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GreenGas USA, Duke Univ. Ink RNG Supply Agreement (Ind. Report)
GreenGas USA, Duke University,
Date: 2021-08-09
As previously reported in July, Durham, North Carolina's Duke University inked a 20-year agreement to purchase 95,000 MMBtus of renewable natural gas (RNG) from Charleston, South Carolina-based GreenGasUSA, which captures wastewater methane to upgrade into RNG.

The GreenGas project will supply RNG from biomethane currently being off-gassed from roughly 700 million ppy of vegetable food processing wastewater holding ponds at McCall Farms in Effingham, South Carolina. Duke University will use the RNG in its on campus steam plants to replace about 6 pct of the fossil natural gas currently being combusted.

Duke has pledge net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2024. (Source: Duke University, PR, Biocycle, 3 Aug., 2021) Contact: Duke University, Tanja Vujic, WasteNot Strategies, LLC Duke Carbon Offsets Initiative, www.duke.edu; GreenGasUSA, Marc Fetten, 412-726-3331, marc.fetten@greengasusa.com, www.greengasusa.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News GreenGas USA,  RNG,  Duke University,  


Univ. Tenn. Peatland Carbon Processes Investigation Funded (Funding)
University of Tennessee
Date: 2020-01-27
A UT microbiologist has received a portion of a $3.1 million grant from the US DOE to study how global warming could affect peatlands and their vast carbon stores in the future.

Steven Wilhelm, the Kenneth and Blaire Mossman Professor of Microbiology, is part of a team led by Jean-Philippe Gibert, a food web expert and assistant professor of biology at Duke University. Wilhelm's co-investigators include David Weston and Dale Pelletier, staff scientists in the Biosciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Jonathan Shaw, professor of biology at Duke. In the three-year project, the group will study and model the effects of warming on the complex network of bacteria, protists, and viruses that interact with peat moss.

Peat moss plays a key role in slowing climate change by keeping 370 million metric tpy of CO2 out of the atmosphere -- equivalent to the emissions from nearly half the car traffic in the US.

Though peatlands cover just 3 pct of the Earth's surface they store twice as much carbon as all the world's forests. Over hundreds or thousands of years, Sphagnum and other peatland plants pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere as they grow, trapping the carbon inside layers of partially decayed plant material up to 20 feet deep. But warming trends could put that carbon storage at risk. Rising temperatures could thaw or dry out peat wetlands, making them more prone to decay and wildfires. Decomposing or burning plants mean the heat-trapping gas long locked up in peatlands could be released, accelerating the global warming process.

To better predict the impacts of warming on peatlands and the carbon they contain, the team is studying a set of players they say are largely overlooked: microbes. Their previous work suggests that under future warming, the community of microbes and other tiny organisms that grow in and around peat mosses could shift balance, which could affect the ability of peatlands to sequester carbon. (Source: University of Tennessee, Knoxville, PR, 27 Jan., 2020) Contact: University of Tennessee, Karen Dunlap, 865-974-8674, kdunlap6@utk.edu, Amanda Womac , 865-974-2992, awomac1@utk.edu, www.utk.edu; Duke University, Robin Smith, (919-681-8057, robin.a.smith@duke.edu, www.duke.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Peatland,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Emissions,  University of Tennessee,  


Duke U. Acquires 10,000 acre Peatland for Carbon Farm (Ind. Report)
Duke University
Date: 2018-12-14
In Durham, North Carolina, Duke University reports it has acquired the rights to 10,000 acres of peatland in Hyde County for what may be the nation's largest "carbon farming" project that could propel the university to carbon neutrality by 2024.

Carbon farming uses land management and conservation to increase the amount of carbon that agriculture pulls out of the air and locks into the soil and vegetation. Existing carbon farming programs in California, the Midwest and other countries have shown that a 2.5 acre plot of pasture or rangeland can store about one metric tpy of carbon. The NC peatlands, once re-wetted, have much greater potential -- perhaps 15 to 20 times more -- meaning the land could yield hundreds of thousands of metric tpy of carbon.

The Duke project will launch with a 300 acre pilot which could be expanded depending on its results. To date, the university has invested approximately $300,000 on the project which could sell carbon credits to companies. (Source: Duke University, Triangle Business Journal, Dec., 2018) Contact: Duke University, Curtis Richardson, Dir., Wetland Center, ww.researchgate.net/profile/Curtis_Richardson

More Low-Carbon Energy News Peatland,  Peat,  Duke University,  CCS,  Carbon Emissiuons,  CO2,  Climate Change,  

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