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Australians Announce "Blue Carbon" Science Hub (Int'l Report)
Blue Carbon
Date: 2019-09-09
Further to our 10th July report, the Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne has announced the establishment of the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Indian Ocean Blue Carbon Hub aimed at protecting and restoring the health of ocean "blue carbon" mangrove ecosystems.

The hub, which will be hosted by the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at the University of Western Australia, will be jointly funded by the federal government and CSIRO to the tune of $600,000 over three years. According to hub director Dr Mat Vanderklift, "Blue carbon ecosystems are highly effective at carbon storage and protecting coastal communities against storms. The Indian Ocean is disproportionately important in blue carbon globally. The hub will allow us to accelerate action and go beyond talking about it, to doing something about it."

Mangrove systems sequester "blue carbon" -- CO2 absorbed from the atmosphere and locked up in coastal wetlands such as mangroves. (Source: The New Nation, Sept., 2019) Contact: Indian Ocean Blu Carbon Hub, Dr Mat Vanderklift, Dir. Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at the University of Western Australia, +61 8 6488 7270, www.uwa.edu.au › facilities › indian-ocean-marine-research-centre

More Low-Carbon Energy News Mangrove,  Blue Carbon,  Climate Change,  


Chevron Unveils Aussie CO2 Storage, Mitigation Project (Int'l)
Chevron
Date: 2019-08-09
In the Land Down Under, Perth-based energy major Chevron Australia Pty Ltd. and its JV partners at the Gorgon LNG project, in Western Australia, are reporting the launch of the Gorgon carbon dioxide (CO2) injection system -- the world's largest greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation project. When fully operational, the CO2 injection facility will cut Gorgon's GHG emissions by about 40 pct or more than 100-million tonnes over the life of the project.

The Gorgon facility incorporates features aimed at maximizing energy efficiency and minimizing GHG emissions, and in steady-state operations, is anticipated to have the lowest GHG emissions intensity of any LNG project in Australia. (Source: Chevron Australia, Mining Weekly, Creamer Media NZ, 8 Aug., 2019) Contact: Chevron Australia Pty Ltd, +61 8 9216 4000, www.chevron.com/about/contact

More Low-Carbon Energy News LNG,  Chevron,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


Politicians Prodded to Address 'Killer Heat' (Opinions & Asides)
Climate Change,Global Warming
Date: 2019-07-19
Killer Heat in the United States, a recently released report from the Union of Concerned Scientist predicts a lot more days of extreme heat -- so much that they're being called "killer heat" days. The study was released in part to spur action on the part of both politicians and business leaders.

According to the report, "The United States federal government needs to continue with the (Obama) Clean Power Plan and not dismantle it, as the current (Trump) administration is attempting to do, to significantly reduce emissions from the power sector, which accounts for roughly 40 pct of the U.S. emissions footprint."

The UCS scientists are asking the federal government to not only wean the nation off of fossil fuels, but develop plans for people to adapt to extreme heat. "The clock is ticking to reduce emissions. If nothing is done, we may have to get ready for an unrecognizably hot future" the report says.

To make the needed deep emissions cuts, the reports recommends the U.S. implement a suite of federal and state policies, including: an economy wide price on carbon; policies to cut transportation sector emissions, including increasing fuel economy and heat-trapping emissions standards for vehicles; increased investment in low-carbon public transportation; policies to cut buildings and industrial sector emissions; policies to increase carbon storage in vegetation and soils, including through climate-friendly agricultural and forest management practices; increased investment in emissions and climate change related R&D; measures to cut methane, nitrus oxide, and other major non-CO2 heat-trapping emissions; and policies to help a rapid transition to low-carbon economies.

Download the Killer Heat in the United States -Climate Choices and the Future of Dangerously Hot Days report HERE (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists, wusf Public Media, 18 July, 2019) Contact: Union of Concerned Scientists, Ken Kimmell, Pres., (617) 547-5552,

More Low-Carbon Energy News Union of Concerned Scientists,  Climate Change,  


Wood Products Mitigate Under 1 pct Global CO2 Emissions (R&D)
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date: 2019-07-08
At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an research analysis across 180 countries found that global wood products -- all the paper, lumber, furniture and more -- offset less than 1 pct of of annual global carbon emissions -- 335 million tons of CO2 in 2015, 71 million tons of which were unaccounted for under current UN standards.

Current U.N. guidelines only allow countries to count the carbon stored in wood products created from domestic timber harvests, not the timber grown locally and shipped internationally, nor products produced from imported lumber. These regulations create a gap between the actual amount of carbon stored in the world's wood products and what is officially counted.

The researchers asked the question, can we continue to consume wood products and have climate change benefits associated with that consumption?" To address that question, the researchers developed a consistent, international analysis of the carbon storage potential of these products, which countries must now account for under the global Paris Agreement to reduce carbon emissions.

They used data on lumber harvests and wood product production from 1961 to 2015, the most recent year available, from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The researchers modeled future carbon sequestration in wood products using five broad models of possible economic and population growth, the two factors that most affect demand for these products. In 2015, that gap amounted to 71 million tons of CO2, equivalent to the emissions from 15 million cars. If those guidelines remain unchanged, by 2065 another 50 million tons of CO2 may go unaccounted for due to this gap. But this additional, uncounted carbon does not significantly increase the proportion of global emissions offset by wood products, according to the study.

Craig Johnston, a professor of forest economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Volker Radeloff, a UW-Madison professor of forest and wildlife ecology, published their findings July 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: WU-Madison, PR, July, 2019) Contact: WU-Madison, Craig Johnston, (608) 890-3609, craig.johnston@wisc.edu, www.wisc.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Woody Biomass,  Carbon Storage,  


Notable Quote -- Carbon Sequestration
IndigoAg
Date: 2019-06-21
"If we took every cultivated acre on earth, which is about 3.5 billion acres, and got it back to 3 pct, that would take 1 trillion tons of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and it hold it in the soil. A trillion tons of carbon dioxide happens to be the increase that we've had in the atmosphere since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.” -- David Perry, CEO, IndigoAg Contact: Indigo Ag, David Perry, CEO, (844) 828-0240, info@indigoag.com, www.indigoag.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Dioxide,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


Forest "Glow" Reveals CO2 Storage Capacity (Ind. Report)
University of Utah
Date: 2019-06-06
Researchers from the University of Utah report they’ve found a way to monitor the total amount of Gross Primary Production (GPP), the chemical energy produced by the process of photosynthesis which can be tracked by satellites in evergreen forests to measure seasonal changes that impact leaf growth and color.

Forests can store large amounts of carbon and so monitoring photosynthesis is an accurate way to track global carbon levels and measure how much CO2 is being stored. For evergreen trees which remain green all year round, it’s challenging to measure photosynthesis and carbon uptake. In the new study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found a way to use solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) emitted by evergreen trees to monitor seasonal changes in photosynthesis and GPP. SIF occurs when chlorophyll levels return from a dormant state, and a photon is emitted which produces a faint “glow” not visible to the naked eye. Satellites can now detect SIF glow, and the researchers used scanning spectrometers to measure SIF in an evergreen forest in Colorado. The team found that fluorescence was a reliable indicator of seasonal chlorophyll changes matching the same patterns found in deciduous forests. Having a way to monitor GPP in both evergreen and deciduous forests will help researchers understand how climate change is impacting forests over a large scale.

“Ultimately, measuring the small fluorescent glow from plants will allow us to see exactly timing and magnitude of carbon uptake from the terrestrial biosphere. This will help us understand how forests are responding to climate change and suggest how they might respond to future climate change,” said Troy Magney, research scientist of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a lead author of the study. (Source: University of Utah, earth.com, May, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  


Aussie Study says Soil Condition Key to Carbon Storage (Int'l)
Curtin University
Date: 2019-06-05
In the Land Down Under, a just released study from Curtin University in Western Australian has found that the rate at which carbon is stored and released from soil differs vastly depending on a range of factors, across different regions and continents.

"Regionally, the effect of climate on soil carbon storage is dependent on interactions with soil properties, mineralogy and topography. In some regions, climate does not play a role. This shows the need for localized assessments of soil carbon dynamics and a more effective approach to carbon management at local scales."

"To slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases and help mitigate global warming, a better understanding of the factors controlling soil organic carbon storage, its composition and its vulnerability to loss is needed," lead researcher Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel said. (Source: Curtin University, Xinhua, 4 June, 2019) Contact: Curtin University, Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel, +61 8 9266 9266, Fax: +61 8 9266 3131, www.curtin.edu.au

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


Illinois Gov. Inks Carbon Storage Pilot Legislation (Reg. & Leg.)
Wabash Valley Resources
Date: 2019-05-10
This week in Indianapolis, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb approved legislation allowing Wabash Valley Resources LLC to open a $450 million pilot project to produce anhydrous ammonia and store up to 50 million metric tons of CO2 at the former SG Solutions plant adjacent to Duke Energy's Wabash River Generating Station.

The project is subject to US EPA approval. (Source: News & Tribune, 8 May, 2019) Contact: Wabash Valley Resources LLC, (929) 400-5230, www.wvresc.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


Carbon Farming in the Golden State (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)

Date: 2019-05-03
"Agriculture is responsible for one-third of global carbon emissions, but an increasing number of farmers and ranchers think it can be a powerful ally in the fight to slow climate change, through a set of techniques called carbon farming.

"The underlying principle of carbon farming is straightforward -- to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, where it drives climate change, and put it back into plants and the pedosphere, the Earth's living soil layer. One way farmers do this is by fertilizing their lands with nutrient-rich compost.

"As plants grow, they store carbon in their leaves and roots and bank it in organic matter, such as decomposing plant pieces in the soil. Soil microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, also store carbon. This prevents the carbon from escaping into the atmosphere and joining oxygen to form carbon dioxide.

"Carbon farming has taken hold in California, which is increasingly stepping up as a pioneer of progressive climate policy in the U.S., even as the Trump administration denies the reality of climate change.

"Today, more than 80 ranchers and farmers in the state are implementing the practice. And the number is likely to increase, since the 2018 Farm Bill includes provisions for a pilot program that gives farmers an incentive to farm carbon.

"Grassland soils naturally absorb and store carbon in soil organic matter, but common agricultural practices, like plowing and tilling, diminish this ability by breaking apart the soil and releasing its stored carbon into the atmosphere. The good news is that carbon can be reabsorbed by the very same soil. Dozens of farming methods, including composting, managed grazing, no-till agriculture and cover crops, are thought to achieve this feat. Many of them mirror age-old, organic farming techniques.

"The potential for land-based carbon sequestration in California is significant. Rangelands cover about 56 million acres, half the state's overall land area. According to The New York Times, if 5 pct of that soil is treated with compost, the carbon sequestered would offset about 80 pct of the state's agricultural emissions, the equivalent of removing nearly 6 million cars from the road. If scaled to 41 pct, it would render the state's agricultural sector -- now accounting for 8 pct of the state's overall emissions -- carbon neutral for years. This amount is anything but negligible: California is the most populous state in the U.S. and the country's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Overall, it's responsible for 1 pct of global greenhouse emissions.

"Ultimately, carbon farming may only pull a limited amount of carbon from the atmosphere. But in California, grasslands appear to be a less vulnerable carbon storage option than fire-prone forests. With global greenhouse gas emissions on the rise, we need to commit to using carbon farming." (Source: NPR, High Country News, May, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Farming,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  


Shell Seeking UK CO2 Storage Development Subsidy (Int'l Report)
Royal Dutch Shell
Date: 2019-04-24
In the UK, the Sunday Times is reporting oil and gas giant Royal Dutch Shell is seeking an unspecified subsidy from the British government to support Shell's development of underground carbon dioxide storage.

The requested subsidy is reportedly less than the roughly £40 million previously granted for renewable energy technologies, according to the Sunday Times. (Source: Talk Finance, Sunday Times, 23 April, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Royal Dutch Shell ,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


DOE Announces $87Mn for Coal R&D Projects (Ind. Report)
US DOE
Date: 2019-04-15
In the nation's capitol, the U.S. DOE has announced up to $87.3 million in federal funding for cost-shared R&D projects for advanced coal technologies. In 2017, coal was the second-largest energy source for electricity generation in the United States.

The R&D projects for coal-fueled power plants and technologies include the following separate funding opportunities:

  • Advancing Steam Turbine Performance for Coal Boilers -- This FOA seeks to improve the performance of steam-based power cycles, resulting in a lower cost of electricity with reduced emissions per megawatt-hour for coal-fueled boilers. This FOA also includes an area of interest for conceptual engineering design for steam turbines in the 50 -- 350 MW range in support of DOE's Coal FIRST initiative. DOE's Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) Advanced Turbines Program will support these projects. DOE Funding: Up to $22 million

  • Transformational Sensing Systems for Monitoring the Deep Subsurface -- This FOA seeks to reduce uncertainty and enable real-time decision making associated with subsurface carbon dioxide (CO2) storage. FE's Carbon Storage Research Program will support these projects. Read more details about this FOA here. Up to $4.8 million is available.

  • Crosscutting Research for Coal-Fueled Power Plants -- This FOA aims to develop innovative technologies that will enhance the performance and economics of the existing and future coal fleet thereby lowering electricity costs for consumers. FE's Crosscutting Research Program will support these projects. Up to $14.5 million funding available.

  • Advanced Materials for High-Efficiency, Flexible and Reliable Coal-Fueled Power Plants -- This FOA will reduce the cost and enhance the cyclic durability of materials used in advanced ultrasupercritical power plants. These advanced materials are critical to increasing the efficiency and reliability of coal-fueled power plants. FE's Advanced Materials Program will support these projects. Up to $26 million available.

  • Process Scale-Up and Optimization/Efficiency Improvements for Rare Earth Elements (REE) and Critical Materials (CM) Recovery from Coal-Based Resources -- This FOA will support cooperative agreements to advance the development of technologies for recovery REEs and CMs from domestic coal-based resources through both novel and conventional extraction, separation, and recovery processes. FE's Feasibility of Recovering Rare Earth Elements Program will support these projects. Up to $20 million available.

    DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) will manage all of the selected projects.

    Download details HERE. ( Source: US DOE, April, 2019) Contact: US DOE, Sec. of Fossil Energy, Steven Winberg, Assist. Sec., www.energy.gov/fe/office-fossil-energy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US DOE,  Coal,  Clean Coal,  


  • Indiana CCS Bill Clears State House (Reg & Leg, Ind. Report)
    Indiana Wabash Valley Resources,Department of Natural Resources.
    Date: 2019-03-27
    In Indianapolis, the Indiana House reports passage of a bill that would create an underground carbon storage (CCS) pilot program to store carbon dioxide underground is going back to the state Senate for approval.

    The original proposal would have allowed companies to store CO2 underground as long as they got consent from owners of about half the land. This current bill creates a pilot program that allows one company to take ownership of the land through eminent domain, subject to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources approval.

    Subject to the bills passage and final approval, Wabash Valley Resources LLC plans to construct an ammonia production facility in Terre Haute and store its CO2 emissions underground to reduce its carbon footprint. (Source: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, wfiu. NPR, 26 Mar., 2019) Contact: Indiana Department of Natural Resources, (317) 232-4200 www.in.gov/dnr; Wabash Valley Resources, Todd Culwell, VP Corp. Affairs, www.wvresc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Wabash Valley Resources,  CCS,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


    Flanders Commits €400Mn to CCS, CCU Initiative (Int'l Report)
    Arcelor Mittal
    Date: 2019-03-25
    Reporting from Antwerp, the Flemish government reports the approval of a plan to spend €400 million over the next 20 years in an effort to manage carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions and to become climate neutral by 2050. The plan calls for a reduction in fossil fuels consumption while implementing carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) of CO2 that is still being produced. Although CCS and CCU technology is not new it is expensive, and there is no related income from CCS for climate protection.

    The Flemish government is interested in CCU, an example of which is a pilot project launched in Ghent last week between steel producer Arcelor Mittal and chemicals manufacturer Dow, to split the carbon monoxide and CO₂ from steel production and use the CO₂ to produce bio-ethanol, a renewable energy source.

    In another example, energy provider Engie has joined with waste incinerator Indeval to use CO2 capture to produce ethanol in Antwerp. (Source: Various Media, Brussels Times, Apr, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Arcelor Mittal,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Storage,  CCS,  


    Midwest Perennial Grasses Biofuel Feedstocks Investigated (R&D)
    University of Minnesota
    Date: 2019-01-30
    In ongoing research to discover the ideal growing conditions for alternative biofuels feedstocks, researchers at the University of Minnesota College of Biological Science are investigating the advantages and environmental implications of perennial grasses on abandoned and degraded agricultural land on the US upper mid-western prairies.

    A potential benefit of perennial grasses is tied to their deep root systems. According to researchers, deeper root systems -- as opposed to those seen in annual crops like corn -- are able to store large amounts of carbon below ground that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. However, because perennial grasses on marginal lands can have low yields due to less fertile soil, researchers examined ways to maximize growth of the grasses without negative effects on the environment.

    In the 10-year study published in Nature Sustainability, researchers utilized 36 plots at an abandoned agricultural site in the Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve to plant 32 species of prairie and savanna plants that are native to Minnesota. In 2007, researchers divided the plots into several groups and assigned them a combination of two treatments: water addition (i.e., irrigated or non-irrigated) and nitrogen fertilization (i.e., 0 g/m2, 7 g/m2, 14 g/m2). Over the next decade, researchers found that:

  • moderate treatments (irrigation and 7 g/m2 of nitrogen) had the best biomass yields and soil carbon storage, while having negligible effects on the stability, diversity and nutrient loss to groundwater;
  • compared with the control (non-irrigated and no additional nitrogen), moderate treatments resulted in almost twice the yield and soil carbon storage and -- if the plants were converted into bioenergy to displace fossil fuels -- it would result in twice the greenhouse gas savings;
  • compared with the moderate treatment, the more intensive treatment (irrigation and 14 g/m2 of nitrogen) had 30 percent lower greenhouse gas savings, 10 times greater nitrate leaching and 120 pct greater loss in plant diversity.

    Compared with corn ethanol, researchers found biomass yield from the best performing native prairie grasses was moderately lower -- six tons per hectare versus the average corn yield of eight tons per hectare in the U.S.. However, researchers found that because of lower nitrogen use and larger amounts of soil carbon storage, the native prairies would result in higher overall greenhouse gas savings when converted to bioenergy.

    The research was funded by the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research program and the Global Climate and Energy Project. (Source: University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences, PR, 28 Jan., 2019) Contact: College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota, Prof. David Tilman, Prof. Clarence Lehman, Lead Researcher, 612-625-5734 Fax: 612-624-6777, lehman@umn.edu, cbs.umn.edu; Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve, www.cedarcreek.umn.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel Feedstock,  


  • U.K. Environmental Coalition Spearheading CCS Project (Int'l)
    Very Large Scale Decarbonization Partners
    Date: 2019-01-16
    In London, U.K. Energy and Clean Growth Minister Hon. Claire Perry has announced the U.K. will lead an international challenge to capture and sequester CO2. Additionally, Houston-headquartered Very Large Scale Decarbonization Partners (VLS Decarb) has announced its intention to carry out field trials of its highly innovative CO2 sequestration system in several U.K. and EU locations, including several U.S. shale basins where, pending results, these trial sites will be developed into fully functioning carbon dioxide storage facilities capable of permanently storing a significant percentage of annual U.S. CO2 emissions. VLS Decarb will target U.S. shale basins in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.

    VLS Decarb is now securing long term carbon storage contracts from industrial, institutional and governmental clients seeking to mitigate CO2 emissions associated with their operations.

    VLS Decarb's proprietary technologies have the potential to permanently sequester approximately 35 years of global electric power CO2 emissions associated with the energy consumed in simultaneously sequestering all global CO2 emissions from all sources during the same time. (Source: VLS Decarbonization Partners, LLC, PR, Jan., 2019) Contact: VLS Decarbonization Partners, John Francis Thrash MD, jfthrash@vlsdecarb.com, www.vlsdecarb.com ; U.K. Energy and Clean Growth Minister, www.gov.uk/government/ministers/minister-of-state-minister-for-energy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


    Equinor Awarded Seabed CO2 Storage Exploration Permit (Int'l)
    Equinor
    Date: 2019-01-16
    The Norwegian Government reports it has awarded an exploitation permit for CO2 storage on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to Norwegian multinational energy company Equinor. The permitted area is close to the Troll oil and gas field in the North Sea.

    Equinor is currently performing front-end engineering and design (FEED) studies on storage with project partners Shell and Total. The FEED-studies will provide more accurate cost estimates necessary for an investment decision. Equinor will next prepare a Plan for Development and Operations (PDO) scheduled for delivery in 2019. An investment decision for the Norwegian full-scale CCS project is expected in 2020/2021. (Source: Equinor, Gas World, 14 Jan., 2019) Contact: Equinor, www.equinor.com/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Equinor,  CCS,  Seabed Carbon Storage,  


    Equinor Licensed to Build Norwegian Seabed CO2 Storage (Int'l)
    Equinor
    Date: 2019-01-11
    In Oslo, Reuters is reporting the Norwegian Oil Ministry has awarded a license to Oslo-headquartered Equinor to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) storage under the North Sea. The company is now expected to submit a development plan for the Norwegian parliament's approval in 2020 or 2021. The preliminary estimates from 2016 showed it could cost approximately $852 million to establish a full CCS chain, including CO2 transportation by ships and the sub-sea storage.

    The planned storage will be located near Norway's largest oil and gas field, Troll, and aims to be able to receive CO2 from onshore power, cement plants and sources. About 1.5 million tpy of CO2 could be stored beneath the seabed during the first phase of the project, according to Equinor.

    If approved, the storage operation is expected to begin operations operations in 2023 or 2024. (Source: Equinor, Gassnova, Reuters, 11 Jan., 2019) Contact: Equinor, www.equinor.com/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Equinor,  Carbon Sequestration,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


    Finland Recalculates Forest Carbon Sink Capacity (Int'l Report)
    Carbon Sink
    Date: 2018-12-14
    In Helsinki, the Finnish Natural Resources Institute is reporting Finland could safely consume over 80 million cubic meters of its forest wood annually without disturbing the forest's carbon storage capacity.

    The Institute notes that earlier assessments of the size of the country's forest carbon sink had been underestimated and did not take the faster growth rate of forests under the influence of global warming and a warmer climate. The Institute added that even though the Finnish carbon sink will shrink because of wood usage, it would not be reduced to a critical level any time before 2050. The current level of forest use is roughly 70 million cubic meters annually. The government has aimed at an increase up to 80 million.

    The Institute study was in compliance with EU land usage decree requirements that members inform the EC by the end of 2018 about estimated carbon sink levels of their forests in 2021-2025. They will then be analyzed by experts from the EU and members. The EU Commission will define the final values in 2020. (Source: Finnish Natural Resources Institute , Xinhua, 12 Dec., 2018) Contact: Finnish Natural Resources Institute, +358 29 532 6000, www.luke.fi/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sink,  CO2,  Carbon Dioxide,  Carbon Emissions,  Forest Carbon,  


    WSU Researchers Find Carbon Reserve Underfoot (R&D, Ind. Report)
    Washington State University
    Date: 2018-12-07
    According to research from Washington State University at least a quarter of all the carbon stored in Earth's soil is found locked up in minerals roughly six feet beneath the surface. But new research suggests this unique carbon reservoir will become less efficient at carbon storage as the planet warms. The research details the way carbon physically and chemically binds to minerals in soils across the globe.

    The new data showed minimal amounts of carbon are stored in the sediments of deserts and dry forests, but roughly six feet beneath the surfaces of wet forests, scientists found an abundance of carbon bound to reactive minerals. The persistence of water and decaying organic matter on the forest floor helps leach carbon from above and transport to minerals buried below.

    According to the new research, global warming won't impact the carbon that is already stored beneath the surface of wet forest floors, but it will alter the pathway by which new carbon gets stored. Temperature increases are likely to minimize the amount of water running through forest soil, even if precipitation levels remain stable.

    The results of the survey were published in the journal Nature Climate Change HERE. (Source: Washington State University, Vancouver, UPI, 2 Nov., 2018) Contact: Washington State University, Vancouver, Assoc. Prof. Marc Kramer, Environmental Chemistry, marc.kramer@wsu.edu, https://labs.wsu.edu/kramerlab/marc-g-kramer

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Washington State University,  Carbon Storage,  


    DRAX Woody Biomass Power Plant CCS Pilot Underway (Int'l. Report)
    DRAX
    Date: 2018-11-28
    Further to our August 20th coverage, in the UK DRAX Energy reports it has begun work on a pilot project to capture and store carbon dioxide emissions at its biomass plant in North Yorkshire. The facility burns woody sawdust pellets to operate the world's first carbon negative power station, according to DRAX.

    The UK aims to slash its greenhouse gas emissions by 80 pct compared with 1990 levels by 2050. (Source: DRAX, Investing.com, 26 Nov., 2018))Contact: DRAX Power, Andy Koss, CEO, +44 0 1757 618381, www.draxpower.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  Woody Biomass,  


    Riparian Forest Carbon Storage Potential Explored (Ind. Report)
    Point Blue Conservation Science
    Date: 2018-11-14
    New Research from Petaluma, California-based Point Blue Conservation Science and Santa Clara University has concluded that riparian ecosystems and stream-side forests store "significant amounts of carbon." Accordingly, the report notes the the restoration of degraded forests is a critical strategy for addressing global climate change.

    The research, led by Dr. Kristen Dybala, found that the average amount of carbon stored in mature streamside forest rivals the highest estimates for tropical or boreal forests. The average values for mature streamside forests range from 168 to 390 tons of carbon per acre in the trees alone.

    Researchers also found that, on average, soil carbon can be expected to more than triple when converting from an un-forested site to a mature stream-side forest. With trees, it can take 40-90 years for these changes to come into full effect, and more than 115 years for soil carbon.

    The report notes new tools and funding sources are emerging to help plan for and implement effective stream-side forest restorations. Countries around the world have pledged to restore degraded forests under the Bonn Challenge, a global commitment to restore forests as a climate mitigation strategy.

    "Point Blue advances conservation of birds, other wildlife, and ecosystems through science, partnerships, and outreach. Our highest priority is to reduce the impacts of habitat loss, climate change, and other environmental threats while promoting nature-based solutions for wildlife and people, on land and at sea," according the the Point Blue website. (Source: Point Blue Conservation Science, Public Release, Nov., 2018) Contact: Point Blue Conservation Science, pointblue@pointblue.org, www.pointblue.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Climate Change,  CO2 Emissions,  Point Blue Conservation Science,  


    NETs Offer CO2 Removal Potential, Report Notes (Ind. Report)
    National Academies of Science, Engineering
    Date: 2018-11-09
    A new report from the Washington, DC-headquartered National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine has concluded that a substantial research initiative should begin as soon as possible to learn more about the impacts, limitations and scalability of Negative Emissions Technologies (NETs).

    According to the report, NETs , which remove CO2 directly from ambient air or enhance natural carbon sinks, could be scaled up to capture and store a significant amount of global carbon emissions, but not enough to prevent a global temperature increase of more than 2 degrees C. More research is needed to understand how to overcome existing constraints on the technologies, such as high costs and energy requirements, according to the report.

    The report highlights two NETs -- direct air capture (DAR) and mineralization using chemicals and reforestation, changing agricultural practices to enhance soil carbon storage, using biomass produce electricity with CCS and enhancing the amount of carbon stored in coastal ecosystems. In addition to mitigating climate change, NETs could open an untapped market, the report notes. (Source: National Academies of Science, Engineering, Engineering News Record, Nov., 2018)Contact: National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, 202-334-2000, www.nationalacademies.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Capture,  Carbon Dioxide,  


    Amazon Mangroves Key to Carbon Storage, says Study (Ind. Report)
    Climate Change
    Date: 2018-09-26
    In Corvallis, Scientists led by Oregon State University ecologist Prof. J. Boone Kauffman have determined for the first time that the Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's rainforest.

    The recently released long-term study offers a better understanding of how mangrove deforestation contributes to the greenhouse gas effect, one of the leading causes of global warming.

    The Brazilian mangrove forest fringes the entirety of the Atlantic Coast at the mouth of the Amazon, the largest river in the world with the largest mangrove forest. Mangroves -- aka Blue Carbon -- represent 0.6 pct of all the world's tropical forests but their deforestation accounts for as much as 12 pct of GHG emissions from all tropical deforestation.

    Partial funding for the study was provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development, Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program. (Source: Oregon State University, KTVZ.COM, 24 Sept., 2018) Contact: Oregon State University, J. Boone Kauffman, Research Leader, www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Kauffman3

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Blue Carbon,  Carbon Sequestration,  Mangrove,  


    $7Mn Awarded for Geological Carbon Storage R&D (Funding)
    Office of Fossil Energy,NETL
    Date: 2018-08-31
    Kallanish Energy is reporting the US DOE Office of Fossil Energy has awarded $7 million in grants to the University of Illinois and the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks to advance the development and validation of geological CO2 storage technologies.

    The two projects will be managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The University of Illinois will focus on reservoirs and residual oil zones in the Illinois Basin in three states. The university received $3.4 million in federal funds and will provide $917,881 in matching funds.

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) will establish the Williston Basin CO2 Field Laboratory in the South Central Cut Bank oilfield in Montana. The NDEERC received $3.4 million in federal funds and will provide $873,926 in matching funds.

    Since 1997, DOE's Carbon Storage program portfolio includes industry cost-shared technology development projects, university research grants, collaborative work with other national laboratories, and research conducted in-house through the NETL Research & Innovation Center. The Carbon Storage program incorporates: Core Storage Research and Development; Storage Infrastructure; and Strategic Program Support to address significant technical challenges in order to meet program goals that support the scale-up and widespread deployment of CCS.

    Download details on the US DOE Carbon Storage Program HERE. (Source: DOE Office of Fossil Energy, Kallanish Energy, Others, 30 Aug., 2018) Contact: DOE Office of Fossil Energy, 202-586-6660, www.energy.gov/fe/office-fossil-energy; University of Illinois, (217) 333-1000, https://illinois.edu; NETL, www.netl.doe.gov; UNDEERC, (701) 777-5000, www.undeerc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News UNDEERC,  Office of Fossil Energy ,  Carbon Storage,  NETL,  


    Norway Open for Carbon Capture & Storage Business (Int'l. Report)
    Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy
    Date: 2018-08-13
    In Oslo, the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy reports it is proceeding with an undersea carbon capture and storage (CSS) project which, if successful, will serve as a stepping stone for full scale international operations.

    The Norwegian demonstration scale project, which is expected to be online by 2020, will capture emissions from a Heidelberg Cement cplant in Brevik and a waste incineration facility in Oslo. These sites all delivered their concept studies for CO2 capture in the fall of 2017. Each plant plans to capture roughly 400,000 tpy.

    Norway began in carbon storage with the Sleipner Project which has stored 1 million tpy CO2 since startup about 20 years ago. It was the first facility dedicated to CO2 storage and was installed as a means of avoiding the Norwegian carbon tax and reducing the CO2 content of natural gas produced in the area, which exceeded the specified European Union limit in CO2 concentration of 2.5 pct. (Source: Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, Design News, Aug., 2018) Contact: Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, +47 22 24 90 90, postmottak@oed.dep.no, www.regjeringen.no

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Capture,  CO2,  Carbon Dioxide,  


    UK Businesses Admonished to Reap CCUS Benefits (Int'l Report)
    Summit Power
    Date: 2018-08-13
    In the UK, in an apparent reference to research by low-carbon power experts Summit Power, the Minister of Energy and Clean Growth, the Hon. Claire Perry has pronounced "carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) one of the greatest industrial opportunities available to Britain today." The Minister adds that "international recognition that the technology must be used if the targets to limit global warming set in the Paris Agreement of 2015 are to be hit."

    In 2017, research by low-carbon power experts Summit Power forecast a £160 boost to the UK economy if CCUS technology was deployed on a large scale along the east coast. Summit Power proposed linking industrial areas in the South East, Teesside, Humber and Scotland to offshore carbon storage under the North Sea. The firm said the operating costs would be £34 billion annually, and the benefits to the national economy £164 billion

    . This past March, the UK's first CCUS demonstration plant opened in Cheshire. The Runcorn facility, owned by Econic Technologies and supported by the EU, converts C02 into polyols which are used to make foam-like materials. (Source: Business Week, 9 April, 2018) Minister of Energy and Clean Growth, the Hon. Claire Perry, www.gov.uk/government/people/claire-perry; Summit Power, https://summitpower.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Capture,  CO2,  


    ITB, IIASA Ink Bioenergy-Carbon Storage MoU (Int'l Report)
    Institut Teknologi Bandung, Austrian research institute International Institute
    Date: 2018-07-30
    In Indonesia, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) reports it has inked a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate with the Austrian research institute International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) on bioenergy combined with Carbon Capture Storage (BECCS).

    Researchers, scientists and experts from both sides will develop and implement a joint research project which will be funded by a third party. There will also be joint scientific publications, research participation from academic staff in seminars and conferences, among other collaborations.

    Developing BECCS is significant for Indonesia since it is considered as one of the world's forest centres. The aim of this will also contribute to the reduction of carbon emissions regionally and globally. (Source: Institut Teknologi Bandung, Open Gov Asia, 27 July, 2018) Contact: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Prof. Dr Pavel Kaba, CEO, www.itb.ac.id; Institut Teknologi Bandung, +62-22-2580935, www.itb.ac.id

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy,  CCS,  


    Trees vs Grass for Carbon Sink Supremacy (R&D, Ind. Report)
    UC Davis
    Date: 2018-07-11
    Researchers from the University of California, Davis have found that grasslands and rangelands are better carbon sinks than forests in present-day California. Years of warming temperatures, fire suppression, and drought have increased wildfire risks and turned the state's forests into carbon producers more than carbon consumers, according to the research.

    Trees store much of their carbon within their leave and woody biomass, while grass stores most of its carbon underground. This means that when a tree catches fire, it releases its stores of carbon back into the atmosphere. But when a fire burns through grasslands, the carbon fixed underground tends to stay in the roots and soil.

    The study suggests that grasslands and range lands should be given opportunities in California's cap-and-trade market, which was designed to reduce the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. Their findings could also influence other carbon offset efforts around the world, especially those in semi-arid environments. This study states that, from a cap-and-trade and carbon-offset perspective, conserving grasslands and promoting rangeland practices that lead to reliable rates of carbon sequestration may help meet California's emission-reduction goals. (Source: UC Davis, earth.com, July, 2018) Contact: UC Davis, John Muir Institute of the Environment , Benjamin Houlton, Dir., (530) 752-7627, johnmuir.ucdavis.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sink,  Climate Change,  Carbon Storage,  


    CO2 Rock Sequestration Verification Demo Touted (Ind Report)
    WellDog
    Date: 2018-06-29
    Laramie, Wyoming-based WellDog, Virginia Tech and Carbon GeoCycle are reporting their collaboration has delivered the world's first successful direct verification of carbon dioxide sequestered in an underground rock.

    The test injected over 13,000 tons of CO2 into stacked unmineable coal seams at depths of 900 to 2,000 feet with the goal of storing CO2 while simultaneously enhancing natural gas recovery. The verification, made using WellDog's proprietary Reservoir Raman System, reveals that carbon dioxide injected over the last two years flowed into all of the targeted coal seams in Buchanan County, Virginia.

    The $15.5 million project is funded by the US DOE, Virginia Tech, and private industry. The project research partners included Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research, Virginia Tech; Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy; DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory; Marshall Miller & Associates; Southern States Energy Board; CONSOL Energy; Geological Survey of Alabama; Sandia Technologies; Det Norske Veritas; WellDog; and Carbon GeoCycle. (Source: WellDog, PR, 27 June, 2018) Contact: WellDog, John M. Pope, CEO, info@welldog.com, www.welldog.com; Carbon GeoCycle, www.carbongeocycle.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


    Aussie Study Values Inland Wetlands Carbon Storage Stocks (Int'l)
    Deakin University
    Date: 2018-06-27
    In the Land Down Under, researchers from the Deakin School of Life and Environmental Sciences' Blue Carbon Lab are reporting that Victoria state's inland wetlands lock away the annual emissions of 185,000 people. Victoria has about 530,000 hectares of inland wetlands, which include marshes, peatlands, pools and lakes, making up about 2.33 pct of the state's land area. The figure is part the state's first tally of its valuable environmental resources which came to three million tpy of CO2.

    In total, the researchers estimated Victoria's inland wetlands had a soil carbon stock of 68 million tons, worth about $6 billion under Australia's most recent carbon price.

    According to lead researcher Dr Paul Carnell, "While a lot more is known about how trees suck up and store carbon, freshwater wetlands can actually sequester 20 to 40 times more carbon than forests on dry land."

    The study was funded by the Victoria Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology. (Source: Deakin University, PR, 26 June 2018) Contact: Deakin University, Dr Paul Carnell, Lead Researcher, +61 3 924 43902, paul.carnell@deakin.edu.au, www.deakin.edu.au: Blue Carbon, http://bluecarbonlab.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Blue Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Urban Forest, Tropical Rainforest Carbon Storage Capacity Nearly Equal (Ind. Report)
    Carbon Storage
    Date: 2018-06-27
    In the UK, a new University College London (UCL) study published in Carbon Balance and Management used publicly-available airborne LiDAR data collected by the UK Environment Agency, combined with ground-based LiDAR measurements, to generate a map of carbon stored in an estimated 85,000 trees across the London Borough of Camden. The study found that urban areas store up to 178 tonnes of carbon per ha, in comparison to the median value for tropical rainforests of 190 tonnes of carbon per ha.

    According to Treeconomics the services provided by urban trees in Greater London are estimated to be worth £133 million per annum. The carbon storage capacity of urban trees alone is valued to be worth £4.8 million per annum in Greater London, or £17.80 per tree.

    The research study was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, in part through the National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO). (Source: University College London, earth.com, 25 June, 2018) Contact: University College London, Natasha Downes, +44 (0)20 3108 3844, n.downes @ucl.ac.uk, www.ucl.ac.uk said lead author on the study, Dr Phil Wilkes (UCL Geography). UCL Geography LiDAR research group.

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


    Wyoming Univ. CCS Project Wins CarbonSAFE Funding (Funding, R&D)
    Basiin Electric, University of Wyoming,
    Date: 2018-06-04
    In Laramie, the University of Wyoming (UW) is reporting receipt of $9.77 million in US DOE funding for a two-year, $12.25 million project to determine the feasibility of establishing a commercial-scale geological storage complex for carbon dioxide (CO2) in Wyoming.In addition to the $9.77 million federal grant, cost-sharing contributions from the partners will total about $2.47 million.

    For the project, UW, Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), and other partners aim to demonstrate that over 50 million metric tons of CO2 could be stored underground near Basin Electric's 385-mw Dry Fork Station near Gillette.

    The grant for the project comes from the DOE's Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE) initiative, which seeks to help mitigate CO2 emissions from consumption of fossil fuels. (Source: University of Wyoming, 25 May, 2018) Contact: University of Wyoming, Carbon Management Institute , Scott Quillinan, Project Manager, (307) 766-1121, www.uwyo.edu; Basin Electric Power, Paul Sukut, CEO, Matt Greek, Snr. VP Technology R&D, (701) 223-0441, www.basinelectric.com; DOE Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise , www.instrumentl.com/grants/carbon-storage-assurance-facility-enterprise-carbonsafe-storage-complex-facility DOE CarbonSAFE details, www.ieaghg.org/docs/General_Docs/Publications/Information_Papers/2017-IP47.pdf

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Basin Electric,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Storage,  CarbonSAFE,  CCS,  Basin Electric,  


    DOE Awarding $30Mn for CCS Feasibility Projects (Ind. Report)
    Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise
    Date: 2018-05-30
    In Washington, the U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy reports it is splitting $29.6 million between three newly selected R&D projects to determine the feasibility of commercial-scale carbon storage complexes as part of the second phase of the cost-shared Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE) program.

    The selected projects are intended to promote sustainable efforts among fossil resources and cut down on the cost of advanced fossil energy technologies -- permanent geologic storage for carbon dioxide to coincide with the predicted use of transformative carbon capture technologies beginning around 2025.

    This marks the second phase of an effort which has already seen approximately $15.4 million distributed among 13 projects. The latest round will be managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and include projects run by the Battelle Memorial Institute, the Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois and the University of Wyoming. (Source: US DOE, Energy Insider, 29 May, 2018) Contact: Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise, www.researchfunding.duke.edu/carbon-storage-assurance-facility-enterprise-carbonsafe-storage-complex-facility; DOE Office of Fossil Energy, www.energy.gov/fe/office-fossil-energy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage,  DOE Office of Fossil Energy,  


    Fundy's "Blue Carbon" Sequestration Capacity Explored (Ind. Report)
    Blue Carbon,Environment and Climate Change Canada
    Date: 2018-05-23
    In Atlantic Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada's recent study of the Bay of Fundy coastal ecosystem and its "blue carbon" has estimated the area's carbon sequestration capacity to hold hundreds of millions of dollars worth of carbon-offsetting costs. "Blue carbon" is a term coined by scientists to describe carbon dioxide stored in coastal plants and soil.

    On land, forests capture carbon dioxide and produce oxygen. Forests release their carbon every few hundred years, due to fire, tree mortality or human harvesting. By comparison, coastal marshes maintain their carbon for thousands of years. Coastal ecosystems do the same -- but they're much better at it, according to McGill University "Blue Carbon" authority Assoc. Prof. Gail Chmurain. Coastal ecosystems can hold three to five times more carbon than the equivalent area of forest, according to a federal government report.

    The financial value of blue carbon comes from its potential for carbon emission credits which the Canadian federal government is introducing. According to government documents, "carbon stored in tidal salt marshes in the Bay of Fundy could have an estimated value of $202 million." That would equal $1 billion in 2022. In terms of Canada's national carbon emissions strategy, blue carbon could be used as an offset to meet international targets and coastal communities could protect or rehabilitate wetlands to generate carbon credits. (Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada, CBC, 22 May, 2018) Contact: Environment and Climate Change Canada, (800) 668-6767, www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change.htm; McGill University, Assoc. Prof. Gail Chmurain, (514) 926-6854, gail.chmura@mcgill.ca, www.mcgill.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Storage,  


    DEFRA OKs £2Mn for UK Peatland Restoration (Int'l Funding)
    DEFRA
    Date: 2018-05-21
    In the UK, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) reports it has approved a £2 million funding application from a partnership of regional organizations for funding the restoration of 1,680 hectares of peatland on Bodmin Moor, Dartmoor and Exmoor.

    According to the restoration project leader Morag Angus, of South West Water, "The peatlands of South West England are very important for water quality, carbon storage, biodiversity, cultural history, recreation and farming but they are the most vulnerable in the UK to the impacts of climate change, due to their southerly position. For this reason, they need to be prioritized nationally and restored for the benefit of all and future generations."

    Peatlands store vast amounts of carbon in their soils -- about 60-times the amount of carbon that is released annually from fossil fuel burning. One-third of all the soil carbon in the world is in peatland ecosystems even though they cover only 3 pct of the terrestrial land surface, according to a 2015 joint study from Chapman University in California, University of Oregon and Purdue University . (Source: DEFRA, Cornish Times, 20 May, 2018)Contact: DEFRA, www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-environment-food-rural-affairs

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DEFRA,  Peatland,  Carbon Storage,  


    TNC, XL Catlin Collaborate on Blue Carbon Credits (Ind. Report)
    TNC, XL Catlin
    Date: 2018-05-11
    The Nature Conservancy (TNC)and insurance/reinsurance firm XL Catlin in Bermuda are touting a project to develop Blue Carbon Resilience Credits that will value the combined carbon sequestration and resilience benefits provided by coastal wetland ecosystems.

    With XL Catlin's support, TNC will develop a system of credits assigning a market value to the resilience services provided by these historically under valueded cosystems. The hope behind this initiative is that, for the first time, insurance firms and other businesses will be able to offset their carbon footprint while simultaneously better underdstanding the contribution they are making to reducing coastal hazards in the world's most vulnerable coastal areas.

    Coastal wetlands -- salt marshes, seagrass meadows and mangroves -- sequester billions of tonnes of "blue carbon" from the atmosphere at concentrations up to five times greater than terrestrial forests. As an increasing number of companies are purchasing carbon credits to offset their footprints, this credit will enable a valuation of the carbon sequestration and coastal resilience benefits that wetlands provide both businesses and communities.

    Unlike other climate mitigation solutions coastal wetlands not only sequester carbon, they also protect coastlines by absorbing incoming wave energy and providing storm protection. Additionally, a recent study found that wetlands prevented $625 million in direct flood damages from Hurricane Sandy in the United States. As such, coastal wetlands provide both carbon sequestration and resilience services- a powerful combination in a world of changing climate.

    TNC will explore different options to value the resilience services provided by coastal wetlands and to develop a credit product to support ongoing wetland conservation. One of these options could include a numeric ranking system assigning a dollar value to wetlands based on factors such as their potential for storm impact reduction, location relative to vulnerable communities, local economic activities and assets, and potential benefits from habitat restoration. The figures generated by the rankings, combined with the carbon storage capacity of a given wetland, would generate Blue Carbon Resilience Credits. These credits would then offer organizations the capacity to manage their carbon footprints whilst acting as the funding mechanism for wetland conservation, increasing coastal resilience for communities. (Source: The Nature Conservancy, 10 May, 2018) Contact: The Nature Conservancy, Maria Damanki, Global Managing Director for the Ocean, www.nature.org: XL Catlin, Paul Jardine, CEO, www.xlcatlin.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  


    Philippines Developer Touts Forest Carbon-Emission Offsetting Initiative (Int'l Report)
    www.ayalaland.com.ph
    Date: 2018-03-19
    In the Philippines, real estate giant Ayala Land Inc. and Center for Conservation Innovations Inc. report they are conducting carbon emission-offsetting forest preservation and reforestation program entitled Carbon Neutral by 2022. The program is aimed at maximizing the carbon storage potential of a 133-hectare forest in Alaminos, Laguna, to help abate the impacts of climate change.

    In January, 2018, the company set aside 450 hectares of land to develop carbon-guzzling forests in line with its other low-carbon targets, including increased reliance on renewable energy, green building practices and increased energy efficiency. Ayala Land Inc. generates produces about 68,000 tpy of CO2, according to the company. tons of carbon dioxide a year.

    The Center for Conservation Innovations Inc. will study five sites in different parts of the Philippines to determine a baseline carbon stock in the carbon-forest sites, three of which are within or adjacent to existing Alaya Land development projects. (Source: Alaya Land Inc., Business Mirror, 18 Mar., 2018)Contact: Center for Conservation Innovations, www.conservation-innovations.org; Ayala Land Inc., Anna Maria Gonzales, Sustainability Manager, www.ayalaland.com.ph

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Offsetting,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Enissions,  


    China's Pearl River Delta CCUS Potential Studied (Int'l)
    Edinburgh University,CCUS
    Date: 2018-03-19
    Scientists from Edinburgh University reports they are partnering with Chinese colleagues on the possible development of large-scale Carbon Capture Storage and Utilization (CCSU) opportunities in rocks underneath the Pearl River Basin, one of China's largest rivers and most polluted regions.

    The joint effort, which aims to develop the river basin's suitability as a site for carbon storage, is focused on three depleted oil fields in the Huizhou area, and could provide decades of secure CO2 storage offshore for projects such as the Haifeng full-chain offshore CCSU project at a coal-fired power station.

    The joint research is supported by the Scottish Funding Council, EPSRC and NERC in partnership with Scottish Carbon Capture and Storage (SCCS), which includes British Geological Survey, Heriot-Watt University and the universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Strathclyde.

    China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to its ongoing dependence on coal as a source of energy. Carbon capture and storage could play a crucial role in reducing the country's greenhouse gas emissions and helping it meet its commitment to the Paris Agreement. (Source: Edinburgh University, The National, 16 Mar., 2018) Contact: Edinburgh University, www.ed.ac.uk; British Geological Survey, www.bgs.ac.uk; Scottish Funding Council, www.sfc.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCus,  CCS,  Carbon Dioxide,  


    SFI Reports Forest Conservation Grants, Collaborations (Ind. Report)
    Sustainable Forestry Initiative
    Date: 2018-03-09
    In Washington and Ottawa, the not-for-profit Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (SFI) is reporting the awarding of five conservation grants that will advance an understanding of the benefits associated with well managed forests across the United States and Canada. These grants feature collaboration between SFI and a diverse range of partners and experts from 45 organizations to advance SFI's Conservation Impact Project.

    SFI advances North American forest conservation through carefully targeted research, direct leadership of critical conservation initiatives and partnerships that contribute to soil productivity, carbon storage, and a better understanding of the benefits of working forests relative to climate change.

    SFI participants have invested more than $1.6 billion in forest-research activities. In 2016 alone, SFI program participants engaged with over 500 organizations on 420 different conservation and research projects and invested $59 million in forest research. (Source: Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc., PR, 6 Mar., 2018) Contact: Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. (2020 596-3452, www. sfiprogram.org, www.sfiprogram.org/conservation/conservation-at-sfi

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Sustainable Forestry Initiative ,  


    Biological Solution to Carbon Capture, Recycling (New Prod & Tech)
    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
    Date: 2018-01-10
    Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli, normally harmless gut bacteria, could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling CO2 to slow down and even reverse global warming. The research has been funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

    Working with local industry partners Sasol UK and Ingenza Ltd, the University researchers developed a process that enables the E. coli bacterium to act as a very efficient carbon capture device. When the bacteria containing the FHL enzyme are placed under pressurized CO2 and hydrogen gas mixtures -- up to 10 atmospheres of pressure -- a 100 pct conversion of the CO2 to formic acid is observed. The reaction happens over a few hours and at ambient temperatures. The "microbial cell factory" could be used to mop up CO2 from many types of industry.

    Not only capturing CO2 but storing or recycling it is a major issue. There are millions of tonnes of CO2 being pumped into the atmosphere every year. For the UK alone, the net emission of C02 in 2015 was 404 million tonnes. There is a significant question of where can we put it all even if we capture it, with current suggestions including pumping it underground in to empty oil and gas fields, according to the researchers release. (Source: University of Dundee, Public PR, 8 Jan., 2018) Contact: University of Dundee, Professor Frank Sargent, www.lifesci.dundee.ac.uk/people/frank-sargent; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, www.bbsrc.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Capture,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Recycling,  


    Carnegie Air Observatory Tracks Borneo's Carbon Reserves (Int'l)
    Carnegie Airborne Observatory
    Date: 2017-12-08
    Ecologists at the Washibgto, D.C. Carnegie Institution for Science, in coordination with the Sabah Forestry Department in Malaysian Borneo, the Southeast Asia Rainforest Research Partnership and others are using the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, an airplane filled with scientific instruments, to map Malaysian Borneo's carbon stocks to help conservationists locate and track the island’s most important carbon reserves.

    Tropical deforestation and ecological degradation account for roughly 10 pct of the planet's annual carbon emissions. Meanwhile, Borneo is home to one of the most efficient carbon recycling and storage systems on the planet. The latest research efforts show, some 40 percent of the island's carbon stocks are without maximum protections and could suffer deforestation and degradation if the land is converted into agriculture or cleared for development.

    Using the latest data collected by the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, the researchers found the island could double its carbon stocks by allowing previously felled forests to regenerate. (Source: Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Airborne Observatory, Newsline, UPI, 4 Dec., 2017) Carnegie Airborne Observatory, https://cao.carnegiescience.edu; Carnegie Institution for Science, (202) 387-6400, https://carnegiescience.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon,  Deforestation,  Carbon Storage,  


    Texas Univ. Awarded $4Mn for CCS Partnership (Ind. Report, Funding)
    University of Texas
    Date: 2017-12-06
    According to a release from the University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology, its leadership in the technology of pumping and sequestering CO2 deep under the seafloor has prompted the U.S. DOE to grant the bureau $4 million to lead a regional partnership to explore how CO2 emitted from industrial facilities along the Gulf Coast can be safely stored in geological formations under the Gulf of Mexico.

    The four-year program's goal is to foster the safe capture, transportation and long-term sequestration of CO2. The partnership includes researchers from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and the Cockrell School of Engineering Hildebrand Department of Petroleum Geosystems and Engineering. The bureau and UTIG are units of the UT Jackson School of Geosciences. Other partners include the U.S. Geological Survey, Louisiana Geological Survey, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lamar University and Trimeric Corporation.

    The partnership will focus on: offshore storage resources geologic characterization; risk assessment, simulation and modeling; monitoring, verification, accounting; Infrastructure, operations and permitting assessment; and knowledge dissemination. (Source: University of Texas, Austin, PR, 4 Dec., 2017)Contact: ontact: Anton Caputo, University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences, (512)232-9623, www.jsg.utexas.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Capture,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    South Africa Confirms 50,000 Tonne CCS Project (Int'l Report)
    South Africa
    Date: 2017-11-08
    The South African Department of Energy and South African Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage reports South Africa plans to sequester initial 50,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide at a depth ranging from 800 meters to 2 kilometers beneath the earth surface -- depending upon rock formation suitability -- at KwaZulu-Natal near the Mozambique border. The project is expected to get underway in 2019.

    If successful, the pilot project would be repeated on a larger scale in the seabed somewhere between Durban and Richards Bay. The commercial-scale facility would enable ESKOM, the country's dominant utility, and other large industrial operations to continue burning coal and other fossil fuels for decades. (Source: South Africa Department of Energy and South African Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage.Business Day, 2 Nov., 2017) Contact: Department of Energy and South African Centre for Carbon Capture and Storage, www.sacccs.org.za

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  CCS,  


    TOTAL Joining Carbon Capture, Utilization Storage Project (Int'l)
    Total,Shell,Statoil
    Date: 2017-11-06
    TOTAL, the Paris-headquartered French energy giant which has committed 10 pct of its R&D budget to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), reports it will partner with Shell and Statoil on a project to study the world's first commercial carbon storage facility near Oslo, Norway.

    The planned facility would store 35 million tpy of carbon emitted by a waste treatment plant, a cement works and a fertilizer plant. The carbon will be stored in a saline aquifer at a water depth of 1,400 meters.

    The project will be scaled to accommodate up to 1.5 million tpy of carbon -- equivalent to the annual emissions of over 300,000 vehicles. in the event that other industrial operators choose to sign on. It will also help lower the cost of the technologies used, a major issue if the CCUS market is to grow.

    Climate experts reportedly estimate that several hundred billion dollars per year will have to be invested between now and 2050 to grow the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry enough to achieve carbon neutrality and meet the Paris Agreement target of holding the average global temperature rise below 2 degrees C by 2100. (Source: TOTAL, PR, 1 Nov., 2017)Contact: TOTAL, Laetitia Maccioni: + 33 6 24 60 57 65 l, laetitia.maccioni@total.com, Investor Relations, +44 (0)207 719 7962 l, www.total.com; Statoil, www.statoil.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Statoil,  Total,  Carbon Emissions,  CCS,  CCUS,  


    Rotterdam and Oslo compete to set up first CO2 highway

    Date: 2017-11-04
    Norway and the port of Rotterdam are competing to create the first European chain that will allow CO2 capture from industrial sites to be transported to a storage site offshore. The two projects featured prominently at a conference in Rotterdam last week, organised by the Global CCS Institute, whose chairman spoke hopefully of a "renaissance" and "renewed interest" in carbon capture and storage (CCS). Previous CCS projects in the European Union focused on trapping the climate-changing carbon dioxide gases from coal-fired power plants, with all elements of the process in the hands of a single party. The last surviving EU project was supposed to be a coal-fired power plant with CCS in Rotterdam, but the project's supports pulled out last summer. Instead, the CO2 from Rotterdam's industry is planned to be stored in depleted gas fields in the North Sea. A feasibility study is due to be ready by the end of the year, with an investment decision planned for the end of 2018. The idea is to create a CO2 'highway' which is operated by a separate entity. Rotterdam's plans received a boost in October when after months of negotiations, four Dutch political parties announced a coalition deal, needed to form a new government. They promised to reduce emissions of 56 megatonnes of CO2 by 2030. A third of that reduction, 18, is planned to be achieved by having industrial sites apply CCS. Earlier in October, the Norwegian government announced it would cut 90 percent of the budget Rotterdam has planned to begin storing CO2 in 2020, while Norway has 2022 as date to be fully operational. (Source: EUObserver, 31 Oct., 2017) Roy Vardheim, who heads the Norwegian industrial CCS initiative, the Technology Centre Mongstad,

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS news,  Carbon Storage news,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage,  


    Vietnam Aims to Increase Forest Carbon Storage (Int'l)
    VietNam,Carbon Emissions
    Date: 2017-10-06
    VietNamNet Bridge reports the Vietnamese government is launching a project aimed at cutting emissions from deforestation and increasing forest CO2 absorption. The project will be implemented in the six provinces where forest coverage accounts for 57 pct or 2.9 million hectares, of the country's total forest area.

    The global Forest Carbon Partnership Facility and World Bank have committed to pay Viet Nam $60 million for the absorption of 10.3 million tonnes of CO2 from 2018 to 2024.

    This project is the first regional-level project implemented by the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) programme in Viet Nam. Cities discharge 70 pct of Vietnam's CO2. (Source: Vietnam Bridge Vietnam Net, Others, Oct., 2017)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  Deforestation,  Reforestation,  


    Tropical Forests Becoming Carbon Sources, Not Sinks (Ind. Report)
    NASA JPL
    Date: 2017-10-04
    A recent NASA study that combined ground and satellite measurements has concluded that tropical forests seem to be a net source of heat-trapping carbon emissions, rather than a carbon sink.

    The study bolsters a growing consensus that tropical forests are drying out or being cleared, burned and logged so fast that they now emit more carbon than they sequester. Whereas earlier estimates based on measurements of atmospheric carbon flows suggested that tropical forests might be carbon neutral or even a net sink, more-recent studies -- including ones based on data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 satellite -- agree broadly with this recent paper, according to David Schimel, an ecologist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. Schimel suspects that human activities such as starting fires and natural factors including droughts have severly hindered tropical forests' carbon storage capability.

    The study estimates that the world's tropical forests release approximately 425 million tpy of carbon -- equivalent to roughly 5 pct of the globe's annual fossil-fuel emissions and about five times more than estimated in 2011. (Source: NASA JPL, Nature, 29 Sept., 2017) Contact: NASA JPL, David Schimel, (818) 354-4321, www.jpl.nasa.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NASA JPL,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sink,  


    Oil Giants Ink Norwegian Carbon Storage Agreement (Int'l Report)
    Shell, Statoil,Total
    Date: 2017-10-04
    Energy Voice is reporting oil industry giants Norske Shell, Statoil and Total have formed a partnership to develop full-scale carbon capture and storage CCS)in Norway. In June, Gassnova awarded Statoil the contract for the first phase of the project. Norske Shell and Total E&P Norge are now entering as equal partners while Statoil will lead the project which will store CO2 captured from onshore industrial facilities in Eastern Norway.

    The first phase of this CO2 project could reach a capacity of approximately 1.5 million tpy. The project will be designed to accommodate additional CO2 volumes as required at future dates.(Source: Various Media, Energy Voice, 2 Oct., 2017)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Shell,  Statoil,  Total,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  


    ADM, RCC Tout $208Mn Illinois CCS Project (Ind. Report)
    Richland Community College
    Date: 2017-10-04
    In the Land of Lincoln, Richland Community College (RCC) and U.S. agribusiness giant Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) based in Decatur are touting the startup of the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) project. The project will store captured CO2 in Mount Simon Sandstone formations that stretch underground through Illinois, Indiana and parts of Kentucky, but area the researchers survey is about a mile wide and a mile deep surrounding the injection site.

    The U.S. DOE is footing 68 pct of the cost of the $208 million project with the remaining $66 million split among other participating agencies. The federal money came from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, which was intended to help the economy recover following the 2008 recession. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory manages the project which was developed by scientists at the University of Illinois. (Source: ADM, Herald & Review, Others, Oct., 2017) Contact: ADM, Alison Taylor, VP, Chief Sustainability Officer, Juan Luciano, CEO, (312) 634-8100, www.adm.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Archer Daniels Midland,  


    P.E.I. Willow Carbon Sequestration Study Wins Funding (Funding)
    Greenhouse Gas
    Date: 2017-09-01
    In Canada's smallest province Prince Edward Island, (pop. 146,000; 5,660 sq. km) the East Prince Agri-Environment Association has been awarded $895,000 for a project to study willow trees planted on riverbanks can act as a carbon storage sinks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and protect streams and rivers from nitrogen and phosphorous runoffs.

    The project is one of 20 supported by the $27 million Canadian Federal Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program, a partnership with universities and conservation groups across Canada. The program supports research into greenhouse gas mitigation practices and technologies that can be adopted on the farm. The East Prince Agri-Environment Association is a group of 12 farm families that came together in 2015 to explore ways of building a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly agriculture industry. (Source: CBC, 30 Aug., 2017) Contact: Agriculture Canada Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program, www.agr.gc.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Greenhouse Gas,  Carbon Sink,  Climate Change Mitigation,  Carbon Storage,  

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