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TEP Touts Clean Energy Expansion Plan (Ind. Report)
Tucson Electric Power
Date: 2020-06-29
Tucson Electric Power (TEP) is reporting plans to provide more than 70 pct of its power from wind and solar resources as part of a cleaner energy portfolio that will reduce carbon emissions 80 pct by 2035.

The 15-year 2020 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) calls for a dramatic expansion of wind and solar power resources, supported by efficient natural gas fired generators and energy storage systems the retirement of TEP's remaining coal-fired power plants over the next 12 years. Key IRP elements include:

  • 2,457 MW of new wind and solar power systems, including 457 MW that will be coming online over the next year.

  • 1,400 MW of new energy storage systems.

  • A proposal to ramp down and ultimately retire two units at the coal fired Springerville Generating Station in 2027 and 2032.

  • Eliminating the use of surface water for power generation and a 70 pc treduction in groundwater use.

  • Continued support for energy efficiency programs to reduce usage and peak power demands.

    TEP's CO2 emission reduction goal was developed in partnership with the University of Arizona's Institute of the Environment with input from a diverse group of customers, community leaders, local government representatives and environmental advocates. The target represents TEP's fair share of worldwide efforts to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius under the 2015 Paris Agreement. TEP's plan would reduce its CO2 emissions by 80 pct, according to the release.

    Download the TEP 2020 Integrated Resource Plan, HERE. (Source: TEP, PR, 26 June, 2020) Contact: TEP, Joseph Barrios , (520) 884-3725, jbarrios@tep.com, www.tep.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Tucson Electric Power,  Renewable Energ,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


  • TEP Plans 80 pct Carbon Emissions Cut by 2035 (Ind. Report)
    Tucson Electric Power
    Date: 2020-06-29
    In Arizona, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) is reporting plans to provide more than 70 pct of its power from wind and solar resources as part of a cleaner energy portfolio that will reduce carbon emissions 80 pct by 2035. The utility's 15-year 2020 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) calls for a dramatic expansion of wind and solar power resources, increased energy storage systems and energy efficiency and the retirement of TEP's remaining two coal-fired power plants in 2027 and 2032. The changes are expected to avoid more than 50 million tons of CO2 emissions over the next 15 years.

    TEP's CO2 emission reduction goal was developed in partnership with the University of Arizona's Institute of the Environment with input from a diverse group of customers, community leaders, local government representatives and environmental advocates. The target represents TEP's fair share of worldwide efforts to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius under the 2015 Paris Agreement. TEP's plan would reduce its CO2 emissions by 80 pct, according to the release. (Source: TEP, PR, 26 June, 2020) Contact: TEP, Joseph Barrios , (520) 884-3725, jbarrios@tep.com, www.tep.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Tucson Electric Power,  Paris Climate Agreement,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Northern Ireland GHG Statistics Show Steady Decrease (Int'l.)
    Northern Ireland
    Date: 2020-06-24
    In the UK, the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) recently released statistical bulletin on greenhouse gas emissions for Northern Ireland (NI) outlines slight decreases for period 1990-2018.

    In 2018, Northern Ireland's greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be 19.4 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent -- a decrease of 2 pct compared to 2017. The longer term trend showed a decrease of 20 pct compared to the base year 1990.

    The largest sectors in terms of emissions in 2018 were agriculture at 27 pct, transportation with 23 pct, and power generation at 15 pct. The largest decreases, in terms of tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e), were in the energy supply, waste management and residential sectors.

    The decreases were driven by improvements in energy efficiency, fuel switching from coal to natural gas, which became available in the late 1990s, and the introduction of methane capture and oxidation systems in landfill management. Northern Ireland accounted for 4 pct of UK greenhouse gas emissions in 2018.

    Details are HERE. (Source: DAERA, Farming Life,23 June, 2020) Contact: DAERA, www.dera-ni.gov.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News GHGs,  Greenhouse Gas,  Climate Change,  


    Blue Flint Ethanol CO2 Storage Project Funded (Ind. Report)
    Blue Flint Ethanol
    Date: 2020-06-22
    The North Dakota Industrial Commission reports it will invest $3.4 million on a project to investigate the suitability of the geology around the Coal Creek Power Plant in Underwood, North Dakota for underground CO2 storage. The Lignite Energy Council also approved the investment. The Coal Creek plant is slated for closure in 2022.

    The $7 million project was proposed by Blue Flint Ethanol, also of Underwood. The ethanol plant uses the CO2 in its processing of corn. (Source: Prairie Public Broadcasting News, 22 June, 2020) Contact: Lignite Energy Council, Jason Bohrer, Exec. Dir., 701-258-7117, www.lignite.com; Blue Flint Ethanol -- MidWest Ag Energy, 701-442-7500, 701-442-7514, www.midwestagenergy.com/fccp-blue-flint-19634; Blue Flint Ethanol, Midwest AgEnergy, Jeff Zueger, CEO, (701) 442-7500/(7010 251-3900, www.midwestagenergygroup.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Flint Ethanol,  COs,  CCS,  


    Xcel Advancing $3Bn Solar, Wind Projects Plans (Ind. Report)
    Xcel Energy
    Date: 2020-06-19
    Xcel Energy is proposing to accelerate nearly $3 billion in spending on new large renewable-energy projects, including a new solar plant in Becker that would be at least four times larger than Minnesota's current largest solar array.

    Xcel would also speed up the planned repowering of four older wind farms with new turbines and other new equipment at a projected cost of $1 billion to $1.4 billion. The wind farm repowering, which hed been previously scheduled for the late 2020s, would allow Xcel to take advantage of federal tax credits.

    Xcel would also be able to use federal tax credits for a 450-MW solar plant, which would cost up to $650 million and be located next to the company's coal-fired plant in Becker. Xcel had been planning to add 3,000 MW of new solar power on line 2026 through 2030 as its coal plants are shutdown.

    Xcels' push to advance its renewables projects is in response to the Minnesota PUC's call for the state's electric and gas utilities to "assist in Minnesota's economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic." (Source: Xcel Energy, Star Tribune, June, 2020) Contact: Xcel Energy, Christopher Clark, Pres. for Minnesota and the Dakotas, www.xcelenergy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Xcel Energy,  Wind,  Renewable Energy,  solar,  


    Platte River Retiring Coal Plant Ahead of Schedule (Ind. Report)
    Platte River
    Date: 2020-06-19
    In Fort Collins, Colorado, not-for-profit wholesale electricity generation and transmission provider The Platte River Power Authority today announced that its 280-MW coal fired Rawhide Unit 1 generating resource will cease producing electricity by 2030, 16 years before its planned retirement date.

    The upcoming shut-down of the 1984-vintage unit is in line with Platte River's 2018 Resource Diversification Policy calling for a 100 pct non-carbon energy mix by 2030. It also supports Colorado's regulatory timelines for a non-carbon future. (Source: Platte River Power Authority, Website,16 June, 2020) Contact: Platte River Power Authority, www.prpa.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Platte River,  Coal,  Carbon Emissions,  


    UK Power Generators Go 2 Months Without Burning Coal (Int'l. Report)
    UK National Grid
    Date: 2020-06-15
    In the UK, National Grid is reporting Britain has completed two months without burning coal to generate electricity. The last time coal was burned at any of Britain's four coal-fired power stations was April 10, 2020, according to the National Grid, the utility company.

    The UK government has pledged to close all coal-powered energy generation sites by 2024. (Source: National Grid, UK Business Insider, 12 June, 2020) Contact: UK National Grid, www.nationalgrid.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal news,  UK National Grid news,  


    Japanese Carbon Capture Tech to be Tested in Wyoming (Ind. Report)
    Kawasaki Heavy Industries
    Date: 2020-06-15
    The state of Wyoming, Japan Coal Energy Center (JCOAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries are reporting an agreement to jointly advance a carbon capture test project to be conducted at the Wyoming Integrated Test Center at the Dry Fork Station power plant. The tests will cover JCOAL and Kawasaki's novel amines -- chemical compounds that naturally attract carbon dioxide -- use in carbon capture. The project is now under construction.

    JCOAL operates under the supervision of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan and is supported by more than 120 member coal-related businesses, including Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems, Nippon Steel and Toshiba. The organization works to promote overall coal activities, from coal mining to the field of coal utilization, toward a stable energy supply, sustainable economic growth and the reduction of the global environment emissions. (Source: Wyoming News Exchange, Laramie Boomerang, 12 June, 2020) Contact: Wyoming Integrated Test Center, 307-635-3573, info@wyomingitc.org, www.wyomingitc.org; JCOAL, www.jcoal.or.jp › eng; Kawasaki Heavy Industries, www.global.kawaski.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Kawasaki Heavy Industries,  JCOAL,  CCS,  Carbon Capture,  ,  


    Poland's Carbon Emissions Reductions Analyzed (Int'l. Report)
    Poland Carbon Emissions
    Date: 2020-06-15
    U.S.-based global management consultancy McKinsey & Company is reporting Poland is able to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 91 pct and increase carbon uptake just enough to compensate for the remaining 9 pct of 2017 levels at a cost of roughly €380 billion.

    Poland's emissions arise mainly from: industry --22 pct; transportation --15 pct; buildings -- 11 pct; agriculture -- 11 percent; and power production 38 pct. Approx. 77 pct of the county's electric power is from coal fired stations. To achieve climate neutrality, the share of coal in Poland's energy mix must be reduced by almost 95 pct. and the share of renewable energy would have to be increased by 80 pct, according to the report. (Source: McKinsey & Company, Warsaw Business Journal, 14 June, 2020) Contact: McKinsey & Company, www.mckinsey.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  


    Ocean Renewables Touted as Climate Change Solution (Ind. Report)
    Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition
    Date: 2020-06-12
    The attached report from the Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition's (OREAC) Ocean Panel has found that ocean-based renewable energy, such as offshore wind, floating solar, tidal and wave power, could meet nearly 10 pct of the global annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions needed to remain on a Paris-compliant 1.5 degrees C pathway in 2050.

    The report estimates that up to 85 pct of this decarbonization potential will come from offshore wind. 1,400 GW of offshore wind would power one-tenth of global electricity demand while saving over 3 billion tpy of CO2 -- equal to taking 800 million cars off the road.

    OREAC is spearheaded by Orsted and Equinor, and includes other major players in the global offshore wind industry: CWind, Global Marine Group, JERA, MHI Vestas, MingYang Smart Energy, Mainstream Renewable Power, Shell, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy, TenneT, and GE Renewable Energy. Additional partner organisations include Global Wind Energy Council, World Resources Institute, UN Global Compact, the Chinese Wind Energy Association and Ocean Energy Systems.

    Download the OREAC The Ocean as a Solution to Climate Change report HERE. (Source: OREAC, PR, reve, June, 2020) Contact: OREAC, www.oceanrenewable.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition,  Ocean Energy,  Renewable Energy,  Wave Energy,  Tidal EnergyCarbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    UK Climate Transition Global Equity Fund Launched (Int'l. Report)
    Aviva Investors
    Date: 2020-06-12
    In the UK, London-based Aviva Investors has launched the Climate Transition Global Equity fund.

    The Aviva Investors Climate Transition fund will take a long-term, high conviction investment approach, targeting global companies that derive material revenues from goods and services addressing climate change mitigation and adaptation, as well as investing in those companies aligning their business models for a warmer, low-carbon world. The fund will not invest in stocks exposed to coal, unconventional fossil fuels, Arctic oil and gas production or thermal coal electricity generation, and limits exposure to those producing oil and gas or gas-fired power generation.

    The Fund aims to support the transition to a low carbon economy as global temperatures continue to rise due to climate change and outperform global equity markets. (Source: Aviva Investors, PR, What Investment Co, 10 June, 2020) Contact: Aviva Investors, David Cumming, Chief Investment Officer, www.avivainvestors.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aviva Investors,  Low Carbon,  


    Rolls-Royce Focused on Net Zero Carbon by 2050 (Int'l Report)
    Rolls-Royce
    Date: 2020-06-08
    In the UK, London-headquartered Rolls-Royce reports it has joined the UN Race to Zero campaign in the run up to COP26 slated for Glasgow in Nov., 2021, and reiterates its commitment to achieving net zero emissions by 2050. To that end, Rolls Royce reports it will:
  • Align its business to the Paris Agreement goals, to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees C;

  • Use its technological capabilities to play a leading role in enabling vital parts of the economy to get to net zero carbon by 2050, including aviation, shipping, rail, and power generation;

  • Continue and accelerate accelerate its R&D and investment in efficient products and novel solutions to the climate change challenge;

  • Drive changes in the efficiency of engines and work together with the fuels industry to significantly ramp up the availability of lower carbon alternative fuels.

  • Accelerate the development of new technologies and capabilities for future low emission products, including pioneering the electrification of flight;

  • Achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions from operations and facilities by 2030, by using 100 pct renewable energy, closed loop manufacturing techniques on high value metals, and deploy our cutting-edge microgrid capabilities.

    The global Race To Zero campaign mobilizes a coalition of leading net zero initiatives, representing 449 cities, 21 regions, 992 businesses, 38 of the biggest investors, and 505 universities. These "real economy" actors join 120 countries in the largest ever alliance committed to achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050 at the latest. Collectively these actors now cover nearly 25 pct of global CO2 emissions and over 50 pct GDP, according to the campaign website. (Source: Rolls Royce, Arabian Aeorspace News, 5 June, 2020) Contact: Rolls Royce, Warren East, CEO, www.rolls-royce.com: UN Race to Zero Campaign, www.unfccc.int/climate-action/race-to-zero-campaign

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Net Zero Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • States Challenging Trump's Clean Car Standard Rollback (Ind. Report)
    Clean Air Act
    Date: 2020-06-03
    In Sacramento, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, leading a multistate coalition, has filed a lawsuit challenging the Trump Administration's disastrous final rule rolling back the nation's Clean Car Standards requiring appropriate and feasible improvements in fuel economy and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from passenger cars and light trucks.

    The Trump Administration's "misguided" Safer Affordable Fuel-Efficient Vehicles (SAFE) rule stops Clean Car Standards progress in its tracks, despite the fact that the auto industry was currently on track to meet or exceed the Clean Car Standards, according to the release.

    The coalition will argue the Trump administration's rule unlawfully violates the Clean Air Act, the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, and that the Trump Administration's rollback of the nation's Clean Cars Standards is unlawful because, among other things, the EPA and NHTSA's rollbacks violate the statutory text and congressional mandates they are bound by; and the EPA and NHTSA improperly and unlawfully relied on an analysis riddled with errors, omissions, and unfounded assumptions in an attempt to justify their desired result.

    In filing the lawsuit, Attorney General Becerra is joined by the attorneys general of Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and the District of Columbia. The California Air Resources Board, the Cities of Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and Denver, and the Counties of San Francisco and Denver also joined the coalition in filing the lawsuit. (Source: California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, PR, 27 May, 2020) Contact: California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, (916) 210-6000, agpressoffice@doj.ca.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Vehicle Enissions,  Mibile Emissions,  Clean Air Act,  


    DRAX Nears Coal to Woody Biomass Switchover (Int'l. Report)
    DRAX
    Date: 2020-06-01
    Situated in Yorkshire, northern England, the Drax Group power plant will complete its switch next year after embarking on a journey almost a decade ago to use organic matter alongside the fossil fuel to slash carbon emissions. The Drax operation, providing four million households with electricity, sees CO2 emitted from burnt wood captured by newly planted trees.

    Four of the plant's six reactors use wood pellets and a carbon-capture system, while Drax intends on becoming carbon negative by 2030, by removing more CO2 from the atmosphere than it emits. Drax adds that the switch, in line with UK government policy to ban the use of coal by 2025, allows it to keep the plant running and maintain 900 jobs. (Source: DRAX, France24, 30 May, 2020) Contact: DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 0 1757 618381, www.draxpower.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Woody Biomass,  


    Glencoe Commits to 30 pct Emissions Cut by 2035 (Int'l Report)
    Glencore
    Date: 2020-06-01
    In its February 2020 climate change position paper, Barr, Switzerland-headquartered mining and metals giant Glencore Plc committed to supporting the transition to a low carbon economy and to reducing its scope 3 emissions -- included the natural depletion of the its oil and coal resource base over time.

    The company notes it stands by its target of a 30 pct cut in scope 3 emissions by 2035 and expects to achieve a 10 pct reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 compared to a 2016 base line. The company is expected to announce new longer-term scope 1 and 2 targets that support the Paris Climate Agreement goals during the course of the year. (Source: Glencore, The Independent, 29 May, 2020) Contact: Glencore, www.glencore.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  


    UK Coalition Seeks Sustainable Aviation Fuel Support (Int'l.) Report)
    Sustainable Aviation
    Date: 2020-06-01
    In the UK, the Sustainable Aviation coalition is calling for the Government to support emerging sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) sector by committing £500 million to early stage projects. When combined with action on aircraft and engine technology R&D, airspace modernization and carbon offset and removal, the UK could build a world leading green aviation sector, the coalition claims.

    The coalition also called for Government to work with industry to: develop aircraft and engine technology R&D capabilities, ensuring the UK is among the first in the world to develop hybrid and electric aircraft; accelerate UK airspace modernization, to make use of new aircraft performance capability and reduce emissions and noise; and progress robust carbon offset measures and carbon removal technologies.

    The Coalition's call to action follows previously reported news that Europe's first municipal waste-to-jet fuel facility -- Altalto Immingham -- was granted planning permission in North East Lincolnshire.

    Sustainable Aviation is the coalition of UK airlines, airports, aerospace manufacturers and air navigation service providers committed to cutting aviation's environmental impact and building a world leading aviation sector, according to its website. (Source: Sustainable Aviation Website, 1 June, 2020) Contact: Sustainable Aviation, Adam Morton, Chair, info@sustainableaviation.co.uk, www.sustainableaviation.co.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News SAF,  ,  Aviation Biofuel,  Sustainable Aviation Fuel,  


    U.S. Renewable Fuel Use Tops Coal (Ind. Report)
    Energy Information Administration
    Date: 2020-05-29
    In Washington, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is reporting U.S. consumption of renewable energy surpassed coal in 2019 for the first time since woody biomass was the top fuel source more than 130 years ago, According to EIA data, electricity generated by renewable energy sources like solar, wind and hydro exceeded coal-fired power in the U.S. for a record 40 straight days

    U.S. coal consumption, primarily for electric power generation, fell 15 pct in 2019 to the lowest level since 1964, while the use of energy from sources like wind and solar notched slightly higher, according to the EIA .

    Total renewable energy consumption in the U.S. grew for the fourth year to a record-high 11.5 quadrillion Btu in 2019. Since 2015, the growth in U.S. renewable energy is almost entirely attributable to the use of wind and solar in the electric power sector. In 2019, electricity generation from wind surpassed hydro for the first time and is now the most-used source of renewable energy for electricity generation in the United States on an annual basis. (Source: BIC, US EIA, May, 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Information Administration news,  


    Taxpayer-Funded CCS Facility Slated for Kemper Miss. (Ind. Report)
    DOE Office of Fossil Energy
    Date: 2020-05-29
    A federally-funded carbon capture facility is planned for a site adjacent to Mississippi Power's Kemper County Energy Facility. The facility will be managed by the Southern States Energy Board and will receive $17.4 million in federal grants and $6.1 million in non-DOE funds for a total of $23.59 million. Up to 900 million metric tpy of CO2 emissions from three Southern Company power which will be stored underground.

    On April 24, the U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy announced $131 million in grants for carbon capture, utilization and storage research and development. Five projects, including the one in Kemper County, were selected for funding. The other carbon capture projects receiving DOE grants include:

  • The Illinois Storage Corridor will construct two capture facilities and receive $25 million.

  • The San Juan Basin in New Mexico will store carbon emissions from a nearby power plant, with some of the carbon dioxide to be stored at a site in northwest New Mexico and the rest sent via pipeline for enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin. The project will receive $21.9 million.

  • The North Dakota project will store carbon emissions from a nearby coal-fired power plant and receive $24.9 million in federal funds.

  • Wyoming will build three storage sites to handle carbon emissions from a coal-fired power plant and will receive federal grants totally $19.1 million.

    The projects will assess safe and cost-effective commercial scale geologic storage sites and examine the technological and economic viability of carbon capture or purification technologies and the National Energy Technology Laboratory will manage the selected projects.

    The $7.5 billion Kemper County plant was originally intended to be fueled by synthesis gas produced from lignite coal and was to have to have removed 65 pct of the carbon emissions and other byproducts from the gas stream for sale to industrial customers. The plant was supposed to cost $2.4 billion, but the cost ballooned by 212.5 percent to $7.5 billion. (Source: U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy, Northside Sun, 27 May, (2020) Contact: U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy, www.energy.gov › office-fossil-energy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE Office of Fossil Energy news,  


  • Aussie Climate Change Road Map Introduced (Int'l. Report)
    Australia
    Date: 2020-05-22
    Australia's conservative government on Thursday released a fresh technology roadmap to tackle climate change, targeting the use of natural gas, hydrogen, batteries and carbon capture, while avoiding the contentious issue of setting a carbon price.

    The latest proposal, which the government aims to turn into formal policy by September, is based on driving down energy storage costs to back up wind and solar power, electrifying industrial processes and scaling up hydrogen production. . Green groups, mining, energy and other big corporations oppose the plan for its continued reliance on fossil fuels, like gas and coal, and are calling for the imposition of a carbon tax to drive green investment.

    The technology roadmap is designed to help Australia meet its Paris Climate Accord commitment to cut carbon emissions by between 26 pct and 28 pct from 2005 levels by 2030.

    Although Australia is one of the world's biggest carbon emitters per capita Angus Taylor, the Minister of Energy and Emissions recently said it is not Australian government policy to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. (Source: Australia Ministry of Energy and Emissions Reduction, Hindustan Times, Reuters, 21 May, 2020) Contact: Australia Ministry of Energy and Emissions Reduction, Hon. Angus Taylor, Minister, www.minister.industry.gov.au/ministers/taylor

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Australia Climate Change news,  Carbon Emissions news,  


    $2Bn Hemp Bioethanol Plant Slated for BC (Ind. Report)
    BC Hemp
    Date: 2020-05-22
    The Prince George, British Columbia-based BC Hemp Corporation has announced plans to construct a $2 billion hemp plant stover waste to-biofuel plant in the BCR industrial area. The plant is expected to produce between 60to 120 million lpy.

    Few details were given . The announcement was made on a live Facebook video stream with the BC Resources Coalition. (Source: BC Hemp Corp,, Facebook, 22 May, 2020) Contact: BC Hemp , Remi Balaj, Pres., 250-596-1150, info@bchempcorporation.ca, www.bchempcorporation.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Hemp. Bioethanol,  Biofuel,  


    Norway's Trillion Dollar Fund Excludes Major Emitters (Int'l.)
    Norwegian Wealth Fund
    Date: 2020-05-15
    In Oslo, Norway's $1 trillion wealth fund -- the world's largest such fund with 1.5 pct of all globally listed shares -- reports it is excluding some of the world's biggest carbon emitting and coal related commodities firms from its portfolio. power from coal. At the end of 2019, the Norwegian Wealth Fund held $1.6 billion in such companies, according to fund data.

    The fund was established in 1996 to save Norway's oil revenues for future generations. (Source: Norwegian Wealth Fund, May, 2020) Contact: Norwegian Wealth Fund, www.nbim.no

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Norwegian Wealth Fund,  Coal,  


    After 40 years India's Emissions Finally Falling (Int'l. Report)
    Carbon Brief,India Emissions
    Date: 2020-05-13
    After four decades of relentlessly rising carbon emissions, India's emission have begun falling. The drop in emissions is partially attributed to the country's COVID-19 lock-down, falling demand for transportation fuel and electric power, a decrease in coal-fired power generation -- down 31 pct in early April -- and the increased reliance on renewable energy, according to Carbon Brief. (Source: International Energy Agency, Carbon Brief BBC News, Various Media, May, 2020)Contact: Carbon Brief, www.carbonbrief.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Brief,  India,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  


    MAG Considers Blue Flint Ethanol Plant Options (Ind. Report)
    Midwest AgEnergy,Blue Flint Ethanol
    Date: 2020-05-13
    North Dakota-based Midwest AgEnergy Group (MAG), the parent company to ethanol biorefineries Blue Flint, near Underwood, North Dakota and Dakota Spirit near Spiritwood, North Dakota, reports they are evaluating alternative thermal energy and utility options to ensure the long-term viability of the Blue Flint facility.

    MAG's move is occasioned by Great River Energy's planned 2022 closure of its Coal Creek Station which provides water and steam to the Blue Flint facility. Great River's Spiritwood Station provides steam and electricity to Midwest AgEnergy's Dakota Spirit facility. To ensure long-term operations at the Blue Flint facility the company is:

  • Assessing the most viable alternative source for water and process heat while preserving the low carbon fuel designation that facility has developed •Evaluating options for using the contract termination payment from Great River Energy to reinvest in economical alternative sources of power and water at the Blue Flint facility

  • Continuing with the development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) project at Blue Flint. CCS will prevent CO2 from entering the atmosphere and safely store it underground in a geological formation and will decrease the carbon intensity of ethanol fuel produced at the facility

  • Continuing to utilize the steam and water services provided by Coal Creek through its scheduled operations into the second half of 2022 and implement changes to allow operations well beyond 2022. The company notes it foresees little to no impact to the Dakota Spirit facility and plans to continue long-term biorefinery operations. (Source: Midwest AgEnergy Group , 11 May, 2020) Contact: Midwest AgEnergy, Jeff Zueger, CEO, (701) 442-7500, www.midwestagenergy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Midwest AgEnergy,  Ethanol,  Blue Flint Ethanol,  


  • "And now for something entirely different!" -- Pyongyang Recommends Charcoal Fueled Vehicles to Cut Emissions (Int'l.)
    North Korea
    Date: 2020-05-11
    In Pyongyang, in an effort to address the growing problem of vehicle emissions and air pollution, the President Donald Trump's new friend's Ministry of Land and Environment Protection has reportedly begun a wide-ranging crack down on "problematic diesel-fueled vehicles vehicles" and have implemented a ban on their importation and future operation with the exception of Cargo trucks weighing more than five tons which are considered "essential for the economy."

    The authorities also called on drivers to use alternative fuels, including the "active use of charcoal-powered vehicles." (Source: Daily NK, 7 May, 2020)

    Editor's Note: Daily NK is an online newspaper focusing on issues relating to North Korea. The site is based in South Korea where it reports stories allegedly obtained from inside North Korea via a network of informants. The service, which was established in April 2010 with staff in Washington DC, Seoul, and London, describes itself as "an unrivaled source of information analysis and news about North Korea."

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Alternative Fuel,  Diesel,  


    energyOrbit Energy Efficiency Report Reveals Savings (Ind. Report)
    energyOrbit
    Date: 2020-05-08
    A new Energy Efficiency Impact Report from San Francisco-based cloud energy efficiency and Demand-Side Management specialist energyOrbit unveils the energy and cost savings for residents and businesses by aggregating data from its customers, including utility companies and other energy efficiency (EE) organizations.

    The report notes that $3.7 billion in incentives were paid to businesses and households and benefited customers participating in energy rebate programs. Enterprises also contributed to a cleaner atmosphere, taking the equivalent of 3.6 million passenger cars off the road, while avoiding 16.7 million metric tons of COշ.

    For its report, energyOrbit tallied data from investor-owned utilities, municipalities, cooperatives and third-party implementers in the U.S. and Canada since 2008. The numbers have been charted in two areas: Total Energy Savings and Incentive Payments. The report also highlights the following savings reference points: Annual electricity use of 2.8 million homes; 4.4 coal-fired plants not in use; 3,600 wind turbines running for a year; 22 million acres of U.S. forests planted in one year , and 54 percent of New York City electricity consumption per year.

    As of 2019, energyOrbit has helped utilities and third-party implementers manage more than 24 TWh of electricity savings. Additionally, 11 GW of peak demand has been reduced by efficiency measures tracked by energyOrbit. Additionally, over $3.7 billion in incentives have been managed and prepared for payment. (Source: energyOrbit, PR, 5 May, 2020) Contact: energyOrbit, Udi Merhav, CEO , 866-628-8744, www.energy-orbit.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News energyOrbit,  Energy Efficiency,  Energy Management,  


    Eurostat Notes Plunging EU CO2 Emissions (Int'l. Report)
    Eurostat,EU
    Date: 2020-05-06
    The EU Eurostat is reporting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from mainly oil and oil products, coal, peat and natural gas fell by 4.3 pct year on year in the 27 member trade bloc in 2019.

    According to Eurostat estimates, emissions fell in 2019 in the majority of EU member states, with the highest decrease in Estonia at 22.1 pct , followed by Denmark at 9.0 pct while Greece and Slovakia recorded a fall of 8.9 pct each. On the other hand, Luxembourg emissions rose 7.5 pct, Austrian emissions were up 2.8 pct followed by Malta with 2.0 pct and Lithuania with 1.6 pct.. (Source: Eurostat, Anadolu Agency, 8 May, 2020) Contact: Eurostat, https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/home

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Eurostat,  EU Carbon Emissions,  


    Claification -- Woody Biomass, Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    Woody Biomass
    Date: 2020-05-01
    "Mature trees do not stop absorbing carbon. It's just the opposite. Carbon sequestration actually accelerates as a tree grows older. 'Managed forests' is usually code for trees farms full of longleaf pine that are cut [down] frequently and absorb a lot less carbon than mature forests."

    "From an emissions standpoint, the UK would be better off burning coal and leaving those (older) trees standing as long as possible." -- Bill Moomaw, Biomass Energy Researcher, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Source: IPCC, Eco Business, Mongabay, 20 April, 2020)

    A Bioenergy & Alternative Fuels report subscriber noted the following:

    First, the 40 million acres, more or less, of managed southern pine plantations are loblolly pine not longleaf pine. These two pine varieties have important differences in growth rate and ecological values.

    Second, and more much importantly, mature pine forest do not 'accelerate' their storage as they mature. These are privately owned lands and the details of the site and management practices are very important, but the annually growth rate (carbon accumulation) on most pine sites slows after 15-20 years. The TOTAL carbon on the acre/hectare increase, but at a slower annual rate.

    Finally, and completely absent from these discussion that are typically led by scientist or environmental groups who do not have a clear understanding of the on the ground ownership and motivations of private landowners in the southern US, is that without a source of income some of these forest will be converted to some other uses, probably pasture, which has very limited carbon storage potential. In effect these EU experts are trying to shift the costs of carbon sequestration to private landowners. One can argue that if they want to sequester carbon in trees, and take on the additional risk of unplanned, large scale release from fire, disease or hurricane, that is fine, but they should pay the landowner for the carbon and the lost income.

    Editor's Note: We thank our reader for his input and clarification of our report.

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  


    Record Drop in Emissions Expected in 2020, says IEA (Int'l Report)
    IEA
    Date: 2020-05-01
    According to the Paris-headquartered International Energy Agency's (IEA) Global Energy Review, COVID-19 is expected to cause global energy emissions to fall a record 8 pct this year due to an unprecedented drop in demand for coal, oil and gas.

    The IEA predicts that global energy demand would fall 6 pct in 2020 -- the biggest year-on-year drop since World War II -- equivalent of losing the entire energy demand of India, the world's third-largest power consumer.

    Advanced economies are set to see the biggest declines, with demand in the United States down nine percent and an 11-percent fall in the EU likely. "This is a historic shock to the entire energy world. The plunge in demand for nearly all major fuels is staggering, especially for coal, oil and gas," said IEA executive director Fatih Birol.

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, emissions had been rising year on year. (Source: IEA, Agence France Presse, 28 April, 2020)Contact: IEA, Dr. Fatih Birol, Exec. Dir., +33 1 40 57 65 00, www.iea.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News IEA,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    NM Tech Funded for $22Mn CCS Study (Ind. Report, Funding)
    New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
    Date: 2020-04-29
    The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech) is reporting receipt of $17.5 million in US DOE funding to study the safe storage of CO2 in underground saline reservoirs near the San Juan Generating Station. An additional $4.4 million in afunding will come from Enchant Energy and NM Tech funds.

    The data obtained from the $22 million effort will be used to prepare, submit and obtain a permit to construction a Class VI well to store CO2 captured from the power plant if Enchant Energy successfully retrofits San Juan Generating Station with carbon capture technology. The Class VI wells are intended to store carbon dioxide in a safe and secure manner for at least 990 years.

    Other recently funded CCS projects include:

  • Approximately $25.4 million for the Illinois Storage Corridor

  • Nearly $23.6 million for an early carbon dioxide storage complex in Kemper County, Mississippi

  • Roughly $25 million for a carbon dioxide storage well project in North Dakota as part of Minnkota Power's Project Tundra

  • About $19.1 million for a storage complex project in Campbell County, Wyoming, that would use CO2 captured from the coal-fired Dry Fork Station. (Source: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Farmington Daily Times, 27 April, 2020) Contact: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Robert Balch, Dir, Petroleum Recovery Research Center at New Mexico Tech, 575-835-5434, www.nmt.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  CCS,  CO2,  New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology ,  


  • Sunrun Prevents 5Mn Metric Tons of CO2 Pollution (Ind. Report)
    Sunrun
    Date: 2020-04-27
    San Francisco-based home solar, battery storage, and energy services specialist Sunrun Inc. reports that through the generation of nearly 2,000 MW of solar energy its customers have saved hundreds of millions of dollars on their electricity bills and prevented more than 5 million metric tons of carbon pollution since the company's 2008 founding, according to the company's just released third annual Impact Report.

    According to the report: Sunrun systems have further prevented the emission nearly 5 million tons of nitrogen oxide pollution since 2008; produced 7.4 billion kilowatt-hours of clean energy since 2007 -- equivalent to taking 1.3 coal-fired power plants offline for a year.

    Download the Sunrum Impact Report HERE. (Source: Sunrun, PR, April, 2020) Contact: Sunrun, Lynn Jurich, CEO, Patrick Jobin , ISVP, IR, (415) 373-5206, investors@sunrun.com www.sunrun.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Sunrun,  Solar,  Carbon Emissions,  


    ADB Loans $100Mn for Mongolian Battery Energy Storage Project (Int'l)
    Asian Development Bank
    Date: 2020-04-27
    The Asian Development Bank (ADB) reports approval of a $100 million loan to help supply renewable energy to coal dependent Mongolia by installing its first large-scale advanced battery energy storage system (BESS).

    The project will install 125 mw of advanced BESS, making it among the largest battery storage systems globally. The system will include a battery energy management system enabling it to be charged entirely by renewable electricity. The project is expected to come in at $114.95 million, of which $3 million is co-financed by a grant from ADB's High-Level Technology Fund, financed by the Government of Japan. The Mongolian government will provide $11.95 million toward the cost of the project, which is due for completion in September 2024. (Source: Asian Dev. Bank, April, 2020)Contact: Asia Development Bank, Takehiko Nakao, Pres. +63 2 632 4444, www.adb.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Asian Development Bank,  Battery Energy Storage,  BESS,  


    Wyoming Carbon Storage Project Scores $15.2Mn Funding (Funding)
    University of Wyoming, Basin Electric
    Date: 2020-04-24
    Plans for a commercial-scale geological carbon dioxide storage complex near Basin Electric Power Cooperative's 385-MW Dry Fork Station and the Wyoming Integrated Test Cente near Gillette have been boosted with a $15.2 million award from the U.S. DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bismark, ND-based Basin Electric Power Cooperative is contributing $1.5 million to the project and University of Wyoming's School of Energy Resources (SER) cost-sharing contribution is $2.4 million. The project is intended to more than 50 million metric tons of CO2 underground.

    The three-year, $19.1 million project is the third phase under the DOE Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE) initiative, which seeks to help mitigate CO2 emissions from consumption of fossil fuels. No CO2 will be injected during this stage. The Dry Fork Station project and others selected by the agency aim to develop integrated carbon capture and storage complexes that are constructed and permitted for operation between 2025 and 2030.

    Over the next three years, the project partners intend to conduct rigorous, commercial-scale surface and subsurface testing, data assessment and modeling; prepare and file permits for construction with Wyoming's Department of Environmental Quality; integrate this project with a separately funded CO2 capture study by Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR); and conduct the required National Environmental Policy Act analyses in support of eventual commercialization of the site. Other project participants include: Advanced Resources International Inc.; Carbon GeoCycle Inc.; Denbury Resources Inc.; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and Schlumberger. Other UW participants are the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute, the College of Business and the College of Law.

    The Powder River Basin produces about 40 pct of all coal consumed in the United States, and is also home to existing CO2 pipelines for oil and gas operations, including fields suitable for use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery. (Source: University of Wyoming, 23 April, 2020) Contact: University of Wyoming, Carbon Management Institute , Scott Quillinan, Project Manager, (307) 766-1121, www.uwyo.edu; Basin Electric Power, Paul Sukut, CEO, Matt Greek, Snr. VP Technology R&D, (701) 223-0441, www.basinelectric.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Basin Electric,  Carbon Storage,  NETL,  University of Wyoming,  


    Enviva Biomass Touts 2020 Responsible Sourcing Policy (Ind. Report)
    Enviva Biomass
    Date: 2020-04-24
    Bethesda, Maryland-based woody biomass pellet specialist Enviva is touting its 2020 Implementation Plans detailing the company's commitment to responsible and sustainable wood sourcing in accordance with strict environmental standards.

    The 2020 Implementation Plans define the company's measurable goals in three sections -- sustainable forestry standards, verification and transparency, and conservation leadership across the U.S. Southeast, where the company owns and operates wood pellet production plants.

    According to a release, in 2020, Enviva plans to publish its first Corporate Sustainability Report describing how the company works to deliver on its mission to displace coal, grow more trees and fight climate change, its current environmental impact and sustainability practices and its goals for continuous improvement in sustainability of its business in the long-term.

    The company also plans to add 30,000 acres to the American Tree Farm System (ATFS) and/or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified land base. Enviva will also strengthen its existing partnership with The Longleaf Alliance to actively seek longleaf restoration through its wood sourcing on private and public lands in Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida, Virginia and the Carolinas. The company will also assist in the conservation of 3,500+ acres of bottomland hardwood (BLHW) forests to meet the company's 10-year goal of conserving 35,000 acres of BLHW forests by 2030.

    View Enviva's 2020 RSP Implementation Plans HERE. (Source: Enviva Biomass, PR, AP, 21 April, 2020) Contact: Enviva Holdings LP, Enviva Biomass, (301-657-5560), media@envivabiomass.com, www.envivabiomass.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Wood Pellet,  Woody Biomass,  Enviva,  


    African Renewable Energy Collaboration Announced (Int'l. Report)
    African Union Commission
    Date: 2020-04-22
    The African Union Commission (AUC) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA )report they work closely to advance renewable energy across Africa to bolster the continent's response to the Covid-19 crisis.

    The AU and IRENA collaboration complements ongoing AU programmes, which include: the Africa Bioenergy Policy Framework and Guidelines; Renewable Energy in African Island States; Development of Small Hydropower in Africa; Geothermal Risk Mitigation Facility; and the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) as well as the Strategy for integrated approach for provision of basic infrastructure in rural and remote areas of Africa. This is in addition to other African initiatives such as Desert to Power, Coalition for Sustainable Energy Access, and the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative (AREI) -- an Africa owned and led drive to scale up renewable energy -- consolidating efforts from the international community to address the needs of African countries.

    The AU and IRENA will also collaborate in the context of IRENA's Clean Energy Corridors initiatives in East, West and Southern Africa focused on advancing the deployment of renewables through the creation of larger and more robust power markets encouraging cross-border trade of renewable power.

    These commitments build on existing cooperation between the AU and IRENA to strengthen the enabling environment for low-carbon, climate-resilient renewable energy investment as the continent seeks to raise its renewable energy ambition. (Source: African Union Commission, IRENA, Modern Diplomacy, 20 April, 2020) Contact: African Union Commission, www.au.int/en/commission; IRENA, www.irena.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News International Renewable Energy Agency,  Renewable Energy,  Africa Renewable Energy,  


    Woody Biomass, Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    IPCC
    Date: 2020-04-22
    "Mature trees do not stop absorbing carbon. It's just the opposite. Carbon sequestration actually accelerates as a tree grows older. 'Managed forests' is usually code for trees farms full of longleaf pine that are cut [down] frequently and absorb a lot less carbon than mature forests."

    "From an emissions standpoint, the UK would be better off burning coal and leaving those (older) trees standing as long as possible." -- Bill Moomaw, Biomass Energy Researcher, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Source: Eco Business, Mongabay, 20 April, 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions ,  


    Austria Cashiers Last Coal-Fired Power Plant (Int'l. Report)
    Austria,Europe Beyond Coal
    Date: 2020-04-20
    Austria's state-controlled Verbund AG utility is reporting the closure of its last coal-fired power plant -- the Mellach coal-fired district heating plant roughly 120 miles south of Vienna.

    With the closure, Austria is now the second European country, after Belgium, to eliminate coal power from its electricity grid in favor of renewable energy. France, Sweden, Slovakia, Portugal, the U.K., Ireland and Italy also plan on exiting coal by 2025, according to Europe Beyond Coal. (Source: Europe Beyond Coal, Bloomberg, Regina Leader Post, 17 April, 2020) Contact: Europe Beyond Coal, www. beyond-coal.eu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Europe Beyond Coal,  Coal,  Climate Change,  Renewable energy,  


    Japanese Banking Majors End Coal-Fired Plant Funding (Int'l.)
    Sumitomo Mitsui Financial
    Date: 2020-04-17
    Japanese financial services giant Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group (SMFG) Inc. reports it will no longer lend to new coal-fired power plants from May 1, 2020. Mizuho Financial Group Inc. will also cease financing for new fossil fueled power projects but may support upgrades to existing coal-fired plants aiming to lower CO2 emissions.

    Worldwide, Japanese banks are among the few major lenders who have stuck to backing coal projects. The nation's three major banks, SMFG, Mizuho and Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, have been among the world's top five lenders to the coal power and mining industries over the past five years, according to Refinitiv SDC Platinum data. (Source: Sumitomo Mitsui Financial, Japan Times, 16 April, 2020) Contact: Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group, www.smfg.co.jp/english

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Coal,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    Japan's GHG Emission Reductions Missing Paris Target (Int'l Report)
    Japanese Environment Ministry
    Date: 2020-04-15
    In Tokyo, the Japanese Environment Ministry reported the country's greenhouse gas emissions fall 3.9 pct in fiscal 2018 from the previous year, thanks in part to an increased reliance on nuclear energy.

    According to the Ministry release, the equivalent of 1.24 billion tons of CO2 was emitted in the year ended March 2019, a fifth annual decline and representing a low among comparable data going back to fiscal 1990.

    Emissions fell 12 pct compared with fiscal 2013, against its Paris Climate Agreement pledge for a 26 percent reduction by fiscal 2030, a target that Japan has itself said is not ambitious enough.

    While many of Japan's nuclear reactors were taken offline in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima crisis, output from the nine active units doubled from the previous year, reducing the need for coal, an increase in renewable energy and low demand for household heating due to a relatively warm winter, all contributed to the drop in CO2 emissions. Meanwhile, Japan's emissions of ozone-depleting hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) rose 4.7 percent from the previous year. (Source: Japanese Environment Ministry, PR, 13 April, 2020) Contact: Japan Environment Ministry, +81-(0)3-3581-3351, www.env.go.jp/en/moemail, www.env.go.jp/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Paris Climate Agreement,  HFC,  


    Notable Quote -- Ethanol and the Coronavirus
    American Coalition for Ethanol
    Date: 2020-04-15
    "The important context here is that a lot of the ethanol industry was hanging on by a string before the coronavirus hit. And we're seeing unprecedented demand destruction right now, so undoubtedly, 2020 is going to be a bloodbath for the industry." -- Brian Jennings, CEO, American Coalition for Ethanol Contact: American Coalition for Ethanol, Brian Jennings, CEO, (605) 334-3381 ext. 3389, www.ethanol.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News American Coalition for Ethanol,  Ethanol,  


    Va.Governor Inks Virginia Clean Economy Act (Reg. & Leg. Report)
    Governor Ralph Northam
    Date: 2020-04-13
    Following up on our 11th March coverage, in the Old Dominion State, the Office of Governor Ralph Northam (D) reports the Governor has signed the Virginia Clean Economy Act into law. The legislation covers energy efficiency promotions and puts a timeline standard stating that coal-fired plants are to close by 2024, and Dominion Energy and Appalachian Power will be 100 pct carbon-free by 2045 and 2050, respectively. Under the Act:
  • Energy companies will pay penalties for not meeting the Act’s objectives and the revenue from the penalties will go towards job training and programs in disadvantaged communities.;

  • There will be a reduction of energy burned for low-income users and all energy-efficient standards and pilot programs are to be “in the public interest.”

  • 5,200 megawatts of offshore wind generation to harvest energy for generating electricity is "in the public interest." Distributed generation facilities including solar power, will have 16,100 megawatts of solar and onshore wind generation as it is also considered "in the public interest."

  • Net metering will be used, which credits solar energy system owners for the electricity they add to the grid making it easier for the growth of rooftop solar power in the Commonwealth.

  • The state will establish a carbon cap-and-trade program to reduce emissions from power plants in compliance with the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI). (Source: Office of Governor Ralph Northam, Website, WAVY.com. 12 April, 2020) Contact: Office of Governor Ralph Northam, 804-786-2211, www.governor.virginia.gov/constituent-services/communicating-with-the-governors-office, www.governor.virginia.gov; RGGI, www.rggi.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  RGGI,  Carbon Emissions,  Renewable Energy,  Energy Efficiency,  


  • Kuwait's KNPC Completes Biofuels Project (Int'l. Ind. Report)
    Kuwait National Petroleum Corp
    Date: 2020-04-10
    The Kuwait News Agency is reporting the Kuwait National Petroleum Corp (KNPC) has completed the addition of two biofuel production units at its Mina Al-Ahmadi oil refinery.

    The two new coal and naphtha hydro treating units will produce 37,000 and 8,400 bpd of oil equivalent respectively. (Source: Kuwait National Petroleum Corp., Reuters 8 April, 2020) Contact: Kuwait National Petroleum Corp., Waleed al-Badr, CEO, www.knpc.com


    COVID-19 and climate change The COVID-19 crisis is having a direct impact on carbon emissions by reducing industrial activity and travel. Similarly, air quality has improved markedly in the UK and around the world, which will reduce the estimated 10 million people who die prematurely each year from poor air quality. In the absence of changes in behaviour, then a rebound would be expected which broadly depended on the strength of the economic recovery: a slow recovery would reduce emissions; a bounce-back would not. The tantalising question is whether employers and employees change their working practices and citizens change their personal ones.

    More home-working would mean reduced travel to work and a likely improvement in air quality as well as reduced carbon emissions. Greater use of online meeting capabilities (especially if they improve rapidly with rapid uptake) could reduce longer range transport including air traffic. Comprises a major part of the carbon emissions of organisations which work internationally.

    The response of government will be critical in determining the longer term impact. They could use the opportunity to advance green policies such as the development of low carbon technologies, a kind of ‘COVID-19 Green New Deal’. Now could be the time, for example, to really push ahead and use the fiscal stimulus to develop a 21st century transport infrastructure to connect our regions (including, for example, short-range electric aircraft) and fully finance the measures already outlined in the Agriculture and Environment Bills.

    This ‘Build Back Better’ approach is being discussed by influential groups including the We Mean Business coalition and McKinsey & Company.


    Date: 2020-04-10
    The COVID-19 crisis is having a direct impact on carbon emissions by reducing industrial activity and travel. Similarly, air quality has improved markedly in the UK and around the world, which will reduce the estimated 10 million people who die prematurely each year from poor air quality. In the absence of changes in behaviour, then a rebound would be expected which broadly depended on the strength of the economic recovery: a slow recovery would reduce emissions; a bounce-back would not. The tantalising question is whether employers and employees change their working practices and citizens change their personal ones.

    More home-working would mean reduced travel to work and a likely improvement in air quality as well as reduced carbon emissions. Greater use of online meeting capabilities (especially if they improve rapidly with rapid uptake) could reduce longer range transport including air traffic. Comprises a major part of the carbon emissions of organisations which work internationally.

    The response of government will be critical in determining the longer term impact. They could use the opportunity to advance green policies such as the development of low carbon technologies, a kind of ‘COVID-19 Green New Deal’. Now could be the time, for example, to really push ahead and use the fiscal stimulus to develop a 21st century transport infrastructure to connect our regions (including, for example, short-range electric aircraft) and fully finance the measures already outlined in the Agriculture and Environment Bills.

    This ‘Build Back Better’ approach is being discussed by influential groups including the We Mean Business coalition and McKinsey & Company. Society is showing how quickly it can adapt – can the momentum be maintained and used to help solve the pressing issues of air quality and climate change? (Source: Cranfield University, Press Release, April, 2020) Contact:Cranfield University, Neil Harris, Professor of Atmospheric Informatics , Centre for Environment and Agricultural Informatics , +44 (0) 1234 750111, www.cranfield.ac.uk The COVID-19 crisis is having a direct impact on carbon emissions by reducing industrial activity and travel. Similarly, air quality has improved markedly in the UK and around the world, which will reduce the estimated 10 million people who die prematurely each year from poor air quality. In the absence of changes in behaviour, then a rebound would be expected which broadly depended on the strength of the economic recovery: a slow recovery would reduce emissions; a bounce-back would not. The tantalising question is whether employers and employees change their working practices and citizens change their personal ones.

    More home-working would mean reduced travel to work and a likely improvement in air quality as well as reduced carbon emissions. Greater use of online meeting capabilities (especially if they improve rapidly with rapid uptake) could reduce longer range transport including air traffic. Comprises a major part of the carbon emissions of organisations which work internationally.

    The response of government will be critical in determining the longer term impact. They could use the opportunity to advance green policies such as the development of low carbon technologies, a kind of ‘COVID-19 Green New Deal’. Now could be the time, for example, to really push ahead and use the fiscal stimulus to develop a 21st century transport infrastructure to connect our regions (including, for example, short-range electric aircraft) and fully finance the measures already outlined in the Agriculture and Environment Bills.

    This ‘Build Back Better’ approach is being discussed by influential groups including the We Mean Business coalition and McKinsey & Company. Society is showing how quickly it can adapt – can the momentum be maintained and used to help solve the pressing issues of air quality and climate change? (Source: Cranfield University, Press Release, April, 2020) Contact:Cranfield University, Neil Harris, Professor of Atmospheric Informatics , Centre for Environment and Agricultural Informatics , +44 (0) 1234 750111, www.cranfield.ac.uk


    "COVID-19 Green New Deal" Touted (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Cranfield University
    Date: 2020-04-10
    According to a release from Cranfield University, "The COVID-19 crisis is having a direct impact on carbon emissions by reducing industrial activity and travel. Similarly, air quality has improved markedly in the UK and around the world, which will reduce the estimated 10 million people who die prematurely each year from poor air quality. In the absence of changes in behavior, then a rebound would be expected which broadly depended on the strength of the economic recovery: a slow recovery would reduce emissions; a bounce-back would not. The tantalizing question is whether employers and employees change their working practices and citizens change their personal ones.

    "More home-working would mean reduced travel to work and a likely improvement in air quality as well as reduced carbon emissions. Greater use of online meeting capabilities (especially if they improve rapidly with rapid uptake) could reduce longer range transport including air traffic which comprises a major part of the carbon emissions of organizations which work internationally.

    "The response of government will be critical in determining the longer term impact. They could use the opportunity to advance green policies such as the development of low carbon technologies, a kind of 'COVID-19 Green New Deal'. Now could be the time, for example, to really push ahead and use the fiscal stimulus to develop a 21st century transport infrastructure to connect our regions and fully finance the measures already outlined in the Agriculture and Environment Bills.

    "This 'Build Back Better' approach is being discussed by influential groups including the We Mean Business coalition and McKinsey & Company. Society is showing how quickly it can adapt -- can the momentum be maintained and used to help solve the pressing issues of air quality and climate change? (Source: Cranfield University, Press Release, April, 2020) Contact:Cranfield University, Neil Harris, Professor of Atmospheric Informatics , Centre for Environment and Agricultural Informatics , +44 (0) 1234 750111, www.cranfield.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  COVID-19,  


    AEG Acquires NC Woody Biomass Facility (M&A, Ind. Report)
    Active Energy Group
    Date: 2020-04-01
    UK-based Active Energy Group (AEG) is reporting acquisition of 100 pct control and ownership of the sawmill and log export activities at AEG's industrial site in Lumberton, North Carolina.

    The Lumberton sawmill generates low-value waste products which Active Energy will use as feedstock for the production of CoalSwitch product and other black pellet fuels.

    The CoalSwitch product is made from woody biomass including pulp and saw mill by-products such as bark, sawdust and thinning, and wood which is over-age, under-quality, blow-down, beetle-kill, forest-fire damaged, or industrial waste. CoalSwitch can be burned by old, coal-fired generation facilities without the need for a retrofit. (Source: Active Energy Group, Various Media, Apr. 2020) Contact: Active Energy, Michael Rowan, CEO, +44 (0)20 3021 1500, www.active-energy.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Active Energy Group,  CoalSwitch,  Biomass,  Waste Biomass,  


    Military Veterans Major Ethanol Industry Employees (Ind. Report)
    Renewable Fuels Association,
    Date: 2020-03-30
    2020 U.S. Energy and Employment Report, a new study from the National Association of State Energy Offices and Energy Futures Initiative has found the U.S. ethanol industry employs a significantly more military veterans than any other segment of the energy industry -- roughly one in five ethanol industry employees is a veteran.

    Per 100 workers, the ethanol industry employs more than twice as many veterans as the petroleum, natural gas, nuclear, coal, and wind energy sectors. (Source: Renewable Fuels Association, 24 Mar.,2020) Contact: Renewable Fuels Association, Geoff Cooper, (202) 289-3835, www.ethanolrfa.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Ethanol,  Renewable Fuels Association,  ,  


    MinnKota Power Touting Project Tundra CCS Project (Ind. Report)
    Minnkota Power
    Date: 2020-03-30
    Further to our 14th Jan., 2019 coverage, Grand Forks, Minnesota-based Minnkota Power Cooperative reports its planned Project Tundra CCS project is expected to capture 90 pct of carbon emissions from a single unit of the 455-MW lignite coal-fired 1970s-era Milton R. Young Station power plant in the city of Center. The project calls for carbon to be pumped into an underground geologic storage area on land underneath the lignite mine that supplies coal to the plant.

    The planned project has received $30 million in federal and $15 million funding from the North Dakota Lignite Research Fund. The University of North Dakota is collaborating with Minnkota on developing the system with ALLETE Clean Energy and ALLETE subsidiary BNI Energy assisting with the development. (Source: Minnkota Power,Ap., 2020) Contact: Minnkota Power, Stacey Dahl, External Affairs, 701-795-4000, www.minnkota.com; Project Tundra, www.projecttundrand.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Minnkota Power ,  CCS,  Allete,  


    Renewable Fuels Coalition Comments on Admin's Not Seeking SRE Ruling Re-hearing (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    Americans for Clean Energy
    Date: 2020-03-27
    Further to our 20th Jan. coverage, a coalition of the Renewable Fuels Association, National Corn Growers Association, American Coalition for Ethanol and National Farmers Union released the following statement:

    "We are pleased the Trump administration has decided not to side with oil refiners in seeking a re-hearing of this unambiguous and well-reasoned court decision in the Tenth Circuit. We trust this also means the administration does not plan to petition the Supreme Court for an appeal. Abiding by the court's ruling is the right thing to do at a time when our industries and rural America are already suffering from the effects of COVID-19, the Saudi-Russia oil price war and ongoing trade disputes.

    "We look to the RFS as a source of demand stability and certainty, especially in these troubling times. Requesting a re-hearing would have only prolonged uncertainty in the marketplace and exacerbated the pain and frustration already being experienced in the Heartland.

    "With this key milestone now behind us, we look forward to EPA applying the Tenth Circuit decision nationwide to all SRE (small refiner exemption) petitions, beginning with the 25 pending petitions for 2019 exemptions."

    The coalition also noted that fully restoring the integrity of the RFS means immediate action to restore 500 million gallons of inappropriately waived 2016 blending requirements, as ordered by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. District in 2017. (Source: Various Media, The Fence Post, 25 Mar., 2020) Contact: Renewable Fuels Association, Geoff Cooper, (202) 289-3835, www.ethanolrfa.org; American Coalition for Ethanol, Brian Jennings, CEO, (605) 334-3381 ext. 3389, www.ethanol.org; National Farmers Union, Roger Johnson, Pres., (202) 554-1600, www.nfu.org; NCGA, (636) 733-9004, (636) 733-9005 -fax, corninfo@ncga.com, www.ncga.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News RFS,  Americans for Clean Energy,  RFS "Hardship" ,  Waivers,  Renewable Fuels Associatio,  National Farmers Union,  National Corn Growers Association,  American Coalition for Ethanol,  


    UQ Study Bullish on CCS Hub Project (Int'l. Report)
    University of Queensland
    Date: 2020-03-25
    In the Land Down Under, a study from the University of Queensland has found that deep emission cuts might be achieved by establishing a large-scale CCS 'Hub' scheme built around retrofitting existing modern, supercritical coal power plants in Queensland areas notionally identified for their storage potential in the deepest part of the Surat Basin.

    Study leader Professor Andrew Garnett, a former Shell and Schlumberger executive, said the sooner that CCS was realized in the roughly 35-year lifespan of these power stations the greater the impact of the initiative. Garnett estimates three to four years might be required commercial feasibility and engineering activities followed by a sequential build-out over several years during which emissions could be cut by roughly 13 million tpy -- equivalent to taking 2.8 million cars off the road each year.

    The 3-year $5.5 million project is funded by the Australian Government through the Carbon Capture and Storage Research Development and Demonstration (CCS RD&D) programme, by Coal 21 and The University of Queensland (Source: The University of Queensland Surat Deep Aquifer Appraisal Project, UQ News, 24 Mar., 2020) Contact: UQ CCS Program, Professor Andrew Garnett , Director, + 61 (7) 3346 4101, naturalgas@uq.edu.au, www.natural-gas.centre.uq.edu.au, www.uq.edu.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Queensland,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  CCS,  Carbon Capture & Stroage,  


    US Expected to Add 50GW of Green Energy by 2023 (Ind. Report)
    Sun Day Campaign,FERC
    Date: 2020-03-20
    According to Takoma Park, Maryland-based Sun Day Campaign, renewables will soon cover 25 pct of the US total electricity capacity in the US with nearly 50GW coming online within three years, based on figures published by federal energy watchdog FERC.

    FERC data found that by the end of 2022, wind energy will account for 26.4GW, solar 19.973GW and natural gas 21.09GW of the nation's total electric power capacity. The FERC statistics show that net installed capacity for coal, nuclear and oil will shrivel over the next three years, with respective drops of 18,857MW, 3,391MW and 3,085MW forecast. (Source: Sun Day Campaign, FERC, 16 Mar., 2020) Contact: FERC, 202-502-6088, www.ferc.gov; Sun Day Campaign, Ken Bossong, Exec. Dir.,301-270-4291, www.sun-day-campaign.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Sun Day Campaign,  FERC,  Renewable Energy,  Wind,  Solar,  


    South Korea Aims for Net-Zero Emissions by 2050 (Int'l. Report)
    South Korea Carbon Emissions
    Date: 2020-03-20
    In Seoul, the South Korean government has announced plans to be the first East Asion nation to adopt a Green New Deal and deliver net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, if reelected in the upcoming legislative elections. To that end, the government would institute a carbon tax, phase out domestic and overseas coal project financing, and make large-scale investments in renewable energy.

    South Korea, the world's seventh-largest carbon emitter as well as the third-largest public coal financier, is home to energy-intensive industries such as automotive and steel and likely to remain heavily dependent on climate-wrecking coal in the immediate future. (Source: Various Media, EcoBusiness, Mar., 2020)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Net-Zero Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  

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