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DOE Invests $17Mn to Advance Carbon Utilization R&D (Funding)
DOE Office of Fossil Energy
Date: 2020-06-19
In Washington, the U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has selected 11 projects to receive approximately $17 million in federal funding for cost-shared research and development projects for carbon utilization. The projects will develop and test technologies that can utilize carbon dioxide (CO2) from power systems or other industrial sources as the primary feedstock. The research goal of DOE's Carbon Utilization Program is to reduce emissions and transform waste carbon streams into value-added products.

"According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the International Energy Agency, fossil fuels will continue to power our world well into the future. Therefore, it is our responsibility to ensure these fuels are utilized as cleanly and efficiently as possible," said Under Secretary of Energy Mark W. Menezes. "DOE's Carbon Utilization Program is investing in cutting-edge technologies to allow us to capture carbon oxides, which will reduce emissions, and then recycle them into economically valuable services like enhanced oil recovery or products like plastics and carbon fibers."

Projects resulting from this FOA will validate the concept, estimate the technology cost, and demonstrate that the carbon life cycle of the products offers a path toward an environmentally sustainable and economically viable product. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage the selected projects.

Additional information, including a full list of the 11 funded projects is HERE. (Source: US DOE , PR, 16 June, 2020) Contact: US DOE Office of Fossil Energy Carbon Utilization Program, www.energy.gov/fe/carbon-utilization

More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE Office of Fossil Energy news,  CCU news,  Carbon Emissions news,  


Shuttered Minnesota Ethanol Plants Rebooting Production (Ind. Report)
Minnesota Ethanol,Ethanol
Date: 2020-06-08
In the Badger State, three of the four recently COVID-19 battered and shuttered ethanol plants in Minnesota are reported to have rebooted production -- Guardian Energy 149 million gpy ethanol plant in Janesville, Granite Falls Energy, and the Denco II ethanol plant in Morris. Of the four shuttered plants, only Gevo's facility in Luverne, the state's smallest ethanol plant, remains closed.

Nationwide, roughly 20 pct of all ethanol plants are still idle, according to the Renewable Fuels Association. U.S. ethanol production rose to 765,000 bpd for the week ending May 29, up from a historic low of 537,000 bpd for the week ending April 24, according to data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). (Source: MSN, Star Tribune, 4 June, 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol news,  Guardian Energy news,  Gevo news,  Granite Falls news,  


U.S. Renewable Fuel Use Tops Coal (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2020-05-29
In Washington, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting U.S. consumption of renewable energy surpassed coal in 2019 for the first time since woody biomass was the top fuel source more than 130 years ago, According to EIA data, electricity generated by renewable energy sources like solar, wind and hydro exceeded coal-fired power in the U.S. for a record 40 straight days

U.S. coal consumption, primarily for electric power generation, fell 15 pct in 2019 to the lowest level since 1964, while the use of energy from sources like wind and solar notched slightly higher, according to the EIA .

Total renewable energy consumption in the U.S. grew for the fourth year to a record-high 11.5 quadrillion Btu in 2019. Since 2015, the growth in U.S. renewable energy is almost entirely attributable to the use of wind and solar in the electric power sector. In 2019, electricity generation from wind surpassed hydro for the first time and is now the most-used source of renewable energy for electricity generation in the United States on an annual basis. (Source: BIC, US EIA, May, 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration news,  


US Ethanol Production Slowly Rising (Ind. Report)
Ethanol,U.S. Energy Information Administration
Date: 2020-05-22
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. ethanol production and use continues to slowly rebound following sharp declines in March and April due to market impacts caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ethanol production for the week ending May 15 was up nearly 8 p ct while weekly ethanol ending stocks fell by more than 2 pct, EIA data shows.

The data shows U.S. ethanol U.S. ethanol production averaged 663,000 bpd the week ending May 15, up from an average of 617,000 barrels per day the previous week. Production was down 409,000 bpd when compared to the same week of last year, and down 416,000 bpd when compared to the volume of ethanol produced during the final week in February, before COVID-19 began to impact U.S. fuel markets. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, 20 May, 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol news,  U.S. Energy Information Administration news,  


Governors Seeking RFS Refinery "Hardship" Waivers (Ind. Report)
EPS, Renewable Fuel Standard
Date: 2020-04-27
ICIS is reporting the governors of Louisiana (D), Texas (R), Oklahoma (R), Utah (R) and Wyoming (R) have written to the US EPA asking for "hardship" waivers for the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for refiners in their states. In their appeal, the governors noted plunging fuel demand as the reason for the request.

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) the states currently under the COVID-19 pandemic "stay at home orders" account for 95 pct of US fuel demand. Meanwhile, ethanol market producers and players say that it is a "convenient reason for them (oil refiners) to escape a US law", and that doing so would further harm ethanol demand.

As previously noted, "hardship waivers" were intended for refineries producing 75,000 bpd or less and suffered "disproportionate economic hardship" from the costs of RFS compliance. The waiver frees the refineries from an obligation to provide the EPA with biofuels credits proving compliance. Under the now vanquished administrator Greg Pruitt's direction, the EPA handed out 54 exemptions over two years and not a single request for an exemption was denied.Under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, the nation's oil refineries are required to blend billions of gallons of biofuels such as ethanol into the fuel or buy credits from those that do. But the EPA can waive their obligations if they prove compliance would cause them financial distress.(Source: Various Trade Media, ICIS, 17 April, 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS,  Hardship Waiver,  Biofuel Blend,  


Archer Daniels Midland Idling Two Corn-Ethanol Plants (Ind. Report)
Archer Daniels Midland
Date: 2020-04-27
Chicago-headquartered biofuel pioneer and ethanol producer Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) reports the idling of two of its 300 million gpy corn ethanol plants in Columbus, Nebraska, and Cedar Rapids, Iowa, as the demand for ethanol continues to fall. The shutdown is expected to last for 3 or 4 months.

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), fuel ethanol production is now at 563,000 bpd, the lowest level of production since the EIA began reporting ethanol production statistics in 2010. (Source: Archer Daniels Midland, ICIS, 23 April, 2020) Contact: ADM, Juan Luciano, Pres., CEO, (312) 634-8100, www.adm.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Archer Daniels Midland,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol,  Biofuel,  


U.S. Ethanol Production Sinks to Another New Low (Ind. Report)
Ethanol
Date: 2020-04-17
Further to our 3rd April report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting U.S. ethanol production fell to 570,000 bpd during the week ending April 10, the lowest daily average since record keeping began in 2010.

Production was 15 pct lower than the 672,000 bpd reported a week earlier, at the time the lowest average daily output on record. (Source: U.S. EIA, Various Media, AG Insider, 15 April, 2020) Contact: Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Ethanol,  U.S. Ethanol,  


U.S. Ethanol Production Drops to 6 Year Low (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2020-04-03
A just released report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) notes that U.S. ethanol production dropped 16 pct to an average of 840,000 bpd, the lowest level since September 2013, for the week ending March 27.

Additional reductions are expected in upcoming weeks as several plants are switching a portion of their production to sanitizers and/or slowing or idling production due primarily to the falling demand for fuel caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the EIA report says. (Source: US EIA, 1 April, 2020) Contact: Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  EIA,  


EIA Reports Rising Ethanol Production (Ind. Report)
EIA
Date: 2020-03-09
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting US ethanol production for the week ending 28 Feb. jumped to the highest in a month while stockpiles were up slightly with an average output of 1.079 million bpd -- the highest level since Jan. 31.

In the U.S. Midwest, by far the biggest-producing region, output of the biofuel jumped to 1.007 million barrels on average, from 977,000 a week earlier. Gulf Coast production increased to 24,000 bpd, on average, from 22,000 bpd seven days earlier. Rocky Mountain output was unchanged at an average of 14,000 bpd. West Coast production declined to 14,000 bpd from 15,000 bpd, and East Coast output fell to an average of 19,000 bpd from 26,000 bpd the previous week.

Stockpiles in the seven days that ended on Feb. 28 came in at 24.964 million barrels, up from 24.718 million a week earlier, according to EIA. (Source: EIA March 8, 2020)Contact: EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Corn,  Ethanol,  


Trump USDA Announces 30 pct Biofuel Goal for 2050 (Ind. Report)
USDA
Date: 2020-02-21
In Washington, as part of a new department-wide sustainability initiative the USDA is reported to have announced a goal for biofuels to make up 30 pct of U.S. transportation fuels by 2050.

Under the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) refineries are presently required to blend 20.09 billion gallons of biofuel in 2020 – roughly 10 pct of projected crude oil production, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. (Source: KLO, Various Media, Reuters, 20 Feb., 2020)

More Low-Carbon Energy News USDA news,  RFS news,  Ethanol news,  Ethanol Blend news,  


Renewables Surpassing Natural Gas in US Power Mix (Ind. Report)
Energy Information Administration
Date: 2020-02-05
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), which previously predicted natural gas energy would dominate the country's energy market through 2050, now says renewable energy will soon surpass natural gas in the U.S. electric power mix.

In its annual energy outlook report, the EIA notes renewables are now growing faster as a source of power generation through 2050 as lower costs make them economically more competitive. (Source: Energy Information Administration, Feb., 2020) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Renewables,  Renewable Energy,  Natural Gas,  


Renewables Topped Coal in April 2019 US Power Mix (Ind. Report)
US EIA
Date: 2020-01-03
The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting utility-scale hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal and biomass accounted for 23 pct of the U.S. energy mix, while coal was only 20 pct in April, 2019. The EIA report noted that although generation output from large coal, gas and nuclear plants is typically lower during April and other demand lull periods, renewable capacity has been growing and coal-fired power falling in recent years.

Each renewable resource set record high generation outputs sometime during 2018. Wind power generated 30.2 million MWh in April, a new monthly high, while a combination of utility-scale solar photovoltaics and solar thermal made history in June with 7.8 million MWh, the EIA report shows. (Source: US EIA, Power Eng., Jan., 2020) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  Coal,  


U.S. Biodiesel Tax Credit Extended Through 2022 (Reg & Leg)
Biodiesel Tax Credit
Date: 2019-12-18
In Washington, U.S. lawmakers have passed an amended a government spending bill that includes extension of the $1.00 per gallon tax credit for the biodiesel industry through 2022 and retroactively to when it expired beginning in 2018.

The credit began in 2005 as a way to help farmers, reduce petroleum imports and support the market for biodiesel.

In September, 95 U.S. biodiesel plants produced 142 million gallons of the fuel, down from 164 million gallons a year earlier, according to the Energy Information Administration. (Source: KDAL, Reuters, Various Media, 17 Dec., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiese,  Biodiesel Tax Credit,  


U.S. Onshore Wind Capacity Exceeds 100 GW, says EIA (Ind. Report)
US EIA, Wind
Date: 2019-12-13
According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, cumulative U.S. installed onshore wind capacity exceeded 100 GW on a nameplate capacity basis as of the end of September 2019. More than half of that amount has been installed since the beginning of 2012.

The inventory notes that as of Q3, 2019, 41 states had at least one installed wind turbine. Texas had the most capacity installed, at 26.9 GW, followed by Iowa at 8.9 GW, Oklahoma at 8.1 GW, and Kansas at 6.2 GW.

The agency projects another 14.3 GW of wind capacity will come online in 2020, bringing U.S. capacity to 122 GW. (Source: US EIA, Dec., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Wind,  Onshore Wind,  


U.S. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions, 2018 Report (Ind. Report)
US Energy Information Administration
Date: 2019-12-09
The recently released U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2018 Report examines economic trends and changes in fuel mix that influence energy-related CO2 emissions in the U.S. As a result, most of the CO2 emissions being discussed are the result of fossil fuel combustion or their use in the petrochemical and related industries, the report states.

In the short term, energy-related CO2 emissions are influenced by the weather, fuel prices and disruptions in electricity generation. In the long term, CO2 emissions are influenced by public policy, reduced costs and improved efficiencies of new technology, demand-side efficiency gains and economic trends, according to the report.

A major factor in recent reductions in the carbon intensity of electric generation in the U.S. is the reduced generation of electricity using coal while increasingly using natural gas. Natural gas emits less CO2 for the same amount of electricity generated, and non-carbon generation (including renewables), which do not emit the gas.

Between 2005 and 2018, EIA has calculated that cumulative U.S. C02 emissions reductions attributable specifically to shifts from coal to natural gas and to non-carbon generation totaled 4,621 million metric tons (MMmt). Of this total, 2,823 MMmt resulted from decreased use of coal and increased use of natural gas; 1,799 MMmt resulted from decreased use of coal and increased use of non-carbon generation sources.

Between 2005 and 2017, total U.S. electricity generation increased by almost 4 pct while related C02 emissions fell by 27 pct. During the same period, fossil fuel electricity generation declined by roughly 9 pct, and non-carbon electricity generation increased by 35 pct.

Download the U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2018 Report HERE. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, 14 Nov., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  CO2 Emissions,  Natural Gas Emissions,  Climate Change,  


BOEM Announces South Carolina Offshore Wind Plans (Ind. Report)
Bureau of Energy Management
Date: 2019-10-28
The Bureau of Energy Management (BOEM) reports it is in the planning stage to lease wind energy areas along the South Carolina coast to develop offshore wind energy.

According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), only 6 pct of the Palmetto State's energy comes from renewable sources, but none of that is wind which is now cheaper than gas, coal, and nuclear energy. The International Energy Agency reports lower costs of offshore wind could totally eliminate the need for using fossil fuels.

BOEM plans to establish wind energy areas off the sc coast this year. More information on offshore wind leasing is HERE. (Source: BOEM, PR, 26 Oct., 2019) Contact: BOEM, (202) 208-6474, www.boem.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bureau of Energy Management,  Offshore Wind,  


EIA Data Questions RFS "Hardship" Waivers Effect on Ethanol Demand (Ind. Report)
EIA
Date: 2019-10-04
As previously reported, ethanol industry proponents have petitioned the EPA to cease issuing Small Refinery "Hardship" Exemptions (SREs) allowable under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). The ethanol industry is trying to convince the EPA that the waivers are hurting their business and, therefore, the agency should stop issuing them.

Month-over-month, official government data tells a very different story. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the ethanol blend rate has remained within normal statistical variation, despite the flood of "hardship" waivers. EIA data shows:

  • The overall physical ethanol consumption for Q1 2019 (the most recent, complete data available) is higher than it was in 2018.

  • The average ethanol blend rate was higher in Q1 2019 (10.21 pct) than in Q1 2018 (10.09 pct).

  • In February 2019, the ethanol blend rate was 10.53 percent -- the highest in the 12 months preceding. And the March 2019 ethanol blend rate was 10.18 percent -- higher than the March 2018 blend rate of 9.75 percent.

    These blend rates have been stable for the past few years, underscoring the truth that ethanol demand is premised partially on the RFS, partially on demand for clean octane and partially on other factors -- not SREs.

    Similarly, when it comes to mid-level ethanol blends like E15, there is no data indicating that SREs are reducing demand. E15 and other mid-level ethanol blend sales have been growing all year and, in the case of E15, sales are higher at this point than they were last year, according to the Minnesota Bio-Fuels Association.

    As previously noted, "hardship waivers" were intended for refineries producing 75,000 bpd or less and suffered "disproportionate economic hardship" from the costs of RFS compliance. The waiver frees the refineries from an obligation to provide the EPA with biofuels credits proving compliance. Under the now vanquished administrator Greg Pruitt's direction, the EPA handed out 54 exemptions over two years and not a single request for an exemption was denied. (Source: American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM), EIA, Business & Industry Connection, 3 Oct., 2019) Contact: AFPM, Derrick Morgan, Snr, VP, (202) 586-8800, www.afpm.org; EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS,  "Hardship" Waiver,  Ethanol.Ethanol Blend,  EIA,  


  • ICAST Completes Multifamily Housing Efficiency Retrofits (Ind. Report)
    International Center for Sustainable Technology
    Date: 2019-09-30
    The Lakewood, Colorado-based not-for-profit International Center for Sustainable Technology (ICAST) is reporting completion of energy-efficiency upgrades to nearly 1,000 multifamily buildings, for a reported savings of 7.4 million kWh, 850,000 therms, and nearly $2 million in utility cost savings.

    The 3 year work contract , which was funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Building Technologies Office (BTO), was intended to spur the growth of energy efficiency in the small and medium commercial building sector -- less than 100,000 square feet in gross floor area -- but accounts for over half of the energy used in the commercial sector, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey.

    At the start of the project, ICAST operated in two states, improving energy in about 100 multifamily buildings per year. ICAST has eight affiliates providing energy-efficiency services to the multifamily sector in four states and seven cities. (Source: US DOE EERE, ICAST, PR, 30 Sept., 2019) Contact: US DOE EERE, www.energy.gov/eere/buildings/zero-energy-ready-home; ICAST, 866.590.4377, info@icastusa.org, www.icastusa.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE EERE,  International Center for Sustainable Technology,  Energy Efficiency,  


    EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2019-09-30
    According to the recently released U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 report, despite renewable energy investment more than tripling globally during the current decade compared to the last 10-year period, most of the power delivered to the world's electric grids during the recent decade was from coal -- still the world's largest source of electricity, providing 38 pct of world electrical generation in 2018, about the same as 1997.

    The world spent about $2.6 trillion on renewable energy projects during the decade, over three times the amount spent from 2000 to 2009. Solar PV investments totaled around $1.3 trillion, and onshore and offshore wind investment totaled around $1 trillion. Globally, solar energy capacity increased by 638 GW between 2009 and 2019, while coal-fired capacity increased by 529 GW, wind capacity increased 487 GW, and natural gas capacity increased 436 GW. In 2018, $41 billion was invested in coal worldwide.

    China's spending on renewable electricity was the highest in the world at $758 billion from 2000 to the first half of 2019. The US was second with $356 billion, followed by Japan at $202 billion. The European nations spent around $698 billion on wind, solar, and other renewable energy sources, with Germany and the UK spending the most. It is expected that 330 GW of new wind power capacity will come online over the next five years, driven primarily by onshore wind power projects in the US and China. Investments in renewable power capacity in 2018, however, dropped 38 pct in China and by 6 pct in the US, while rising 45 pct in Europe.

    The report predicts that electric power demand for coal will fall to 17 pct of total generation by 2050. Moody's Investors Service predicts coal will represent 11 pct of total U.S. power generation by 2030 -- down from 27 pct in 2018. The over 50 pct drop in coal demand from utilities by 2030 implies that coal demand would decline by about 7 pct per year on average over the next 10 years.

    Download the US EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 -- Projections to 2050 report HERE. (Source: US EIA, Sept., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  


    Plant-level U.S. Biodiesel Prod. Capacity Data Released (Ind. Report)
    U.S. Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-09-16
    On September 13, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its first annual U.S. Biodiesel Plant Production Capacity Report. The report includes the total biodiesel production capacity for all operating plants in both million gallons per year (gal/y) and barrels per day (b/d) as of January 1, 2019. The names of the reporting plants are organized by Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD). Like the Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Report, EIA plans to update the report annually.

    The 2019 U.S. Biodiesel Plant Production Capacity Report shows 102 operating biodiesel plants with 2.6 billion gpy in biodiesel production capacity, or 167,000 bpd. More than half of the nation's biodiesel production capacity is in the Midwest region, led by Iowa, Missouri, and Illinois. Of the top 15 biodiesel-producing states, 9 are located in the Midwest.

    U.S.biodiesel production topped 1.8 billion gallons (119,000 bpd) in 2018, implying a 72 pct utilization rate based on the nameplate capacity level recorded at the beginning of 2018.

    In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA forecasts that U.S. production of biodiesel will reach about 2.0 billion gallons (128,000 bpd) in 2019, resulting in 77 pct utilization of reported nameplate capacity as of January 1, 2019.

    Respondents report the biodiesel production capacity data to EIA on Form EIA-22M, Monthly Biodiesel Production Survey, and EIA publishes the data in the Monthly Biodiesel Production Report. All entities that produce biodiesel that meets ASTM D 6751-07B specifications and is used for commercial purposes within the United States submit Form EIA-22M. Additional data collected on Form EIA-22M include production, sales, stock changes, and feed stock inputs to production. (Source: US EIA Release, Sept., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov/petroleum/ethanolcapacity

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel,  U.S. Energy Information Administration,  


    Maine Enacts Sweeping Renewable Energy Mandates (Ind. Report)
    Heartland Institute
    Date: 2019-08-02
    The Heartland Institute is reporting Maine State Gov. Janet Mills has signed into law several energy measures as part of her commitment to fight "purported" human-caused climate change by reducing fossil fuel use.

    Among the slate of bills Mills signed is one requiring Maine's electric power providers, who are currently required to obtain 40 pct of their electricity from renewable sources, to provide 80 pct from such sources by 2030 and 100 pct by 2050. Presently, Maine has the 11th highest average electricity cost in the U.S..

    Another climate-related bill Mills signed establishes a Maine Climate Council charged with developing plans to reduce the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 45 pct by 2030 and 80 pct by 2050. Mills also signed legislation creating new incentives to install energy efficient heating systems and to increase the number and size of solar power projects in the state.

    A study by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago shows seven years after a state imposes a renewable energy mandate (REM) a 1.8 pct increase in renewable energy generation results in an 11 pct increase in electricity prices, and after 12 years a 4.2 pct increase in renewable power produces a 17 pct rise in the cost of electricity. The link between REMs and higher prices is confirmed by U.S. Energy Information Administration data showing electric power prices in the 29 states with REMs are 26 pct higher than in states without REMs.

    (Source: Heartland Institute, 1 May, 2019) Contact: Gov. Janet Mills (D-ME): www.maine.gov/governor/mills/home, www.maine.gov/governor/mills/contact; Heartland Institute, www.heartland.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Heartland Institute,  Renewable Energy,  Climate Change,  


    US Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Expected to Fall (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-07-17
    The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reported to be forecasting a 2.2 pct decrease in CO2 emissions for 2019, due primarily to fewer emissions from coal consumption while natural gas CO2 emissions increase and petroleum CO2 emissions remain virtually unchanged.

    For the remainder of 2019, EIA expects relatively mild forecast temperatures will keep energy demand and resulting energy-related CO2 emissions below 2018 levels. Accordingly, the agency forecasts CO2 emissions from coal will decrease by 169 million metric tonnes (MmMmt) in 2019, the largest decrease in CO2 emissions from coal since 2015.

    On the other hand, natural gas CO2 emissions are projected to rise by 53 Mmmt, largely due to forecast changes in the electric power generation mix as natural gas continues to grow as the most prevalent electricity generation fuel. Power generation consumes nearly 92 pct of the coal used in the U.S..

    EIA also projects CO2 emissions from petroleum consumption, which have risen every year for past six years, will be virtually flat in 2019. Petroleum accounted for 45 pct of energy-related CO2 emissions in 2018. (Source: Energy Information Administration, Kallanish Energy, 15 July, 2019) Contact: Energy Information Administration, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Dioxide Emissions,  EIA,  


    EIA Report Issues Biomass 2019-20 Stats, Projections (Ind Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2019-06-17
    In its just released June Short Term Energy Outlook, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is predicting non-hydropower renewables will provide 11 pct of U.S. power generation in 2019, increasing to 13 pct in 2020.

    Non-hydropower renewables provided 10 pct of electricity generation in 2018. Of that total, woody biomass is expected to generate 113,000 MWh per day of electricity this year, increasing to 115,000 MWh per day in 2020. Waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 57,000 MWh per day of electricity in both 2019 and 2020.

    In the electric power sector, waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 48,000 MWh per day in both 2019 and 2020. Generation from wood biomass is expected to reach 37,000 MWh per day this year, increasing to 39,000 MWh per day in 2020. Across other sectors, waste biomass is expected to be used to generate 76,000 MWh per day in both 2019 and 2020, with wood biomass used to generate 9,000 MWh per day in both years.

    The electric power sector is expected to consume 0.269 quadrillion Btu (quad) of waste biomass this year, increasing to 0.27 quad next year. The sector is also expected to consume 0.221 quad of wood biomass in 2019, increasing to 0.232 quad in 2020. The industrial sector is expected to consume 0.169 quad of waste biomass in both 2019 and 2020, along with 1.439 quad of wood biomass in 2019 and 1.401 quad of wood biomass in 2020. The commercial sector is expected to consume 0.044 quad of waste biomass and 0.084 quad of wood biomass in both 2019 and 2020, while the residential sector is expected to consume 0.492 quad of wood biomass this year, falling to 0.488 quad next year.

    Across all sectors, waste biomass consumption is expected to reach 0.482 quad in 2019 and remain at that level into 2020. The consumption of wood biomass is expected to reach 2.238 quad this year, falling to 2.205 quad next year. Biomass capacity in the electric power sector is expected to reach 7,071 MW by the end of this year, including 4,141 MW of waste biomass capacity and 2,930 MW of wood biomass capacity, falling to 7,052 MW by the end of 2020, including 4,080 MW of waste biomass capacity and 2,972 MW of wood biomass capacity. Biomass capacity across other sectors is expected to reach 6,657 MW by the end of 2019, including 866 MW of waste biomass capacity and 5,791 MW of wood biomass capacity. Capacity is expected to fall slightly to 6,649 MW by the end of 2020, including 866 MW of waste biomass capacity and 5,784 MW of wood biomass capacity. (Source: US EIA, June, 2019)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  


    U.S. Soybean Oil for Biodiesel Production Rising (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2019-05-10
    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the share of total soybean oil consumed as a biodiesel feedstock doubled from the current 15 pct to 30 pct as the total U.S. soybean oil supply grew from about 22.5 billion pounds to nearly 26.0 billion pounds between marketing year 2010-2011 and 2017-2018.

    Soybean oil is the most commonly used vegetable oil for biodiesel production, and inputs reached 7.1 billion pounds during the latest soybean oil marketing year which ran from Oct. 1, 2017, to Sept. 30, 2018. Between marketing year 2010-2011 and marketing year 2017-2018, U.S. domestic biodiesel production grew from 700 million gpy to 1.8 billion gpy. The production increase was largely driven by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) biofuel blending mandate. (Source: US EIA, Xinhua, 8 May, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Soybean,  Soybean Oil,  BiodieselBiofuel,  


    ADM Planning Three Ethanol Plant Spinoff (Ind. Report, M&A)
    Archer Daniels Midland
    Date: 2019-04-29

    Last Friday, Chicago-headquartered biofuel pioneer Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) reported it may spin off three large dry mill ethanol plants after the unsuccessful search for a buyer came up empty. ADM's move is being seen as a sign of the industry's troubles with U.S. President Trump's punitive tariffs and trade wars, thin margins, overproduction, and the motoring public's growing love affair with electric vehicles and fuel efficient vehicles, all of which is forcing the biofuels industry to seek new markets -- such as China -- for their overproduction.

    Last week, U.S. ethanol production hit 1.05 million bpd, highest in at least five years seasonally, and inventories climbed to 22.75 million barrels, not far from the record of 24.45 million hit in March, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. (Source: ADM, Reuters, Grainews, 26 April, 2019) Contact: ADM, Juan Luciano, Pres., CEO, (312) 634-8100, Collin Benson, VP Bioactives, Jackie Anderson, ADM Media, (217) 424-5413, www.adm.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Archer Daniels Midland ,  Ethanol,  Biofuel,  


    US Ethanol Exports Up 23 pct in 2018 (Ind. Report)
    Ethanol
    Date: 2019-04-26
    In Washington, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting US ethanol exports jumped by 23 pct in 2018 reaching 112,000 bpd, up from a previous record high of 91,000 bpd in 2017.

    According to the EIA, at 33,000 bpd Brazil was the top market for US ethanol, followed by Canada at approximately 23,000 bpd while India ranked third, receiving 10,000 bpd of US ethanol followed by South Korea and the Netherlands. (Source: US EIA, 25 April, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  EIA,  Biofuel,  


    NC Solar Power Production Jumps 36 pct in 2018 (Ind. Report)
    Duke Energy
    Date: 2019-03-20
    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) latest data, North Carolina's annual solar power production jumped 36 pct in 2018, firmly placing the Tar Heel State as the nation's 2nd larget solar power producer behind California. By way of comparison, California's annual solar production rose 15 pct and Arizona's and Nevada's outputs each grew 10 pct in 2018. (Source: US EIA, Duke Energy, Compelo, 18 Mar., 2019) Contact: Duke Energy North Carolina, Stephen De May, Pres., www.duke-energy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Solar,  Duke Energy North Carolina,  


    EIA Finds Arkansas Slow to Curb CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-03-11
    Carbon emissions from the energy sector have been on the decline nationwide, according to a report last week from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. According to the report, Arkansas invested in coal and produced more energy-related carbon emissions but a downward trend in emissions in the state has begun as those investments have shifted to renewable energy and natural gas along with the rest of the nation. Other states had little carbon emissions from electricity generation and had more from the burning of petroleum in manufacturing and from fossil fuels used to heat and cool buildings.

    A pending legal settlement in federal court could trigger the closure of the state's two largest coal-fired plants, principally owned and operated by Entergy Arkansas. The utility has opened solar arrays and announced plans for more in recent years, and would be required under the proposed settlement to invest in hundreds more megawatts of renewable energy in coming years. That settlement is being challenged before the Arkansas Public Service Commission.

    The EIA ranked Arkansas 17th in the country in the production per capita of carbon dioxide -- about 20 metric tons per person. At its highest point, Arkansas' carbon emissions from energy sources was at 69 million metric tons. That was 2014, a year before the state's use of coal-fired plants declined sharply. (Source: US EIA, Arkansas OnLine, Arkansas Democrat Gazette, 3 Mar., 2019)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov; Entergy Arkansas, www.entergy-arkansas.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Arizona Utility Expanding Battery Energy Storage (Ind. Report)
    ASP
    Date: 2019-03-04
    In the sun-drenched southwest, Arizona's largest utility, APS, reports it plans to add 850 MW of battery storage and at least 100 MW of new solar generation by 2025. The additional storage capacity will be equivalent to about 3 million solar panels. APS plans to install six battery systems at existing solar plants in Maricopa County and Yuma by 2020.

    Arizona ranks second to California in terms of the size of batteries being used and for generating solar energy, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, for generating solar energy. (Source: APS, Payson Roundup, 4 Mar., 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News APS news,  Battery Energy Storage news,  


    U.S. Fuel Ethanol Production Falls in February (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-02-11
    On February 7th the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported US fuel ethanol production averaged 967,000 bpd in the week to February 1, 2019. This is the lowest since mid-April 2018.

    Download the US EIA Biofuels: Ethanol and Biodiesel Explained report HERE.

    Access EIA Monthly Reviews HERE. (Source: US EIA, Feb, 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration ,  Ethanol,  


    Coal Part of the US Grid until 2050, says EIA (Ind. Report)
    US Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2019-01-30
    According to the US Energy Information Administration's just released 2019 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), coal is here to stay, at least for awhile yet despite recent warnings from top scientists about the urgency of climate action.

    Based on projections about trends in energy—from the amount of fossil fuels produced and sold, to the growth of renewable energy, coal is still projected to provide 17 pct of the United States' electricity in 2050. The EIA projections note that natural gas -- a fossil fuel that is less carbon-emitting than coal but still a problem for climate change -- will increase its share of US electricity production from 34 pct to 39 pct.

    Download the EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2019 projects growing oil, natural gas, renewables production report HERE. (Source: EIA, Jan., 2019) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US Energy Information Administration,  Carbon Emissions,  Coal,  


    Badger State Burned More Coal in 2017 than 2016 (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2019-01-16
    According to recently released US Energy Information Administration (EIA) data, Wisconsin burned approximately 7 pct more coal in 2017 than 2016 to provide better than half of the Badger State's energy that year.

    Since the most recent data period,coal-powered plants in Pleasant Prairie, Sheboygan and Green Bay have been shutter and replaced with natural gas and renewable energy.

    The Wisconsin Public Service Commission( WPSC) notes that the state's coal consumption has decreased by 28 pct since its peak in 2005, and overall emissions have dropped 20 pct. (Source: WPSC, University of Wisconsin, Wisc. Public Radio, 14 Jan., 2019) Contact: The Wisconsin Public Service Commission, 608-266-5481, https://psc.wi.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Calif. Q2 Renewable Diesel Supply Tops 100Mn Gal. (Ind. Report)
    California ARB
    Date: 2018-11-16
    The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting that in an effort to meet the state's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS), California has increased its net supply of renewable "green" diesel, reaching 100 million gallons during Q2, 2018 -- 10.1 pct of the total diesel supplied to California during the quarter.

    Administered by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), LCFS aims to incrementally decrease the carbon intensity of gasoline and diesel fuel by at least 10 pct by 2020 relative to a 2010 baseline.

    Under the state's LCFS, petroleum refiners, gasoline and diesel importers, and transportation fuel wholesales are required to either produce low carbon fuels or purchase credits to demonstrate compliance. But while under the RFS, both biodiesel and renewable diesel meet a 50 pct GHG reduction threshold (and are eligible to generate biomass-based diesel RINs), LCFS uses a measurement called carbon intensity (CI).

    Renewable diesel generates a large number of credits relative to other fuels because it has some of the largest lifecycle GHG reduction compared to other fuels. The total volume of renewable diesel LCFS credits exceeded ethanol credits for the first time this year, reaching about 870,000 metric tons of CO2 equivalent during the second quarter. (Source: US EIA, Agri-Pulse, 14 Nov., 2018) Contact: CARB, Melanie Turner, Information Officer, (916) 322-2990, melanie.turner@arb.ca.gov, www.arb.ca.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Low Carbon Fuel Standard,  California Air Resources Board,  .Biofuel,  Renewable Fiesel ,  


    EIA Oct. Short-Term Energy Outlook --Renewables, CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
    EIA
    Date: 2018-11-09
    In 2017, the US Energy Information Administration EIA estimates that U.S. wind generation averaged 697,000 MWh per day (MWh/d). EIA forecasts that wind generation will rise by 8 pct to 750,000 MWh/d in 2018 and by a further 6 pct to 793,000 MWh/d in 2019.

    Solar power generates less electricity in the U.S. than wind power but continues to grow at a faster rate. EIA expects solar generation will rise 26 pct from 211,000 MWh/d in 2017 to 267,000 MWh/d in 2018 and jump 14 pct to 305,000 MWh/d in 2019.

    After falling by 0.8 pct in 2017, EIA forecasts that U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions will rise by 2.2 pct in 2018 -- largely due to higher natural gas consumption because of a colder winter and a warmer summer than in 2017. Emissions are expected to to fall 1.1 pct in 2019, as forecast temperatures are forecast to return to normal.

    Download the full EIA report HERE. Source: EIA, Oct. 2018) Contact: EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Renewables,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Renewables,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  


    US Meeting Obama's Climate Targets, Despite Trump (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-10-31
    Yesterday, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data confirming that the U.S. power sector's CO2 emissions have dropped 28 pct since 2005, on target with the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan aimed at reducing carbon emissions by 32 pct t by 2030.

    The EIA attributes this drop to a declining demand for energy, a move to renewable energy, an abundance of inexpensive natural gas and dropping coal consumption.

    According to Union of Concerned Scientists President Kenneth Kimmell, "the trend is expected to continue despite President Donald Trump's efforts."

    For your interest, the Obama Clean Power plan can be downloaded HERE. (Source: US EIA, Earther, 29 Oct., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Clean Power Plan,  Carbon Emissions,  


    EIA Reports Densified Biomass Fuel Production Stats (Ind. Report)
    U.S. Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2018-09-17
    According to the US EIA's recently released Monthly Densified Biomass Fuel Report, U.S. manufacturers produced approximately 680,000 tons of densified biomass fuel in May, with sales reaching 610,000 tons.

    The EIA data was collected from 85 densified biofuel manufacturers but does not include data from facilities with annual production capacities of less than 10,000 tons. The 85 manufacturers have a combined production capacity of 11.82 million metric tpy. Production included 132,432 tons of heating pellets and 549,031 tons of utility pellets. Domestic sales of densified biomass fuel reached 90,000 million tons in May, with an average price of $141.72 per ton. Exports in May reached 520,000 tons, at an average price of $144.48 per ton, according to the report. (Source: EIA, Biomass Mag, Other Media, Sept., 2018)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News U.S. Energy Information Administration,  


    Trump's New Affordable Clean Energy Rule Fast Facts (Reg. & Leg.)
    Clean Power Plan
    Date: 2018-08-29
    On August 21, 2018, the U.S. EPA proposed the Trump administration's Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule which would establish emission guidelines for states to develop plans to address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from existing coal-fired power plants.

    The ACE rule would replace the 2015 (Obama administration) Clean Power Plan (CPP) which EPA has proposed to repeal because it "exceeded EPA's authority." The CPP was stayed by the U.S. Supreme Court and has never gone into effect.

    The ACE rule has several components: a determination of the best system of emission reduction (BSER) for GHG emissions from coal-fired power plants, a list of "candidate technologies" states can use when developing their plans, a new preliminary applicability test for determining whether a physical or operational change made to a power plant may be a "major modification" triggering New Source Review, and new implementation regulations for emission guidelines under Clean Air Act section 111(d). The EPA notes that with CO2 emissions steadily declining:

  • EPA projects that, compared to a no CPP scenario, the ACE rule will reduce CO2 emissions in 2025 by between 13 and 30 million short tons, resulting in $1.6 billion in monetized domestic climate benefits;
  • EPA estimates that the ACE rule could reduce 2030 CO2 emissions by an amount equivalent to the annual emissions of up to 5 million cars. The rule could also reduce co-pollutant emissions by up to 2 pct.;
  • These illustrative scenarios suggest that when states have fully implemented the ACE rule, U.S. power sector CO2 emissions could be around 34 pct below 2005 levels;
  • CO2 emissions in the power sector have steadily declined in recent years due to a range of factors including market forces, technology improvements, regulatory and policy changes. As a result, the industry has increased the use of natural gas and renewable energy sources;
  • These trends have resulted in CO2 emission reductions even as the U.S. has sustained economic growth and job gains across the economy without the (Obama) Clean Power Plan ever going into effect;
  • The (Trump) ACE rule will continue this trend;
  • The power sector emitted roughly 1.9 billion tons of CO2 in 2017, compared to 2.7 billion tons in 2005 -- a 28 pct decrease.
  • Approximately 600 coal-fired electric generating units at 300 facilities could be covered by the ACE rule.

    According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the U.S. leads the world in reducing CO2 emissions with U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions falling by 14 pct between 2005 to 2017, with coal-related CO2 emissions down 39 pct over that period. During that time, global energy-related CO2 emissions rose by 21 pct.

    More information and additional fact sheets along with copies of the proposed rule and accompanying Regulatory Impact Analysis are available HERE, www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2018-08/documents/ace_trends.pdf. (Source: US EPA, EIA, 27 Aug., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Trump.Carbon Emissions,  Clean Power Plan ,  


  • Sunnova Expanding Solar Lease, Loan Options in Illinois (Ind Report)
    Sunnova Energy
    Date: 2018-08-24
    Houston, Texas-headquartered residential solar and energy storage service provider Sunnova Energy reports it is expanding into the state of Illinois, starting with its 25-year solar lease options and quickly adding solar loan products. With the addition of Illinois, Sunnova now operates in 23 U.S. states and territories.

    According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), Illinois currently only generates 0.7 pct of its electricity from solar. While he Illinois Power Agency aims to source 25 pct of the state's energy from renewables by 2025, the state is currently ranked 33rd among states in terms of solar growth. (Source: Sunnova Energy, CleanTechnica, 22 Aug., 2018) Contact: Sunnova Energy, (281) 985-9900, www.sunnova.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Sunnova Energy,  Solar,  


    Six States Produce 72 pct of U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-08-17
    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Iowa, Nebraska, Illinois, Minnesota, Indiana and South Dakota in that order produced 72 pct of the country's total fuel ethanol in 2016 -- 265 million barrels of the total U.S. production amount of 367 million barrels. The top six states are also among the top 10 U.S. producers of corn, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, according to the USDA.

    Between 2006 and 2016, fuel ethanol production more than doubled after the Energy Policy Act of 2005 created the Renewable Fuel Standard. By 2010, most of the gasoline sold in the U.S. was blended with 10 pct ethanol.

    Among the top six ethanol producing states, Iowa can produce more than 102 million bpy of fuel ethanol for about 19 pct of total U.S. ethanol production. Nebraska's production capacity of more than 50 million barrels of fuel ethanol is the second-highest, followed by Illinois at up to 40 million bpy. Minnesota has an ethanol production capacity of 28 million bpy followed by Indiana and South Dakota at 27 million bpy of ethanol annually. (Source: US EIA, Tax, Business & Politics, 15 Aug., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  EIA,  


    EIA Reports Continued US Solar, Wind Growth (Ind. Report)

    Date: 2018-08-10
    According to the just released Energy Information Administration (EIA) Short Term Energy Outlook, (STEO), although solar generates less electricity than wind power, it is growing faster,

    The EIA projects solar generation will go from 211,000 MWh per day in 2017 to 260,000 MWh/d in 2018, a 23 pct increase, and to 290,000 MWh/d in 2019, another 12 pct increase. The latest STEO also cuts the amount of utility-scale solar capacity that the EIA expects to come online in 2019 to 6.3 GW -- a 45 pct drop from the 11.4 GW forecast in last month's STEO.

    The EIA reports that wind generation averaged 697,000 MWh per day in 2017 and forecasts that it will rise by 7 pct to 746,000 MWh/d in 2018 and by another 5 pct in 2019 to 782,000 MWh/d. (Source: US EIA, Utility Dive , Various Media, 8 Aug., 2018)Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  EIA,  Wind,  Solar,  


    U.S. 2017 Coal Consumption Hits Historic Low (Ind. Report)
    Coal, US EIA
    Date: 2018-08-06
    In its Friday daily brief, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) noted that the U.S. power sector consumed 661 million short tons of coal last in 2017, the lowest level since 1983 and the fourth straight year for a decline, the brief stated. The report noted "Electric power sector coal consumption in 2017 was 36 pct lower than in 2008, when U.S. coal production reached its highest level." the report read.

    Coal accounts for about 30 pct of total energy used globally and about 40 pct of total electric power generation, the report said. (Source: US EIA, Inforsurhoy, 5 Aug., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  US EIA,  


    Utility Revenue Expands LED Lighting Division (Ind. Report)
    Utility Revenue Services
    Date: 2018-07-20
    Dublin, Ohio energy consultancy Utility Revenue Services, reports it has extended its offerings to include LED lighting analyses , retrofits and and related capital projects. Rapid advancements in solid state lighting along with a precipitous fall in price have lowered the barrier to entry for LED retrofits for apartment properties and have created a compelling business case: energy savings from LED technology is, on average, about 75 pct over traditional technologies, with less heat output and 25-times the lifespan of incandescent.

    The qualifying threshold for EPA's ENERGY STAR for buildings will experience a significant reset at the end of August. For the first time since 2003, scores will be measured against new data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA)which projects LED lighting market to be over $100 billion by 2025. In addition to their high operational efficiency, dropping production cost and moderate heat output, smart or connected applications are helping to drive LED's explosive growth.

    To date, the company has improved the performance of over a half million apartment units since 2006. Those assets continue to experience increased net operating income, currently over $45 million annually and growing, according to the release. (Source: Utility Revenue Services, PR, 18 July, 2018) Contact: Utility Revenue Services, Tom Spangler, (804) 475-9601, tspangler@utilityrevenue.com, www.utilityrevenue.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LED Light news,  Energy Efficiency news,  


    US Banned MTBE Being Exported (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-07-16
    The US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that in 2017, the US experted an average of 38,000 bpd of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to primarily Mexico, Chile, and Venezuela.

    MTBE was once commonly used as a motor gasoline additive in the United States but was phased out in the late 2000s as a result of water contamination concerns. Since then, fuel ethanol has replaced MTBE as a gasoline additive. In contrast to MTBE, the use of fuel ethanol has been supported by tax subsidies such as the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit and by the Renewable Fuel Standard, which mandates the use of biofuels in the US transportation fuel supply. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, PR, 13 July, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Ethanol,  MTBE,  


    600,000 Tons of Densified Biomass Fuel Sold in March (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2018-06-29
    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently released Monthly (June) Densified Biomass Fuel Report, U.S. manufacturers produced approximately 650,000 tons of densified biomass fuel from 1.27 million tons of raw biomass feedstock in March, with sales reaching 600,000 tons during the month. Production included 147,226 tons of heating pellets and 498,864 tons of utility pellets.

    For the report, the EIA collected data from 86 operating manufacturers of densified biomass fuel. The report does not include data from facilities with annual capacities of less than 10,000 tons, which report data annually rather than monthly. The 86 manufacturers that submitted data in February have a combined annual production capacity of 11.79 million tpy.

    Domestic sales reached 122,727 tons and averaged $149.22 per ton. Exports in March reached 381,319 tons an averaged $174.32 per ton. Inventories of premium/standard wood pellets reached 225,990 tons in March, up from 217,859 tons in February. Inventories of utility pellets reached 345,615 tons in March, up from 255,172 tons in February. (Source: US EIA, June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration,  Biomass,  


    EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
    EIA,Energy Efficiency
    Date: 2018-06-29
    According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

    Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

    Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

    Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EIA,  Energy Efficiewncy ,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


    Aloha State Pledges Carbon Neutrality by 2045 (Reg & Leg)
    Hawaii
    Date: 2018-06-22
    The Hawaiian State Legislature has inked legislation committing to 100 pct renewable energy and to becoming carbon neutral by 2045. The legislature also committed to eliminate fossil fuels in ground transportation by 2045, and that the rise in sea levels be considered when proposed developments projects are being scrutinised. Hawaii reportedly could be hit by $19 billion in damage due to rising sea levels, according to the Hawaii Sea Level Rise Vulnerability and Adaptation report. The legislation has been described as "just plain common sense."

    Hawaii is the ninth lowest producer of energy-related CO2 emissions among the 50 US states, according to the US Energy Information Administration. It is also a member of the United States Climate Alliance, a group of state governors that have agreed to abide by the 2015 Paris climate agreement. (Source: Various Media, Compelo, June, 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Neutral,  Carbon Emissions,  


    EIA Details Energy Efficiency Incentives Results (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-06-22
    According to a US Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey (EIA-861) of electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency, U.S. electric utilities reported spending $3.6 billion on energy efficiency customer incentives in 2016, for an average of $24 per customer.

    Most reported spending supported residential and commercial energy efficiency: 43 pct of spending targeted residential customers, 49 pct targeted commercial customers, and the remaining 8 pct targeted industrial customers. Average reported spending per customer varied by state, from $0 in Alaska to $128 in Massachusetts. High-spending states and low-spending states tend to be concentrated in particular regions. By U.S. census region, average utility spending ranged from $11 per customer in the South to $47 per customer in the Northeast. Spending also was higher in certain states with high electricity prices, such as Hawaii, or in certain states with climates that require more energy for heating and cooling, such as Illinois and Arizona.

    Incremental savings as a result of energy efficiency spending for reporting year 2016 totaled 27.5 billion kWh or 0.7 pct of nationwide retail electricity sales. Projected lifecycle savings were much greater, at 354 billion kWh over the lifetime of the efficiency measures used, because some measures that affect heating, cooling, and water heating equipment can provide benefits for several years. Like spending, most savings occurred in the residential and commercial sectors.

    Annual incremental savings also varied by state, from near 0 pct of electricity retail sales in Kansas and Alaska to 3 pct of retail sales in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Average electricity savings by U.S. census region was the highest at 1.2 pct in the Northeast, and the lowest at less than 0.4 pct in the south. (Source: EIA, Today in Energy, 20 June, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Energy Efficiency Incentive,  


    Renewables Subsidies Drop as Renewable Energy Grows (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-05-25
    According to the EIA' Direct Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy in Fiscal Year 2016 Report, federal subsidies for renewable energy -- including renewable generation of electricity -- dropped to $6.7 billion in FY 2016, a 56 pct decline from FY 2013. renewable subsidies in FY 2010 and FY 2013 were approximately $15 billion, more than double FY 2016 levels, as support from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) lessened. Despite the decline, renewable energy continued to receive a large share of total federal energy subsidies, accounting for 46 pct of the FY 2016 total.

    In the report, the EIA defines subsidies as funds a government expends, or revenue it foregoes, to encourage or support certain activities. EIA's report includes the following financial activities: direct expenditures, tax expenditures, research and development (R&D), and credit subsidies to recipients of federal loan guarantees.

    Tax expenditures provided 80 pct of FY 2016 renewables subsidies. Renewable electricity-related tax expenditures provided nearly 70 pct of FY 2013 renewable electricity subsidies, falling to about half that share in FY 2016. Most of this amount went to commercial wind and solar installations from the Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC). The PTC provided an inflation-adjusted tax credit worth 2.4 cents per kilowatthour (kWh) in 2016, while the ITC provided a deduction equal to 30 pct of facility installation costs. EIA estimates the PTC and ITC credits taken in FY 2016 at $1.4 billion and $1.2 billion, respectively.

    Nearly all renewable energy direct expenditures for FY 2010, FY 2013, and FY 2016 resulted from provisions of ARRA -- a broad-based set of programs designed to expedite economic recovery, including energy infrastructure. Under ARRA, DOE has invested more than $31 billion since 2009. Much of this funding supported renewable energy projects, but by FY 2016, most provisions of ARRA energy programs had expired. Direct expenditures for renewable energy decreased 90 pct, from nearly $9 billion in FY 2013 to about $1 billion in FY 2016.

    Although R&D expenditures are small compared with tax expenditures and direct expenditures, R&D provides the foundation for many energy technology advancements and cost reductions. Federal R&D expenditures for renewable energy were estimated at about $850 million for FY 2010 and FY 2013, but they dropped to about $450 million in FY 2016. Another $296 million in federal loan guarantees was distributed to recipients in FY 2010, but in both FY 2013 and FY 2016, federal loan guarantee subsidies were zero. (Source: US Energy Information Administration, May, 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  US EIA,  


    "More Biofuels Vital to Energy Outlook" - Growth Energy (Ind. Report)
    Growth Energy
    Date: 2018-02-19
    According to Chris Bliley, Growth Energy VP for regulatory affairs, the US Energy Information Administration's (EIA) just released Annual Energy Outlook 2018 demonstrate a clear and growing need for U.S. biofuels. The report predicts an 18 pct increase in miles traveled by U.S. motorists in traditional light-duty vehicles -- an increase from 2.8 trillion miles in 2017 to 3.3 trillion miles in 2050.

    "Blending more homegrown, cost-efficient biofuels into the fuel supply is the ready-made solution to lowering prices at the pump while also dramatically reducing emissions.

    "Federal experts agree that ethanol slashes emissions by 43 pct over the full energy life-cycle-from farm to engine but that the level of carbon savings is rising with each passing year, thanks to innovations in biofuel production and precision agriculture. We must reduce emissions in the transportation sector and that means deploying higher ethanol blends like E15 and E85 as well as mid-level ethanol blends like E30 alongside advanced and cellulosic biofuels. A strong Renewable Fuel Standard is vital to that effort, and we urge the Environmental Protection Agency to reject calls from a few fossil fuel advocates who want to hold back the rapid growth of ethanol production in rural America," Bliley says.

    (Source: Growth Energy, 15 Feb., 2018) Contact: Growth Energy, Emily Skor, CEO, (202) 545-4000, www.growthenergy.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Growth Energy,  Biofuel,  Biofuel Blend,  


    Rise Expected in 2018 Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-02-12
    In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions will increase by 1.8 pct this year then remain stable in 2019. The agency also noted that US energy-related CO2 emissions fell by 14 pct from 2005 to 2017 due in part to a 39 pct decline in coal-related emissions and an 11 pct fall in petroleum related emissions. Natural gas-related emissions, however, increased by 24 pct over that period.

    EIA estimates that global energy-related CO2 emissions rose 21 pct between 2005 and 2017 at an annual growth rate of 1.6 percent. The rate is projected to slow to 1 pct in 2018 and remain essentially flat in 2019. (Source: US EIA, Feb., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US EIA,  Carbon Emissions,  

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