Return to Today's Publications

 

Newsletter:
Date Range (YYYY-MM-DD) -
Company, Industry or Technology:
  Search Tips


20 pct of U.S. Electricity from Wind Will Have Limited Impacts on System Efficiency and Regional Climate (Cornell Report Attached)
Cornell University
Date: 2020-02-24
According to new research from Cornell University, the U.S. could increase its present wind energy energy production from 7 pct to 20 pct within a decade "without requiring additional land, negative impacts on system-wide efficiency or local climates." The Cornell research, published Jan. 17 in Nature Scientific Reports, is funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Science and is based on an extensive series of high-resolution atmospheric simulations.

Access the 20 pct of U.S. Electricity from Wind Will Have Limited Impacts on System Efficiency and Regional Climate report HERE. (Source: Cornell University Chronicle, 22 Feb., 2020) Contact: Cornell University, Prof. Sara C Pryor, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences , 607-255-3376, sp2279@cornell.edu, www.cornell.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Cornell University,  Wind,  Renewable Energy,  


Cornell's Lighting, Efficiency Upgrades Saves Millions (Ind. Report)
Cornell University
Date: 2019-11-22
In the Empire State, Cornell University is reporting completion of a comprehensive indoor and outdoor lighting upgrade to LEDs at its Ithaca campus. The upgrades, which began in 2014, have saved the campus more than 18,000 tons of carbon and $2.9 million to date for an expected $16 million savings over the lifetime of their use. The new lighting also reduces the campus carbon footprint by nearly 3 pct per year and will remove more than 45,500 metric tons of CO2 equivalent from the campus carbon footprint in the next five years. (Source: Cornell Univ., American School & University, 21 Nov., 2019) Contact: Cornell University, www.cornell.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Efficiency,  LED Light,  Energy Efficiency,  


NY Universities Tout Renewables Purchasing Consortium (Ind. Report)
SUNY,Renewable Energy
Date: 2019-02-18
In the Empire State, 21 public and private universities including the State University of New York (SUNY) system's 16 campuses, Cornell University in Ithaca and other private universities report they are partnering to form the New York Campuses' Aggregate Renewable Energy Solutions Consortium (NYCARES).

The new group aims to lower the costs of renewable energy procurement through combined purchasing power, solicit new renewable energy opportunities and projects, promote the development of a "green" low-carbon economy, and support the state's commitments to source 50 pct of New York's energy requirements from renewable sources by 2030. The consortium will also focus its efforts on projects that will be ready for operation no later than 2020. (Source: NYCARES, CleanTechnica, Feb., 2019) Contact: SUNY, Kristina Johnson, Chancellor, www.suny.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News SUNY,  Renewable Energy,  


Cornell Reports Bioreactor Algal Biofuel Breakthrough (Ind. Report)
Boyce Thompson Institute
Date: 2017-10-02
Cornell University's Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and Texas A&M University researchers are reporting "algal droplet bioreactors on a chip", a new technology that may revolutionize the search for the perfect algal strain.

In the new technology, a single algal cell is captured in a droplet of water encapsulated by oil then millions of algal droplets squeeze onto a chip about the size of a quarter. Each droplet is a "micro-bioreactor", a highly controlled environment in which algal cells can grow and replicate for several days, forming a genetically homogenous colony that goes through its typical biological reactions, including the production of lipids.

The researchers first validated the chip system with algae known to grow faster or slower, or produce more or less lipid. They then screened 200,000 chemically mutated cells, identifying six mutants with both faster growth and higher lipid content. The screening, done on-chip, uses fluorescence detection of chlorophyll, representing total cell mass, and BODIPY, a fluorescent molecule that binds to lipids. All mutants with potential for improved growth or lipid production were recovered and verified off-chip.

The tools for improving throughput are already in development, including larger chips that can screen millions of droplets in one experiment.

With the discovery and development of much more efficient algal strains, commercial-scale production of biofuel from algae may finally be a realistic promise. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation. (Source: Cornell University, PR, Plant Direct, 28 Sept., 2017) Contact: Cornell Univ., George Lowery, (607) 255-2171, gpl5@cornell.edu, www.cornell.edu; Texas A&M, Arum Han , (979) 845-9686; Boyce Thompson Institute, (607) 254-1234, https://btiscience.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algal,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  

Showing 1 to 4 of 4.