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Climeworks Touts Iceland Geothermal-Powered CCS Project (Int'l.)
Climeworks ,Carbfix
Date: 2020-08-28
ETH Zurich University spin-off carbon capture firm Climeworks AG reports it will partner with Carbfix and ON Power in a geothermal powered direct air carbon capture and storage (DACCS) project in Iceland.

The planned facility will have the capacity to remove 4,000 tpy of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air using Climeworks' direct air capture (DAC) technology and Reykjavik Energy subsidiary Carbfix's natural underground mineralisation carbon storage method. (Source: Climeworks, PR 26 Aug., 2020) Contact: ON Power, Berglind Ran Olafsdottir, CEO, www.on.is; Climeworks, Christoph Gebald, CEO, +41 44 533 2999, www.climeworks.com; CarbFix, www.carbfix.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbfix,  Climeworks ,  CCS,  Geothermal,  


KIT Atmospheric CO2-to-Carbon Black Pilot Underway (Int'l, R&D)
NOCEC,Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Date: 2020-03-27
In Germany, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is reporting the NECOC Technologies for Negative Greenhouse Gas Emissions Research Project is now under way.

In the NECOC research project, an integrated pilot plant is being constructed to test a new process for reducing the greenhouse gas CO2 in the atmosphere and to produce carbon black -- a high-quality, solid carbon with industrial applications.

Project partners include INERATEC GmbH, a spinoff of KIT, and Climeworks AG, a spinoff of ETH Zurich. The research project, scheduled for a duration of three years, is funded with a total of €1.5 million by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). (Source: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 25 Mar.,2020)Contact: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Professor Thomas Wetzel of the Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Martin Heidelberger, +49 721 608-21169, martin.heidelberger@kit.edu, www.kit.edu, www.tvt.kit.edu/21_3547.php; Climeworks AG, Jan Wurzbacher and Christoph Gebald, co-founder and co-CEO, +41 44 533 2999, www.climeworks.com; ETH Zurich, +41 44 632 03 52, www.up.ethz.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News ETH Zurich,  Climeworks,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  Carbon Black,  NOCEC,  Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,  Carbon Black,  


ETH Zurich, Total Convert CO2, H2 to Methanol (Ind. Report)
ETH Zürich, Total
Date: 2019-07-31
Swiss researchers at ETH Zurich and the Paris-headquartered oil and gas giant Total report they've developed a new catalyst that efficiently converts CO2 and hydrogen (H2) directly into methanol and have jointly filed for a patent on the technology. Offering realistic market potential, the technology paves the way for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals, the release claims.

The core of the new approach is a chemical catalyst based on indium oxide, which was developed by Javier Perez-Ramírez, Professor of Catalysis Engineering at ETH Zurich, and his team. The team of scientists have now succeeded in boosting the activity of the catalyst significantly, without affecting its selectivity or stability. They achieved this by treating the indium oxide with a small quantity of palladium.

The CO2 may be extracted from the atmosphere or—more simply and efficiently—from the exhaust discharged by combustion power plants. Even if fuels are synthesized from the methanol and subsequently combusted, the CO2 is recycled and thus the carbon cycle is closed.

Total now plans to scale up the approach and potentially implement the technology in a demonstration unit over the next few years. Methanol can be converted into fuels and a wide variety of chemical products, including those that today are mainly based on fossil resources. (Source: ETH Zurich, PR, Green Car Congress, 30 July, 2019) Contact: ETH Zurich, +41 44 632 03 52, www.up.ethz.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News ETH Zurich,  Total,  Methanol,  CO2,  


Major Tree Plantings Recommended to Fight Climate Change (Int'l.)
ETH Zurich
Date: 2019-07-08
A recently released study from the Crowther Lab at ETH Zurich notes 0.9 billion hectares of land worldwide would be suitable for reforestation an the resulting capture of two thirds of human-made carbon emissions and would thus be the most effective method to combat climate change.

The study identified where -- excluding cities or agricultural areas -- in the world new trees could grow and how much carbon they would store. The researchers calculated that under the current climate conditions, Earth's land could support 4.4 billion hectares of continuous tree cover -- 1.6 billion more than the currently existing 2.8 billion hectares. Of these 1.6 billion hectares, 0.9 billion hectares fulfill the criterion of not being used by humans. This means that there is currently an area of the size of the US available for tree restoration. Once mature, these new forests could store 205 billion tonnes of carbon: about two thirds of the 300 billion tonnes of carbon that has been released into the atmosphere as a result of human activity since the Industrial Revolution.

The study identifies Russia (151 million hectares); the US (103 million hectares); Canada (78.4 million hectares); Australia (58 million hectares); Brazil (49.7 million hectares); and China (40.2 million hectares) as the countries with the greaterd forestation potential. (Source: ETH Zurch, PR, 4 July, 2019) Contact: ETH Zurich, Prof. Tom Crowther, Institute for Integrative Biology, +41 44 632 4141, tom.crowther@usys.ethz.ch, www.hk.ethz.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News ETH Zurich,  Forestation,  Reforestation,  Climate Change,  


ETH Zurich Considers Man-Made CO2 Effects, Ocean Levels (Int'l)
ETH Zurich.
Date: 2019-03-18
In Switzerland, an international study led by federal technology institute ETH Zurich notes that the world's oceans absorb a third of CO2 emissions produced by humans and that from 1994-2007 the oceans absorbed 34 billion tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere -- about 31 pct of all the CO2 produced by human activities.

According to the ETH Zurich report, oceans absorb CO2 in two stages. First CO2 in the atmosphere dissolves in surface water and is carried by currents into the depths of the sea, where it accumulates. For the report, researchers from seven countries measured concentrations of CO2 gathered from the world's oceans and developed statistical model to calculate the proportion generated by human activities.

ETH Zurich environmental physics professor Nicolas Gruber, who led the research, was already involved at the turn of the millennium in a similar study on the absorption of man-made CO2 from the beginning of industrialization around 1800 up to 1994. Comparisons of the two surveys found that the proportional volume of CO2 stored by the oceans has remained stable in the 200 years since the industrial revolution but increased in absolute terms as atmospheric CO2 levels have risen, leading to fears that the oceans might one day become saturated and unable to serve as a carbon "sink". (Source: ETH Zurich, swissinfo.ch, Mar., 2019) Contact: ETH Zurich, Prof. Nicolas Gruber, Dept. of Environmental Systems Science, +41 44 632 03 52, www.up.ethz.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News ETH Zurich,  CO2,  CO2 Emissions,  Climate Change,  

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