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Yield10 Bioscience Evaluates Camelina, Canola (R&D, Ind. Report)
Yield10 Bioscience
Date: 2020-11-04
In the Bay State, Woburn-based agricultural bioscience specialist Yield10 Bioscience Inc. reports completion of its 2020 Field Test Program in Canada and the U.S. to evaluate novel traits in biofuel feedstock Camelina and canola. The company expects to begin reporting test data before the year end and early in 2021.

The test program monitored key plant agronomic and growth parameters including oil content, PHA content and/or other metrics to advance plant development and commercialization for biofuel and other applications. (Source: Yield10 Bioscience Inc., Website News, 2 Nov., 2020) Contact: Yield10 Bioscience Inc., 617-583-1700, www.yield10bio.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Camelina,  Biofuel,  


Calif. Refiners Refocusing on Renewable Diesel (Ind. Report)
Renewable Diesel
Date: 2020-08-21
Further to our August 14 report, Phillips 66, Global Clean Energy, and Marathon Oil are reporting plans to convert their petroleum refineries in the Golden State to renewable diesel production.

Phillips66 plans to use fats and greases, along with used cooking oil and soybean oil, at its San Francisco Refinery in Rodeo to produce 19 million bpy of renewable diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuel starting in 2024. A refinery conversion in Bakersfield will use camelina sativa, an oilseed crop grown in rotation with wheat. Global Clean Energy bought the facility in May. It plans to make renewable diesel starting in 2022 and has a deal to sell 2.5 million bbl per year of the fuel to ExxonMobil.

Marathon says it may convert its idled refinery in Martinez to renewable diesel, though it has not given an estimate of the plant's expected capacity or when it will come on-line. Neste, Valero, and REG are also supplying renewable diesel to California where fuel companies are required to purchase enough certified low carbon fuel to reduce the carbon intensity of the state's pool of transportation fuel 20 pct from 2011 to 2030. (Source: Phillips 66, Chemical & Engineering News, 18 Aug., 2020)Contact: Phillips 66, Brian Mandell, VP Marketing, Joe Gannon, 832-765-4547, joe.gannon@p66.com, www.p66.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Diesel,  Phillips 66,  ExxonMobil,  ,  


ExxonMobil, GCEH Ink Renewable Diesel Offtake Deal (Ind. Report)
Global Clean Energy Holdings,ExxonMobil
Date: 2020-08-14
ExxonMobil is reporting a 5-year off-take agreement with Long Beach, California-based Global Clean Energy Holdings (GCEH) to purchase 2.5 million bpy of renewable diesel from Global Clean Energy's Bakersfield, California, refinery which is being re-tooled to produce renewable diesel from camelina, cooking oil, soybean oil and distillers corn oil and other non-petroleum feedstocks.

Following scheduled production startup in 2022, ExxonMobil plans to distribute the renewable diesel within California and potentially to other domestic and international markets. (Source: ExxonMobil, PR, 12 Aug., 2020) Contact: ExxonMobil, Bryan Milton, Pres. ExxonMobil Fuels and Lubricants Co, www.exxonmobil.com/en/aviation; Global Clean Energy Holdings, Richard Palmer, CEO, 424-318-3618, contact@gceholdings.com, www.gceholdings.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Global Clean Energy Holdings,  ExxonMobil,  Renewable Diesel,  


Bakersfield Renewable Fuels Finds Investors (Ind. Report)
Bakersfield Renewable Fuels
Date: 2020-06-03
Orion Energy Partners L.P., GCM Grosvenor and Voya Investment Management have entered a capital partnership with Bakersfield Renewable Fuels (BKRF), a special purpose vehicle wholly owned by Global Clean Energy Holdings Inc. (GCE). BKRF was created to purchase an existing refinery in Bakersfield, Calif.

BKRF will retool a portion of the refinery into a renewable diesel (RD) bio-refinery. The project will use GCE's camelina oil as well as traditional biofuel feedstocks such as waste fats, oils and greases to produce RD, liquid propane, naphtha and others. (Source: GCE, NatGas, Various Media, June, 2020) Contact: Global Clean Energy Holdings, Richard Palmer, CEO , www.gceholdings.com; Orion Energy Partners, 212.292.0345, Info@OrionEnergyPartners.com, www.orionenergypartners.com; GMC Grosvenor, www.gcmgrosvenor.com; VOYA, www. investments.voya.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bakersfield Renewable Fuel,  Orion Energy,  Renewable Diesel ,  Camelina,  


GCEH Converting Calif. Refinery to Biodiesel Production (M&A)
Global Clean Energy Holdings
Date: 2020-05-11
In the Golden State, Torrance-based Global Clean Energy Holdings (GCEH) Inc. is reporting the $40 million purchase of the idled Alon USA Energy Inc. Big West gasoline and diesel refinery in Kern County.

GCEH plans to convert the 70,000 bpd facility to produce biodiesel from used cooking oil, soybean oil and camelina. The refinery has not run for 12 consecutive months since 2012. (Source: GCEH, PR, The Bakersfield Californian, 8 May, 2020) Contact: GCEH, Richard Palmer, CEO, www.gceholdings.com; Alon USA Energy www.delekus.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Global Clean Energy Holdings,  DELEK,  Delek,  Biodiesell,  


NIFA Supports Bio-jet Fuel Technology R&D (R&D Report)
USDA,National Institute for Food and Agriculture
Date: 2019-12-18
In the Cornhusker State, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) is reporting receipt of grant funding from the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) to support collaborative research by Washington State University and University of Nebraska-Lincoln on the use of camelina oilseeds and other vegetable oil crops in renewable bio-based jet fuel manufacturing.

The research is aimed at developing new bio-based jet fuel manufacturing technology and crop feedstocks with vegetable oil compositions tailored for this technology.

The research team will use camelina as an oilseed platform to develop vegetable oil formulations with shorter carbon chains that are better suited for the processing technology. These genetic strategies will be transferred to other vegetable oil feedstocks, such as soybean and oil-rich sorghum, which are currently being developed by university faculty for the U.S. DOE Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI).

Research at UNL builds on prior US DOE and Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research'funding. (Source: University of Nebraska, Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, UNL IANR NEWS, 17 Dec., 2019) Contact: UNL Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, 402-472-2081, www.unl.edu; National Institute for Food and Agriculture, www.nifa.usda.gov; U.S. DOE Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation, www.cabbi.bio

More Low-Carbon Energy News Camelina,  Oilseed,  USDA,  National Institute for Food and Agriculture,  


Aviation Biofuel Emissions, Contrail Studied (Int'l Report)
Max Planck Institute ,NASA,German Aerospace Center
Date: 2018-02-19
A joint project between the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) and the US National Aeronatics and Space Administration (NASA) is aiming to determine the effects alternative aviation fuels have on the formation of contrails and whether aircraft emissions are reduced by using biofuels.

In their joint effort, the scientists performed eight test flights at varying altitudes to compare traditional aviation fuels against biofuels. In each test, a DLR Airbus A320 was fueled with a different blend of kerosene and Camelina-based biofuel. NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory followed a few kilometres behind an measured the pollutants in the Airbus' exhaust plume. Among the instruments on the flying laboratory were the ERc Instrument for Chemical composition of Aerosols (ERICA), from the Max Planck Institute and JGU Mainz.

NASA and DLR have been researching whether aviation biofuels are more eco-friendly for some time. According to a statement from the University of Mainz, previous studies have shown that 50 pct and 70 pct less soot particles form from a 50 pct biofuel mixture with 50 pct normal kerosene. "At altitudes of eight kilometres, soot particles and water vapour form ice crystals at -50 degrees C, which can be seen in the sky as contrails. Among other things, the ice crystals prevent heat from escaping the atmosphere into space, meaning that every contrail creates its own small greenhouse effect." (Source: German Aerospace Center, NASA, Various Media, Biofuels Int'l, 15 Feb., 2018)Contact: NASA, www.nasa.gov; Max Planck Institute, www.mpg.de/institutes; German Aerospace Center, www.dlr.de/rd/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News NASA,  Aviation Biofuel,  Max Planck Institute,  

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