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AurCrest Gold, Blue Source Seek Forest Carbon Sequestration Opportunities (Ind. Report)
AurCrest Gold, Blue Source
Date: 2019-08-21
Toronto-based AurCrest Gold Inc. reports it and Alberta-headquartered Blue Source Canada have inked a Carbon Development & Marketing Agreement to collaborate to develop forest carbon sequestration opportunities on behalf of Canadian First Nations communities.

As previously reported, three Northwestern Ontario First Nations groups, AurCrest and carbon offset developer Blue Source, will work together to assess the potential of forests to capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) within the First Nation's traditional territory for the development of Greenhouse Gas offsets.

AurCrest, a mineral exploration company focused on the acquisition, exploration, and development of gold properties, holds a portfolio of properties in Ontario, which include the Richardson Lake and Bridget Lake gold properties. (Source: AurCrest Gold Inc., PR, 19 Aug., 2019) Contact: AurCrest Gold Inc. Christopher Angeconeb , CEO, (807) 737-5353, christopherangeconeb@gmail.com; Blue Source, (403) 262-3026, www.bluesource.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News AurCrest Gold,  Blue Source,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Offset,  


GEVO Trialing LocusAG Technology to Amplify Soil Carbon Sequestration (Ind Report)
GEVO
Date: 2019-08-02
Englewood, Colorago-headquartered biobutanol and biofuels specialist GEVO Inc. is reporting a partnership with Locus Agricultural Solutions® (LocusAG) to trial a new technology to improve the capture of soil carbon, reduce applied nitrogen fertilizer needs and improve crop yields.

LocusAG's Rhizolizer® line of fresh, non-GMO soil probiotic treatments have been used to treat 40,000 commercial agriculture acres across several crops, with positive results in improving crop productivity, crop quality, vigor and sustainability. Treatments are now being tested on Gevo's 30-acre farm co-located at its Luverne, MN ethanol facility.

According to LocusAG, the treatments have the potential to amplify crop soil carbon sequestration by up to an additional 3 to 6 metric tpy of CO2 equivalents per acre while increasing crop yields and grower profits. (Source: GEVO, PR, Newswire, 31 July, 2019) Contact: LocusAG, Paul Zorner, CEO, www.LocusAG.com; Gevo, Patrick Gruber, CEO, 303-858-8358, pgruber@gevo.com, www.gevo.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News GEVO,  Soil Carbon,  Carbon Sequestration,  


Wood Products Mitigate Under 1 pct Global CO2 Emissions (R&D)
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date: 2019-07-08
At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, an research analysis across 180 countries found that global wood products -- all the paper, lumber, furniture and more -- offset less than 1 pct of of annual global carbon emissions -- 335 million tons of CO2 in 2015, 71 million tons of which were unaccounted for under current UN standards.

Current U.N. guidelines only allow countries to count the carbon stored in wood products created from domestic timber harvests, not the timber grown locally and shipped internationally, nor products produced from imported lumber. These regulations create a gap between the actual amount of carbon stored in the world's wood products and what is officially counted.

The researchers asked the question, can we continue to consume wood products and have climate change benefits associated with that consumption?" To address that question, the researchers developed a consistent, international analysis of the carbon storage potential of these products, which countries must now account for under the global Paris Agreement to reduce carbon emissions.

They used data on lumber harvests and wood product production from 1961 to 2015, the most recent year available, from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The researchers modeled future carbon sequestration in wood products using five broad models of possible economic and population growth, the two factors that most affect demand for these products. In 2015, that gap amounted to 71 million tons of CO2, equivalent to the emissions from 15 million cars. If those guidelines remain unchanged, by 2065 another 50 million tons of CO2 may go unaccounted for due to this gap. But this additional, uncounted carbon does not significantly increase the proportion of global emissions offset by wood products, according to the study.

Craig Johnston, a professor of forest economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Volker Radeloff, a UW-Madison professor of forest and wildlife ecology, published their findings July 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: WU-Madison, PR, July, 2019) Contact: WU-Madison, Craig Johnston, (608) 890-3609, craig.johnston@wisc.edu, www.wisc.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Woody Biomass,  Carbon Storage,  


Notable Quote -- Carbon Sequestration
IndigoAg
Date: 2019-06-21
"If we took every cultivated acre on earth, which is about 3.5 billion acres, and got it back to 3 pct, that would take 1 trillion tons of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and it hold it in the soil. A trillion tons of carbon dioxide happens to be the increase that we've had in the atmosphere since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.” -- David Perry, CEO, IndigoAg Contact: Indigo Ag, David Perry, CEO, (844) 828-0240, info@indigoag.com, www.indigoag.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Dioxide,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


IndigoAg Offers Farmers Incentives to Capture Carbon (Ind Report)
IndigoAg
Date: 2019-06-21
Boston-based Indigo Ag is touting the June 12th launch of its Terraton Initiative carbon sequestration program that will pay farmers to use regenerative farming practices and remove carbon from the atmosphere. Since its launch, farmers have pledged more than 700,000 acres to the program. Indigo provides seed treatments and electronically connects grain growers and buyers.

The Terraton Initiative is a global effort to capture 1 trillion tons of CO2 from the atmosphere by using agricultural plants and then storing that carbon in the soil. Through farming practices, such as cover crops, no-till, crop rotations and complimentary livestock enterprises, farmers can develop carbon-enriched soils, the company says. Basically, more plants equal more photosynthesis, which captures more carbon and creates healthier soil for better crop yields, the company says.

As part of the Terraton Initiative, Indigo created Indigo Carbon, which is the platform that will pay farmers for increasing the carbon content of their soil and reducing overall emissions. Farmers joining Indigo Carbon within the first 12 months are eligible to receive a minimum of $15 per metric ton of carbon dioxide sequestered. Most farmers can sequester 2 to 3 tons per acre per year, which would be an added revenue of $30 to $60 per acre, the company adds.

Indigo's Terraton Initiative details are HERE. (Source: IndigoAg, PR, AgPro, 20 June, 2019) Contact: Indigo Ag, David Perry, CEO, (844) 828-0240, info@indigoag.com, www.indigoag.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News IndigoAg,  Carbon Capture,  


Rutgers, Duke Farms Partner on NJ Carbon Sink Project (Ind. Report)
Rutgers
Date: 2019-06-17
In the Garden State, Rutgers University and Duke Farms in Hillsborough Township report they are collaborating on a study to develop 2,700 acres as an experimental carbon sink to absorb and store atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Higher levels of carbon dioxide are a factor in global warming and climate change.

The Rutgers University researchers, from the New Brunswick, Newark and Camden campuses, will conduct monitoring and research at the largely wooded Duke Farms over five years. The study will begin by compiling baseline data on the presence of carbon in various land types and land management protocols. The Rutgers scientists will then create strategies to remove CO2 from the atmosphere and store it in soil and vegetation. The study will also determine the greenhouse gas emissions supporting the Duke Farms operations compared to the carbon stored on the property. (Source: Rutgers, Bridgewater Courier, 13 June, 2019) Contact: Rutgers Climate Institute, Marjorie Kaplan, Assoc. Dir., (848) 932-5739, www.climatechange.rutgers.edu; Duke Farms, Michael Catania, Exec. Dir., www.dukefarms.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Sink,  


Carbon Engineering, Oxy Partner on CCS, EOR Project (Ind. Report)
Carbon Engineering Ltd
Date: 2019-05-24
Kallanish Energy is reporting Squamish, BC-based Carbon Engineering Ltd and Houston-headquartered oil major Occidental Petroleum subsidiary Oxy Low Carbon Ventures LLC (Oxy) are in the process of engineering and designing a plant to capture CO2 emissions from the air, and to use those emissions in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) activities.

The plant, which would be located in the Permian Basin, is being billed the world's largest Direct Air Capture (DAC) and sequestration facility and is designed to capture 500 kilotonnes per year of CO2 directly from the atmosphere.

Plant construction could get underway in 2021 for operation in 2023. Plant costs and other details have not been revealed. (Source: Carbon Engineering, Kallanish Energy, May, 2019) Contact: Oxy Low Carbon Ventures, www.oxy.com/OurBusinesses/midstreamMarketing/LowCarbonVentures; Carbon Engineering, Steve Oldham, CEO, info@carbonengineering.com, www.carbonengineering.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Engineering ,  EOR,  Carbon Sequestration,  CCS,  


Sub-Sea CO2 Storage Leakage Studied (Ind. Report)
Carbon Storage
Date: 2019-05-15
Researchers at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel investigating the possibilities and limits of the sub-sea CO2 storage report it is possible to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions by separating CO2 from flue gases and storing the captured CO2 in geological formations. The researchers also note negative emissions can be achieved by coupling biogas production with CO2 separation and storage.

Assessments by the IPCC show that these approaches are essential parts of the technology mix needed to limit global warming to less than 2 degrees C.

In Europe the largest potential to store CO2 is located offshore in deep saline aquifers and other sub-seabed geological formations of the North Sea where over 10,000 oil and gas wells have been drilled. At many of these wells, methane gas from shallow biogenic deposits is leaking into the environment because the surrounding sediments were mechanically disturbed and weakened during the drilling process. The study notes that CO2 stored in the vicinity of these wells may leak and ultimately return into the atmosphere.

"We have performed a release experiment in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea to determine the footprint and consequences of such a leak", explains study lead author Dr. Lisa Vielstadte from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel.

In the study, CO2 released at the seabed in 82 meters of water was tracked and traced using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with chemical and acoustic sensors and additional measurements on board of Research Vessel Celtic Explorer. The resulting data showed that CO2 gas bubbles were completely dissolved close to the seafloor and the pH value of ambient bottom waters was lowered from a background value of 8.0 to a more acidic value of 7.0 at the release site as a consequence of the dissolution process. This bottom water acidification has detrimental effects on organisms living at the seabed", However, strong bottom currents induced a rapid dispersion of the dissolved CO2 such that the area at the seabed where potentially harmful effects can occur is small.

Accordingly, the study tentatively concluded it is possible to store CO2 safely in sub-seabed formations if the storage site is located in an area with a small number of leaky wells, the report summarizes. (Source: Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel , PR, 14 May, 2019) Contact: GEOMAR - Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Dr. Lisa Vielstadte, +49 431 600-0, Fax:+49 431 600-2805, www.geomar.de/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  CCS,  


Loughborough Univ. Granted £200,000 for Green Travel R&D (Int'l)
Loughborough Univ
Date: 2019-05-08
Loughborough University has been awarded £200,000 in grant funding from the UK Department for Transport and Supergen Bioenergy Hub -- a group of experts focussed on developing sustainable bioenergy systems -- for two projects which aim to make the transport sector more environmentally friendly. The projects will explore biofuel production, bioenergy carbon capture, and storage and utilisation.

One project, led by Dr Jin Xuan, a Senior Lecturer in Low Carbon Processes, will examine the role of e-biofuel in reducing emissions and increasing the sustainability of the road transport sector while enhancing renewable energy security. The research will examine the feasibility of a novel electrochemical process to produce biofuels while reusing the captured CO2.

The project will develop a new concept of e-biofuel which combines the advantages of both e-fuel (produced from renewable electricity and CO2) and biofuel (produced from biomass) to intensively decarbonise the road transport sector. It also provides Loughborough researchers with a new link to the Supergen Bioenergy Hub and the Department of Transport.

A second project led by Dr Tanja Radu, a Lecturer in Water Engineering, will research algae-based biomethane fuel purification and carbon sequestration. The project aims to develop and assess an innovative process for the simultaneous production of high-purity biomethane as a potential natural gas vehicle fuel, together with the sequestration of remaining biomass and biogas carbon into algal co-product and biochar.

The Supergen Bioenergy Hub at Aston University aims to bring together industry, academia and other stakeholders to focus on the research and knowledge challenges associated with increasing the contribution of UK bioenergy to meet strategic environmental targets in a coherent, sustainable and cost-effective manner. (Source: DfT, Loughborough University, East Midlands Business Link, 8 May, 2019) Contact: Loughborough University, www.lboro.ac.uk; Supergen Bioenergy Hub, Professor Patricia Thornley, Dir., p.thornley@aston.ac.uk, www.supergen-bioenergy.net

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy news,  Biofuel news,  CCS news,  Biogas news,  


AurCrest Gold, Lac Seul First Nation Investigate CCS (Ind. Report)
AurCrest Gold, Lac Seul First Nation
Date: 2019-05-08
Toronto-headquartered Canadian minerals exploration specialist AurCrest Gold Inc. reports it and the Lac Seul First Nation are partnering to investigate carbon sequestration opportunities in the First Nation's traditional territory in Northwestern Ontario.

Lac Seul First Nations seeks to determine the feasibility of valuing their traditional territory for purposes of CCS and monetizing carbon offset credits for sale to the benefit of the First Nation and its business partners.

AurCrest and its subsidiary Wiigwaasaatig Energy Inc. will work with the First Nation to finalize a definitive carbon credit management agreement to develop and implement sequestration project opportunities. (Source: AurCrest Gold Inc., Accesswire, 7 May, 2019) Contact: AurCrest Gold, www.aurcrest.ca; Lac Seul First Nation, www.lacseul.firstnation.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  


Carbon Farming in the Golden State (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)

Date: 2019-05-03
"Agriculture is responsible for one-third of global carbon emissions, but an increasing number of farmers and ranchers think it can be a powerful ally in the fight to slow climate change, through a set of techniques called carbon farming.

"The underlying principle of carbon farming is straightforward -- to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, where it drives climate change, and put it back into plants and the pedosphere, the Earth's living soil layer. One way farmers do this is by fertilizing their lands with nutrient-rich compost.

"As plants grow, they store carbon in their leaves and roots and bank it in organic matter, such as decomposing plant pieces in the soil. Soil microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, also store carbon. This prevents the carbon from escaping into the atmosphere and joining oxygen to form carbon dioxide.

"Carbon farming has taken hold in California, which is increasingly stepping up as a pioneer of progressive climate policy in the U.S., even as the Trump administration denies the reality of climate change.

"Today, more than 80 ranchers and farmers in the state are implementing the practice. And the number is likely to increase, since the 2018 Farm Bill includes provisions for a pilot program that gives farmers an incentive to farm carbon.

"Grassland soils naturally absorb and store carbon in soil organic matter, but common agricultural practices, like plowing and tilling, diminish this ability by breaking apart the soil and releasing its stored carbon into the atmosphere. The good news is that carbon can be reabsorbed by the very same soil. Dozens of farming methods, including composting, managed grazing, no-till agriculture and cover crops, are thought to achieve this feat. Many of them mirror age-old, organic farming techniques.

"The potential for land-based carbon sequestration in California is significant. Rangelands cover about 56 million acres, half the state's overall land area. According to The New York Times, if 5 pct of that soil is treated with compost, the carbon sequestered would offset about 80 pct of the state's agricultural emissions, the equivalent of removing nearly 6 million cars from the road. If scaled to 41 pct, it would render the state's agricultural sector -- now accounting for 8 pct of the state's overall emissions -- carbon neutral for years. This amount is anything but negligible: California is the most populous state in the U.S. and the country's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Overall, it's responsible for 1 pct of global greenhouse emissions.

"Ultimately, carbon farming may only pull a limited amount of carbon from the atmosphere. But in California, grasslands appear to be a less vulnerable carbon storage option than fire-prone forests. With global greenhouse gas emissions on the rise, we need to commit to using carbon farming." (Source: NPR, High Country News, May, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Farming,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  


Ontario Kills Reforestation-Carbon Sequestration Program (Ind. Report)
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
Date: 2019-04-26
At Queen's Park in Toronto, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry reports it is cancelling the government's $4.7-million per year 50 Million Tree Program as part of it budgetary restraint effort. According to the industry group Forests Ontario, more than 27 million trees have been planted across Ontario through the reforestation-carbon sequestration program since 2008.

Forests Ontario notes about 40 pct forest cover is needed to ensure forest sustainability. The average coverage in southern Ontario is 26 pct with some areas hovering at 5 pct. (Source: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Canadian Press, National Post, 25 April, 2019) Contact: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, 800-667-1940, www.ontario.ca/page/ministry-natural-resources-and-forestry; Forests Ontario, (416) 646-1193, www.forestsontario.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Reforestation,  Carbon Sequestration,  


Natural Forests Best for Fighting Climate Change (Ind. Report)
University of Edinburgh
Date: 2019-04-10
In the UK, researchers at the University of Edinburgh and University College London have found that natural forests store more carbon for longer periods compared to plantations and agroforestry. The researchers found the carbon sequestration potential of natural forests is 40 times greater than that of plantations, reforestation and re-greening efforts and the cultivation of commercial crops.

In reaching their conclusions, the researchers examined commitments made by 43 countries in tropical and subtropical regions, where trees grow faster and thus hold greater promise of removing atmospheric carbon.

These countries have pledged as of October 2017 to restore a combined 2.92 million square kilometers (1.13 million square miles) of degraded and deforested land -- an area almost twice the size of Alaska. Some of these are national commitments, while others were made under the Bonn Challenge launched in 2011 by the German government and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The latter initiative aims to restore 3.5 million square kilometers (1.35 million square miles) of degraded and deforested land by 2030 -- greater than the land mass of India.

The researcher's analysis found that at present, 45 pct of the commitments made by the 43 countries involve planting commercially profitable trees. Many of these plantations are expected to occur in countries like Brazil, China, Indonesia, Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo. In China, 98.8 pct of the area to be restored will host plantations. In Brazil, it's just over 80 pct of the targeted restoration area, with well under 1 pct for natural forests. (Source: University of Edinburgh, Mongabay, April, 2019) Contact: University of Edinburgh, /www.ed.ac.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Edinburgh,  Carbon Sequestration,  Forest Carbon Sink,  Reforestation,  


Shell Plans $300Mn Investment to Offset Carbon Emissions (Int'l)
Royal Dutch Shell
Date: 2019-04-10
Oil major Royal Dutch Shell reports it plans to invest $300 million in forests, wetlands and other natural ecosystems around the world over the next three years as part of its strategy to "act on global climate change." The investment programme will contribute to the Shell Group's three-year target, beginning in 2019, to reduce its net carbon footprint by between 2 pct and 3 pct, according to Shell.

Projects in Shell's pipeline include a 5 million tree planting initiative in the Netherlands, a 300-hectare reforestation project in Spain and an 800-hectare endangered native forest regeneration project in the state of Queensland. (Source: Shell, Various Media, Bunkerspot, April, 2019) Contact: Royal Dutch Shell, Ben van Beurden, CEO, www.corporate-office-headquarters.com/shell-oil-company

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Royal Dutch Shell,  Reforestation,  Carbon Sequestration,  


Carbon Sequestration via Next-Gen Bioreactor Tech (Ind. Report)
LanzaTech
Date: 2019-03-20
Emissions Reduction Alberta reports it is supporting a LanzTech project that will demonstrate the company's next-generation microbubble bioreactor (MBR) technology, which will maximize the quantity of fuels produced per tonne of wood waste in an integrated biorefinery.

LanzaTech proposes to demonstrate the MBR by producing ethanol from the off-gas of forestry-residue pyrolysis in Alberta, with extended benefits for converting other resources such as industrial waste gases and agricultural residues using LanzaTech's gas fermentation platform. This project takes a major step towards creating value from new waste resources, such as gasified agricultural residues, and serving hard-to-decarbonize sectors, such as aviation (jet fuel from ethanol) and consumer goods (materials from fermentation-derived chemicals), according to Emissions Reductions Alberta.(Source: Emissions Reductions Alberta, News Website, 12 Mar., 2019) Contact: Emissions Reduction Alberta, (780)498-2068, info@eralberta.ca, www.eralberta.ca; LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News LanzaTech,  Carbon Sequestration,  Ethanol,  


Aussie Scientists Touting CO2- Into-Coal Tech (New Prod & Tech)
RMIT University
Date: 2019-03-01
In the Land Down Under, Scientists at RMIT University in Melbourne are claiming the development of a new way to turn CO2 back into coal -- breakthrough that could pave the way for new carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies with the greatly limited possibility of "leakage."

According to the researchers, most carbon capture methods involve compressing CO2 into liquid form to be pumped and stored underground. Despite progress, the best carbon capture and storage technologies still aren't economical. They also pose environmental concerns.

To turn CO2 into coal, scientists developed a liquid metal catalyst that is highly conductive. The conversion process begins by dissolving the captured CO2 in an electrolyte liquid. After a small amount of the catalyst is added, a current is run through the solution. Chemical reactions caused solid flakes of carbon "coal" to separate from the solution. Because the carbonaceous solids are stable, they could be compacted and buried in the ground.

The process is efficient and scalable, but researchers acknowledge more work is needed before the method can be commercialized, according to the researchers. The research was conducted at RMIT's MicroNano Research Facility and the RMIT Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility, with support from the Australian Research Council Centre for Future Low-Energy Electronics Technologies (FLEET) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES). The paper is published in Nature Communications -- Room temperature CO2 reduction to solid carbon species on liquid metals featuring atomically thin ceria interfaces -- DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08824-8. (Source: RIMT University, Nature Communications, UPI, Feb., 2019) Contact: RMIT University, Australian Research Council , Dr, Torben Daeneke, Dr. Dorna Esrafilzadeh +61 3 9925 2000, www.rmit.edu.au

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  Carbon Sequestration,  Coal,  


GroundMetrics Applies Deep Learning to CCS Monitoring (Ind Report)
GroundMetrics
Date: 2019-02-22
San Diego-based electromagnetic sensor system company and oil and gas technology pioneer GroundMetrics Inc reports it will use proprietary sensor systems and machine learning to monitor CO2 in the subsurface through a new project awarded by the US DOE.

In partnership with the DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL) and Expero Inc., GroundMetrics will develop a continuous sequestered carbon monitoring system to measure resistivity changes in the subsurface. The system will help carbon sequestration managers monitor CO2 saturation and thus provide time and cost-effective insight into how the CO2 is being distributed underground and whether it is leaking.

GroundMetrics offers full-field survey and monitoring services as well as partnership opportunities to oil and gas, geophysical service, and mineral exploration companies. (Source: GroundMetrics, Inc., PR, 21 Feb., 2019) Contact: GroundMetrics, George Eiskamp, CEO, Jessie Kaffai, (858) 381-4155, jkaffai@)groundmetrics.com, www.groundmetrics.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  CO2,  Carbon Dioxide,  Carbon Sequestration,  


GTI Low-Carbon Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) from Wood Wastes Study Released (Report Attached)
GTI
Date: 2019-02-15
The Des Plaines, Illinois-headquartered Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has released a site-specific engineering design titled Low-Carbon Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) from Wood Wastes, a blueprint for converting an existing biomass facility into an RNG production site, using the wood waste feedstock.

New RNG production facilities using the commercial technologies outlined in the analysis could reduce criteria pollutants by approximately 99 pct compared to existing operational biomass power plants and produce a very low carbon fuel in the base case and below zero in the case including carbon sequestration technologies, according to the study.

The engineering design illustrated in the report was performed by GTI, Black & Veatch, Andritz, and Haldor Topsoe. The engineering design study was funded by California Air Resources Board (CARB), PG&E, SoCalGas, Northwest Natural and SMUD.

Download Low-Carbon Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) from Wood Wastes report HERE. (Source: GTI, Feb., Green Car Congress, 15 Feb., 2019) Contact: GTI, Vann Bush, VP Technology Technology Development and Commercialization, (847)768-0500, www.gastechnology.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News GTI,  RNG,  Woody Biomass,  Rnewable Natural Gas,  


Carbon Capture Modernization Act Tabled in DC (Reg. & Leg.)
Carbon Capture
Date: 2019-02-13
In Washington, Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn) and Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND) have introduced the Carbon Capture Modernization Act to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel producers by creating additional incentives for utilities to install carbon capture and storage technology.

The bi-partisan Act, which is cosponsored by Sens. Kevin Cramer (R-ND), Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), John Barrasso (R-Wy), Jon Tester (D-Mont), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Steve Daines (R-Mont), updates the tax credit system for coal producers and incentivizes underground carbon sequestration rather than releasing carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

"Climate change will continue to threaten our economy and our future if we don't find ways to decrease our nation's carbon footprint, While we continue to transition to clean and affordable forms of energy, this legislation helps ensure that carbon dioxide released by fossil fuel power plants is captured and stored before it can be emitted into the atmosphere. This bill supports the good work that Minnesota Power, Minnesota's rural electric co-ops, and other utilities in our state are doing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions," Sen. Smith stated in a release. (Source: Various Media, Brainerd Dispatch, 12 Feb., 2019) Contact: Sen. Tina Smith (D-Minn), www.smith.senate.gov/content/about-tina; Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND), www.hoeven.senate.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


$4.7Mn for California Soil Amendments CCS Research (R&D, Funding)
Carbon Sequestration,UC Davis
Date: 2019-01-21
In the Golden State, the University of California, Davis, and the UC Working Lands Innovation Center are reporting receipt of $4.7 million in grant funding over 3-years from the California Strategic Growth Council to research scalable methods of using soil amendments to sequester greenhouse gases like (CO2) in soil. The project aims to find ways to capture billions of tons of CO2 and bring net carbon emissions in California to zero by 2045.

The consortium will conduct and oversee 29 treatment and control sites across California and assess whether soil amendments -- pulverized rock, compost and biochar -- can bring additional carbon Capture and storage (CCS) co-benefits, such as improved crop and rangeland productivity and soil health to California growers and ranchers across diverse regions.

The sites range from croplands in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys to the Imperial Valley, as well as ranchlands from Marin County to Southern California.

In addition to UC Berkeley and UC Davis, the consortium also includes scientists from UC Merced, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and California State University, East Bay. The group will be working with the California Collaborative for Climate Change Solutions (C4S), Larta Institute, the Almond Board of California, commercial manufacturers of compost and biochar, ranchers and farmers, carbon offset registries, the USDA California Climate Hub, and UC Cooperative Extension. (Source: UC Davis, PR, 16 Jan., 2019) Contact: UC Davis, John Muir Institute of the Environment , Benjamin Houlton, Dir., (530) 752-7627, johnmuir.ucdavis.edu; California Strategic Growth Council, www.sgc.ca.gov, UC Working Lands Innovation Center Grant Award, www.sgc.ca.gov/programs/climate-research/docs/20181221-CCR_Summary_2019CCR20007.pdf

More Low-Carbon Energy News UC Davis,  CCS,  CO2,  Carbon Sequestration,  Greenhouse Gas,  


Wyoming Gov. Seeks $10Mn for Carbon Capture Test (Funding)
CCS,University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources
Date: 2019-01-18
In Cheyenne, the freshman republican governor of Wyoming, Mark Gordon, is reportedly seeking $10 million from the state legislature's Joint Appropriations Committee to fund a carbon capture test project at the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources in Laramie.

The $10 million in state funds would be used to try and acquire an additional $40 million from the U.S. DOE for another project that would be connected with the Integrated Test Center in Gillette.

The proposed 5-MW equivalent pilot project would use enhanced coal-based technology that captures at least 75-pct of the carbon emissions, according to the governor's request. (Source: Office of Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon, Wyoming Public Media, 16 Jan., 2019) Contact: Office of Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon, www.facebook.com/markgordon4wyoming; University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources, www.uwyo.edu/ser

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  CO2,  Carbon Sequestration,  Greenhouse Gas,  


U.K. Environmental Coalition Spearheading CCS Project (Int'l)
Very Large Scale Decarbonization Partners
Date: 2019-01-16
In London, U.K. Energy and Clean Growth Minister Hon. Claire Perry has announced the U.K. will lead an international challenge to capture and sequester CO2. Additionally, Houston-headquartered Very Large Scale Decarbonization Partners (VLS Decarb) has announced its intention to carry out field trials of its highly innovative CO2 sequestration system in several U.K. and EU locations, including several U.S. shale basins where, pending results, these trial sites will be developed into fully functioning carbon dioxide storage facilities capable of permanently storing a significant percentage of annual U.S. CO2 emissions. VLS Decarb will target U.S. shale basins in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas.

VLS Decarb is now securing long term carbon storage contracts from industrial, institutional and governmental clients seeking to mitigate CO2 emissions associated with their operations.

VLS Decarb's proprietary technologies have the potential to permanently sequester approximately 35 years of global electric power CO2 emissions associated with the energy consumed in simultaneously sequestering all global CO2 emissions from all sources during the same time. (Source: VLS Decarbonization Partners, LLC, PR, Jan., 2019) Contact: VLS Decarbonization Partners, John Francis Thrash MD, jfthrash@vlsdecarb.com, www.vlsdecarb.com ; U.K. Energy and Clean Growth Minister, www.gov.uk/government/ministers/minister-of-state-minister-for-energy

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  CCS,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


Equinor Licensed to Build Norwegian Seabed CO2 Storage (Int'l)
Equinor
Date: 2019-01-11
In Oslo, Reuters is reporting the Norwegian Oil Ministry has awarded a license to Oslo-headquartered Equinor to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) storage under the North Sea. The company is now expected to submit a development plan for the Norwegian parliament's approval in 2020 or 2021. The preliminary estimates from 2016 showed it could cost approximately $852 million to establish a full CCS chain, including CO2 transportation by ships and the sub-sea storage.

The planned storage will be located near Norway's largest oil and gas field, Troll, and aims to be able to receive CO2 from onshore power, cement plants and sources. About 1.5 million tpy of CO2 could be stored beneath the seabed during the first phase of the project, according to Equinor.

If approved, the storage operation is expected to begin operations operations in 2023 or 2024. (Source: Equinor, Gassnova, Reuters, 11 Jan., 2019) Contact: Equinor, www.equinor.com/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News Equinor,  Carbon Sequestration,  CO2,  Carbon Storage,  


$867Bn 2018 Farm Bill Includes Carbon Sequestration (Reg. & Leg.)

Date: 2019-01-07
In a tacit recognition of the agricultural community's growing concern with climate change, includes a $25 million climate-friendly soil health pilot program that will incentivize and reward carbon sequestration by farmers through the use of "no-till", strip-till, cover crops and more diverse crop rotations.

No-till farming is a way of growing crops or pasture from year to year without disturbing the soil through tillage. No-till is an agricultural technique which increases the amount of water that infiltrates into the soil, the soil's retention of organic matter and its cycling of nutrients.

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 -- Farm Bill -- reauthorized many expenditures in the prior United States farm bill: the Agricultural Act of 2014. The $867 billion reconciled farm bill was passed by the Senate on December 11, 2018, and by the House on December 12, 2018. (Source: No-Till Farmer, Washington Post, USDA, Wikipedia, Jan., 2019)


AFT Affirms Commitment to Climate Change Fight (Ind. Report)
American Farmland Trust
Date: 2018-11-28
Washington, DC-headquartered American Farmland Trust (AFT) is reporting new commitments to combating climate change, including the addition of Jennifer Moore-Kucera as director of its "Farmers Combat Climate Change" initiative. AFT also reiterated its support of the US Climate Alliance's Natural and Working Lands Challenge in developing policies and programs to increase carbon sequestration and reduce GHGs on farm and ranch land to combat climate change.

The US Climate Alliance is a bipartisan coalition of U.S.states and unincorporated self-governing territories that are committed to upholding the objectives of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement (COP15).

The initiative supports farmers and ranchers in adopting climate-smart farming practices on land they own and rent, encourages smart growth and protecting farmland to reduce transportation emissions and expands renewable energy siting while protecting productive, versatile and resilient farmland. "The goals and strategies outlined in the Farmers Combat Climate Change Initiative will play a critical role in helping farmers, ranchers, and urban growth planners develop and implement practices that can reduce greenhouse emissions, sequester carbon, and help mitigate, if not begin to reverse the negative impacts predicted by climate change models," according to Jennifer Moore-Kucera. (Source: American Farmland Trust, The Fence Post, 26 Nov., 2018) Contact: American Farmland Trust, John Piotti, Pres., CEO, Jennifer Moore-Kucera, Carbon Initiate Dir., (202) 331-7300, www.farmland.org; US Climate Alliance, www.usclimatealliance.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP15,  US Climate Alliance,  American Farmland Trust,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


Blue Carbon Research Forum Launched in Scotland (Int'l Report)
Blue Carbon
Date: 2018-11-05
Holyrood is reporting the Scottish Government and a group of Scottish universities have established the Blue Carbon Forum to measure the ability of Scotland's marine environment to store carbon dioxide.

The programme is being developed by Marine Scotland in partnership with Scottish Natural Heritage, St Andrew's University, Glasgow University, Heriot-Watt University, Napier University, and the Scottish Association for Marine Science.

Scotland Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham said: "The potential role of our marine environment in tackling the greenhouse gas problem is enormous, with recent research by the University of St Andrews estimating that more carbon is captured and stored in sea lochs alone than in our terrestrial environment, such as forests and peatlands. Scottish Natural Heritage has estimated that the amount of carbon stored within Scotland's Marine Protected Areas is the equivalent of four years of Scotland's total greenhouse emissions," the Environment Secretary added.

Chair of the Blue Carbon Forum Professor John Baxter said: the "Programme will provide essential information to help inform what is required to be done to enhance and protect these key habitats into the future which is essential for the mitigation of future climate change." (Source: Gov. of Scotland, Holyrood Mag., Nov., 2018) Contact: St. Andrews University Professor John Baxter, +44 (0)1334 46, jmb24@st-andrews.ac.uk, startlink]St. Andrews Univ., www.st-andrews.ac.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  CO2,  Carbon Sink,  Carbon Sequestration,  


Ellgrass CO2 Sink Loss Studied (Int'l, Research Report)
Carbob Sequestration
Date: 2018-11-02
In a new study spanning coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, researchers at Abo Akademi University explored the magnitude of organic carbon stocks stored and sequestered by eelgrass meadows -- the most abundant seagrass species in temperate waters.

According to the study, eelgrass organic carbon stocks were comparable to organic carbon stocks of tropical seagrass species, as well as mangroves, salt marshes and terrestrial ecosystems. The researchers also found that on average, eelgrass meadows stored 27.2 tons of organic carbon per hectare, although the variation between the regions was considerable

In the marine systems, the blue carbon species alone account for up to 33 pct of the total oceanic CO2 uptake. In contrast to terrestrial soils, which usually store carbon up to decades, the carbon stored in blue carbon ecosystems may persist for timescales of millennia or longer and thus, contribute significantly to climate change mitigation and alleviation of the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Despite the importance of these ecosystems, to date, none of them are included in the global carbon trading programmes. Alarmingly, in the past 50 years, at least one-third of the distribution area of coastal vegetated ecosystems has been lost. (Source: Abo Akademi University, Public Press Release, 31 Oct., 2018) Contact: Abo Akademi University, Christoffer Bostrom , Associate Professor in Environmental and Marine Biology, +358 50 431 8226, christoffer.bostrom@abo.fi, www.abo.fi

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  CO2,  Carbon Sink,  Carbon Sequestration,  EllGrass,  


Calif. Open Space District Adopting Climate Action Plan (Ind. Report)
Climate Change
Date: 2018-10-15
Following on the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCCC) climate change report the San Francisco Bay area Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District has approved its own climate change policy and action plan. The plan sets ambitious emission reduction goals for the organization and providing a roadmap to achieve them.

Midpen, which stewards more than 63,000 acres of public open space, including redwood forests which store large amounts of carbon, is targeting a reduction in emissions of 20 pct below its 2016 baseline by 2022, 40 pct by 2030 and 80 pct by 2050. To that end, Midpen will reduce emissions from vehicles, equipment, employee commutes, business travel, offices and tenant residences, using renewable diesel fuel, installing electric vehicle chargers,and others. The plan also identifies strategies for reducing or offsetting emissions from livestock grazing in Midpen's open space preserves, enhancing carbon sequestration, reducing preserve visitor transportation emissions and increasing staff and visitor awareness of climate change.

This goal is in line with the Golden State's climate change policy and the Paris Climate Agreement, which aims to limit global warming to two degrees Celsius.

The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District is a public agency committed to acquiring and preserving open space and agricultural land of regional significance, protect and restore the natural environment and provide opportunities for ecologically sensitive public enjoyment and education. (Source: Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, Siliconner, 13 Oct., 2018) Contact: Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, Ana Maria Ruiz, Dir., (650) 691-1200, (650) 691-0485 (fax), info@openspace.org, www.openspace.org/climate

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


Business Energy Efficiency Coalition Launched in Va. (Ind. Report)
Energy Efficiency
Date: 2018-09-28
In the Old Dominion State, a new Sustainable Business Coalition which was created from Renew Rocktown is aiming to facilitate energy efficiency and encourage sustainability in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County businesses.

The coalition's vision includes: establishing a city-wide zero waste program; an increased urban tree canopy to increase carbon sequestration; offseting greenhouse gas emissions and providing a safe and accessible multi-modal transportation network. The Coalition also supports unrestricted development of behind-the-meter solar power by businesses, schools and residents. (Source: Sustainable Business Coalition, The Breeze, 27 Sept., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Energy Efficiency,  Sustainability ,  


Amazon Mangroves Key to Carbon Storage, says Study (Ind. Report)
Climate Change
Date: 2018-09-26
In Corvallis, Scientists led by Oregon State University ecologist Prof. J. Boone Kauffman have determined for the first time that the Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's rainforest.

The recently released long-term study offers a better understanding of how mangrove deforestation contributes to the greenhouse gas effect, one of the leading causes of global warming.

The Brazilian mangrove forest fringes the entirety of the Atlantic Coast at the mouth of the Amazon, the largest river in the world with the largest mangrove forest. Mangroves -- aka Blue Carbon -- represent 0.6 pct of all the world's tropical forests but their deforestation accounts for as much as 12 pct of GHG emissions from all tropical deforestation.

Partial funding for the study was provided by the U.S. Agency for International Development, Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program. (Source: Oregon State University, KTVZ.COM, 24 Sept., 2018) Contact: Oregon State University, J. Boone Kauffman, Research Leader, www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Kauffman3

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  Blue Carbon,  Carbon Sequestration,  Mangrove,  


Apple Supporting Carbon Sequestration through Mangrove Restoration (Ind. Report)
Mangrove, Apple
Date: 2018-09-17
Smart Phone juggernaut Apple reports it is investing an undisclosed sum in a project in Colombia to restore mangroves and sequester as much as 17,000 metric tons (18,739 tons) of carbon dioxide in two years. That’s equal to the emissions that the fleet of vehicles updating Apple Maps will produce over the coming decade, according to the Apple release.

Beyond cutting the amount of carbon dioxide we put into the atmosphere, scientists show that we will also need to pull carbon dioxide from the air to avoid catastrophic climate change. There are six so-called “negative-emissions technologies” that can help us get there: afforestation and reforestation; enhanced weathering (using minerals that capture carbon dioxide); soil carbon (tweaking the crops and forests we currently grow to absorb more carbon); biochar (using a special kind charcoal as to trap carbon dioxide); BECCS (bioenergy with carbon capture and storage, which requires capturing carbon dioxide produced by burning biomass like wood and then burying it underground); and DAC (direct air capture, which involves the use of machines that are essentially trees on steroids to suck carbon dioxide from the air and bury it underground).

Among those negative-emissions technologies, mangrove restoration would be classed as reforestation. The Conservation International project would cover an area of 17,000 hectares (42,000 acres) in the Sinu river delta. The NGO will use the money raised for the project to help the 12,000 people in the community who use the mangroves for food, firewood, and livelihoods. Conservation International believes the carbon offsets will provide financial security to the region and develop sustainable ways to support tourism and fisheries.

(Source: Apple, PR, Sept., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration news,  Apple news,  Mangrove news,  


UK Report Calls for Fast Greenhouse Gas Action (Int'l Report)
Royal Academy of Engineering
Date: 2018-09-17
In the UK, The Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) have released a joint report outlining a plan of action which could help the UK lead the way in deploying technologies to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

The report makes various recommendations that would allow the UK to achieve its target of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 and identifies and assesses technologies available that might allow emissions removal goals to be reached. It considers not only the UK, but the global picture and how these technologies might be deployed alongside each other to achieve global carbon removal by 2100 as per the Paris Agreement.

Technologies discussed include ready-to-deploy methods as well as more speculative methods. Ready-to-deploy, land-based methods such as such as forestation, habitat restoration, and soil carbon sequestration could be quickly applied, but unfortunately these will become saturated within the century. Furthermore, these approaches alone will only allow the UK to achieve around one quarter of the target GGR required to reach net-zero emissions.

Development of speculative methods, such as direct air capture, bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and low-carbon concrete, is vital if sufficient GGR is to be achieved, the report says.

Download the Greenhouse Gas Removal Report HERE. (Source: THE Royal Society, Royal Academy of Engineering, Chemical Engineer, Sept., 2018) Contact: Royal Academy of Engineering, www.raeng.org.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  


Notable Quote
Climate Change
Date: 2018-08-24
"If we are intellectually honest with one another, we'll say, yeah, the observations show the planet is warming. The evidence of the models suggest that it's human-induced, or there's a strong human signal ... but we don't know everything there is to know about the nitrogen cycle, about all the carbon cycling, all this stuff. Carbon sequestration. We don't know."

"Is there a tipping point for climate change? I don't know. The planet's incredibly resilient. So what do I feel about it? Well, my feeling is the planet ... you can kick it in the butt really, really hard, and it will come back." -- Former University of Oklahoma meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier -- President Trump's nominee to be the top White House science and technology adviser

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change,  


Wolf Joins Alberta Carbon Trunk Line CCS Project (Ind. Report)
Enhance Energy
Date: 2018-08-06
Calgary, Alberta-based Enhance Energy reports Wolf Midstream has agreed to partner to construct the 240-kilometre Alberta Carbon Trunk Line. The pipeline will collect CO2 from the Redwater Fertilizer Facility and the new Sturgeon Refinery near Edmonton and transport it to an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project near Lacombe.

Under the deal, Wolf will construct, own, and operate the CO2 capture and pipeline transportation assets. Enhance will continue to be the owner and operator of the EOR project and carbon sequestration. Initially, Wolf will provide midstream services only to Enhance, with other suppliers and users of CO2 having future access to its capture, compression, and transportation services.

Initial CO2 flow rates on the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line are expected to start at 800 tpd in the fourth quarter of 2019, increasing to 4,400 tpd by the end of 2019.

Pipeline construction is slated to get underway within 60 days. Up to $305 million in construction funding will come from Wolf's investor, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board. The project also has $223 million in funding from the Province of Alberta and $63 million in funding from the federal government.

The Alberta Carbon Trunk Line (ACTL) is the world's largest carbon capture and storage project. Pioneered in Alberta, Canada by Enhance Energy Inc., the ACTL is the first large-scale Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and storage project to actively work towards reducing environmental impacts while enriching the local economy. (Source: Enhance Energy, PR, Markets Insider, 2 Aug., 2018) Contact: Enhance Energy Inc., (403) 984-0202, (403) 984-0226, info@enhanceenergy.com,www.enhanceenergy.com; Wolf Midstream, (403) 781-8181, www.wolfmidstream.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Enhanced Oil Recovery,  Enhance Energy,  Wolf Midstream,  CO2,  


Global Carbon Capture and Storage Market 2017-2021 Developments, Opportunities, Players, Regions, Suppliers -- Report Available (Ind. Report)
Carbon Capture and Storage ,CCS
Date: 2018-08-01
The recently released Global Carbon Capture and Storage Market 2017-2021 Developments, Opportunities, Players, Regions, Suppliers report provides detailed information on the driving factors and challenges that will define the upcoming development of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) market. The report examines existing opportunities in small markets for investors thorough an analysis of the competitive landscape and product offerings of key players including: Babcock & Wilcox, ENGIE, GE Power, The Linde Group, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Air Products and Chemicals, Aker Solutions, Amec Foster Wheeler, Chevron, Fluor, Hitachi, Net Power, Schlumberger, Shell, Siemens, Statoil, and Sulzer.

According to the report, the CCS market is predicted to grow at a CAGR of 9.18 pct. up to 2021.

View report details HERE. Request a report Sample PDF HERE. (Source: Absolute Reports, July, 2018) Contact: Absolute Reports, www.absolutereports.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Dioxide,  CO2,  Carbon Market,  Carbon Tax,  Carbon Sequestration,  


American Farmland Trust Calls for Increased CCS (Ind. Report)
American Farmland Trust
Date: 2018-07-20
In Washington, the American Farmland Trust (AFT) reports it recently joined a consortium of conservation-centric agricultural organizations at a "Learning Lab" for the U.S. Climate Alliance Natural and Working Lands Initiative. The consortium aimed to draft guiding principles that state governments can use to develop strategies, policy, and funding projects to capture and sequester carbon in farm, rangelands, forests, and wetland soils.

To store large amounts of carbon in the soil, carbon compounds must be grown down in the soil profile where the compounds can contact micro-organisms. "That's where fibrous roots come into play. Cover crops like cereal rye provide deep roots that help transfer carbon from the atmosphere to the soil." The U.S. is losing an estimated 3 acres of farmland every minute. The loss of agricultural capacity is unsustainable from a farming perspective and contributes to the impact toward climate change, according to a release.

In 2017, AFT launched its Farmers Combating Climate Change initiative to: protect farmland and promote smart growth to significantly reduce emissions; improve soil health to reverse climate change and improve productivity; and build strong support among the farm community to advance policies. (Source: American Farmland Trust, Delta Farm Press, 17 July, 2018) Contact: American Farmland Trust, Jimmy Daukas, Snr. Program Manager, (202) 331-7300, www.farmland.org; US Climate Alliance, www.usclimatealliance.org; U.S. Climate Alliance Natural and Working Lands Initiative, www.usclimatealliance.org/nwlands

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCS,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  American Farmland Trust,  Carbon Sequestration,  Climate Change,  


Farmland Trust Joins Carbon Sequestration Initiative (Ind Report)
American Farmland Trust
Date: 2018-07-18
The Washington, DC-headquartered American Farmland Trust (AFT) reports it is joining other major agriculture and conservation organizations at a Learning Lab for the U.S. Climate Alliance Natural and Working Lands Initiative. A team of over 50 technical experts from government, academia, and industry will provide technical assistance to state governments on how to draw down carbon from the air and sequester it in the soil across diverse systems such as farms, rangelands, forests, and wetlands. The lab wiil also help states develop strategies related to policy development and funding projects.

AFT is working in partnership with the Coalition on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (C-AGG), American Forests, the Forest-Climate Working Group, The Nature Conservancy, World Resources Institute, and The Trust for Public Land to support the Natural and Working Lands Initiative.

The AFT's Farmers Combating Climate Change program aims to : protect farmland and promote smart growth to significantly reduce emissions; improve soil health to reverse climate change and improve productivity; and build support among the farm community and advance policies and environmentally sound farming practices to help keep farmers on the land. (Source: American Farmland Trust, AgDaily, July, 2018) Contact: American Farmland Trust, (202) 331-7300, www.farmland.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News American Farmland Trust,  Carbon Sequestration,  Climate Change,  


Trees vs Grass for Carbon Sink Supremacy (R&D, Ind. Report)
UC Davis
Date: 2018-07-11
Researchers from the University of California, Davis have found that grasslands and rangelands are better carbon sinks than forests in present-day California. Years of warming temperatures, fire suppression, and drought have increased wildfire risks and turned the state's forests into carbon producers more than carbon consumers, according to the research.

Trees store much of their carbon within their leave and woody biomass, while grass stores most of its carbon underground. This means that when a tree catches fire, it releases its stores of carbon back into the atmosphere. But when a fire burns through grasslands, the carbon fixed underground tends to stay in the roots and soil.

The study suggests that grasslands and range lands should be given opportunities in California's cap-and-trade market, which was designed to reduce the state's greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. Their findings could also influence other carbon offset efforts around the world, especially those in semi-arid environments. This study states that, from a cap-and-trade and carbon-offset perspective, conserving grasslands and promoting rangeland practices that lead to reliable rates of carbon sequestration may help meet California's emission-reduction goals. (Source: UC Davis, earth.com, July, 2018) Contact: UC Davis, John Muir Institute of the Environment , Benjamin Houlton, Dir., (530) 752-7627, johnmuir.ucdavis.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Storage,  Carbon Sink,  Climate Change,  Carbon Storage,  


Farmland Trust Joins Carbon Sequestration Initiative (Ind Report)
American Farmland Trust
Date: 2018-07-11
The Washington, DC-headquartered American Farmland Trust (AFT) reports it is joining other major agriculture and conservation organizations at a Learning Lab for the U.S. Climate Alliance Natural and Working Lands Initiative. A team of over 50 technical experts from government, academia, and industry will provide technical assistance to state governments on how to draw down carbon from the air and sequester it in the soil across diverse systems such as farms, rangelands, forests, and wetlands. The lab wiil also help states develop strategies related to policy development and funding projects.

AFT is working in partnership with the Coalition on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (C-AGG), American Forests, the Forest-Climate Working Group, The Nature Conservancy, World Resources Institute, and The Trust for Public Land to support the Natural and Working Lands Initiative.

The AFT's Farmers Combating Climate Change program aims to : protect farmland and promote smart growth to significantly reduce emissions; improve soil health to reverse climate change and improve productivity; and build support among the farm community and advance policies and environmentally sound farming practices to help keep farmers on the land. (Source: American Farmland Trust, AgDaily, 9 July, 2018) Contact: American Farmland Trust, (202) 331-7300, www.farmland.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  CCS,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


CO2 Rock Sequestration Verification Demo Touted (Ind Report)
WellDog
Date: 2018-06-29
Laramie, Wyoming-based WellDog, Virginia Tech and Carbon GeoCycle are reporting their collaboration has delivered the world's first successful direct verification of carbon dioxide sequestered in an underground rock.

The test injected over 13,000 tons of CO2 into stacked unmineable coal seams at depths of 900 to 2,000 feet with the goal of storing CO2 while simultaneously enhancing natural gas recovery. The verification, made using WellDog's proprietary Reservoir Raman System, reveals that carbon dioxide injected over the last two years flowed into all of the targeted coal seams in Buchanan County, Virginia.

The $15.5 million project is funded by the US DOE, Virginia Tech, and private industry. The project research partners included Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research, Virginia Tech; Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy; DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory; Marshall Miller & Associates; Southern States Energy Board; CONSOL Energy; Geological Survey of Alabama; Sandia Technologies; Det Norske Veritas; WellDog; and Carbon GeoCycle. (Source: WellDog, PR, 27 June, 2018) Contact: WellDog, John M. Pope, CEO, info@welldog.com, www.welldog.com; Carbon GeoCycle, www.carbongeocycle.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  Carbon Storage,  CO2,  


SCCS Research Confirms CO2 Storage Safety (R&D, Ind. Report)
CCS,Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage
Date: 2018-06-13
In Edinburgh, Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage (SCCS) has reported on new research indicating that captured carbon dioxide (CO2) can be safely stored for thousands of years by injecting the liquefied gas deep underground into the microscopic pore spaces of common rocks. The findings increase confidence in the widespread roll-out of engineered carbon capture and storage (CCS).

Researchers from SCCS's partner institutes, the Universities of Aberdeen and Edinburgh, compiled a worldwide database of information from natural CO2 and methane accumulations and hydrocarbon industry experience -- including engineered gas storage, decades of borehole injection, and laboratory experiments. Computer simulations were used to combine all these factors and model storage of CO2 for 10,000 years into the future. Previous research in this area had not fully accounted for the natural trapping of CO2 in rock as microscopic bubbles, or the dissolving of CO2 into the salty water already in the rocks.

SCCS is the largest Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research group in the UK. Founded in 2005, SCCS is a partnership of the British Geological Survey, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Aberdeen, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Strathclyde working together with universities across Scotland. SCCS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (SFC). (Source: Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage, Gasworld, 12 June, 2018) Contact: University of Edinburgh, Dr. Stephanie Flude, www.research.ed.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/stephanie-flude(7fc05249-dbeb-4603-a5ec-ac2ca605d200).html; University of Aberdeen, Dr. Juan Alcalde, www.abdn.ac.uk/geosciences/people/profiles/juan.alcalde; Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage, +44 (0)131 651 4647, info@sccs.org.uk, www.sccs.org.uk

More Low-Carbon Energy News Scottish Carbon Capture & Storage ,  CCS,  Carbone Storage,  Carbon Sequestration,  


DOE Touts Carbon Capture, Utilization Storage Initiative (Ind. Report)
US DOE
Date: 2018-06-01
At the ninth Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM9) meeting last week in Copenhagen, Denmark, the US DOE announced the launch of two new clean energy initiatives to boost green energy adoption -- the Nuclear Innovation: Clean Energy Future (NICE Future) and the Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) initiatives.

The CCUS initiative will seek to support and accelerate existing CCUS projects such as those undertaken by the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum, the International Energy Agency (IEA), the IEA's Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme, Mission Innovation, and the Global CCS Institute.

The US, Saudi Arabia and Norway will lead the project, with international partners including Canada, China, Japan, Mexico, and the UK.

The technologies are predicted to play a key role in global decarbonization efforts, with nuclear set to make energy-intensive processes such as desalination, hydrogen production and energy storage carbon neutral. Following the Paris Agreement, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and IEA predicted that CCUS would be essential to limiting global warming to 2 degree C. (Source: US DOE, Power Tech, 31 May, 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News CCUS,  Carbon Capture,  CO2,  


Fundy's "Blue Carbon" Sequestration Capacity Explored (Ind. Report)
Blue Carbon,Environment and Climate Change Canada
Date: 2018-05-23
In Atlantic Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada's recent study of the Bay of Fundy coastal ecosystem and its "blue carbon" has estimated the area's carbon sequestration capacity to hold hundreds of millions of dollars worth of carbon-offsetting costs. "Blue carbon" is a term coined by scientists to describe carbon dioxide stored in coastal plants and soil.

On land, forests capture carbon dioxide and produce oxygen. Forests release their carbon every few hundred years, due to fire, tree mortality or human harvesting. By comparison, coastal marshes maintain their carbon for thousands of years. Coastal ecosystems do the same -- but they're much better at it, according to McGill University "Blue Carbon" authority Assoc. Prof. Gail Chmurain. Coastal ecosystems can hold three to five times more carbon than the equivalent area of forest, according to a federal government report.

The financial value of blue carbon comes from its potential for carbon emission credits which the Canadian federal government is introducing. According to government documents, "carbon stored in tidal salt marshes in the Bay of Fundy could have an estimated value of $202 million." That would equal $1 billion in 2022. In terms of Canada's national carbon emissions strategy, blue carbon could be used as an offset to meet international targets and coastal communities could protect or rehabilitate wetlands to generate carbon credits. (Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada, CBC, 22 May, 2018) Contact: Environment and Climate Change Canada, (800) 668-6767, www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change.htm; McGill University, Assoc. Prof. Gail Chmurain, (514) 926-6854, gail.chmura@mcgill.ca, www.mcgill.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Storage,  


TNC, XL Catlin Collaborate on Blue Carbon Credits (Ind. Report)
TNC, XL Catlin
Date: 2018-05-11
The Nature Conservancy (TNC)and insurance/reinsurance firm XL Catlin in Bermuda are touting a project to develop Blue Carbon Resilience Credits that will value the combined carbon sequestration and resilience benefits provided by coastal wetland ecosystems.

With XL Catlin's support, TNC will develop a system of credits assigning a market value to the resilience services provided by these historically under valueded cosystems. The hope behind this initiative is that, for the first time, insurance firms and other businesses will be able to offset their carbon footprint while simultaneously better underdstanding the contribution they are making to reducing coastal hazards in the world's most vulnerable coastal areas.

Coastal wetlands -- salt marshes, seagrass meadows and mangroves -- sequester billions of tonnes of "blue carbon" from the atmosphere at concentrations up to five times greater than terrestrial forests. As an increasing number of companies are purchasing carbon credits to offset their footprints, this credit will enable a valuation of the carbon sequestration and coastal resilience benefits that wetlands provide both businesses and communities.

Unlike other climate mitigation solutions coastal wetlands not only sequester carbon, they also protect coastlines by absorbing incoming wave energy and providing storm protection. Additionally, a recent study found that wetlands prevented $625 million in direct flood damages from Hurricane Sandy in the United States. As such, coastal wetlands provide both carbon sequestration and resilience services- a powerful combination in a world of changing climate.

TNC will explore different options to value the resilience services provided by coastal wetlands and to develop a credit product to support ongoing wetland conservation. One of these options could include a numeric ranking system assigning a dollar value to wetlands based on factors such as their potential for storm impact reduction, location relative to vulnerable communities, local economic activities and assets, and potential benefits from habitat restoration. The figures generated by the rankings, combined with the carbon storage capacity of a given wetland, would generate Blue Carbon Resilience Credits. These credits would then offer organizations the capacity to manage their carbon footprints whilst acting as the funding mechanism for wetland conservation, increasing coastal resilience for communities. (Source: The Nature Conservancy, 10 May, 2018) Contact: The Nature Conservancy, Maria Damanki, Global Managing Director for the Ocean, www.nature.org: XL Catlin, Paul Jardine, CEO, www.xlcatlin.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Blue Carbon,  


NB Env. Trust Fund Supports Climate Change Projects (Funding)
NB Environmental Trust Fund
Date: 2018-05-02
In Maritime Canada, the Environmental Trust Fund (ETF0, a New Brunswick provincial agency, reports it will invest more than $330,000 of a total $6.5 million in Southern New Brunswick's Tantramar Region in support of various environmental projects, including climate change adaptation.

Among the recipients, EOS Eco-Energy Inc. will receive $45,000 for the Tantramar Climate Change Week, the Tantramar Climate Change Adaptation Collaborative, and to address climate-related stress workshop series. Community Forests International has been granted $60,000 for its Climate Smart Forestry: Designing Adaptive Silviculture for the Acadian Forest project aimed at increasing carbon sequestration and adaptation to climate change. Additionally, the Atlantic Canadian Organic Regional Network (ACORN) will receive $40,000 for a project called Cultivating Climate Resilience in New Brunswick.. Nature NB has been granted $30,000 to undertake activities in Port Elgin and Bathurst that will demonstrate the integration of nature-based solutions into municipal climate change adaptation planning. (Source: NB Environmental Trust Fund, Sackville Tribune, 1 May, 2018) Contact: NB Environmental Trust Fund, http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/services/services_renderer.13136.Environmental_Trust_Fund.html

More Low-Carbon Energy News Climate Change Adaptation,  Climate Change Mitigation,  Climate Change,  


Carbon Sequestration Market Outlook 2022 -- Report Available (Ind. Report)
Carbon Sequestration
Date: 2018-04-11
Global Carbon Sequestration Market -- Industry Size, Share, Trends, Analysis and Forecasts 2022, a new reports from Market Reports predicts the projected growth rate of Carbon Sequestration technologies and the current and projected landscape of the Carbon Sequestration technologies market.

The Carbon Sequestration report provides and overview of the carbon sequestration industry including growth analysis and historical and futuristic cost, revenue, demand and supply data, and a description of the value chain and its distributor analysis.

The report covers the Carbon Sequestration Market by regions, companies, type (natural, man-made disasters, application and others. It also investigates new project feasibility thorough SWOT and investment analysis of imminent Carbon Sequestration Market opportunities.

Sample and additional information is HERE. (Source: Absolute Reports, satPR, April, 2018) Contact: Absolute Reports, www.absolutereports.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Sequestration,  


DOE Funds Real-Time Carbon Sequestration Monitoring (R&D, Funding)
Penn State,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Date: 2018-03-16
Researchers from Penn State, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL), and the University of Texas at Austin are partnering on a new 4-year, $2.5-million, US DOE-funded project to better understand what happens to CO2 during underground sequestration.

At high underground pressures, CO2 will fill up pore space in rocks or dissolve into saltwater, but researchers still do not have a clear picture of where the CO2 migrates in a reservoir and whether it has a chance to leak out of the reservoir or injection well.

To address this, LBL scientist Tom Daley, and project collaborators, developed real-time monitoring equipment that is installed during the construction of an injection well. The equipment emits an energy pulse that vibrates the material it passes through. By analyzing the vibration that echoes back to the monitoring device, researchers can create a relatively clear picture of the CO2 held in the reservoir.

Using the seismic data collected during injection, the researchers will continually refine the picture of what's happening underground as the carbon dioxide spreads and then increases in concentration in different rock features.

In addition to analyzing data from the new monitoring equipment, the team will conduct a small-scale laboratory experiment to validate their tools at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The majority of this work will be processed on supercomputers managed by the Penn State Institute for CyberScience. (Source: Penn State University, PR, AAAS, 14 Mar., 2018) Contact: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Tom Daley, (510)486-7316, tmdaley@lbl.gov, www.lbl.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,  Carbon Sequestration,  CO2,  CCS,  


Battelle-Led MRCSP Touts CCSU Demo Project Success (Ind. Report)
Battelle,Core Energy LLC
Date: 2018-03-14
In Columbus, Ohio, a Battelle-led team known as Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) reports it has successfully stored 1,000,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of its large-scale demonstration project. The MRCSP demo is one of eight such DOE projects helping to develop and deploy carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology.

In the intervening decade since the project got underway Battelle began the third phase of injection in 2013 and, in conjunction with Traverse City, Michigan-based Core Energy LLC, is monitoring, verifying and accounting for the CO2 being used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the depleted oil fields of Michigan's Northern Reef Trend.

The MRCSP comprises a 10-state region that generates almost 25 pct of all electricity generated in the country -- more than half of that by burning coal. The MRCSP is one of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships in the U.S. established by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). (Source: Battelle, PR, Bus.Wire, 12 Mar., 2018) Contact: Core Energy LLC, www.coreenergyholdings.com; Battelle, Neeraj Gupta, Principal Investigator for the MRCSP, T.R. Massey, (614) 424-5544, masseytr@battelle.org, www.battelle.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership,  Battelle,  Core Energy ,  


NZ Emissions Rise While Forestry Carbon Sink Shrinks (Int'l)
Statistics New Zealand
Date: 2018-02-28
In Auckland, Statistics New Zealand is reporting the country's carbon emissions grew slower than growth in the economy while native fores tareas shrank slightly over the same period. According to Stats NZ, that spells difficulty for New Zealand in meeting its Paris climate change accord obligations by 2030, given that plantation forests are currently the country's main fallback for offsetting rising national emissions.

According to Stats NZ, Greenhouse gas emissions measures between 1990 and 2015, the latest year for which figures are available, show emissions increased from 61 million tpy to 76 million tpy.

Stats NZ accounts show both a dramatic rise in the total carbon sequestration occurring in maturing plantation forests and a dramatic drop in new planting from a peak at the start of the period of around 100,000 hectares a year to well under 20,000 hectares annually since 2005. That's in spite of the recognition that plantation forest carbon 'sinks' are one New Zealand's best options to meet its climate change commitments. To remedy the situation, the government is ramping up a "billion trees" planting programme over the next decade. (Source: Stats NZ, SHARECHAT.co.nz, 29 Feb., 2018)Contact: Statistics New Zealand, www.stats.govt.nz

More Low-Carbon Energy News NZ Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Sink,  Reforestation,  


West Virginia Extends CCS Tax Credits Beyond Coal (Red & Leg)

Date: 2018-02-21
In West Virginia, a recently passed and signed Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 includes the Furthering Carbon Capture, Utilization, Technology, Underground Storage, and Reduced Emissions (FUTURE) Act which extends and expands the Section 45Q carbon sequestration tax credits for the first time to industries and companies other than the coal-fired power plants the original 2008 45Q tax credits originally benefited.

Now the tax credits are available to any industrial facility at which carbon capture equipment is installed and which captures at least 500,000 metric tpy of CO2. There are currently only a handful of projects that have been built to take advantage of 45Q and only 17 large scale CO2 capture projects worldwide. This expansion can help the next wave of investments in CO2 capture projects. (Source: WV News, 18 Feb., 2018)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Clean Coal,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  

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