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Wartsila Joins Maritime Carbon Capture Consortium (Int'l.)
Wartsila
Date: 2021-09-10
Helsinki-headquartered Wartsila reports it will take a central role in developing maritime carbon capture & storage (CCS) technologies as one of the leading partners in the LINCCS (linking carbon capture and storage) consortium.

Wartsila Exhaust Treatment is the market leading modular marine exhaust gas cleaning system manufacturer, with a range of lifecycle scrubbing solutions. The treatment offers integrated compliant solutions for all types of ships, and in open loop, closed loop or hybrid configurations.

To support CCS technology development, Wartsila Exhaust Treatment will expand its engineering facility in Moss, Norway to develop, test and verify the CCS solutions. This will bring the technology to a maturity level where it can be piloted in full scale on a vessel.

The LINCCS project is focused on reducing costs for new carbon storage facilities by 70 pct and advancing the development of carbon capture technologies in a range of sectors. This week, it was announced that the LINCCS consortium would receive 111m Norwegian kroner in funding over the next three years from the Norwegian government's Green Platform Initiative.

Wartsila will lead this workstream with support from the Sustainable Energy Catapult Center and SINTEF Energy to contribute to wider, cross-industry CCS developments from project partners including Aker Solutions, Cognite, Aize, AGR, OpenGoSim, Wintershall Dea, Var Energi, Lundin, Equinor and TotalEnergies. (Source: Wartsila, PR, Maritime Exec, 8 Sept., 2021) Contact: Wartsila, Mirja-Maija Santala, Marketing, +358 400 793 827, mirja-maija.santala@wartsila.com, www.wartsila.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Maritime Emissions,  Wartsila,  LINCCS,  


Enchant Seeks Carbon Storage "Pore Space" Clarity (Ind. Report)
Enchant Energy
Date: 2021-07-19
In New Mexico, Enchant Energy is calling for state lawmakers to consider legislation to clarify "pore space" ownership and related issues.

Pore space -- the empty space between grains of rocks underground where the firm hopes to store carbon it would remove while running the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station with carbon capture technology -- starts just below the surface and can be used to sequester carbon dioxide by injecting the gas thousands of feet underground.

Enchant Energy has been working with the City of Farmington to retrofit the San Juan Generating Station with carbon capture technology after current operations end next year.

According to the company, pore space ownership is beneficial to the state by creating jobs, furthering economic development and generating taxes and payments from injection fees as well as defining ownership and conveyance without harming mineral rights. Montana, Oklahoma and Wyoming presently have pore space legislation. (Source: Enchant Energy, PR, Farmington Times, 17 July, 2021) Contact: Enchant Energy, Ciny Crane, CEO, 505-436-1828, www.enchantenergy.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Enchant Energy,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  


UNDEERC to Study Hydrogen Energy Development (Ind. Report)
UNDEERC
Date: 2021-06-16
The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) reports the state Industrial Commission has approved $10 million to fund two legislatively-directed research projects that could lead to more "value added" energy development. The UNDEERC will conduct the research.

One study will look at the feasibility of creating salt caverns for hydrocarbon storage which is going to be important for attracting the petrochemical industry, as well as for storing hydrogen and other liquid fuels. The study will cost $9.5 million. The other $500,000 study looks at hydrogen energy development in North Dakota. Two companies recently announced a plan to produce "blue hydrogen" at the Great Plains Synfuels Plant.

"Blue hydrogen is what we create using a fossil fuel source. We then capture the carbon, and store it underground. It's perfect for a state like North Dakota. Minnesota, Iowa, places like that cannot, because they don't have suitable geology," the release noted. The state's Oil and Gas Research Council will still have to complete a technical review before the studies can move forward, the release noted. (Source: UNDEERC, Website PR, June, 2021)Contact: UNDEERC, Niki Massmann, Communications, 701.777.5000, eercinfo@undeerc.org, www.undeerc.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News UNDEERC,  Hydrogen,  


Aalto Studies Green Infrastructure to Cut Carbon Foot Prints (Int'l.)
Aalto University
Date: 2021-06-16
A new study led by Finland's Aalto University is the first to map out how green infrastructure can be a resource for cities on the path to carbon neutrality. The study, done in collaboration with the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) and the University of Helsinki, charted the lifecycle phases of plants, soils and mulches to determine the basic considerations needed to create standards for products commonly used in green urban spaces. p> The study identified the existing carbon footprint standards, widely used in the construction industry, that would need development if applied to green infrastructure. To do so, they compared the flows of carbon in soils, mulches and plants over their lifespans. The team then tried to translate these carbon flows into the standardised reporting format used for conventional building products.

The study recommendations provide a concrete basis for developing global and regional -- for example, European Union -- standards for green infrastructure. The aim is to ensure claims of carbon storage hold true, as well as eventually have a tool for landscape designers to help plan new areas or refurbishing existing urban spaces.

The recommendations are particularly relevant for countries and regions like the Nordics, where nature has been traditionally integrated into urban landscapes. However, they can also help other areas meet their carbon targets.

Researchers at Aalto University, together with consortium partners of the Co-Carbon project, are currently starting field tests to determine the exact carbon sequestration potential of plants at various stages of growth. While the carbon storage potential of trees is relatively well-known, the study is set to be the first to focus on plants and bushes, elements commonly used in urban landscaping. At Luke, researchers are developing a tool to model the changes in carbon storage of plants and soil at regional level due to land use changes. Such a tool could help planners target and maintain existing carbon storage in plants and soil. (Source: Aalto University, PR, Website, June, 2021) Contact: Aalto University, Dr. Matti Kuittinen, Dr. Matti Kuittinen, +358 5059 47990, matti.kuittinen@aalto.fi, www.aalto.fi; Natural Resources Institute Finland, Dr. Eeva-Maria Tuhkanen, Research scientist, +358 2953 26595, eeva-maria.tuhkanen@luke.fi, www.luke.fi

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Foot Print,  


Chief Ethanol, Catahoula Announce CCS Agreement (Ind. Report)
Chief Ethanol
Date: 2021-06-14
In the Cornhusker State, Grand Island-based Chief Industries, Inc. is reporting its Chief Ethanol division in Hastings and Houston-headquartered Catahoula Resources have agreed to jointly develop carbon capture and permanent sequestration (CCS) within Nebraska.

The two firms are currently evaluating CCS infrastructure investments that will enhance the sustainability and improve the economics of ethanol production through low-cost carbon storage. Work has already begun to evaluate favorable storage geology through Catahoula's joint development arrangement with Battelle.

Catahoula Resources is a portfolio company of private investment firm The Energy and Minerals Group, a major investor in midstream infrastructure in North America and a leader in identifying, developing and executing world-class design/build/operate capabilities for midstream assets, according to a company release. (Source: Chief Industries, Inc., Catahoula Resources, North Platte Telegraph12 June, 2021) Contact: Chief Industries, Inc., D.J. Eihusen, CEO, (308) 389-7200, www.chiefind.com ; Catahoula Resources, Jeff Rawls, CEO, 713.324.640o, info@catahoularesources.com, www.catahoularesources.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Chief Ethanol,  CCS,  


Alberta Establishing CCUS, Carbon Management Hubs (Ind. Report)
ALberta
Date: 2021-06-11
In Edmonton, "The Government of Alberta sees carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) as an integral part of our environmental and economic future. Injecting carbon dioxide underground is a proven process and has occurred in Alberta for decades. However, as a means to address greenhouse gas emissions and recognize the environmental benefit of CCUS, a strong regulatory system must exist. The regulatory system is especially important with the large volumes of carbon dioxide that need to be captured and injected to meet global climate targets. The system must establish a high level of rigor that accounts for and demonstrates the permanent storage of every tonne of carbon dioxide.

"Moving forward, the government will issue carbon sequestration rights through a competitive process, advancing the development of strategically located carbon storage hubs that will provide carbon sequestration services to a number of industrial facilities. The intent is to enhance Alberta's carbon management system by providing confidence to industry investors and Albertans that CCUS will be deployed in a responsible and strategic manner."

Download the Carbon Sequestration Tenure Management document HERE. (Source: Gov. of Alberta, Energy Operations, May, 2021) Contact: Gov. of Alberta, Energy, carboncapture.energy@alberta.gov.ca, www.alberta.gov.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  CCUS,  Carbon Emissions,  


TGS, Horisont Partner to Advance CCS Tech. (Int'l. Report)
TGS, Horisont
Date: 2021-05-14
Global energy data specialist TGS reports it is collaborating with Sandnes, Norway-based Horisont Energi to jointly develop new carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies and methods to classify and monitor CO2 storage reservoirs to establish a "roadmap for sustainable carbon storage reservoir identification and monitoring" The collaboration will initially focus on Horisont Energi's oil and gas acreage on the Norwegian continental shelf.

The two firms intend to de-risk and monitor potential CCS reservoirs in Norwegian waters by using imaging and monitoring technologies such as 4D seismic, Distributed Acoustic Sensing, and P-Cable technology. In an effort to boost global CCS advancement, the firms also plan to promote cooperation between industry, commercial technology providers, and academia. (Source: TGS, PR, Hydrocarbons Technology, 13 May., 2021) Contact: Horisont Energi , Bjorgulf Haukelidsæter Eidesen, CEO, 51225531, hello@horisontenergi.no, www.horisontenergi.no; TGS, Jan Schoolmeesters, Exec. VP, www.tgs.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Capture & Storage,  


Blue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis (Marine Conservation Society Report Attached)
Marine Conservation Society
Date: 2021-05-05
In the UK, the Marine Conservation Society, in partnership with Rewilding Britain, has released Blue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis, a report on the ocean's vital role in fighting the climate crisis and blue carbon solutions as an effective strategy for hitting net zero by 2050. In recognition of the vital role oceans must play in climate change mitigation and adaptation, ocean-based solutions must be adopted with pace and at scale by 2030.

Globally, the "rewilding" of key blue carbon securing marine and coastal ecosystems -- seagrass beds, saltmarshes and mangroves -- could deliver CO2 mitigation amounting to 1.83 billion tonnes. That is 5 pct of the emissions savings we need to make globally. This figure doesn't include the enormous quantities of carbon stored in fish and other marine life; in marine ecosystems such as coral reefs, seaweeds and shellfish beds; or the vast stores of carbon in our seabed sediments.

The report motes that 500,000 km2 of the UK's shelf seas hold an estimated 205 million tonnes of carbon -- 50 million tonnes more than the entire quantity held within the UK's forests. Harmful fishing practices such as bottom trawling, and other activities such as dredging, disturb seabed sediments and have the potential to result in the loss of 13 million tonnes of carbon from vital blue carbon stores, including shellfish beds and kelp forests, over the next decade.

Nature-based solutions could provide a third of climate change mitigations required to address the climate crisis, but currently they attract less than 3 pct of funds invested globally in addressing climate change, he report notes. Internationally, the UK is leading the way by committing to significantly increase its spending on nature-based solutions, including those offered by the ocean. This must be matched with equally ambitious actions at home. Investment in protecting our marine ecosystems is vital, for both biodiversity and blue carbon storage.

The report makes the case for the development of a four nation Blue Carbon Strategy, focusing on three key action areas. First, scaling up marine rewilding for biodiversity and blue carbon benefits. Second, Integrating blue carbon protection and recovery into climate mitigation and environmental management policies. Third, working with the private sector to develop and support sustainable and innovative low-carbon commercial fisheries and aquaculture.

With COP26 occurring in six months time, it has never been more pertinent for UK governments to take action. Ocean-based solutions must be part of the many urgent and varied solutions required to address the climate crisis.

Download theBlue Carbon -- Ocean-based Solutions to Fight the Climate Crisis report HERE. (Source: Marine Conservation Society, PR Website, Apr., 2021) Contact: Marine Conservation Society, Dr Chris Tuckett, Prog. Dir., info@mcsuk.org, +44 0 1989 566017, www.mcsuk.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


FACA Recommends USDA Carbon Bank Pilot Projects (Ind. Report)
Food and Agriculture Climate Alliance
Date: 2021-05-05
The Food and Agriculture Climate Alliance (FACA) has developed the following specific recommendations for how the U.S. USDA should approach a potential carbon bank -- a voluntary policy mechanism to help reduce barriers that producers and landowners face to participating in voluntary carbon markets and adopting climate-smart practices.

FACA recommends that USDA lay the foundation for a potential carbon bank by first developing a series of pilot projects aimed at:

  • Scaling climate solutions -- Pilot projects should help increase adoption of climate-smart practices that reduce, directly capture or sequester greenhouse gas emissions, and/or increase climate resilience. Pilots should deploy "critical climate infrastructure" to increase the capacity of farmers, ranchers and forest owners to adapt to climate change, while ensuring food and economic security.

  • Removing barriers to adoption -- Pilot projects should encourage the widespread adoption of climate-smart practices and critical climate infrastructure by removing barriers and making it easier for producers and landowners to adopt these practices.

  • Improving carbon accounting standards -- USDA should develop consistent and credible criteria to account for the carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas reduction benefits of climate-smart agriculture and forestry projects and practices.

  • Ensuring equitable opportunities -- Pilot projects must be developed with and provide equitable opportunities for minority, socially disadvantaged and small-scale producers.

  • Information gained from the pilots will serve two critical purposes -- First, it will help USDA build a durable foundation for a carbon bank that gains long-term bipartisan congressional support. Second, it will help USDA build confidence in how to verify the climate benefits delivered by specific practices and management approaches.

    According to the FACA, this approach will lay essential building blocks for a voluntary carbon bank that creates opportunities for all producers and landowners to participate in rapidly developing voluntary private markets and leverages private investment in agricultural and forestry climate solutions. As USDA develops a carbon bank, it must protect all existing funding for farm bill conservation and insurance programs, and it must ensure that a USDA-led carbon bank doesn't undermine voluntary private markets.

    The FACA consists of 70 member organizations representing farmers, ranchers, forest owners, agribusinesses, manufacturers, the food and innovation sector, state governments, sportsmen, and environmental advocates. These groups have broken through historical barriers to develop and promote shared climate policy priorities across the entire agriculture, food and forestry value chains, according to its website. (Source: FACA, Website PR, 3 Apr., 2021) Contact: FACA, www.agclimatealliance.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Voluntary Carbon Market,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  Carbon Bank,  Carbon Storage,  CCS,  


  • Univ. of Wyoming Releases Carbon Storage Study (Ind. Report)
    University of Wyoming
    Date: 2020-12-30
    The University of Wyoming, in partnership with West Virginia University of Law and the U.S. Energy Association (USEA) has released a comparative study for the U.S. DOE identifying the regulatory shortcomings slowing the deployment of carbon dioxide utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies. The study findings could help eliminate regulatory blindspots that pop up when projects are proposed with federal or private surface and subsurface interests.

    Scientists are working to find commercial ways to capture and store CO2 underground. But CO2 can also be used at oil fields, by injecting it into reservoirs to remove residual oil that traditional drilling processes could not extract. Researchers note policy makers need to know both the legal and regulatory obstacles facing energy developers trying to advance these technologies. For examples, developers hoping to establish these technologies on federal, state or private lands can run into issues involving land, mineral, pore space or water rights, pipeline regulations, eminent domain or limits to CO2 storage regulation, among others, according to the report.

    Recent federal incentives could accelerate the advancement of CO2 storage and utilization across the 12 states studied. For one, in 2018 Congress revised Section 45Q of the tax code to provide more favorable tax incentives to companies engaged in carbon capture and sequestration. The 45Q federal tax credit is given to companies for each ton of CO2 they sequester in the ground. Since then, the program has received feedback from potential claimants, and the Internal Revenue Service recently proposed rules to regulate the program. (Source: University of Wyoming, PR, US Energy Association, Dec., 2020) Contact: US Energy Association, (202) 312-1230, www.usea.org; University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources, Holly Krutka, Exec. Dir., (307) 766-1121, hkrutka@uwyo.edu, www.uwyo.edu/ser

    More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Wyoming,  CCS,  CCUS,  U.S. Energy Association ,  


    Peatland Carbon Storage Restoration Declared "Vital" (Int'l.)
    Peat
    Date: 2020-12-21
    In the UK, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) analysis has revealed the scale of the challenge that the Northern Ireland Assembly and the other UK governments and agencies face to restore and maintain the country's peatlands, which play a pivotal role in combating climate change.

    Peatland covers approximately 12 pct of the land area of Northern Ireland, but 86 pct of peatlands have been damaged by pressures, including drainage, overgrazing, afforestation, burning and extraction in lowland areas.

    The RSPB's analysis shows peatlands avoid 1,992 tpy of CO2 emissions -- equivalent to 5 pct of total UK greenhouse gas emissions every year. According to Martin Harper, RSPB Director of Global Conservation, "Peatlands are an incredibly important habitat in the UK both for wildlife and for storing carbon. If our peatlands are not restored, they will emit twice as much carbon as would be captured by tree planting in the Committee on Climate Change's UK forestry targets for 2050."

    (Source: RSPS, Farm Week, 20 Dec., 2020) Contact: RSPB, www.community.rspb.org.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Peat,  Carbon Storage,  Methane,  


    Irish Soil Carbon Observatory to Monitor Emissions (Int'l. Report)
    Ireland Soil Carbon
    Date: 2020-11-20
    In Dublin, the Irish Minister for Agriculture, Food and Marine, reports the Department is investing in the establishment of a National Agricultural Soil Carbon Observatory to monitor carbon emissions and removals across a range of Irish soils.

    The National Agricultural Soil Carbon Observatory will comprise up to 10 "Flux Towers" on agricultural systems across a range of soil types adding value to existing projects including; the industry co-funded SignPost farms and the Agricultural Catchments Programme. The Observatory will place Ireland at the forefront of EU carbon sequestration research and will enable Ireland to:

  • better quantify and model soil carbon emissions and sinks from agricultural land;

  • enable mitigation measures to increase carbon sequestration to be included in the national inventory;

  • participate in the EU ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observation System) network:

  • enable Ireland to benefit from the 2018 EU Effort Sharing Regulation. (Source: Gov. of Ireland, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, PR, 19 Nov., 2020) Contact: Ireland, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, www.agriculture.gov.ie

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage news,  CO2 news,  Carbon Emissions news,  Soil Carbon news,  


  • TOTAL, Partners Tout Next-Gen. CO2 Storage Simulator (Int'l. Report)
    TOTAL,Stanford University,LLNL
    Date: 2020-11-10
    Paris-headquartered energy major Total , US DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University have released GEOSX, an open source simulator for large-scale geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage.

    GEOSX was developed using advanced new technologies in high-performance computing and applied mathematics and aims to improve the management and safety of geological CO2 repositories. Its computing performance is unmatched to date. The open-source nature of GEOSX aims to ensure a high level of transparency, sharing and community support to pave the way for the large-scale development of Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) technologies.

    GEOSX is the first major outcome of the five-year FC-MAELSTROM research project launched in 2018 by Total, Stanford University School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, and LLNL. It draws on each partner's 20-plus years of expertise in simulation and high-performance computing research. GEOSX, www.geosx.org. (Source: TOTAL, PR, 10 Nov., 2020) Total Marie-Noelle Semeria, Total's Chief Technology Officer Media Relations: +33 1 47 44 46 99 l presse@total.com l @TotalPress Investor Relations: +44 (0)207 719 7962 l ir@total.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Stanford University news,  TOTAL news,  LLNL news,  CCS news,  Carbon Emissions news,  Carbon Storage news,  


    Oxford Launches Carbon Offsetting Principles (Int'l. Report)
    Oxford University
    Date: 2020-10-26
    In the UK, a multi-disciplinary team from the University of Oxford has released The Oxford Principles for Net Zero Aligned Carbon Offsetting guidelines on how offsetting should be done to ensure it is trustworthy and effective in helping the world achieve carbon net-zero.

    The Oxford guidelines recommend a shift to verified carbon removal offsetting and to long-lived carbon storage, stating "users of offsets should increase the portion of their offsets that come from carbon removals rather than from emission reductions, ultimately reaching 100 pct carbon removals by mid-century to ensure compatibility with the Paris Climare Agreement goals". To that end, the guidelines also recommend:

  • Cut emissions, use high quality offsets, and regularly revise offsetting strategy as best practice evolves: prioritise reducing your own emissions, ensure environmental integrity, and maintain transparency;

  • Shift to carbon removal offsetting -- Users of offsets should increase the portion of their offsets that come from carbon removals;

  • Shift to long-lived storage -- This refers to methods of storing carbon that have a low risk of reversal over centuries to millennia, such as storing CO2 in geological reservoirs or mineralizing carbon into stable forms;

  • Support the development of net-zero aligned offsetting -- Using long-term agreements; forming sector-specific alliances; supporting the restoration and protection of a wide range of natural and semi-natural ecosystems in their own right; and adopting and publicising these Principles and incorporate them into regulation and standard setting for approaches to offsetting and net-zero.

    Access Oxford Principles for Net Zero Aligned Carbon Offsetting HERE. (Source: University of Oxford, Smith School Enterprise & Environment, Sept., Oct., 2020) Contact: University of Oxford, Smith School, +44 0 1865 614942, enquiries@smithschool,ox.ac.uk, www.smithschool.ox.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Oxford University,  Carbon Offsetting,  Carbon Offset,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • Louisiana Carbon Storage Project Awaits EPA Permits (Ind. Report)
    Gulf Coast Sequestration
    Date: 2020-10-23
    Louisiana-based Gulf Coast Sequestration LLC is reporting plans to create a 10,000 foot deep carbon sequestration project to store up to 80 million tons of CO2 between the Sabine River and Lake Charles, Louisiana.

    The company, which has applied for the necessary EPA Class VI UIC permits , believes the project will be "the largest geologic carbon capture sequestration project in the U.S. and one of the largest in the world", according to the release. (Source: Gulf Coast Sequestration LLC , Website PR, 20 Oct., 2020) Contact: Gulf Coast Sequestration LLC, Colin Williams, Bus. Dev., info@gcscarbon.com, www.gcscarbon.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Gulf Coast Sequestration ,  CCS,  


    Climeworks Touts Iceland Geothermal-Powered CCS Project (Int'l.)
    Climeworks ,Carbfix
    Date: 2020-08-28
    ETH Zurich University spin-off carbon capture firm Climeworks AG reports it will partner with Carbfix and ON Power in a geothermal powered direct air carbon capture and storage (DACCS) project in Iceland.

    The planned facility will have the capacity to remove 4,000 tpy of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air using Climeworks' direct air capture (DAC) technology and Reykjavik Energy subsidiary Carbfix's natural underground mineralisation carbon storage method. (Source: Climeworks, PR 26 Aug., 2020) Contact: ON Power, Berglind Ran Olafsdottir, CEO, www.on.is; Climeworks, Christoph Gebald, CEO, +41 44 533 2999, www.climeworks.com; CarbFix, www.carbfix.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbfix,  Climeworks ,  CCS,  Geothermal,  


    Kamloops Considering Major Climate Change Initiative (Ind. Report)
    IPCC,Kamloops,Climate Change
    Date: 2020-07-13
    In British Columbia, the city of Kamloops (pop. 90,200) city council reports it will this week begin considering a major community climate action plan to address greenhouse gas emissions from three major sources -- transportation, buildings and solid waste. Under the proposed plan, each sector 'must set a course to achieve zero-carbon emissions by 2050 to be congruent with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) direction.'

    The Kamloops community climate action plan proposes the following:

  • Car-light community -- By 2050, 50 pct of trips in Kamloops to be active transportation and transit. Policy options could potentially include low-emissions "superblocks" prioritizing low-emissions vehicles , cycling and walking networks.

  • Zero emissions transportation -- By 2050, 85 per cent of kilometres driven by Kamloops-registered passenger vehicles owners to be zero-emissions vehicles. Immediate actions could include adopting an EV-ready bylaw, planning and budgeting for publicly accessible EV charging and policy review and financing for retrofitting buildings for EV charging.

  • Zero-carbon homes and buildings -- By 2030, all new and replacement heating and hot water systems to be zero emissions. Policy options could include setting targets for zero-carbon new buildings, encouraging low-carbon new buildings, calling for provincial zero-carbon building regulations, incentives for energy efficiency, incentives for energy efficient building materials and a retrofit program for existing buildings.

  • Zero-waste/circular economy -- Kamloops to be a zero-waste community by 2040. Policy options include: creation of a zero-waste research and innovation centre, collection and processing of organic waste, investigation into biofuel production from local organics for city uses such as for heating of civic facilities or fuel for vehicles, requirements for diverting waste and materials from construction and demolition sites. Immediate actions could include a feasibility study for biogas capture from organics collection and policy review to require or encourage building deconstruction and materials be reused.

  • Renewable energy (No target identified) -- Policy options could exploration of community and neighbourhood scale renewable energy systems and storage, support for related R&D. Immediate actions could include exploration of renewable energy opportunities with partners and renewable energy utility opportunities.

  • Zero-carbon civic operations -- Strive to reduce carbon emissions from municipal operations by 40 pct by 2030 and 100 pct by 2050. Policy options could include a corporate energy review, phasing out of fossil fuels in buildings and fleets, support for green commuting, internal carbon pricing and a creative community engagement and marketing plan. Immediate actions could include a corporate energy review, committing all new city buildings to zero carbon, transitioning buildings and fleets to electric/zero emissions and incentives for staff for e-bikes and transit passes.

  • Healthy urban ecosystem -- Increase the city's urban forest canopy cover to 20 pct by 2030 and 30 pt by 2050 to increase forests' carbon storage capacity and support biodiversity, The plan also calls for carbon off-setting linked with biodiversity and conservation and integrating green technologies with infrastructure upgrades.

    The city notes that, in addition to emissions reductions actions already in place, the above efforts could potentially reduce GHG emissions by 538,000 to 556,000 tonnes of CO2 by 2050. In 2019 the city committed to maintain a 1.5 C temperature increase, as set out in the Paris Agreement as well as IPCC targets for emissions to be reduced by between 40 and 60 pct by 2030 or sooner. (Source: City of Kamloops, Civic Web, July, 2020) Contact: City of Kamloops , www.kamloops.civicweb.net; IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  IPCC,  


  • Midwest AgEnergy CCS Project Wins $3.4Mn Grant (Ind. Report)
    Midwest AgEnergy
    Date: 2020-07-01
    Midwest AgEnergy Group (MAG), the parent company to ethanol biorefinery, Blue Flint, near Underwood, ND and Dakota Spirit, a 75 million gpy biorefinery near Spiritwood, ND, is reporting receipt of $3.4 million in grant funding from the North Dakota Industrial Commission. The funding will be used advance the development of a potential carbon storage (CCS) system at the Blue Flint facility located next to Coal Creek Station near Underwood, ND.

    The research will involve drilling a stratigraphic test well to examine the geology near the Blue Flint facility to determine the potential and viability of permanently storing CO2 in a deep saline formation. If the sequestration project is successfully completed, the Blue Flint facility anticipates sequestering approximately 200,000 tpy of CO2. The result of the sequestration will be a lower carbon footprint for the facility and the ability to participate in the IRS 45Q tax credit program, incenting such activities. (Source: Midwest AgEnergy, Daily News, 29 June, 2020) Contact: Midwest AgEnergy, Jeff Zueger, CEO, (701) 442-7500/(701) 251-3900, www.midwestagenergygroup.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Midwest AgEnergy,  Ethanol,  Blue Flint Ethanol,  CCS,  


    Norcem, Aker Solutions Ink CO2 Capture Agreement (Int'l. Report)
    CCS,Norcem,Aker Solutions
    Date: 2020-06-17
    Aker Solutions and HeidelbergCement-owned Norcem are reporting an agreement to advance the engineering, procurement and construction of a CO2 capture, liquification and intermediate storage plant at Norcem's cement plant in Brevik, Norway.

    The project will use Aker Solutions' Advanced Carbon Capture (ACC) technology and its HSE-friendly S26 amine solvent.

    The Akers Solutions--Norcem project is subject to Norwegian government approval and funding of the project. If completed, the plant could become the world's first large-scale capture plant at a cement producer. (Source: Aker Solutions, Cement News, 17 June, 2020) Contact: Aker Solutions, Fredrik Berge, Inv. Relations, +47 22 94 62 19, fredrik.berge@akersolutions.com, www.akersolutions.com; Norcem, www.norcem.no

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aker Solutions,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Norcem,  Cement,  CO2,  


    Notable Quote -- Shell VP Comments on CCS
    Shell Oil
    Date: 2020-05-19
    "CCS is a crucial technology to help society and economies thrive through the energy transition. We appreciate the leadership shown by the Norwegian government to accelerate the development of CCS value chains and believe that the Northern Lights carbon dioxide  solution has the potential to unlock investment in capture projects across Europe." -- Syrie Crouch, CCS VP, Shell Oil

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Northern Light,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  


    Norcem Advancing Norwegian Cement Plant CCS Project (Int'l Report)
    CCS,Norcem,Aker Solutions
    Date: 2020-05-04
    Oslo-based HeidelbergCement subsidiary cement manufacturer Norcem is reporting as much as 400,000 tpy of carbon dioxide could be captured and stored at what is set to become the world's first full-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) facility for cement production, if government construction funding is approved. The project, which would use Aker Solutions carbon capture technology, would be constructed at a Norcem cement plant in Brevik.

    The project has received necessary safety and quality certifications and could break ground in January 2021. Building the full-scale CCS system and operating it for five years is estimated to cost $1 billion. (Source: Norcem, ENR, May, 2020) Contact: Aker Solutions, Fredrik Berge, Inv. Relations, +47 22 94 62 19, fredrik.berge@akersolutions.com, www.akersolutions.com; Norcem, www.norcem.no

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aker Solutions,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Norcem,  Cement,  CO2,  


    Claification -- Woody Biomass, Carbon Emissions Notable Quote
    Woody Biomass
    Date: 2020-05-01
    "Mature trees do not stop absorbing carbon. It's just the opposite. Carbon sequestration actually accelerates as a tree grows older. 'Managed forests' is usually code for trees farms full of longleaf pine that are cut [down] frequently and absorb a lot less carbon than mature forests."

    "From an emissions standpoint, the UK would be better off burning coal and leaving those (older) trees standing as long as possible." -- Bill Moomaw, Biomass Energy Researcher, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (Source: IPCC, Eco Business, Mongabay, 20 April, 2020)

    A Bioenergy & Alternative Fuels report subscriber noted the following:

    First, the 40 million acres, more or less, of managed southern pine plantations are loblolly pine not longleaf pine. These two pine varieties have important differences in growth rate and ecological values.

    Second, and more much importantly, mature pine forest do not 'accelerate' their storage as they mature. These are privately owned lands and the details of the site and management practices are very important, but the annually growth rate (carbon accumulation) on most pine sites slows after 15-20 years. The TOTAL carbon on the acre/hectare increase, but at a slower annual rate.

    Finally, and completely absent from these discussion that are typically led by scientist or environmental groups who do not have a clear understanding of the on the ground ownership and motivations of private landowners in the southern US, is that without a source of income some of these forest will be converted to some other uses, probably pasture, which has very limited carbon storage potential. In effect these EU experts are trying to shift the costs of carbon sequestration to private landowners. One can argue that if they want to sequester carbon in trees, and take on the additional risk of unplanned, large scale release from fire, disease or hurricane, that is fine, but they should pay the landowner for the carbon and the lost income.

    Editor's Note: We thank our reader for his input and clarification of our report.

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  


    NM Tech Funded for $22Mn CCS Study (Ind. Report, Funding)
    New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
    Date: 2020-04-29
    The New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NM Tech) is reporting receipt of $17.5 million in US DOE funding to study the safe storage of CO2 in underground saline reservoirs near the San Juan Generating Station. An additional $4.4 million in afunding will come from Enchant Energy and NM Tech funds.

    The data obtained from the $22 million effort will be used to prepare, submit and obtain a permit to construction a Class VI well to store CO2 captured from the power plant if Enchant Energy successfully retrofits San Juan Generating Station with carbon capture technology. The Class VI wells are intended to store carbon dioxide in a safe and secure manner for at least 990 years.

    Other recently funded CCS projects include:

  • Approximately $25.4 million for the Illinois Storage Corridor

  • Nearly $23.6 million for an early carbon dioxide storage complex in Kemper County, Mississippi

  • Roughly $25 million for a carbon dioxide storage well project in North Dakota as part of Minnkota Power's Project Tundra

  • About $19.1 million for a storage complex project in Campbell County, Wyoming, that would use CO2 captured from the coal-fired Dry Fork Station. (Source: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Farmington Daily Times, 27 April, 2020) Contact: New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Robert Balch, Dir, Petroleum Recovery Research Center at New Mexico Tech, 575-835-5434, www.nmt.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  CCS,  CO2,  New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology ,  


  • Wyoming Carbon Storage Project Scores $15.2Mn Funding (Funding)
    University of Wyoming, Basin Electric
    Date: 2020-04-24
    Plans for a commercial-scale geological carbon dioxide storage complex near Basin Electric Power Cooperative's 385-MW Dry Fork Station and the Wyoming Integrated Test Cente near Gillette have been boosted with a $15.2 million award from the U.S. DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bismark, ND-based Basin Electric Power Cooperative is contributing $1.5 million to the project and University of Wyoming's School of Energy Resources (SER) cost-sharing contribution is $2.4 million. The project is intended to more than 50 million metric tons of CO2 underground.

    The three-year, $19.1 million project is the third phase under the DOE Carbon Storage Assurance Facility Enterprise (CarbonSAFE) initiative, which seeks to help mitigate CO2 emissions from consumption of fossil fuels. No CO2 will be injected during this stage. The Dry Fork Station project and others selected by the agency aim to develop integrated carbon capture and storage complexes that are constructed and permitted for operation between 2025 and 2030.

    Over the next three years, the project partners intend to conduct rigorous, commercial-scale surface and subsurface testing, data assessment and modeling; prepare and file permits for construction with Wyoming's Department of Environmental Quality; integrate this project with a separately funded CO2 capture study by Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR); and conduct the required National Environmental Policy Act analyses in support of eventual commercialization of the site. Other project participants include: Advanced Resources International Inc.; Carbon GeoCycle Inc.; Denbury Resources Inc.; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and Schlumberger. Other UW participants are the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute, the College of Business and the College of Law.

    The Powder River Basin produces about 40 pct of all coal consumed in the United States, and is also home to existing CO2 pipelines for oil and gas operations, including fields suitable for use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery. (Source: University of Wyoming, 23 April, 2020) Contact: University of Wyoming, Carbon Management Institute , Scott Quillinan, Project Manager, (307) 766-1121, www.uwyo.edu; Basin Electric Power, Paul Sukut, CEO, Matt Greek, Snr. VP Technology R&D, (701) 223-0441, www.basinelectric.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Basin Electric,  Carbon Storage,  NETL,  University of Wyoming,  


    North West UK Hydrogen - CCS Project Funded (Int'l. Funding)
    HyNet
    Date: 2020-04-24
    In the UK, the HyNet hydrogen and carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCS) project reports receipt of Government funding to map out the northwestern region's journey to becoming the country's first net-zero carbon industrial sector by 2040.

    The £120,000 project, which is jointly funded by UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) under the Industrial Decarbonization Challenge Fund (IDCF), will help determine how the North West region will decarbonise and meet its goal. The region -- Cheshire, parts of North East Wales, Warrington, Liverpool City Region and Greater Manchester -- which collectively generates roughly 6 million tpy of industrial CO2 emissions. (Source: HyNet, GasWorld, 22 April, 2020) Contact: UK Research & Innovation Industrial Decarbonization Challenge Fund, www.ukri.org/innovation/industrial-strategy-challenge-fund/industrial-decarbonisation

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  CCS,  Hydrogen,  Carbon Captur,  


    Mature Tree CO2 Absorption Rate Questioned (Int'l. Report)
    Western Sydney University
    Date: 2020-04-20
    In the Land Down Under, a newly released study from Western Sydney University has found that mature forests may absorb significantly less carbon dioxide than previously thought, suggesting Earth may be closer to a climate change tipping point than previous models suggested.

    Reseacrhers led by Professor Belinda Medlyn, spent four years pumping roughy 38 pct more CO2 than would naturally be absorbed into an adult eucalyptus forest and then measured how much CO2 the trees could absorb. Initially the trees absorbed 12 pct of the CO2 but were unable to capture the additional CO2 to prevent it from re-entering the atmosphere. Current climate change models estimate that mature trees should absorb and capture approximately 12 pct of the CO2 in the atmosphere.

    The study found that although the trees could absorb the expected 12 pct, they were unable to retain the CO2 through sequestration and passed about half of the CO2 they had absorbed into the soil, where it was processed and then returned to the atmosphere via soil bacteria or small fungi on the forest floor. The other half of the carbon dioxide was released through the trees themselves. (Source: Western Sydney University, Lifesly, 17 April, 2020) Contact: Western Sydney University, Prof. Belinda Medlyn, Research Leader, www.westernsydney.edu.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Economy Could Lose $10Tn with Business-as-Usual Approach to Climate Change (Ind. Report)
    World Wildlife Fund,University of Minnesota
    Date: 2020-03-27
    A recently released collaborative report from the University of Minnesota (UMN) and the World Wildlife Fund has found that the global economy stands to lose $10 trillion by 2050 if countries continue to operate under a "business as usual" approach to climate change. The report notes the U.S. will likely be the biggest loser.

    Through a combination of applied economics and environmental mapping, the team uses satellite technology to analyze different landscapes and ecosystems around the world. Based on the geographical data, researchers can calculate the landscape's susceptibility to things like carbon storage or erosion and can predict how local economies will be affected by the damage done by climate change.

    The study predicts that if countries begin to follow an alternative "global conservation" approach, the U.S economy could gain as much as $11 billion by 2050. (Source: University of Minnesota, World Wildlife Fund, Minnesota Today, 25 Mar., 2020) Contact: WWF, Toby Roxburgh, www.worldwildlife.org; University of Minnesota Institute on the Environment, Justin Johnson, Stephn Polasky, (612) 624-6973, www.environment.umn.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News World Wildlife Fund,  Climate Change,  University of Minnesota,  


    NETL Exploring Cost-Effective CCUS Technologies (Ind. Report)
    National Energy Technology Lab
    Date: 2020-03-23
    The National Energy Technology Lab (NETL) is reporting it efforts to develop cost-effective, clean carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies have yielded more than 180 second-generation R&D projects and cut the cost of carbon capture by nearly 50 pct while reducing the amount of energy used by such technologies by nearly 20 pct.

    Other related NETL programs include a Carbon Storage program which aims to install CO2 injection and containment throughout geologic storage complexes. Further, its Carbon Utilization program pushes R&D that would use CO2 to create chemicals, offset capture costs, promote clean and safe development of energy resources, and create new markets along the way. The lab is also looking at things like materials engineering, fabrication, and computer technologies to spur greater energy efficiency and longer power plant service lives. (Source: NETL, Energy Matters, 19 Mar., 2020) Contact: NETL, Brian Anderson, www.netl.doe.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News National Energy Technology Lab,  NETL,  Carbon Capture,  


    BC Carbon Capture Storage Assessment Completed (Ind. Report)
    TGS
    Date: 2020-03-13
    Global geoscience data for exploration & production specialist TGS reports completion of a Geological Carbon Storage Atlas for British Columbia (Canada) for a major oil and gas company. The study provides the most up-to-date understanding of geological carbon storage locations, onshore and offshore, throughout the province of British Columbia.

    Through collaboration with its partner Canadian Discovery Limited, TGS leveraged its world-class basin evaluation expertise, subsurface data library, and geological knowledge and experience through working in British Columbia, to create a framework for carbon storage assessment and atlas for potential storage locations, according to the TGS release. (Source: TGS. Strategic Research Institute, SteelGuru,, Gasoil News , 12 Mar., 2020) Contact: TGS, Katja Akentieva, Global.Marketing@tgs.com, www.tgs.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage ,  


    Heriot-Watt Touts New Carbon Capture R&D (Int'l. Report)
    Heriot-Watt University
    Date: 2020-02-10
    As previously reported chemical engineers from Heriot-Watt University in the UK are reporting a collaboration with international researchers to design materials that could synthesize new metal-organic framework materials (MOFs) -- porous crystals that combine metal nodes with organic linkers -- that can capture CO2.

    To that end, the research team conducted experiments that mimicked real industrial operations and compared the performance of their new materials with those that are currently commercially available.

    According to Dr Susana Garcia, Assoc. Dir., Heriot-Watt Research Centre for Carbon Solutions, "Instead of the conventional trial and error, we computer-generated 325,000 MOFs and identified the features of the best performers. We now have the tools to tailor-make a material that will separate carbon dioxide in the most economical way for a given source, like industrial emissions, and make it available for other purposes like carbon storage or as a resource for the chemical industry," Dr. Garcia noted. (Source: Heriot-Watt University, PR, Engineer Live, 17 Dec., 2019) Contact: Heriot-Watt University, Dr Susana Garcia, Assoc. Dir., Heriot-Watt Research Centre for Carbon Solutions, www.hw.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Heriot-Watt University ,  Carbon Capture,  


    LLNL Envisions CO2 Cuts Without Cutting CA Oil Prod. (Ind. Report)
    Lawrence Livermore National Lab
    Date: 2020-02-07
    In the Golden State, a new study from the US DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has found that California can bury or offset 125 MW per year of CO2 by 2045 through land management practices, waste material processing, capturing atmospheric CO2 and storing the gas deep underground without negatively impacting the state's oil production.

    The study also suggests the local economy might be able to avoid fallout from Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to achieve carbon neutrality, in part, by managing the decline of California's Kern-centric oil industry and Kern's previously recognized geologic underground carbon storage capacity.

    The LNL report -- Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California -- also notes the entire effort would cost less than $10 billion per year, or less than .05 pct of the state's economic output.

    According to the report, 84 megatons per year of CO2 emissions can be rerouted by creating biofuels from biomass and that carbon associated with such activities could then be buried. Another 25 megatons per year could be avoided by restoring woodlands, grasslands and wetlands, among other land-management practices. Additional savings could be pulled right out of the air using energy-intensive technology. (Source: Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Bakersfield.com,3 Feb., 2020) Contact: Lawrence Livermore National Lab, www.llnl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California,  Lawrence Livermore National Lab ,  


    Heriot-Watt Univ. Funded for UK CCS Mapping Project (Int'l. Report)
    Heriot-Watt University
    Date: 2020-02-07
    In the UK, Heriot-Watt University reports its researchers led by Professor John Underhill are to map out the UK's best sites for carbon capture by studying the geology of depleted gas fields in the North Sea. The team will use data from the Oil and Gas Authority's (OGA) National Data Repository (NDR), which was opened up to access for the first time in 2019.

    Prof. Underhill believes the southern North Sea is one of the UK's most promising options for large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS).

    The £1.4 million study, which is funded by the Oil and Gas Technology Centre's (OGTC) Subsurface Solution Centre and matched funding from industry and Heriot-Watt University, is intended to help policymakers determine the most suitable CCS sites. (Source: Heriot-Watt University Website, insider.co.uk, 5 Feb., 2020) Contact: Heriot-Watt University, Prof. John Underhill, Dr Susana Garcia, Assoc. Dir., Heriot-Watt Research Centre for Carbon Solutions, www.hw.ac.uk; Oil and Gas Technology Centre, +44 1224 063200, www.theogtc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Heriot-Watt University,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    Stockholm Planning Carbon-Negative District Heating (Int'l.)
    Stockholm Exergi,Fortum
    Date: 2020-01-29
    In Sweden, Stockholm Exergi, a joint venture between Helsinki, Finnish utility Fortum Oyi and the city of Stockholm, reports it is looking to make Swedish capital's district heating the world's first to become carbon negative.

    To that end, the company this spring will close its last coal-fired boiler and has replaced most of its coal-based production with biofuels. The company is also investigating the implementation of carbon capture systems to achieve a positive carbon footprint by 2040.

    Fortum Oyi is also testing carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology in Oslo at its joint venture Fortum Oslo Varme. Both the Stockholm and Oslo projects are partnering with the Northern Lights initiative, which is studying carbon storage in the bedrock of the North Sea. (Source: Stockholm Exergi, Recharge, 28 Jan., 2020) Contact: Stockholm Exergi, www.stockholmexergi.se; Fortum Oyi, www3.fortum.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Fortum,  Carbon Negative,  Carbon Emissions,  Stockholm,  


    Univ. Tenn. Peatland Carbon Processes Investigation Funded (Funding)
    University of Tennessee
    Date: 2020-01-27
    A UT microbiologist has received a portion of a $3.1 million grant from the US DOE to study how global warming could affect peatlands and their vast carbon stores in the future.

    Steven Wilhelm, the Kenneth and Blaire Mossman Professor of Microbiology, is part of a team led by Jean-Philippe Gibert, a food web expert and assistant professor of biology at Duke University. Wilhelm's co-investigators include David Weston and Dale Pelletier, staff scientists in the Biosciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Jonathan Shaw, professor of biology at Duke. In the three-year project, the group will study and model the effects of warming on the complex network of bacteria, protists, and viruses that interact with peat moss.

    Peat moss plays a key role in slowing climate change by keeping 370 million metric tpy of CO2 out of the atmosphere -- equivalent to the emissions from nearly half the car traffic in the US.

    Though peatlands cover just 3 pct of the Earth's surface they store twice as much carbon as all the world's forests. Over hundreds or thousands of years, Sphagnum and other peatland plants pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere as they grow, trapping the carbon inside layers of partially decayed plant material up to 20 feet deep. But warming trends could put that carbon storage at risk. Rising temperatures could thaw or dry out peat wetlands, making them more prone to decay and wildfires. Decomposing or burning plants mean the heat-trapping gas long locked up in peatlands could be released, accelerating the global warming process.

    To better predict the impacts of warming on peatlands and the carbon they contain, the team is studying a set of players they say are largely overlooked: microbes. Their previous work suggests that under future warming, the community of microbes and other tiny organisms that grow in and around peat mosses could shift balance, which could affect the ability of peatlands to sequester carbon. (Source: University of Tennessee, Knoxville, PR, 27 Jan., 2020) Contact: University of Tennessee, Karen Dunlap, 865-974-8674, kdunlap6@utk.edu, Amanda Womac , 865-974-2992, awomac1@utk.edu, www.utk.edu; Duke University, Robin Smith, (919-681-8057, robin.a.smith@duke.edu, www.duke.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Peatland,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Emissions,  University of Tennessee,  


    Heriot-Watt Touts New Carbon Capture R&D (Int'l. Report)
    Heriot-Watt University
    Date: 2019-12-20
    In the UK, chemical engineers from Heriot-Watt University are reporting a collaboration with a team of international researchers to design materials inspired by drug design tools used by the pharmaceutical industry that could synthesise new metal-organic framework materials (MOFs) -- porous crystals that combine metal nodes with organic linkers -- that can capture CO2.

    The researchers conducted experiments that mimicked real industrial operations and compared the performance of their new materials with those that are currently commercially available. According to Dr Susana Garcia, Assoc. Dir., Heriot-Watt Research Centre for Carbon Solutions, "Instead of the conventional trial and error, we computer-generated 325,000 MOFs and identified the features of the best performers. We now have the tools to tailor-make a material that will separate carbon dioxide in the most economical way for a given source, like industrial emissions, and make it available for other purposes like carbon storage or as a resource for the chemical industry." (Source: Heriot-Watt University, PR, Engineer Live, 17 Dec., 2019) Contact: Heriot-Watt University, Dr Susana Garcia, Assoc. Dir., Heriot-Watt Research Centre for Carbon Solutions, www.hw.ac.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Capture,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Sutdy Examines Farming as CO2 Absorber (Ind. Report)
    University of Virginia
    Date: 2019-12-11
    A recently released study from the University of Virginia notes that farming, agriculture and other land practices presently contribute around 11 gigatons to CO2 emissions per year -- roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. However, the study argues that the land could actually be converted into an absorber of carbon, given the right conditions.

    Among the measures recommended by the study were richer countries transitioning to plant-based diets and reducing food waste, while aiding poorer nations to curb deforestation and restore degraded land. If a concerted global effort was made, land could be absorbing three gigatons of carbon by 2050, turning one of our biggest liabilities into a helping hand in the fight against climate change. The study also recommends:

  • 95 pct reduction in deforestation and land degradation by 2050. This would include more robust conservation policies in developing tropical countries, as well as the conversion of coastal wetlands into protected areas and the prohibition of peatland burning.

  • 25 pct reduction in agricultural emissions by 2050. This would include introducing synthetic or organic fertilizers, enhancing the water-agriculture interface in places where rice cultivation is a primary industry and managing emissions from fermentation and manure.

  • 50 pct adoption of plant-based diets by 2050. This would involve encouraging a healthier diet through consumer campaigns and governmental policies, as well as the development of new foodstuffs to entice unconvinced consumers.

  • 50 pct reduction of current level of food waste by 2050. This would involve tightening up gaps in the supply chain, improving consumer awareness through advertising campaigns and enhancing refrigeration and distribution capabilities in the developing world.

  • Restoration of forests, coastal wetlands and drained peatlands. This would involve financing ecosystem services, improving in local and national conservation policies and investing in restoration practices.

  • Improving forestry and agroforestry management. This would include optimising current forestation conservation process and integrating agroforestry into lands currently used for agriculture and grazing.

  • Enhancing soil carbon sequestration capabilities. This would include controlling soil erosion, reducing tillage of the land and restoring degraded soils, as well as the application of biochar where appropriate.

  • Deploying bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in developed countries. This would involve investing into the research and development of BECCS technologies and deploying them in relevant sites. (Source: University of Virginia, Environmental Technology, 1 Dec., 2019) Contact: University of Virginia, Stephanie Roe, Environmental Researcher, Report Lead Author, 434-924-7761, www.evsc.as.virginia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon,  Carbon Storage,  


  • Packard Foundation Warns Put a Brake on Bioenergy by 2050 to Avoid Negative Climate Impacts (Ind. Report)
    Packard Foundation
    Date: 2019-12-09
    According to the newly released Global Change Biology study from the Los Altos, California-based David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the burgeoning bioenergy sector must peak and decline in the next 30 years to alleviate extreme pressure on land. The study researchers assert that projections envisioning the use of biomass from crops, trees or grasses for fuel through 2100 overlook the technology's high carbon footprint and excessive land use.

    An Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report released last year found that many scenarios capable of reducing the threat of climate change relied heavily on bioenergy, predicting that energy from biomass could make up 26 pct of primary energy in 2050 -- up from 10 pct in 2020 -- and predicting that solar and wind combined would likely only account for 22 pct. Those scenarios often relied on significant use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), which involves growing trees across a large area of land to produce wood pellets burned for energy, then capturing and sequestering the carbon emissions. In its analysis, though, the IPCC found significant challenges associated with a high reliance on bioenergy, noting in particular that the vast areas of land required to produce biomass for energy would compete with food production and other human needs.

    The Global Change Biology assessment examine a flurry of recent reports that suggest even more problems with large-scale bioenergy projects reliant on large tracts of land, and also show that more cost-effective alternatives will be available in the coming decades. Pulling from these recent studies, the authors establish three reasons why large-scale bioenergy must and can peak and decline in the next 30 years:

  • Large-scale bioenergy emits carbon. Carbon emissions from bioenergy can be greater in the near-term than emissions from the fossil fuels it is replacing, undermining the assumption that bioenergy is always a relatively low-emission and low-cost form of energy. Burning wood pellets, for example, creates a "double climate problem." Manufacturing and shipping wood pellets entails substantial emissions of fossil CO2, and it can take decades or centuries for harvested areas to return to pre-harvest carbon stocks.

  • Large-scale bioenergy puts a squeeze on land. Land is already a scarce resource, and it will become even scarcer with time due to an increase in the human population and a rise in the appreciation of the conservation value of natural and mostly-natural ecosystems--even if agricultural yields continue to increase. Because land is so limited, we should use it as efficiently as possible for energy production. In contrast to land-intensive bioenergy, the amount of electricity that can be produced from a hectare of land using photovoltaics is at least 50-100 times that from biomass.

  • Large-scale bioenergy is inferior to other solutions. And, by mid-century, land-intensive bioenergy will face fierce competition from superior technologies such as wind and solar energy, the development of efficient storage and other flexibility solutions, and the advent of more effective carbon removal technologies such as direct air capture with carbon storage.

    The assessment comes at a time when the bioenergy industry is ramping up worldwide, with the EU in the lead. Bioenergy currently accounts for 10 pct of the world's energy, and 50 pct of our renewable energy. In the EU, bioenergy accounts for two-thirds of all renewable energy (nearly half from wood). Two-thirds of the EU's "20 pct Renewable Energy by 2020" target depends on bioenergy. And the bloc is also about to greenlight the conversion of five large coal plants to bioenergy plants that burn imported wood pellets from overseas forests.

    Land-intensive electrical power projects in particular are picking up steam as governments and industry leaders seek to transform disused coal factories into new profit centers. Between 2006 and 2015, the production of wood pellets for biomass energy use quadrupled to 26 million tons. Worldwide, demand for globally traded wood pellets destined for use in phased-out coal plants or new dedicated bioenergy plants is expected to rise 250 pct by 2027.

    The study lays out a bioenergy trajectory that policymakers can use to encourage sustainable bioenergy while also opening the door for new technologies to replace land-intensive bioenergy in the very near future. These recommendations include improved accounting of the actual carbon emissions associated with the use of biomass, favoring biomass from waste, residues or land management practices that enhance carbon storage, and providing incentives for energy storage, direct air capture technologies, and low-carbon alternatives to fossil fuels. Above all, the authors argue that bioenergy projects should be avoided if they involve natural forests, such as converting natural forests to bioenergy plantations, or use land best suited for food crops. And the authors caution that claims that bioenergy projects are a zero-carbon form of energy should be met with skepticism.

    The Packard Foundation through 2020, will have awarded nearly $1 billion in grants to reduce carbon emissions, one of the its greatest program commitments in its 55-year history. (Source: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Dec., 2019) Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Walt Reid, Director Conservation and Science Program, Report Author, 650-948-7658, www.packard.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy,  CO2,  CCS,  Biofuels,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • Peatlands Carbon Content Double Previous Estimates (Ind. Report)
    Columbia University Earth Institute,
    Date: 2019-10-23
    According to a recently published Columbia University Earth Institute study published in Nature Geoscience, Northern peatlands may hold twice as much carbon as scientists previously suspected. The study findings suggest that peatland areas play a more important role in climate change and the carbon cycle than they're credited for.

    The report notes that global climate models, which scientists use to predict climate change and its impacts, rarely account for the carbon that peat and other soils absorb, store and release.

    Their new study incorporates 4,139 radiocarbon measurements from 645 peatland sites in northern Europe, Asia, and North America. But the main innovation is in how the researchers calculated the carbon storage in peatlands.

    The report notes researchershave calculated that northern peatlands hold 1.1 trillion tons of carbon rather than previous estimates of roughly 545 billion tons. The report concludes that peatlands are decaying faster and releasing more carbon as the planet's thermostat climbs. (Source: Columbia University, Earth Institute, 21 Oct., 2019) Contact: Columbia University Earth Institute, Prof. Jonathan Nichols, 212-854-3830, www.earth.columbia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Peatland,  CO2,  Carbon Sequestrartion,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  


    DOE Invests $56Mn in Coal Technology Projects (R&D, Funding)
    US DOE,DOE Office of Fossil Energy
    Date: 2019-09-23
    The U.S. DOE is announcing 32 winners for $56.5 million in federal funding for cost-shared R&D projects for advanced coal technologies and research under six separate funding opportunity announcements (FOAs). The projects further the (Trump) Administration's commitment to strengthening clean coal technologies and cover a range of topics, including carbon capture, utilization, and storage; rare earth element recovery; coal to products; crosscutting coal R&D; steam turbine efficiency; and advanced materials. The awards are as follows:
  • $10 million for ten projects under DE-FOA-0001992, Maximizing the Coal Value Chain. The projects will develop innovative uses of domestic coal for upgraded coal-based feedstocks used to produce power and make steel and for producing high-value products from coal or coal by-products.

  • $11.9 million under DE-FOA-0001996, Advancing Steam Turbines for Coal Boilers. The two projects selected under this FOA seek to improve the performance of steam-based power cycles, resulting in lower cost electricity with reduced emissions per megawatt-hour from coal fueled boilers.

  • $9.3 million for ten projects under DE-FOA-0002001, Crosscutting Research for Coal-Fueled Power Plants. This effort supports DOE's Crosscutting Research Program, which develops technologies that can be applied to a range of fossil energy uses.

  • $5 million under DE-FOA-0002002, Advanced Materials for High-Efficiency, Flexible and Reliable Coal-Fueled Power Plants. DOE selected five projects to support its Crosscutting Research program, which fosters the development and deployment of innovative systems for improving efficiency and environmental performance.

  • 3 projects will receive up to $15 million under DE-FOA-0002003, Process Scale-Up and Optimization/Efficiency Improvements for Rare Earth Elements (REE) and Critical Materials (CM) Recovery from United States Coal-Based Resources.

  • 2 projects will receive $5.3 million under DE-FOA-0001998, Transformational Sensing Systems for Monitoring the Deep Subsurface. This award seeks to reduce uncertainty of and enable real-time decision-making associated with subsurface carbon dioxide (CO2) storage. The selected projects support DOE's Carbon Storage Research Program by improving characterization and prediction of subsurface fluid movement and enhancing real-time measurement of critical subsurface properties.

    DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)will manage the selected projects. (Source: US DOE, 20 Sept., 2019) Contact: US DOE Office of Fossil Energy, www.energy.gov/fe; NETL, www.netl.doe.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE Office of Fossil Energy,  NETL,  Coal,  Clean Coal,  US DOE,  


  • DOE Announces $110Mn Grant Funding for CCUS R&D (R&D Funding)
    US DOE,NETL
    Date: 2019-09-16
    The U.S. DOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has announced approximately $110 million in federal funding for cost-shared R&D projects under three funding opportunity announcements (FOAs). Approximately $75M is for awards selected under two FOAs announced earlier this fiscal year; $35M is for a new FOA.

    These FOAs further the (Trump) Administration's commitment to strengthening coal while protecting the environment. Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) is increasingly becoming widely accepted as a viable option for coal-fired energy sources or gas-fired power plants and other industrial sources to lower their CO2 emissions.

    Under the first FOA award, Front-End Engineering Design (FEED) Studies for Carbon Capture Systems on Coal and Natural Gas Power Plants, DOE has selected nine projects to receive $55.4 million for cost-shared R&D. The selected projects will support FEED studies for commercial-scale carbon capture systems.

    Under the second FOA award, Regional Initiative to Accelerate CCUS Deployment, DOE selected four projects to receive up to $20 million for cost-shared R&D. The projects also advance existing R&D by addressing key technical challenges; facilitating data collection, sharing, and analysis; evaluating regional infrastructure; and promoting regional technology transfer.

    Under the new FOA, , DOE is announcing up to $35 million for cost-shared R&D projects that will accelerate wide-scale deployment of CCUS through assessing and verifying safe and cost-effective anthropogenic CO2 commercial-scale storage sites, and carbon capture and/or purification technologies. These types of projects have the potential to take advantage of the 45Q tax credit for each ton of CO2 sequestered or utilized. The credit was recently increased to $35/metric ton for enhanced oil recovery and $50/metric ton for geologic storage.

    Projects selected under this new FOA shall perform the following key activities: complete a detailed site characterization of a commercial-scale CO2 storage site (50 million metric tons of captured CO2 within a 30 year period); apply and obtain an underground injection control class VI permit to construct an injection well; complete a CO2capture assessment; and perform all work required to obtain a National Environmental Policy Act determination for the site.

    DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory NETL) will manage the selected projects. (Source: US DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, PR, 13 Sept., 2019)Contact: US DOE Office of Fossil Energy. www.energy.gov/fe/foa-2058-front-end-engineering-design-feed-studies-carbon-capture-systems-coal-and-natural-gas, www.energy.gov/fe; NETL, www.netl.doe.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News NETL,  CCS,  US DOE,  CCUS,  CO2,  Office of Fossil Energy,  


    Australians Announce "Blue Carbon" Science Hub (Int'l Report)
    Blue Carbon
    Date: 2019-09-09
    Further to our 10th July report, the Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne has announced the establishment of the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) Indian Ocean Blue Carbon Hub aimed at protecting and restoring the health of ocean "blue carbon" mangrove ecosystems.

    The hub, which will be hosted by the Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at the University of Western Australia, will be jointly funded by the federal government and CSIRO to the tune of $600,000 over three years. According to hub director Dr Mat Vanderklift, "Blue carbon ecosystems are highly effective at carbon storage and protecting coastal communities against storms. The Indian Ocean is disproportionately important in blue carbon globally. The hub will allow us to accelerate action and go beyond talking about it, to doing something about it."

    Mangrove systems sequester "blue carbon" -- CO2 absorbed from the atmosphere and locked up in coastal wetlands such as mangroves. (Source: The New Nation, Sept., 2019) Contact: Indian Ocean Blu Carbon Hub, Dr Mat Vanderklift, Dir. Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre at the University of Western Australia, +61 8 6488 7270, www.uwa.edu.au › facilities › indian-ocean-marine-research-centre

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Mangrove,  Blue Carbon,  Climate Change,  


    Chevron Unveils Aussie CO2 Storage, Mitigation Project (Int'l)
    Chevron
    Date: 2019-08-09
    In the Land Down Under, Perth-based energy major Chevron Australia Pty Ltd. and its JV partners at the Gorgon LNG project, in Western Australia, are reporting the launch of the Gorgon carbon dioxide (CO2) injection system -- the world's largest greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation project. When fully operational, the CO2 injection facility will cut Gorgon's GHG emissions by about 40 pct or more than 100-million tonnes over the life of the project.

    The Gorgon facility incorporates features aimed at maximizing energy efficiency and minimizing GHG emissions, and in steady-state operations, is anticipated to have the lowest GHG emissions intensity of any LNG project in Australia. (Source: Chevron Australia, Mining Weekly, Creamer Media NZ, 8 Aug., 2019) Contact: Chevron Australia Pty Ltd, +61 8 9216 4000, www.chevron.com/about/contact

    More Low-Carbon Energy News LNG,  Chevron,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


    Politicians Prodded to Address 'Killer Heat' (Opinions & Asides)
    Climate Change,Global Warming
    Date: 2019-07-19
    Killer Heat in the United States, a recently released report from the Union of Concerned Scientist predicts a lot more days of extreme heat -- so much that they're being called "killer heat" days. The study was released in part to spur action on the part of both politicians and business leaders.

    According to the report, "The United States federal government needs to continue with the (Obama) Clean Power Plan and not dismantle it, as the current (Trump) administration is attempting to do, to significantly reduce emissions from the power sector, which accounts for roughly 40 pct of the U.S. emissions footprint."

    The UCS scientists are asking the federal government to not only wean the nation off of fossil fuels, but develop plans for people to adapt to extreme heat. "The clock is ticking to reduce emissions. If nothing is done, we may have to get ready for an unrecognizably hot future" the report says.

    To make the needed deep emissions cuts, the reports recommends the U.S. implement a suite of federal and state policies, including: an economy wide price on carbon; policies to cut transportation sector emissions, including increasing fuel economy and heat-trapping emissions standards for vehicles; increased investment in low-carbon public transportation; policies to cut buildings and industrial sector emissions; policies to increase carbon storage in vegetation and soils, including through climate-friendly agricultural and forest management practices; increased investment in emissions and climate change related R&D; measures to cut methane, nitrus oxide, and other major non-CO2 heat-trapping emissions; and policies to help a rapid transition to low-carbon economies.

    Download the Killer Heat in the United States -Climate Choices and the Future of Dangerously Hot Days report HERE (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists, wusf Public Media, 18 July, 2019) Contact: Union of Concerned Scientists, Ken Kimmell, Pres., (617) 547-5552,

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Union of Concerned Scientists,  Climate Change,  


    Wood Products Mitigate Under 1 pct Global CO2 Emissions (R&D)
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Date: 2019-07-08
    At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an research analysis across 180 countries found that global wood products -- all the paper, lumber, furniture and more -- offset less than 1 pct of of annual global carbon emissions -- 335 million tons of CO2 in 2015, 71 million tons of which were unaccounted for under current UN standards.

    Current U.N. guidelines only allow countries to count the carbon stored in wood products created from domestic timber harvests, not the timber grown locally and shipped internationally, nor products produced from imported lumber. These regulations create a gap between the actual amount of carbon stored in the world's wood products and what is officially counted.

    The researchers asked the question, can we continue to consume wood products and have climate change benefits associated with that consumption?" To address that question, the researchers developed a consistent, international analysis of the carbon storage potential of these products, which countries must now account for under the global Paris Agreement to reduce carbon emissions.

    They used data on lumber harvests and wood product production from 1961 to 2015, the most recent year available, from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The researchers modeled future carbon sequestration in wood products using five broad models of possible economic and population growth, the two factors that most affect demand for these products. In 2015, that gap amounted to 71 million tons of CO2, equivalent to the emissions from 15 million cars. If those guidelines remain unchanged, by 2065 another 50 million tons of CO2 may go unaccounted for due to this gap. But this additional, uncounted carbon does not significantly increase the proportion of global emissions offset by wood products, according to the study.

    Craig Johnston, a professor of forest economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Volker Radeloff, a UW-Madison professor of forest and wildlife ecology, published their findings July 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: WU-Madison, PR, July, 2019) Contact: WU-Madison, Craig Johnston, (608) 890-3609, craig.johnston@wisc.edu, www.wisc.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Woody Biomass,  Carbon Storage,  


    Notable Quote -- Carbon Sequestration
    IndigoAg
    Date: 2019-06-21
    "If we took every cultivated acre on earth, which is about 3.5 billion acres, and got it back to 3 pct, that would take 1 trillion tons of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and it hold it in the soil. A trillion tons of carbon dioxide happens to be the increase that we've had in the atmosphere since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.” -- David Perry, CEO, IndigoAg Contact: Indigo Ag, David Perry, CEO, (844) 828-0240, info@indigoag.com, www.indigoag.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Dioxide,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


    Forest "Glow" Reveals CO2 Storage Capacity (Ind. Report)
    University of Utah
    Date: 2019-06-06
    Researchers from the University of Utah report they’ve found a way to monitor the total amount of Gross Primary Production (GPP), the chemical energy produced by the process of photosynthesis which can be tracked by satellites in evergreen forests to measure seasonal changes that impact leaf growth and color.

    Forests can store large amounts of carbon and so monitoring photosynthesis is an accurate way to track global carbon levels and measure how much CO2 is being stored. For evergreen trees which remain green all year round, it’s challenging to measure photosynthesis and carbon uptake. In the new study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers found a way to use solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) emitted by evergreen trees to monitor seasonal changes in photosynthesis and GPP. SIF occurs when chlorophyll levels return from a dormant state, and a photon is emitted which produces a faint “glow” not visible to the naked eye. Satellites can now detect SIF glow, and the researchers used scanning spectrometers to measure SIF in an evergreen forest in Colorado. The team found that fluorescence was a reliable indicator of seasonal chlorophyll changes matching the same patterns found in deciduous forests. Having a way to monitor GPP in both evergreen and deciduous forests will help researchers understand how climate change is impacting forests over a large scale.

    “Ultimately, measuring the small fluorescent glow from plants will allow us to see exactly timing and magnitude of carbon uptake from the terrestrial biosphere. This will help us understand how forests are responding to climate change and suggest how they might respond to future climate change,” said Troy Magney, research scientist of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a lead author of the study. (Source: University of Utah, earth.com, May, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2 Storage,  Carbon Storage,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Aussie Study says Soil Condition Key to Carbon Storage (Int'l)
    Curtin University
    Date: 2019-06-05
    In the Land Down Under, a just released study from Curtin University in Western Australian has found that the rate at which carbon is stored and released from soil differs vastly depending on a range of factors, across different regions and continents.

    "Regionally, the effect of climate on soil carbon storage is dependent on interactions with soil properties, mineralogy and topography. In some regions, climate does not play a role. This shows the need for localized assessments of soil carbon dynamics and a more effective approach to carbon management at local scales."

    "To slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases and help mitigate global warming, a better understanding of the factors controlling soil organic carbon storage, its composition and its vulnerability to loss is needed," lead researcher Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel said. (Source: Curtin University, Xinhua, 4 June, 2019) Contact: Curtin University, Professor Raphael Viscarra Rossel, +61 8 9266 9266, Fax: +61 8 9266 3131, www.curtin.edu.au

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


    Illinois Gov. Inks Carbon Storage Pilot Legislation (Reg. & Leg.)
    Wabash Valley Resources
    Date: 2019-05-10
    This week in Indianapolis, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb approved legislation allowing Wabash Valley Resources LLC to open a $450 million pilot project to produce anhydrous ammonia and store up to 50 million metric tons of CO2 at the former SG Solutions plant adjacent to Duke Energy's Wabash River Generating Station.

    The project is subject to US EPA approval. (Source: News & Tribune, 8 May, 2019) Contact: Wabash Valley Resources LLC, (929) 400-5230, www.wvresc.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


    Carbon Farming in the Golden State (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)

    Date: 2019-05-03
    "Agriculture is responsible for one-third of global carbon emissions, but an increasing number of farmers and ranchers think it can be a powerful ally in the fight to slow climate change, through a set of techniques called carbon farming.

    "The underlying principle of carbon farming is straightforward -- to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, where it drives climate change, and put it back into plants and the pedosphere, the Earth's living soil layer. One way farmers do this is by fertilizing their lands with nutrient-rich compost.

    "As plants grow, they store carbon in their leaves and roots and bank it in organic matter, such as decomposing plant pieces in the soil. Soil microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, also store carbon. This prevents the carbon from escaping into the atmosphere and joining oxygen to form carbon dioxide.

    "Carbon farming has taken hold in California, which is increasingly stepping up as a pioneer of progressive climate policy in the U.S., even as the Trump administration denies the reality of climate change.

    "Today, more than 80 ranchers and farmers in the state are implementing the practice. And the number is likely to increase, since the 2018 Farm Bill includes provisions for a pilot program that gives farmers an incentive to farm carbon.

    "Grassland soils naturally absorb and store carbon in soil organic matter, but common agricultural practices, like plowing and tilling, diminish this ability by breaking apart the soil and releasing its stored carbon into the atmosphere. The good news is that carbon can be reabsorbed by the very same soil. Dozens of farming methods, including composting, managed grazing, no-till agriculture and cover crops, are thought to achieve this feat. Many of them mirror age-old, organic farming techniques.

    "The potential for land-based carbon sequestration in California is significant. Rangelands cover about 56 million acres, half the state's overall land area. According to The New York Times, if 5 pct of that soil is treated with compost, the carbon sequestered would offset about 80 pct of the state's agricultural emissions, the equivalent of removing nearly 6 million cars from the road. If scaled to 41 pct, it would render the state's agricultural sector -- now accounting for 8 pct of the state's overall emissions -- carbon neutral for years. This amount is anything but negligible: California is the most populous state in the U.S. and the country's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Overall, it's responsible for 1 pct of global greenhouse emissions.

    "Ultimately, carbon farming may only pull a limited amount of carbon from the atmosphere. But in California, grasslands appear to be a less vulnerable carbon storage option than fire-prone forests. With global greenhouse gas emissions on the rise, we need to commit to using carbon farming." (Source: NPR, High Country News, May, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Farming,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  


    Shell Seeking UK CO2 Storage Development Subsidy (Int'l Report)
    Royal Dutch Shell
    Date: 2019-04-24
    In the UK, the Sunday Times is reporting oil and gas giant Royal Dutch Shell is seeking an unspecified subsidy from the British government to support Shell's development of underground carbon dioxide storage.

    The requested subsidy is reportedly less than the roughly £40 million previously granted for renewable energy technologies, according to the Sunday Times. (Source: Talk Finance, Sunday Times, 23 April, 2019)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Royal Dutch Shell ,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  

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