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Valero Shuts Down Two Corn Ethanol Plants (Ind. Report)
Valero Energy
Date: 2019-11-08
San Antonio-headquartere Valero Energy Corp., the second-largest U.S. oil processor by capacity, is reporting the temporary shutdown of its corn ethanol production facilities in Riga, Michigan and Bluffton, Indiana, due to "weak margins" and "market conditions". The plants will resume production "as soon as favorable economic conditions exit", according to the company's website. (Source: Valero Energy Corp., Bloomberg, 7 Nov., 2019) Contact: Valero Renewable Fuels, Joe Gorder, Pres., (800) 324-8464, www.valero.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Valero Energy,  Ethanol,  


Corn Growers Praise, Plead Trump for RFS Action (Ind. Report)
Trump
Date: 2019-09-30
In a recent letter to Pres. Donald Trump, corn grower organizations in 23 states called on the President to direct his administration's EPA to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule and to simply uphold the law.

"Dear President Trump,

"We are writing on behalf of the more than 300,000 corn farmers across the country who are being negatively impacted by a perfect storm of challenges in rural America. The 31 new Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) waivers to big oil companies, recently approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and bringing total waivers issued under your Administration to 85, could not have come at a worse time for agriculture.

"Ethanol plants in several states, including Iowa, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Minnesota and Mississippi have closed or idled. These closures have cost 2,700 rural jobs and impacted demand for more than 300 million bushels of corn. Corn farmers are beginning harvest and continuing to lose markets to deliver their corn. Frustration in the countryside is growing.

"Corn farmers are not asking for a special deal. We are simply asking, as we have been for the past two years, that your EPA uphold the law. To effectively stop the harm caused by RFS waivers, EPA needs to account for projected waivers beginning with the pending 2020 RFS volume rule. Accounting for waivers in the annual RFS volume process restores integrity to the RFS. It also allows your Administration to continue granting waivers, as allowed by the law, while keeping the RFS whole."

"While adding gallons and improving market access for higher blends of ethanol are all policies farmers appreciate and support, future waivers will continue to minimize the RFS, unless your Administration acts to account for waivers beginning this coming year first.

"We were pleased to see press reports indicating that, following a meeting with farm-state lawmakers, an agreement had been reached to address the harm caused by waivers. With more than 4 billion gallons waived out of the RFS, we appreciate you listening to our elected representatives about what is needed to restore meaning to the RFS. Farmers across the country are anxiously awaiting the release of more details about this agreement. Ethanol plants will continue to close if you don't act soon, creating a rippling effect throughout the rural economy.

"Corn farmers are appreciative of your past support for agriculture and ethanol. We especially appreciate your efforts to remove the barrier to year-round sales of E15, but EPA's current use of waivers undermines growth potential for higher blends of ethanol, reduces demand, lowers the value of our crop, and puts the outlook for the rural economy in jeopardy.

"Mr. President, we firmly ask that you uphold your commitment to America's farmers and the RFS." (Source: Ag Ohio, Various Trade Media, Sept., 2019)

Editor's Note: For our reader's convenience, we have underlined the few lines that actually call on Trump to honestly do his job and uphold the RFS. The remaining five paragraph's are, in our opinion, little more than flattery to the White House.

More Low-Carbon Energy News Trump,  "Hardship" Waivers,  Corn Ethanol,  


Ringneck's Onida Ethanol Plant Report Update (Ind. Report)
Ringneck Energy,ICM
Date: 2019-09-20
Following up on our 28th July coverage, Ringneck Energy LLC reports production is well underway at its 80 million mtpy ethanol plant in Onida, South Dakota. The plant, which was designed by ICM, uses primarily locally sourced corn as a feedstock and incorporates ICM's Evap Zero technology. (Source: Ringneck Energy, Sept., 2019) Contact: Ringneck Energy LLC, Walt Wendland, Pres., CEO, (605) 258-2900, walt@ringneckenergy.com, www.ringneckenergy.com; ICM Inc., David VanderGriend, CEO, (316) 796-0900, www.icminc.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ringneck Energy,  Corn Ethanol,  ICM,  


POET Idling Cloverdale Corn Ethanol plant (Ind. Report)
POET, EPA
Date: 2019-08-30
Sioux Falls, South Dakota-based ethanol producer POET reports it is idling its Clverdale, Indiana bioprocessing facility due the EPA's policies on RFS "hardship" waivers. The shutdown will take several weeks after which time the plant, which normally processes 30 million bpy, will stop processing corn for ethanol production.

POET already has cut production at half of its biorefineries with the biggest impact being felt at its Iowa and Ohio plants where corn processing will drop by an additional 100 million bushels. (Source: POET, The Messenger, 29 Aug., 2019) Contact: POET, Jeff Broin, CEO, (605) 965-2200, www.poet.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News POET,  EPA,  "Hardship" Waivers,  RFS,  


Growth Energy CEO Rebuts EPA Zero Demand Destruction Claim (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
Growth Energy, RFS, EPA
Date: 2019-08-21
In response to the EPA's recent claim -- "There is zero evidence that EPA's congressionally mandated small refinery exemption program has had any negative impact on domestic corn ethanol producers" -- Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor issued the following statement.

"The latest reports say President Trump 'felt misled' about the EPA's most recent batch of small refinery exemptions. That's hardly a surprise. The EPA spent months trying to paper over the devastating impact these refinery (waiver) handouts have had on farm communities and rural workers in America's biofuel sector. They can't hide the simple fact that dozens of biofuel plants have cut production, and ethanol consumption fell for the first time in 20 years in the wake of these exemptions. Closures in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Florida, Virginia, Texas, Pennsylvania, Missouri and Nebraska are only the beginning.

"Just today, the world's largest ethanol producer closed a major plant in Indiana and cut production across seven states. Hundreds of millions of gallons of production are offline, and hundreds of millions of bushels of grain are falling in value, just as farmers face the worst economic conditions in a generation.

"The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) creates an incentive that opens the market to biofuel blends, including the E15 that President Trump personally embraced. These exemptions destroy that incentive, pure and simple. You cannot carve billions of gallons from America's biofuel targets and still keep this administration's promises to farm families. EPA needs to account for these lost gallons immediately and start repairing the damage before more rural communities lose hope for a comeback."

Growth Energy represents producers and supporters of ethanol working to bring consumers better choices at the fuel pump, grow America's economy and improve the environment. (Source: Growth Energy, 21 Aug., 2019) Contact: Growth Energy, Emily Skor, CEO, Elizabeth Funderburk, (202) 545-4000, EFunderburk@GrowthEnergy.org, www.growthenergy.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Growth Energy,  RFS,  Renewable Fuel Standard,  


Praj, Dedidn Ink Brazilian Biofuels Plants Pact (Int'l.)
Praj Industries,Dedini IndWstrias de Base
Date: 2019-08-14
Brazilian sugar-ethanol mill developer Dedini IndWstrias de Base is reporting a cooperation agreement with India's Praj Industries under which Praj will sell corn ethanol production equipment and technologies. technologies for corn-based biofuel. Details of the agreement have not been announced.

The Brazilian company added that the cooperation agreement is intended to take advantage of a growing demand for ethanol as a result of an upcoming national programme to boost biofuel use, known as RenovaBio, which is scheduled to start in January, 2020. The RenovaBio program will require 30 new ethanol plants in Brazil, the expansion of some existing plants and the rebooting of some previously shuttered facilities. (Source: Dedini IndÅ´strias de Base, Hindu Business Line, 13 Aug., 2019) Contact: Dedini IndWstrias de Base, +55 19 3403-5500, www.dedini.com.br; Praj Industries Ltd., +91 20 7180 2000 / 2294 1000, info@praj.net, www.praj.net

More Low-Carbon Energy News Praj Industries,  Brazil Biofuel,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  


Gevo Earns ISCC Plus Certification (Ind. Report)
GEVO,International Sustainability and Carbon Certification
Date: 2019-08-12
Englewood, Colorado-headquartered isobutanol producer GEVO Inc. is reporting receipt of International Sustainability and Carbon Certification (ISCC) under the ISCC PLUS scheme for food, feed, industrial applications, energy, and biofuels outside Europe. In obtaining ISCC certification, Gevo continues to prove its dedication to meeting the highest industry standards by demonstrating the sustainable cultivation of field corn, which Gevo then converts into renewable, sustainable isobutanol (biobutanol).

ISCC PLUS certification validates the responsible nature of GEVO's liquid transportation fuels and highlights the traceability of its biofuel, qualifying that such fuels produced in a sustainable manner. By completing ISCC certification, Gevo has verified that the feedstock, in this case field corn, is being grown in a socially, environmentally, and ethically responsible manner.

ISCC PLUS is a sustainability certification scheme for biobased applications like chemicals, food and feed products and applications in the bioenergy sector. (Source: GEVO, PR, 7 Aug., 2019) Contact: International Sustainability and Carbon Certification, www.sustainabilityxchange.info/en/institutions/iscc-international-sustainability-carbon-certification; GEVO, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Biobutanol,  Corn Ethanol,  International Sustainability and Carbon Certification,  


Plymouth Energy Halts Ethanol Production Amid "Supply-demand Imbalance" (Ind. Report)
Plymouth Energy ,Iowa Renewable Fuels Association
Date: 2019-08-02
Merrill, Iowa-based corn ethanol producer Plymouth Energy LLC reports it has ceased production until further notice.

Ten other ethanol plants in the country have also temporarily shut down and three others have reportedly closed due to what Iowa Renewable Fuels Association Executive Director Monte Shaw described as a "supply-demand imbalance" caused by waivers that federal officials are granting big oil refiners. (Source: Plymouth Energy Business Record, Radio Iowa, 1 Aug., 2019) Contact: Plymouth Energy, 712-938-2373, www.plymouth-energy.com; Iowa Renewable Fuels Association, Monte Shaw, Exec. Dir., info@IowaRFA.org (515) 252-6249, www.iowarfa.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Iowa Renewable Fuels Association,  


Benson Hill Biosystems, Brownseed Genetics Partner on Corn Genetics (Ind. Report)
Benson Hill Biosystems
Date: 2019-07-29
St. Louis-based crop improvement specialist Benson Hill Biosystems is reporting a partnership with Wisconsin-based Brownseed Genetics, a seed breeder of new corn hybrids that offer significant added value for growers, livestock, and ethanol and biodiesel producers. The hybrids yield about 9 percent corn oil -- nearly triple the normal production -- and are rich in the amino acids lysine and methionine, according to the release.

Because of their higher calorie and nutrient content, Brownseed hybrids already enjoy steady growth in the livestock industry. Now, with its E+ hybrid, the company is taking aim at the corn-to-ethanol industry. Most ethanol plants require only limited modifications in their line process to accommodate the hybrid, the release added. (Source: Benson Hills Biosystems, PR 29 July, 2019) Contact: Benson Hills Biosystems, 314-222-8218, www.bensonhillbio.com; Brownseed Genetics, Charles Brown, CEO, Brownseed Genetics, ctwww.brownseedgenetics.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Corn Ethanol,  


EPA's RFS Obligations Another Setback for American Farmers, says NFU (Ind. Report)
NFU,EPA,RFS
Date: 2019-07-19
The US EPA's recently proposed renewable volume obligations (RVOs) under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for the year 2020 would set required biofuel use at 20.04 billion gallons next year, a marginal increase over this year's 19.92 billion gallons. The difference is primarily attributable to an expansion of cellulosic biofuel, from 420 million to 540 million gallons. The rule maintains the current 15-million-gallon target for corn ethanol, according to a NFU release.

In the face of the EPA's proposal, the National Farmers Union (NFU) has expressed its disappointment in the almost unlimited issuance of RFS refinery "hardship waivers", the newly released RVO's and the that the agency's failure not only to factor the lost demand into its proposed RVOs but to increase biofuel use at all. "At every turn, EPA and this (Trump) administration have undermined the intent of RFS and destroyed demand for billions of gallons of ethanol", NFU President Roger Johnson added. (Source: The Cattle Site, National Farmers Union, PR, July, 2019) Contact: National Farmers Union, Roger Johnson, Pres., (202) 554-1600, www.nfu.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS news,  NFU news,  National Farmers Union news,  "Hardship Waiver" news,  


Attis Industries Joins the Advanced Biofuels Assoc. (Ind. Report)
Attis Industries, Advanced Biofuels Association
Date: 2019-07-10
Milton, Georgia-headquartered Attis Industries Inc., a diversified innovation and technology holding company with a corn ethanol production asset in Fulton, NY, reports it joined the Advanced Biofuels Association (ABFA).

The ABFA supports and advocates for public policies that are technology neutral, utilize sustainable feedstocks, and offer subsidy parity to ensure all viable advanced biofuels can compete with the benefit of a level playing field. The ABFA engages government at all levels to secure support for the advanced biofuels industry, allowing its member companies to commercialize their technologies and bring products to market that are competitive and compatible with petroleum-based fuels and byproducts. (Source: Attis Industries, PR, Globe Newswire, 10 July, 2019) Contact: Advanced Biofuels Association

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries news,  Ethanol news,  Advanced Biofuels Association news,  


Are EPA's Proposed RFS 'Obligations' Actually Just Suggestions?" asks RFA (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
RFA, RFS
Date: 2019-07-08
By neglecting to prospectively reallocate small refinery exemptions and blatantly ignoring a court order to restore improperly waived gallons, the U.S. EPA's proposed 2020 renewable volume obligations (RVOs) completely betrays President Trump's commitment to uphold the integrity of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), according to the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA).

"As long as EPA continues to dole out compliance exemptions to oil refiners without reallocating the lost volume, the agency may as well start referring to the annual RFS levels as 'renewable volume suggestions' rather than renewable volume 'obligations'. It is a complete misnomer to call these blending volumes 'obligations' when EPA's small refinery bailouts have essentially transformed the RFS into a voluntary program for nearly one-third of the nation's oil refineries.

"In its announcement today, EPA has proposed a total renewable fuel volume of 20.04 billion gallons, of which 5.04 billion gallons are advanced biofuel, including 540 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel. That leaves, on paper, a 15-billion-gallon requirement for conventional renewable fuels like corn ethanol, unchanged from 2019.

"Most notably, EPA failed to prospectively account for any expected small refinery exemptions in the 2020 proposal, even though it is almost a foregone conclusion at this point that the Agency will continue to grant more exemptions.

"Congress gave EPA the direction and tools necessary to ensure that the statutory RFS volumes are enforced, and that includes prospectively reallocating exempted volumes to non-exempt parties. Instead, EPA has chosen to continue its demand destruction campaign that has been crippling to both ethanol producers and the farmers who supply our industry. Enough is enough.

"EPA approved 54 exemptions for 2016 and 2017 and an additional 38 requests for 2018 exemptions are pending. Not a single exemption request has been denied by EPA since 2015. The exemptions effectively lowered the total RFS requirement for 2017 by 1.82 billion gallons and cut the 2016 requirement by nearly 800 million gallons.

"Making matters worse, EPA's proposal continues to flout the D.C. Circuit Court's 2017 order requiring the Agency to restore 500 million gallons of renewable fuel obligations that it inappropriately and illegally waived from the 2016 RVO. Unbelievably, the Agency is proposing to snub the court's ruling by refusing to restore the 500 million gallons remanded volume. EPA's stubborn refusal to obey a court order to restore lost demand is yet another kick in the teeth to U.S. renewable fuel producers and farmers already facing the worst market conditions in a generation. EPA's suggestion that following the court's directive would place an 'additional burden' on obligated parties is an insult and an affront to the farmers and ethanol producers who trusted this administration would follow the law. The RFS wasn't intended to make oil refiners comfortable; it was intended to change the status quo by guaranteeing renewable fuels would have access to a marketplace otherwise closed to competition.

"EPA appears to be selling out to oil refiners -- again -- at the expense of rural America. The court found in favor of renewable fuel producers in 2017 because it was clear our industry had been harmed by EPA's illegal use of a general waiver -- now EPA is doubling down on that harm to the ethanol industry and farmers.

"Today's proposal undermines the pledge President Trump made to farmers and renewable fuel producers that his administration would enforce the statutory RFS volumes. By failing to prospectively reallocate, failing to commit to a more judicious and restrained approach to refinery waivers, and failing to follow a court's order to restore lost demand, EPA is blatantly undercutting President Trump's commitment to ethanol, which he restated less than a month ago when he visited the Southwest Iowa Renewable Energy ethanol plant. We urge the President to resolve the disconnect between the oval office and EPA and get the RFS back on track." (Source: RFA, PR, 8 July, 2019) Contact: Renewable Fuels Association, Geoff Cooper, (202) 289-3835, www.ethanolrfa.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News RFA,  RFS,  


EPA's RFS Obligations Another Setback for American Farmers, says NFU (Ind. Report)
RFS,EPA,National Farmers Union
Date: 2019-07-08
Last Friday, the EPA released its proposed renewable volume obligations (RVOs) under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for the year 2020. The proposal would set required biofuel use at 20.04 billion gallons next year, a marginal increase over this year's 19.92 billion gallons. The difference is primarily attributable to an expansion of cellulosic biofuel, from 420 million to 540 million gallons. The rule maintains the current 15-million-gallon target for corn ethanol.

In the face of the EPA's proposal, the National Farmers Union (NFU) has expressed its disappointment in the almost unlimited issuance of RFS refinery "hardship waivers", the newly released RVO's and the that the agency's failure not only to factor the lost demand into its proposed RVOs but to increase biofuel use at all.

"At every turn, EPA and this (Trump) administration have undermined the intent of RFS and destroyed demand for billions of gallons of ethanol", NFU President Roger Johnson added. (Source: The Cattle Site, National Farmers Union, PR, 8 July, 2019) Contact: National Farmers Union, Roger Johnson, Pres., (202) 554-1600, www.nfu.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News "Hardship Waiver",  RFS,  National Farmers Union,  Biofuel,  Ethanol Blend,  


Attis Praises EPA's Approval of Year Around E15 Dales (Ind. Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2019-06-21
Milton, Georgia-headquartered corn ethanol producer and technology holding company Attis Industries Inc. is lauding the Trump Administration's May 30th approval of the expansion of 15 pct (E15) ethanol blends in on-road transportation fuels. Previously, the sale of E15 was restricted to just eight months of the year.

The rule change has the potential to create a significant increase in market demand for corn-based ethanol as well as other advanced fuels such as cellulosic ethanol. Even so, the administration continues to undermine the enforcement of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) through its abuse of the small refiner "hardship" exemptions (SREs) which have had a drastic effect on renewable fuel demand over the past two years, according to Attis. "Attis encourages the Administration to continue its support of the nation's farmers and renewable fuel producers by limiting SREs to those refiners who truly have encountered hardships by complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard," the Attis release notes.

Attis Biofuels, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Attis Industries Inc., currently operates a 100 million gpy corn-based ethanol facility in Fulton, NY and has plans to expand the production of renewable fuels to include cellulosic ethanol and various other advanced biofuels, according to the release. (Source: Attis Ind., PR, June, 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., David Winsness, President of Attis Innovations, Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries,  Biofuel,  E15,  Ethanol Blend,  RFS,  


Attis Creating NY Ethanol Plant Green Tech Campus (Ind Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2019-06-07
Following up on our previous coverage, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc. reports its recently acquired Sunoco LP's nameplate 100-million gpy corn ethanol plant and grain malting operation in Fulton, New York, will become the centerpiece of its proposed Green Tech Campus. The company will focus on byproduct optimization of the corn ethanol plant and the new production of advanced biofuels and biobased products while also looking to generate "green" power, thus reducing the overall carbon footprint of the Fulton campus and taking advantage of valuable carbon credits to increase the site's profitability.

Attis plans to immediately begin the process of deploying its patented biorefinery technology to further diversify the biofuel and biobased product manufacturing at the campus. Attis will convert extracted locally sourced woody biomass pulp into cellulosic fuels and lignin into bioplastics, carbon fiber and advanced biofuels like renewable diesel and jet fuel.

Attis also aims to improve the quality and volume of co-products currently being produced at the Fulton ethanol plant by implementing its patented and licensed corn oil extraction technology that will almost double the current corn oil production yields at the plant and provide an augmented revenue stream. (Source: Attis Industries, DTN, June, 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries,  Ethanol,  Sunoco LP,  


RFA Congratulates Husker Ag on Ethanol Production (Ind. Report)
Renewable Fuels Association
Date: 2019-06-05
The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) today congratulated member company Husker Ag LLC, as it recently produced its one-billionth gallon of corn ethanol. The Plainview, Nebraska facility presently produces over 300,000 gpd of ethanol.

The Husker Ag facility was originally built by Fagen Inc. and designed by ICM of Colwich, KS. Husker Ag expanded its operations in the fall of 2007 and as of 2017 utilizes more than 26 million bpy of corn to produce about 76 million gpy of denatured ethanol and about 450,000 tpy of modified wet distillers' grain (DDG) for cattle feed. (Source: Renewable Fuels Association, Husker Ag, 3 June, 2019) Contact: Renewable Fuels Association, Geoff Cooper, (202) 289-3835, www.ethanolrfa.org; Husker Ag, Seth Harder, Gen. Mgr., (402) 582-4446, www.huskerag.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DDGs,  Corn Ethanol,  Husker Ag,  Renewable Fuels Association,  


Attis Completes Sunoco Corn Ethanol Plant Acquisition (M&A)
Attis Industries,Sunoco LP
Date: 2019-06-05
Milton, Georgia-headquartered Attis Industries Inc is reporting completion of its $20 million acquisition of Sunoco LP's 100 million gpy corn ethanol plant and grain malting operation in Fulton, New York.

The transaction includes a 6-month transition services agreement as well as a 10-year offtake agreement for the ethanol produced at the facility.

According to an Attis release, "today, the United States consumes roughly 19 billion gallons of renewable fuel on an annual basis; however, Attis believes firmly that through the deployment of its innovative and transformative suite of green technologies, yearly production can nearly double while taking advantage of more carbon neutral feedstocks. Desperately needed innovation is required to realign existing production to the Renewable Fuel Standard's goal of 36 billion gallons by 2022." (Source: Attis Industries, Inc. , Website 3 June, 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, (678) 580-5661, www.attisind.com; Sunoco LP, www.sunocolp.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Corn Ethanol,  DDGs,  Attis Industries,  Ethanol,  Sunoco LP,  


CARB Certifies Edeniq Customers for Corn Fiber Ethanol (Ind Report)
Edeniq,Siouxland Ethanol
Date: 2019-05-15
Visalia, California-headquartered cellulosic ethanol process specialist Edeniq, Inc. reports the California Air Resources Board (CARB) has approved Siouxland Ethanol and Elite Octane as its first two Intellulose 2.0 customers for cellulosic ethanol production from corn kernel fiber.

Siouxland Ethanol, a 90 million gpy corn ethanol plant located in Jackson, Nebraska was certified on May 6 with a carbon intensity rating of 26.67 and Elite Octane, a 150 million gpy corn ethanol plant located in Atlantic, Iowa was certified on May 7 with a carbon intensity rating of 30.32. Using Intellulose 2.0, the two plants achieved average corn kernel fiber ethanol production of 3% of total production, nearly triple the average performance traditionally associated with the benefits of Intellulose 1.0 that regulatory agencies had approved.

Edeniq's Intellulose 2.0 technology typically achieves between 2 and 4.5 pct cellulosic ethanol production from the corn kernel fiber at existing corn ethanol plants without any capex requirements. The technology measures the amount of ethanol produced from multiple different molecules present in corn kernels and quantifies the individual contribution of each component. The technology builds on Intellulose 1.0, which measures the cellulosic ethanol produced from a single corn kernel component.

Seven Edeniq Intellulose 1.0 customers were previously approved by the U.S. EPA for D3 RIN generation and/or by CARB for low-CI corn kernel fiber ethanol production. (Source: Edeniq Inc., PR, 13 May, 2019) Contact: Edeniq Inc., Brian Thome, President and CEO, Lily Wachter, (559) 302-1777, lwachter@edeniq.com, www.edeniq.com; Siouxland Ethanol, LLC , Nick Bowdish, President and CEO www.siouxlandethanol.com; Elite Octane, www.eliteoctane.net; California Air Resources Board, Melanie Turner, Information Officer, (916) 322-2990, melanie.turner@arb.ca.gov, www.arb.ca.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News California Air Resources Board,  Corn Ethanol,  Edeniq,  Ethanol,  Siouxland Ethanol,  


Perdue Notes "Positive" Chinese Ethanol Tariff Talks (Ind. Report)

Date: 2019-04-10
"There have been conversations with China on reducing that tariff on ethanol, which would obviously be good for our domestic corn industry. While things look positive, it's never over till it's over with the Chinese." -- U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, 9 April, 2019

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue was commenting on the progress of his "positive" talks with China about reducing Beijing's 70 pct "retaliatory" tariff on U.S. ethanol products. In his comments, Perdue also noted that he wanted the EPA to more tightly control its use of small refinery "hardship" waivers that exempt plants from their obligation to blend biofuels like corn-based ethanol under the Renewable Fuel Standard. Perdue added that he'd discussed the matter with EPA chief Andrew Wheeler. (Source: Voice of America, NASDAQ, 9 April, Contact: U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, (202) 720-2791 -- general information, https://twitter.com/SecretarySonny, www.whitehouse.gov/people/sonny-perdue

More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  


USDA Study Shows Significant GHG Benefits of Ethanol Compared with Gasoline (Report Attached)
USDA
Date: 2019-04-03
The Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Corn Ethanol -- Assessing Recent Evidence, a new study from the USDA finds greenhouse gas emissions from corn-based ethanol are about 39 pct lower than gasoline. The study also states that when ethanol is refined at natural gas-powered refineries, the GHG emissions are even lower, around 43 pct below gasoline.

"These new findings provide further evidence that biofuels from America's heartland reduce greenhouse gases even more than we thought, and that our farmers and ethanol plants continue to become more efficient and effective," said Secretary Sonny Perdue. "Expanding the sale of E15 year-round will provide consumers with more choices when they fill up at the pump, including environmentally friendly fuel with decreased emissions. I appreciate EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler moving expeditiously to finalize the E-15 rule before the start of summer driving season," Perdue added.

The study, led by Dr. Jan Lewandrowski of USDA's Office of the Chief Economist, and published in the journal Biofuels, supports findings of other research that ethanol has a significantly better GHG profile than previously estimated.

The study attributes much of these additional benefits to revised estimates of the impacts of land-use change as a result of demand for ethanol. Where previous estimates anticipated farmers bringing additional land into production as a result of increased corn prices, recent analysis finds only modest increases in crop acreage. Additional improvements at ethanol refineries, combined with on-farm conservation practices that reduce GHG emissions, such as reduced tillage and cover crops, have further decreased emissions associated with corn ethanol. The study projects that with added improvements in refineries and on farms, a reduction of over 70 pct in lifecycle emissions is possible by 2022.

The study is available for download HERE. Additional information on the greenhouse gas profile of biofuels is available at www.usda.gov/oce/oeep. (Source: USDA, 2 April, 2019) Contact: USDA, www.usda.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News USDA,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  Carbon Emissions,  GHGs,  


Biofuels Contribute $5Bn to Iowa's GDP, says Report (Ind. Report)
IRFA
Date: 2019-03-22
Contribution of the Renewable Fuels Industry to the Economy of Iowa, a recent study commissioned by the Iowa Renewable Fuels Association (IRFA) has found that biofuels contribute over $5 billion to the Hawkeye State's GDP, equivalent to 3 pct. The report also found the biofuels industry supports over 48,000 jobs in the state and adds over $2.5 billion to Iowa household incomes.

The report was authored by John Urbanchuck, managing partner at ABF Economics.

As we reported on 23 Jan., 2019, 2018 was a record year for ethanol production in Iowa with the state's ethanol production facilities producing 4.35 billion gallons -- 150 million gallons more than 2017 and 150 million gallons short of capacity. The Hawkeye State produces about 27 pct of total U.S. ethanol production. Iowa's two cellulosic ethanol and 41 corn ethanol plants use more than 1.3 billion bpy of corn. Iowa also produced a record 365 million gallons of biodiesel in 2018 (Source: Iowa Renewable Fuels Assoc., Mar., 2019) Contact: IRFA, Monte Shaw, Exec. Dir., info@IowaRFA.org, (515) 252-6249, www.iowarfa.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Iowa Biofuel,  Monte Shaw,  IRFA,  


BiochemUSA to Develop $422 Mn Indian Biorefinery (Int'l Report)
BiochemUSA,Petron Scientech
Date: 2019-02-01
The Times of India is reporting Petron Scientech Inc.'s subsidiary BiochemUSA has inked a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the government of Gujarat to develop and construct a $422.9 million ethanol, biodiesel, corn oil and distillers dried grains (DDGs) livestock feed biorefinery in Gujarat State.

The plant , which is expected to use approximately 1 million metric tpy of corn and 300,000 tpy of biomass, is reportedly slated to come online within 24 months. (Source: Petron Scientech, Times of India, 30 Jan., 2019) Contact: BioChem USA, www.biochemusa.com; Petron Scientech Inc ., www.petronscientech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Petron Scientech,  Corn Ethanol,  DDGs,  Biodiesel,  


Midwest Perennial Grasses Biofuel Feedstocks Investigated (R&D)
University of Minnesota
Date: 2019-01-30
In ongoing research to discover the ideal growing conditions for alternative biofuels feedstocks, researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Biological Science are investigating the advantages and environmental implications of perennial grasses on abandoned and degraded agricultural land on the US upper mid-western prairies.

A potential benefit of perennial grasses is tied to their deep root systems. According to researchers, deeper root systems -- as opposed to those seen in annual crops like corn -- are able to store large amounts of carbon below ground that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. However, because perennial grasses on marginal lands can have low yields due to less fertile soil, researchers examined ways to maximize growth of the grasses without negative effects on the environment.

In the 10-year study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers utilized 36 plots at an abandoned agricultural site in the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve to plant 32 species of prairie and savanna plants that are native to Minnesota. In 2007, researchers divided the plots into several groups and assigned them a combination of two treatments: water addition (i.e., irrigated or non-irrigated) and nitrogen fertilization (i.e., 0 g/m2, 7 g/m2, 14 g/m2). Over the next decade, researchers found that:

  • moderate treatments (irrigation and 7 g/m2 of nitrogen) had the best biomass yields and soil carbon storage, while having negligible effects on the stability, diversity and nutrient loss to groundwater;
  • compared with the control (non-irrigated and no additional nitrogen), moderate treatments resulted in almost twice the yield and soil carbon storage and -- if the plants were converted into bioenergy to displace fossil fuels -- it would result in twice the greenhouse gas savings;
  • compared with the moderate treatment, the more intensive treatment (irrigation and 14 g/m2 of nitrogen) had 30 percent lower greenhouse gas savings, 10 times greater nitrate leaching and 120 pct greater loss in plant diversity.

    Compared with corn ethanol, researchers found biomass yield from the best performing native prairie grasses was moderately lower -- six tons per hectare versus the average corn yield of eight tons per hectare in the U.S.. However, researchers found that because of lower nitrogen use and larger amounts of soil carbon storage, the native prairies would result in higher overall greenhouse gas savings when converted to bioenergy.

    The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research program and the Global Climate and Energy Project. (Source: University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences, PR, 28 Jan., 2019) Contact: College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota, Prof. David Tilman, Prof. Clarence Lehman, Lead Researcher, 612-625-5734 Fax: 612-624-6777, lehman@umn.edu, cbs.umn.edu; Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, www.cedarcreek.umn.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel Feedstock,  


  • Iowa Ethanol Production Breaks Record High (Ind. Report)
    Iowa Renewable Fuel Association
    Date: 2019-01-23
    In Iowa, 2018 is slated to go down as another record year for ethanol production with the state's ethanol production facilities producing 4.35 billion gallons -- 150 million gallons more than 2017 and 150 million gallons short of capacity. Iowa produces about 27 pct of total U.S. ethanol production. The Hawkeye State also produced a record 365 million gallons of biodiesel in 2018.

    Iowa's two cellulosic ethanol and 41 corn ethanol plants use more than 1.3 billion bpy of corn. (Source: Iowa Renewable Fuel Association, WHO13, 21 Jan., 2019) Contact: Iowa Renewable Fuel Association, Monte Shaw, info@IowaRFA.org, (515) 252-6249, https://iowarfa.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Cellulosic,  Corn Ethanol,  Iowa Ethanol,  Iowa Renewable Fuel Association ,  


    EPA Waivers Costly for Ethanol Ind., says Study (Ind Report)
    EPA "Hardship Waivers"
    Date: 2019-01-02
    According to a recently released University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) study, the US EPA's small refinery "hardship" waivers of their obligations under the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) could cost the ethanol industry nearly $20 billion annually.

    The study concludes that the small refinery waivers could account for as many as 4.6 billion gallons of domestic demand lost over the next six years, along with the hit to revenue. Conventional biofuel such as corn ethanol stands to fall in use, along with consumption of ethanol in flex fuels and mid-level blends, and wholesale ethanol prices could slip as much as 19 cents per gallon on average. The study also notes that U.S. ethanol consumption stands to drop 761 million gpy on average between 2018 and 2023 with a resulting decline in gross ethanol sales revenues, with an average of $3.3 billion lost per year. (Source: University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute, Transportation Today, 2018) Contact: University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute, (573) 884-4688, www.fapri.missouri.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News EPA,  "Hardship Waiver",  Ethanol Biofuel,  


    Ringneck's Onida Ethanol Plant Mar. Startup Expected (Ind. Report)
    Ringneck Energy
    Date: 2018-12-21
    Further to our October 13th, 2017 coverage, Ringneck Energy reports its building contractor, Fagen Inc., is near to completing its $150 million, corn ethanol plant near Onida, about 33 miles northeast of the South Dakota capitol city of Pierre. A stsrtup date of 1 March, 2019 is expected.

    When fully operational, the plant is expected to use about 29 million bpy of corn to produce 80 million gpy of ethanol, as well as 240,000 tpy of distillers grain(DDGs). (Source: Ringneck Energy, Capital Journal, 19 Dec., 2018)Contact: Ringneck Energy LLC, Walt Wendland, Pres., CEO, (605) 258-2900, walt@ringneckenergy.com, www.ringneckenergy.com; Fagen Inc., (320) 564-3324, www.fageninc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DDGs,  Fagen,  Ringneck Energy,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol,  


    EPA to Hold the Line on 2019 RFS Biofuel Blend Quotas (Ind. Report)
    RFS,Renewable Fuels Standatd
    Date: 2018-11-28
    Bloomberg is reporting the Trump administration will likely order refiners to use 15 billion gallons of corn ethanol and other conventional renewable fuels in 2019 despite oil industry pressure to lower the mandate, The slate of biofuel blending targets, which are expected to be released on Friday, are unlikely to placate biofuel and agricultural interests that have denounced the EPA's generous issuance of RFS "hardship" waivers to small refineries. To date, 15 refineries have reportedly applied for "hardship" waiver relief from the 2018 quotas.

    The EPA had proposed requiring refiners to blend 19.88 billion gallons of biofuels next year, a 3.1 pct increase over current quotas. That target included a 15 billion gallon quota for corn-based ethanol and other conventional renewable fuels, the maximum allowed under federal law and the same amount required in 2018. The agency also is set to finalize a 2020 requirement for using biodiesel, after proposing a 15.7 pct increase in the target.

    The EPA reportedly plans to establish new biofuel blending targets for 2020 through 2022 and is poised to lower congressional goals for cellulosic biofuels as part of the RFS "reset" process. (Source: EPA, Bloomberg, Farm Journal, 27 Nov., 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS news,  Biofuel Blend news,  Cellulosic news,  


    FS Bioenergia Breaks Ground on Brazilian Corn Ethanol Plant (Int'l)
    FS Bioenergia
    Date: 2018-11-14
    Following up on our 5th February report, FS Bioenergia reports construction is underway on its second corn-ethanol plant in Sorriso, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The new facility is expected to produce 530 million lpy (140 million gpy) of ethanol when fully operational in 2020. The company is also doubling the capacity of its 265-million lpy corn ethanol facility in Lucas do Rio Verde -- the country's first corn-ethanol facility.

    FS Bioenergia is a JV between U.S.-based Summit Agricultural Group and Fiagril Ltda of Brazil. (Source: FS Bioenergia, Pro Farmer, 12 Nov., 2018) Contact: FS Bioenergia, +55 65 3549-1500, www.fsbioenergia.com.br; Summit Agricultural Group, Bruce Rastetter, CEO, (515) 854-9820, www.summitag.com;

    More Low-Carbon Energy News FS Bioenergia,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  


    ICM Acquires Abengoa Bioenergy's Idle Kansas Biofuel Plant (M&A)
    Abengoa Bioenergy, ICM
    Date: 2018-10-03
    Colwich, Kansas based agricultural and renewable energy technology firm ICM reports it is acquiring the bankrupt Abengoa Bioenergy's Colwich corn ethanol facility for $3.1 million. The plant has been idle since late 2017.

    The facility processes up to 240,000 tpy of corn to produce roughly 25 million gpy of bioethanol and 70,000 tpy of DGS which is used for livestock feed. (Source: ICM, WMW, 2 Oct., 2018) Contact: ICM, (316) 796-0900, www.icminc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Abengoa Bioenergy,  Landfill Gas,  ICM,  


    Study says EPA Waivers Could Cost Ethanol Ind. $20 bln (Ind Report)
    EPA
    Date: 2018-09-12
    According to a recently released University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) study, the US EPA's small refinery "hardship" waivers of their obligations under the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) could cost the ethanol industry nearly $20 billion annually.

    The study concludes that the small refinery waivers could account for as many as 4.6 billion gallons of domestic demand lost over the next six years, along with the hit to revenue. Conventional biofuel such as corn ethanol stands to fall in use, along with consumption of ethanol in flex fuels and mid-level blends, and wholesale ethanol prices could slip as much as 19 cents per gallon on average.

    The study also found that U.S. ethanol consumption stands to drop 761 million gpy on average between 2018 and 2023 with a resulting decline in gross ethanol sales revenues, with an average of $3.3 billion lost per year.

    As previously reported, "hardship waivers" were intended for refineries producing 75,000 bpd or less and suffered "disproportionate economic hardship" from the costs of RFS compliance. The waiver frees the refineries from an obligation to provide the EPA with biofuels credits proving compliance. (Source: University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute, Transportation Today, 11 Sept., 2018) Contact: University of Missouri Food and Agriculture Policy Research Institute, (573) 884-4688, www.fapri.missouri.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Fuel Standard,  Hardship Waiver,  RFS,  EPA,  Ethanol,  EPA Hardship Waivers,  


    $4.7Bn Not Enough, Iowa Corn Growers Tell Trump (Ind. Report)
    USDA,Iowa Corn Growers
    Date: 2018-08-29
    The USDA has announced details of a $4.7 billion trade mitigation and aid package for farmers facing possible loses due to the Trump administration's tariffs and trade uncertainty. The aid package will provide some short-term relief, but as Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said, "it will not make farmers whole."

    Profitability is a huge concern for Iowa's corn farmers now facing the fifth consecutive year of declining farm incomes while facing high levels of uncertainty due to ongoing trade disputes and disruptions in the ethanol markets.

    The Iowa Corn Farmers Association's message to the Trump administration was clear -- "Corn farmers prefer to have market access to compete in a global marketplace, not rely on government assistance, for their livelihoods. Remove unnecessary trade barriers and restore our access to international markets." (Source: Iowa Corn Growers Association, PR, 27 Aug., 2018)Contact: Iowa Corn Growers Association, (515) 225-9242, www.iowacorn.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Corn,  USDA,  Corn Ethanol,  


    ACE Touts Low Carbon Corn Ethanol Benefits (Ind. Report)
    American Coalition for Ethanol
    Date: 2018-08-20
    The American Coalition for Ethanol (ACE) is reporting the release of its White Paper -- The Case for Properly Valuing the Low Carbon Benefits of Corn Ethanol.

    The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was enacted, in part, to drive innovation and production of low carbon biofuels that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and as a result the program has replaced 10 pct of petroleum in the U.S. transportation fleet with carbon-friendly fuel. However, the EPA has yet to update its original corn ethanol GHG assessments of a decade ago to reflect today's significant GHG reduction benefits, the report says.

    "The ACE White Paper makes a compelling case that lifecycle GHG modeling must reflect the latest science if low carbon fuel programs are to achieve their desired results. The Great Plains Institute agrees there is a huge opportunity for existing corn ethanol plants to lower their carbon footprint through innovative technology and updated lifecycle modeling," said Brendan Jordan, VP of the Great Plains Institute.

    Download the full The Case for Properly Valuing the Low Carbon Benefits of Corn Ethanol White Paper HERE. (Source: American Coalition for Ethanoll, Aug., 2018) Contact: American Coalition for Ethanol, Brian Jennings, CEO, Ron Lamberty, VP, (605) 334-3381, https://ethanol.org; Great Plains Institute, (512) 278-7150, www.betterenergy.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News American Coalition for Ethanol,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethano,  ,  


    Six States Produce 72 pct of U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Ind. Report)
    US EIA
    Date: 2018-08-17
    According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Iowa, Nebraska, Illinois, Minnesota, Indiana and South Dakota in that order produced 72 pct of the country's total fuel ethanol in 2016 -- 265 million barrels of the total U.S. production amount of 367 million barrels. The top six states are also among the top 10 U.S. producers of corn, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, according to the USDA.

    Between 2006 and 2016, fuel ethanol production more than doubled after the Energy Policy Act of 2005 created the Renewable Fuel Standard. By 2010, most of the gasoline sold in the U.S. was blended with 10 pct ethanol.

    Among the top six ethanol producing states, Iowa can produce more than 102 million bpy of fuel ethanol for about 19 pct of total U.S. ethanol production. Nebraska's production capacity of more than 50 million barrels of fuel ethanol is the second-highest, followed by Illinois at up to 40 million bpy. Minnesota has an ethanol production capacity of 28 million bpy followed by Indiana and South Dakota at 27 million bpy of ethanol annually. (Source: US EIA, Tax, Business & Politics, 15 Aug., 2018) Contact: US EIA, www.eia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  EIA,  


    Gevo Adding Shockwave at Luverne Ethanol Plant (Ind. Report)
    GEVO,Shockwave LLC
    Date: 2018-08-17
    Englewood, Colorado-bases isobutanol producer Gevo, Inc. reports it has entered into two separate operating leases and service agreements with Des Moines-based Shockwave LLC to install Shockwave's Thermodynamic Corn Fractionation Process as well as related technology and equipment at Gevo's Luverne, Minnesota production facility.

    Shockwave is financing the equipment required for this multi-million dollar project and is providing certain performance guarantees for the Shockwave Process. The Shockwave Process is expected to cut production costs and improve profitability at the Luverne Facility by increasing the number and value of feed and protein products, producing corn oil for food use, and helping to lower the facility's overall carbon footprint. The Shockwave Process is expected to be operational in Q1,2019.

    Shockwave's Thermodynamic Corn Fractionation Process, is a front-end corn fractionation platform that uses high velocity air and pressure changes to fractionate solid materials, providing an innovative, low-cost approach to separating the corn kernel into the various fractions including a higher-starch feed for fermentation as well as germ and fiber (Source: GEVO, PR, 14 Aug., 2018) Contact: Shockwave LLC, Joe Fitzgerald, Founder and President, (515) 266-0904, www.shockwave.com; :GEVO, Pat Gruber, CEO, (303) 858-3358, info@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Isobutanol,  Biofuel,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol,  


    Attis Industries, DGIST Announce Renewable Fuel Research, Licensing Agreement (Ind. Report)
    Attis Industries
    Date: 2018-08-10
    Milton, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc., a diversified innovation and technology holding company, is reporting the execution of a sponsored research and exclusive license agreement with South Korea's Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), to develop and commercialize processes that use sunlight to efficiently promote conversion of CO2 and water into hydrocarbon fuels.

    The agreement build on the Company's and DGIST's prior work, Attis expects to collaborate with DGIST and provide the adjacent research and other resources needed to increase conversion efficiencies even further, while expanding process tolerances and capabilities. The Company's early-stage commercialization targets include commercially viable production of methane for direct use and conversion into methanol, synthesis gas for conversion into Fischer-Tropsch fuels, and ethane for conversion into polyethylene and ethanol. Each target has extreme significance to the Company's biorefinery goals, including its plans to consolidate existing renewable fuel production assets, such as first generation corn ethanol plants. (Source: Attis Industries, PR, Aug., 2018) Contact: Attis Industries, Chris Kennedy, (678) 580-5661, ckennedy@attisind.com, www.attisind.com; Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Dae Im Kang, VP R&D, +82-53-785-7000, dikang@dgist.ac.kr, en.dgist.ac.kr

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries ,  CO2,  Renewable Fuel,  


    Marquis Considering Bluffs Wisc. Ethanol Plant Location (Ind. Report)
    Marquis Energy
    Date: 2018-08-08
    Hennepin, Wisconsin-headquartered Marquis Energy LLC is reportedly planning construction of a corn ethanol plant in Bluffs, Scott County, Wisconsin. Subject to permitting, the plant could come into production in 2020.

    Founded in 2008, Marquis Energy began as a 100 million gpy ethanol facility and by 2015 was the largest dry-mill ethanol facility in the United States, according to the company's website. The company presently has a production capacity of about 1 million gpd of fuel-grade ethanol. Marquis Energy also has a facility in Necedah, Wisconsin. (Source: Marquis Energy , Journal-Courier, 3 Aug., 2018) Contact: Marquis Energy, Tom Marquis, VP, (815) 925-7300, inquiries@marquisenergy.co, www.marquisenergy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Marquis Energy,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol ,  


    POET's Planned Shelbyille Ethanol Plant Advances (Ind. Report)
    POET
    Date: 2018-07-25
    In the Hoosier State, the Shelbyville Plan Commission reports it has unanimously approved POET Biorefining's proposed corn ethanol plant site development plan on W 300 North highway. The project still needs an Indiana Department of Environmental Management air permit to proceed.

    According to POET, the plant will generate nearly $3 million per for farmers, create 45 new jobs and have a $200 million economic impact on the area. (Source: Fox, 24 July,2018) Contact: POET, Jeff Broin, Pres., (605) 965-2200, www.poet.com; Shelbyville Plan Commission, (317) 392-6338, www.cityofshelbyvillein.com/event/plan-commission

    More Low-Carbon Energy News POET,  Ethanol,  


    Iowa Gov. Comments on RFS (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Iowa Gov. Kim Reynols
    Date: 2018-07-20
    "Our (Iowa) farmers need some positive news. It's our hope new EPA leadership will adhere to promises made by President Trump to protect the RFS and grow demand for our homegrown fuels. It's time to end the domestic demand destruction by undermining of the RFS. It's time to open up the market for higher ethanol blends, E15 and above, to be sold year round. Unfortunately, the proposed RFS rule before us does neither of those things.

    "On the surface, the numbers appear positive. Conventional biofuels like corn ethanol are set at 15 billion gallons and cellulosic ethanol, biodiesel and total advanced levels are all proposed to increase. But the EPA's decision to grant numerous small-refinery waivers and to not reallocate those volumes as the law envisioned, undercuts the 15 billion gallon level.

    "These small refinery waivers have created the backdoor destruction of 1.5 billion gallons of ethanol demand. That means 500 million bushels of corn will be left in the bins, putting added pressure on already low commodity prices. Every RFS category is reduced by these small refiner waiver exemptions. In fact, it almost wipes out the proposed increase for advanced biofuels.

    "And the 15 billion gallons ethanol number is in reality more like 13.5 billion. To put that in context, nearly 1 billion gallons less ethanol than was blended into U.S. gasoline in 2017. That is not progress. That is not the letter or spirit of the RFS. And that is not what President Trump promised the voters of Iowa. This issue must be addressed. The criteria for exemptions must be reasonable and transparent, and any exemptions must be reallocated to the remaining obligated parties. Correcting the small refinery exemption excesses need to be in the final rule. 15 billion gallons must mean 15 billion gallons.

    "The former head )Pruitt) of the EPA often said that the decision to allow year-round sales of E15 was a matter of authority, not policy. The EPA has publicly acknowledged it has the authority, so it's time to act. It's also time for the EPA to stop ignoring a court order to restore 500 million gallons of conventional ethanol demand that was illegally waived by the Obama Administration for the 2016 compliance year." (Source: Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R), 18 July, 2018) Contact: Office of Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, https://governor.iowa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  RFS,  Ethanol Blend,  Hardship Waiver,  E15,  


    Elite Octane Iowa Ethanol Plant Production Underway (Ind. Report)
    Elite Octane
    Date: 2018-07-05
    Iowa-headquartered Elite Octane Inc. is reporting its new ethanol plant in Atlantic, Iowa, began crushing corn this week, and that dried distillers grains (DDGs) for livestock feed sales from the plant to area livestock feedlots have already weighed on the regional market.

    According to the company website, the new plant's ethanol production capacity is over 120 million gpy, which could translate to around 380,000 tpy of DDgs. (Source: Elite Octane, Uk AgroConsult, July 04, 2018) Contact: Elite Octane, Nick Bowdish, Pres., CEO, (712) 254-9850, www.eliteoctane.net

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DDG,  Elite Octane,  Ethanol,  Corn Ethanol,  


    Attis Ind. Acquires Greenshift Clean Tech Licensing Business (M&A)
    Attis Industries,GreenShift
    Date: 2018-06-01
    Milton, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc. is reporting the May 25th completion of an $18 million series of transactions with Alpharetta, Georgia-based GreenShift Corporation and the consequent acquisition of an 80 pct stake in FLUX Carbon LLC, a new investment management JV company.

    FLUX Carbon manages an existing engineering and licensing business, and holds the rights to several proprietary, patented, and patent-pending technologies including methods to increase the efficiency and profitability of corn ethanol production facilities by intercepting and processing corn ethanol co-products into value-added renewable offsets for fossil fuel-derived products.

    About a third of the corn processed by dry mill ethanol plants is converted into ethanol. Another third is emitted to the atmosphere as a relatively pure stream of carbon dioxide. The final third is dried and sold asDDGs, a commercial animal feed, according to a release. (Source: Attis Industries, Inc., PR, 31 May, 2018) Contact: Attis Industries, Jeff Cosman, CEO, (678) 580-5661, www.attisind.com; GreenShift, 770.886.2734, www.greenshift.com; FLUX Carbon, 770-886-2734

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Corn Oil,  Ethanol,  Attis Industries,  GreenShift ,  


    Colwich, Kansas Ethanol Plant Construction Underway (Ind. Report)
    Element LLC,The Andersons,ICM Holdings
    Date: 2018-05-23
    Following up on our March 9 coverage, Element LLC, a collaboration between ICM Holdings and The Andersons, Inc. reports construction is underway on a new $175 million corn ethanol plant in Colwich, Kansas.

    The plant, which will produce corn oil, ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, DDGs for livestock feed is slated to open next spring. (Source: Wichita Eagle, AP, ICM, Others, 22 May, 2018)Contact: Elements LLC, (316) 796-0900, www.icminc.com; The Andersons Inc, (419) 893-5050, www.andersonsethanol.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Element LLC,  The Andersons,  ICM Holdings,  


    N.D. Ethanol Plants Testing Syngenta's Enogen Corn (Ind. Report)
    Tharaldson Energy,Syngenta,AgEnergy Group
    Date: 2018-05-21
    AgWeek is reporting corn ethanol producers in North Dakota are at different stages of incorporating Minnetonka, Minnesota-based Syngenta's patented Enogen corn into their mix. Enogen corn has enzymes genetically engineered into the kernels. Ethanol plants normally purchase enzymes to help turn corn starch into sugar as part of the fermenting process.

    Enogen is classified as an "identity preserved crop" and must either go to the ethanol plants that contract for it or be used as livestock feed.

    The product is presently being used or tested in over 30 ethanol plants nationwide, including Tharaldson Energy at Casselton, N.D., and Midwest AgEnergy Group plants at Spiritwood, N.D., and Underwood, N.D. (Source: INFORUM, AgWeek, 20 May, 2018) Contact: Syngenta, Jack Bernens, Enogen Technology Leader, (202) 737-6520, www.syngenta.com; Enogen, (877) 436-0436, www.enogen.net; Tharaldson Energy, www.tharaldsonethanol.com; MidwestAgEnergy Group, www.midwestagenergygroup.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Tharaldson Energy,  Syngenta,  Enogen,  Corn,  Ethanol Corn Ethanol,  AgEnergy Group ,  


    Cellulosics Beat Corn Ethanol for Climate Impact, says Study (R&D)
    Colorado State University
    Date: 2018-03-16
    A new study from Colorado State University is breathing new life into the concept of biofuels produced from native switchgrass as a better feedstock than corn and other cereal and oilseed crops for biofuel production.

    The researchers used modelling to simulate various growing scenarios, and found a climate footprint ranging from -11 to 10 grams of carbon dioxide per megajoule -- the standard way of measuring greenhouse gas emissions. By way of comparison, the impact of using gasoline results in 94 grams of carbon dioxide per megajoule. According to John Field, research scientist at the Natural Resource Ecology Lab at CSU, "What we saw with switchgrass is that you're actually storing carbon in the soil ... you're building up organic matter and sequestering carbon." "They (switchgrass) don't require a lot of fertilizer or irrigation. Farmers don't have to plow up the field every year to plant new crops, and they're good for a decade or longer," Field added.

    The study was published online Feb. 19 in Nature Energy. (Source: Colorado State University, Manitoba Co-operator, 12 Mar., 2018) Contact: Colorado State University Natural Resource Ecology Lab, John Field, (970) 491-1604, www.ecology.colostate.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Cellulosic,  Swithgrass,  Biofuel,  Biofuel Feedstock,  


    Notable Quote -- Renewable Fuel Standard and Corn Ethanol
    Ethanol
    Date: 2018-03-14
    "The (Renewable Fuels Standard) law hasn't worked out as we intended. We've now had more than a decade of experience with it (corn ethanol) and it had the best of intentions. But it has turned out to be a well-intended flop.

    "It actually doesn't cut down on greenhouse gas emissions, it expands them. It's had a significant impact on over-planting in fragile areas of the corn belt. It has had significant impacts on small engines. And it's also had a significant impact on feed prices -- and there is a lot of evidence it has increased the cost of food." -- Rep. Peter Welch (D-VT) NOQ Report, 12 Mar., 2018 Contact: Rep. Peter Welch, (888) -605-7270, https://welch.house.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS,  Corn Ethanol,  


    Oregon Lawmakers Considering Ethanol Mandate Reforms (Reg & Leg)

    Date: 2018-03-14
    In Salem, Oregon legislators are considering The GREENER Fuels Act, a bill to reform the biofuels mandate and gradually reduce the amount of biofuels such as corn ethanol in the nation's fuel supply.

    It would also stop more land from being converted into biofuel sources and invest over $10 billion to restore lost fish and wildlife habitat over the next decade. Nationally, more than 7 million acres have been plowed to make way for biofuel feed stock crops such as corn and soy since the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)standard came into force in 2007.

    According to National Wildlife Federation Pres. Collin O'Mara, the legislation could correct a mistake Congress made 10 years ago. The bill would eliminate a loophole that allows older biofuel plants to bypass climate pollution standards, and would incentivize truly renewable biofuels, such as those derived from farm waste and plant cellulose.

    Download the GREENER Fuels Act. HERE. (Source: Public News Service Oregon, 12 Mar., 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Biofuel,  RFS,  


    NCGA Claims Negative Consequences of RFS Changes (Ind. Report)
    RFS,National Corn Growers Associatiom
    Date: 2018-03-12
    Following up on our February 28th coverage, National Corn Growers Assn. (NCGA) president Kevin Skunes on March 1 commented as follows on the Trump White House meetings aimed at reaching a compromise to proposed changes to the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS): "For corn farmers, the question for the ongoing White House discussions is simple -- what is the problem you are trying to solve? According to EPA, refiners don't have a problem. "EPA concluded in November that refiners are able to recover the cost of RINs through the prices they receive for refined products and that RIN values are not causing economic harm to refiners.

    "For farmers, ethanol blending equals corn demand. Farmers care about RIN values, not because we want them to be high, but because we want the RIN market mechanism to work freely to incentivize (ethanol) blending. Increased blending will, in turn, lower RIN values, exactly the way the RFS is intended to work. Government manipulation of the RIN market, on the other hand, disrupts the incentive to blend."

    An Iowa State study concluded that: a leading Renewable Fuel Standard reform proposal considered by policymakers would allow E15 sales throughout the year and implement a cap on D6 RIN prices between $0.10 to $0.20/RIN; while year-round sales of E15 would encourage retailers to sell the fuel, capping D6 RIN prices would reduce consumption of E15 and E85: a cap on D6 RIN prices between $0.10/gal to $0.20/gal would likely reduce the effective ethanol mandate from 15 billion gallons to about 14.3 billion gallons in 2018; and unless increased ethanol exports compensate for the reduced mandate, corn prices would decrease under the proposal's D6 RIN price cap. (Source: NCGA, Farm Equipment, 9 Mar., 2018) Contact: NCGA, (202) 326-0644, www.ncga.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NCGA,  Corn Ethanol,  Ethanol Blends,  RFS,  


    ICM, The Andersons JV Planning KS Ethanol Plant (Ind. Report)
    The Andersons ,ICM
    Date: 2018-03-09
    The Andersons Inc and Kansas-headquartered grain ethanol technology specialist ICM Inc. are reporting a joint venture project called Element LLC. The JV will construct and operate a 70 million gpy, dry mill ethanol plant adjacent to ICM's headquarters in Colwich.

    Construction is expected to get underway early this year for start-up in spring of 2019. The facility will feature heat and power generation from waste wood, high protein distillers dried grains (DDGs), cellulosic ethanol production from corn kernel fiber and advanced corn oil production.

    The project's ethanol output is expected to be marketed in California and other emerging low carbon markets. (Source: The Andersons, ICM, Mar., 2018) Contact: The Andersons Inc, (419) 893-5050, www.andersonsinc.com; ICM, (316) 796-0900, www.icminc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Dry Mill Corn Ethanol,  The Andersons ,  ICM,  Ethanol,  


    Vertimass Wins New Uses for Field Corn as Feedstock for Sustainable Chemicals Challenge (Ind. Report)
    Vertimass, NCGA
    Date: 2018-03-07
    The National Corn Growers Association named Irvine, California-headquartered Vertimass LLC as one of six awardees of the Consider Corn Challenge: New Uses for Field Corn as Feedstock for Making Sustainable Chemicals Competition.

    Vertimass believes their technology of converting sustainable ethanol into fungible gasoline, diesel, jet fuel blend stocks and the chemical building blocks benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) can substantially increase corn demand in the US. This innovative technology eliminates the ethanol blend wall that currently limits ethanol use and allows for further expansion of renewable fuels and chemicals while maintaining a low greenhouse gas footprint.

    According to Vertimass, "This innovative technology will be fully applicable to conversion of ethanol from cellulosic biomass such as agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops and sugars into BTEX and hydrocarbon fuels as it is to corn ethanol." (Source: Vertimass LLC, PR, 5 Mar., 2018) Contact: Vertimass, Charles Wyman, CEO, John Hannon, COO, (949) 417-4307, www.vertimass.com; : NCGA, (202) 326-0644, www.ncga.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NCGA,  Vertimass,  Corn,  Ethanol,  Biofuel Feedstock,  


    Corn Consumption for Ethanol up in December, 2017 -- USDA Report Attached (Ind. Report)
    USDA
    Date: 2018-02-14
    The USDA has released the February edition of its Grain Crushings and Co-Products Production report, announcing corn use for fuel alcohol production reached 487 million bushels in December, up 2 pct from November and up 3 pct when compared to December 2016. Corn consumed in December for dry milling fuel production and wet milling fuel production was 90.2 pct and 9.8 pct, respectively.

    Total corn consumed for alcohol and other uses reached 538 million bushels in December, up 2 pct from November and 2 pct from December 2016.

    Access the full report HERE. (Source: USDA, Feb., 2018) Contact: USDA,www.usda.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News USDA,  Corn,  Corn Ethanol,  


    Meridian, Generex Seal Corn Ethanol Byproducts Deal (Ind. Report)
    Meridian Waste Solutions,Attis Innovations
    Date: 2018-02-12
    Further to our Jan. 12, coverage, Atlanta-based Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc. reports it has inked a strategic partnership with Alpharette, Georgia-based Genarex LLC, to develop a range of agricultural waste based bioadditives for the plastics market.

    According to Meridian, the US corn ethanol industry produces about 50 million tpy of distillers dried grains(DDGs) which Genarex's technology converts into a polymerized material branded as Bylox. This material is claimed to have a high value as a functional filler in numerous plastic formulations.

    Attis Innovations, a wholly owned subsidiary of Meridian Waste Solutions Inc., recovers lignin from the byproduct stream of biomass processing industries, such as pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol. The recovered lignin is said to be unique in that it is a melt flowing biomaterial that is low cost and acts as a polymerized biofiller in applications such as plastics, adhesives and transportation fuels. .(Source: Meridian, WMW, 10 Feb., 2018) Contact: Meridian Waste Solutions, Jeff Cosman, CEO, (917) 658-7878, www.amsnt.comwww.MWSinc.com; Attis, www.attisinnovations.com; Genarex LLC, (470) 253-1616, info@generex.com, https://ca.linkedin.com/company/genarex-inc, www.generex.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Genarex,  Meridian Waste Solutions,  Bioplastic,  Ethanol,  Attis Innovations,  

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