICM Ethanol,  DDGs,  


    Attis, Novozymes Collaborate on Biorefinery Technologies (Ind. Report)
    Attis Industries,Novozymes
    Date: 2019-01-18
    Milton, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc. reports it has inked an agreement with Copenhagen-headquartered Novozymes A/S under which Novozymes will supply enzymes to Attis' planned cellulosic ethanol biorefineries.

    Attis has successfully converted the pulp extracted from its patented biomass processing into high yields of sugar using Novozymes' proprietary enzyme cocktails.

    Initially, Attis and Novozymes will focus on optimizing the value of the biotechnology utilized in the Attis process. (Source: Attis Industries, Chemical Engineering, Jan., 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com; Novozymes, Peder Holk Nielsen, President and CEO, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries,  Novozymes,  Biofuel,  


    Imperial College London Researchers Enhance Bioprocessing for Biofuels Production (Int'l Report)
    Imperial College London
    Date: 2018-11-26
    In the UK, according to an Imperial College London study aimed at enhancing bioprocessing for cheap and environmentally friendly production of biofuels, plant-based biomass can be broken down 30 times faster than it is usually done.

    In the study, the glucosidase enzyme that helps break down the complex carbohydrates present in biomass was modified the chemical structure of the enzyme to let it withstand heat of up to 137 degree C so that it can be used in ionic liquids instead of the usual water. The scientists found that the combined effect of heat resistance and solubility in ionic liquids increased the glucose output 30-fold. If the technique is taken up on a large scale, fuel-related carbon emissions could fall by 80-100 per cent.

    According to researcher Dr. Alex Brogan, "We've made bioprocessing faster, which will require less equipment and will reduce carbon footprint. One major advantage of this will be increased biofuel production -- potentially helping biofuels become more widespread as a result. Furthermore, this alteration can be applied to a wide variety of enzymes, for various applications such as making fuels from waste and recycling plastics, thereby making bioprocessing more efficient." (Source: Imperial College London, Coherent Times, 24 Nov., 2018)Contact: Imperial College London, Department of Chemical Engineering, Dr. Alex Brogan, +44 (0) 20 7594 9028, www.alexbrogan.co.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Imperial College London,  Biofuel,  


    Novozymes Reports Growing Bioenergy Segment Sales (Ind. Report)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2018-10-26
    Further to our August 15th coverage, in its just released Q3, 2018 financial report, Novozymes reports significant growth in demand for enzymes in the conventional biofuel market. Overall, the company reported 5 pct organic sales growth for Q3, when compared to the same period of 2017. For the first nine months of the year, sales grew by 4 pct organically. Sales in bioenergy were up 14 pct, while agriculture and feed sales grew by 5 pct. Bioenergy accounted for 19 pct of the company's sales during the first three quarters of 2018. (Source: Novozymes, Various Media, 24 Oct., 2018)Contact: Novozymes, Peder Holk Nielsen, President and CEO, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes,  


    Univ. of Arkansas Awarded $800,000 for Biofuel R&D (R&D, Funding)
    University of Arkansas
    Date: 2018-08-31
    In Fayetteville, the University of Arkansas reports biological sciences assistant professor Ruben Michael Ceballos has been awarded $800,000 over four years in grant funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to research methods to improve the efficiency and environmental soundness in the production of biofuel,

    The research is intended to create a way to protect and enhance enzymes in the process to turn organic material into fuel. Ceballos will use a protein derived from microorganisms that live in acidic geothermal pools and springs to enhance the conversion process. (Source: University of Arkansas, 30 Aug., 2018) Contact: University of Arkansas, Prof. Ruben Michael Ceballos, 479-575-5643, ceballos@uark.edu, https://ceballoslab.uark.edu; National Science Foundation, www.nsf.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News National Science Foundation,  University of Arkansas,  Biofuel,  


    Novozymes Touts Bioenergy Segment Growth (Ind. Report)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2018-08-15
    In a just released financial report for the first half of 2018, Novozymes reported 14 pct organic sales growth for its bioenergy segment which accounted for 19 pct of the company's sales during the first half of the year. The company also noted its newly launched Innova Drive yeast product posted good growth in the second quarter. Novozymes also reported that sales of enzymes for biomass conversion declined during the first half of 2018 when compared to the same period of last year.

    Novozymes also noted that organic sales growth for the bioenergy segment is expected to be driven mainly by new product launches and innovation. (Source: Novozymes, AgraNet, Various Media, 14 Aug., 2018) Contact: Novozymes, Tina Sejersgard Fano, VP Bioenergy, +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes ,  Enzymes,  Bioenergy,  Biofuel,  


    Syngenta Ready to Expand in Bangladesh (Int'l Report)
    Syngenta
    Date: 2018-08-10
    Basel, Switzerland-headquartered agrochemical specialist Syngenta International reports it is seeking investment opportunities, partnerships and knowledge sharing opportunities with suitable partners worldwide, including Bangladesh where it holds a 60 pct stake in Syngenta Bangladesh Limited. The state-run Bangladesh Chemical Industries Corporation holds the remaining 40 pct.

    Syngenta's patented Enogen corn has enzymes genetically engineered into the kernels. Ethanol plants normally purchase enzymes to help turn corn starch into sugar as part of the fermenting process. Enogen is classified as an "identity preserved crop" and must either go to the ethanol plants that contract for it or be used as livestock feed. The product is presently being used or tested in over 30 ethanol plants nationwide, including Tharaldson Energy at Casselton, N.D., and Midwest AgEnergy Group plants at Spiritwood, N.D., and Underwood, N.D.

    Syngenta International, which was acquired by China's state-run enterprise ChemChina in 2017, operates research and development facilities in Research Triangle Park in North Carolina and in Beijing. (Source: Syngenta, New Age Business, United News of Bangladesh, 8 Aug., 2018) Contact: Syngenta, Eric Fyrwald, CEO, +41 61 323 11 11, www.syngenta.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Syngenta,  Biouel Feedstock,  Enogen,  


    Yokohama Touts Isoprene from Biomass Tech. (New Prod & Tech)
    Yokohama Rubber
    Date: 2018-08-06
    Tokyo-headquartered tire manufacturer Yokohama Rubber Co., Ltd., working with RIKEN and Zeon Corporation, reports it has developed a technology for efficiently producing isoprene from biomass.

    The new process utilizes an artificial pathway and highly active enzymes to create cells which have excellent isoprene-synthesizing capability. The new technology is used to make cells which have the capability to generate isoprene from a biomass (sugar) that serves as the starting material. The in-vivo generated isoprene is then polymerized to achieve synthesis of polyisoprene rubber. The research project effectively leveraged the cell design and plant science technologies of the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) to develop this new technology.

    The technology can be used for butadiene-based synthetic rubber and other diene rubbers, according to a Yokohama release. (Source: Yokohama Rubber Co., Tires & Parts, Aug., 2018) Contact: Yokohama Rubber , www.y-yokohama.com/global

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Sugar Biomass,  


    ADM, DuPont Collaborate on Cellulose Enzymes (Ind. Report)
    Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM), DuPont Industrial Biosciences
    Date: 2018-06-22
    Chicago-headquartered Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) and DuPont Industrial Biosciences report they are collaborating to develop, produce and market cellulase enzymes for grain-based ethanol production.

    Cellulase enzymes assist in hydrolyzing the corn kernel fiber which, broken down, releases more sugars to be fermented into ethanol.

    Ethanol from corn kernel fiber may qualify for D3 RINS under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) which encourages producers to utilize non-starch components of grains and other waste products in the production of biofuels. Initial product prototypes have proven successful in both laboratory and ethanol plant scale testing, and more evaluations are planned, the companies say. (Source: ADM, DuPont, World-Grain, 21 June, 2018) Contact: DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Troy Wilson, www.biosciences.dupont.com; ADM, Juan Luciano, Pres., CEO, (312) 634-8100, Collin Benson, VP Bioactives, Jackie Anderson, ADM Media, (217) 424-5413, media@adm.com, www.adm.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Archer Daniels Midland ,  DuPont Industrial Biosciences,  Cellulosic,  Enzyne,  


    White Dog, AdvanceBio Collaborate on Clostridia Technology (R&D)
    White Dog Labs
    Date: 2018-06-13
    Rehovot,Israel-based White Dog Labs Israel, a subsidiary of New Castle, Delaware-based White Dog Laboratories (WDL) and AdvanceBio are reporting receipt of grant funding from the Israel-US Binational Industrial Research and Development Foundation BIRD Energy to further develop CelZyme™, a cellulosic hydrolysis technology developed by WDL Israel using the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ( Ctx ).

    In the wild, Ctx is nature's best cellulosic degrader, and since it is anaerobic, the technology has the potential of lowering enzymes costs via onsite CelZyme production, using part of the biomass as its feedstock.

    WDL has developed a core competency for the isolation, selection, cultivation and engineering of Clostridia, a long known but less understood class of bacteria, with promising applications in biochemicals and fuels.

    Cincinnati, Ohio-headquartered AdvanceBio provides renewable chemical and fuel process technology development and design services globally to first generation producers as well as companies developing second-generation, cellulosic ethanol processes. (Source: White Dog Lab, PR, Business Wire, June, 2018) Contact: White Dog Lab., Bryan Tracy, (302) 220-4763, btracy@whitedoglabs.com, www.WhiteDogLabs.com; White Dog Labs Israel, Alon Karpol, akarpol@whitedoglabs.com; AdvanceBio, Dale Monceaux, monceaux@advancebio.com, www.AdvanceBio.com; BIRD Foundation, Dr. Eitan Yudilevich, Executive Director, +972 3 698 8300, (650) 752-6485, www.birdf.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News White Dog Labs,  BIRD Energy,  ,  


    BASF, Lallemand Report US Ethanol Market Collaboration (Ind. Report)
    BASF Enzymes, Lallemand Biofuels
    Date: 2018-06-13
    In San Diego, BASF Enzymes and Montral-headquartered Lallemand Biofuels & Distilled Spirits (LBDS) report they've formally entered into a marketing and sales collaboration agreement with the aim to maximize value to customers in the US ethanol market.

    In the collaboration, BASF's enzyme portfolio will be used for applications in liquefaction and fermentation to improve fermentation performance. LBDS will use its TransFerm yeast product line which it claims provides increased ethanol yields and reduces the need for glucoamylase addition.

    The BASF company portfolio is organized into five segments -- chemicals, performance products, functional materials & solutions, agricultural solutions and oil & gas.

    LBDS supplies fermentation ingredients and 'value creating services' to the global fuel ethanol and distilled beverage industries. (Source: BASF, LBDS, PR, Biofuels Int'l, 12 June, 2018) Contact: Lallemand, Jim Steele, CEO, Angus Ballard, Pres., (815) 721-6165, www.lallemandbds.com; BASF Enzymes, Dirk Daems, Drector of Operations, (858)451-8500, https://www.bloomberg.com/profiles/companies/VRNM:US-basf-enzymes-llc, www.basf.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BASF,  Enzymes,  Lallemand Biofuels,  Ethanol,  


    DuPont Launches New Products for Fuel Ethanol (New Prod & Tech)
    DuPont Industrial Biosciences
    Date: 2018-06-06
    Building off the recent launch of its fuel ethanol platform DuPont™ XCELIS™,Wilmigton, Delaware-based DuPont Industrial Biosciences has unveiled three new products designed to increase yields, speed fermentation and reduce energy and chemical consumption:
  • DuPont™ SYNERXIA® THRIVE GX: Next Generation in Yeast for the Fuel Alcohol Industry;
  • DuPont DISTILLASE DXT: Advanced Glucoamylase Blend;
  • DuPont OPTIMASH AX: Xylanase for Enhanced Liquefaction

    The new XCELIS platform also will feature an online partner community for the industry, GRAIN CHANGERS. This online community and innovative product offerings represent a new age for DuPont's XCELIS biorefinery team. By improving performance, efficiency and fuel ethanol yields, XCELIS helps ethanol producers reach their goals with new products, tools and technologies. "These three products are -- quite simply -- game-changers for the fuel ethanol market. Our team has done it once again -- listened to customer needs, engineered cutting-edge enzyme and yeast technologies and worked hand-in-hand with ethanol producers to bring products to market that provide the best possible yields and new options for efficiency," the release says. (Source: DuPont Industrial Biosciences, PR, June, 2018) Contact: DuPont Industrial Biosciences , Judy Underwood, Global Marketing Leader Grain Processing, Wendy Rosen , (650) 284-6429, www.dow-dupont.com, http://biosciences.dupont.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DuPont Industrial Biosciences ,  Ethanol,  Biofuel,  Enzymes,  


  • Novozymes Eying Chinese Enzymes Market Opportunities (Int'l)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2018-05-28
    The Chinese news agency Xinhua is reporting Danish industrial enzymes specialist Novozymes expects its products to play a major role in the world's third-largest ethanol market, China's ambitious goals for sustainability and development. Novozymes opened its first facility Chine 20 years ago in the Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area.

    Novozymes said ethanol fuel is one of the major opportunities the company sees in China, which plans to push nationwide use of bioethanol-gasoline blends by 2020 to cut emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

    With a 48-pct market share in industrial enzymes, Novozymes provides biological solutions for producers of ethanol, bread, detergent and textiles in 130 countries. (Source: Xinhua, Novozymes, 27 May, 2018) Contact: Novozymes, Sara Dai, Asia Pacific Regional Pres., +45 44 46 00 00, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes,  Enzymes,  Ethanol,  


    N.D. Ethanol Plants Testing Syngenta's Enogen Corn (Ind. Report)
    Tharaldson Energy,Syngenta,AgEnergy Group
    Date: 2018-05-21
    AgWeek is reporting corn ethanol producers in North Dakota are at different stages of incorporating Minnetonka, Minnesota-based Syngenta's patented Enogen corn into their mix. Enogen corn has enzymes genetically engineered into the kernels. Ethanol plants normally purchase enzymes to help turn corn starch into sugar as part of the fermenting process.

    Enogen is classified as an "identity preserved crop" and must either go to the ethanol plants that contract for it or be used as livestock feed.

    The product is presently being used or tested in over 30 ethanol plants nationwide, including Tharaldson Energy at Casselton, N.D., and Midwest AgEnergy Group plants at Spiritwood, N.D., and Underwood, N.D. (Source: INFORUM, AgWeek, 20 May, 2018) Contact: Syngenta, Jack Bernens, Enogen Technology Leader, (202) 737-6520, www.syngenta.com; Enogen, (877) 436-0436, www.enogen.net; Tharaldson Energy, www.tharaldsonethanol.com; MidwestAgEnergy Group, www.midwestagenergygroup.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Tharaldson Energy,  Syngenta,  Enogen,  Corn,  Ethanol Corn Ethanol,  AgEnergy Group ,  


    Indian Ag Waste-to-Ethanol Demo Touts Success (Int'l, Report)
    DBT-ICT Centre for Energy Biosciences
    Date: 2018-04-02
    In Mumbai, Indian scientists under the leadership of Prof. Arvind Lali from the DBT-ICT Centre for Energy Biosciences are touting the successful operation of the country's first agricultural waste-to-ethanol demonstration facility in the town of Kashipur in Uttarakhand.

    The plant processes as much as 10 tpd of agricultural waste in a single day using a pre-treatment phase that converted the waste into a form that was more digestible by microbial enzymes which can be reused for over 50 cycles. (Source: DBT-ICT Centre for Energy Biosciences, The Hindu, 1 April, 2018)Contact: DBT-ICT Centre for Energy Biosciences, Prof. Arvind Lali, +91 22 2414 5616, www.dbt-ceb.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Ethanol,  AgWaste-toEthanol,  


    Enzyme Enables First-time Microbial Production of Aromatic Biofuel (R&D, New Prod & Tech)
    Department of Energy Joint BioEnergy Institute
    Date: 2018-03-26
    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have discovered a new enzyme that will enable microbial production of a renewable alternative to petroleum-based toluene, a widely used octane booster in gasoline that has a global market of 29 million tpy..

    A major focus of research at JBEI, and in the broader community of biofuel researchers, is the production of industrially and commercially relevant fuels and chemicals from renewable resources, such as lignocellulosic biomass, rather than from petroleum. The enzyme discovered in this study will enable the first-time microbial production of bio-based toluene, and in fact, the first microbial production of any aromatic hydrocarbon biofuel.

    The enzyme discovery resulted from the intensive study of two very different microbial communities that produced toluene. One community contained microbes from lake sediment, and the other from sewage sludge. Since microbes in the environment are a reservoir of enzymes that catalyze an extraordinarily diverse set of chemical reactions, it's not unusual for scientists working in biotechnology to source enzymes from nature.

    The toluene-synthesizing enzyme discovered in this study, phenylacetate decarboxylase, belongs to a family of enzymes known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs). The radical nature of GREs allows them to catalyze chemically challenging reactions, such as anaerobic decarboxylation of phenylacetate to generate toluene.

    In fact, metagenome analyses revealed that these microbial communities each contained more than 300,000 genes - the equivalent of more than 50 bacterial genomes. Another challenge was that the anaerobic microbial communities and many of their enzymes were sensitive to oxygen, forcing the scientists to manipulate cultures and enzymes under strictly anaerobic conditions.

    The discovery process combined protein purification techniques used by biochemists for decades, such as fast protein liquid chromatography, with modern metagenomic, metaproteomic, and associated bioinformatic analyses, some of which were carried out in collaboration with the Joint Genome Institute, a DOE Office of Science User Facility. An important component of the discovery process was to validate the researchers' predictions of the toluene biosynthesis enzyme with experiments using highly controlled assays involving purified proteins.

    The researchers believe that their study results have implications for fundamental and applied science. From a biochemical perspective, the study expands the known catalytic range of GREs, and from a biotechnological perspective, it will enable first-time biochemical synthesis of an aromatic fuel hydrocarbon from renewable resources. (Source: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 26 Mar., 2018) Contact: DOE Joint BioEnergy Institute, www.jbei.org; LBNL, Harry Beller, Snr. Scientist, JBEI scientific lead, (510) 486-7321, HRBeller@lbl.gov, www.lbl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News JBEI,  LBNL,  Enzyme,  Biofuel ,  


    Novozymes Intros Yeast for Ethanol Producers (New Prod & Tech)
    Novozymes
    Date: 2018-02-07
    Danish enzymes and microbes specialist Novozymes reports the unveiling of its new yeast platform for starch-based ethanol production. designed to help ethanol producers ‘get more’ from their raw materials. The first product in the new yeast platform is Innova Drive, a new yeast strain designed to reduce fermentation time by up to two hours compared to current yeasts, according to Novozymes.

    Novozymes claims that during fermentation, Innova Drive produces a higher-performing glucoamylase enzyme. Apparently, this enzyme is twice as effective as glucoamylases produced by other yeast products when it comes to converting sugar into ethanol. (Source: Noovozymes, Feb., 2018) , Contact: Novozymes, Peder Holk Nielsen, CEO, Michael Burns, Biorefining Business Development North America, Peter Halling, VP Biofuel, (919) 496-6926, www.novozymes.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Novozymes,  Yeast,  Enzymes,  Biofuel,  


    BRD, Alkol BioTech Ink EUnergyCane Supply LoI (Ind. Report)
    Bio Refinery Development,Alkol BioTech
    Date: 2018-01-19
    Bio Refinery Development BV (BRD) reports the signing of a letter of intent (LOI) with London-based Alkol Biotech for the supply of up to 500,000 tpy of EUnergyCane, a sugarcane variety, to be used as feedstock at a proposed biorefinery.

    Alkol Biotech adapts plant varieties to grow in colder and drier climates, offering better resistance to pests and diseases, along with higher productivity. The first crop it is developing is EUnergyCane, a sugarcane variety.

    BRD is a commercialization partner in Bioforever (BIO-based products from FORestry via Economically Viable European Routes), a consortium of 14 companies in Europe that aims to build a biorefinery to produce products normally sourced from oil. The consortium includes Avantium, Borregaard, Royal DSM, Green Biologics and MetGen. The consortium is addressing several pre-treatment technologies for the production of intermediates, such as cellulose, C5 and C6 sugars, lignin and humins. The consortium aims to create conversion routes from the intermediates to a variety of building blocks and end products, such as carbon binders, butanol, resin acid, enzymes and furan dicarboxylic acid (FDCA), and to demonstrate lignocellulosic value chains at pre-industrial scale for some final products.(Source: BRD, PR, Alkol Biotech, Jan., 2018) Contact: Bio Refinery Development BV, Anton Robek, CEO, +31 62 00 16964, amfrobek@brdbv.com, www.brdbv.com; Alkol BioTech Ltd., +44 20 3475 8387, www.alkolbiotech.co.uk; Bioforever, www.bioforever.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio Refinery Development,  Biomass,  Alkol BioTech,  Bioforever,  Biomass,  

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