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EU Considering Carbon Tariffs on Import Goods (Int'l. Report)
EU,COP25
Date: 2019-12-30
Politico is reporting European countries are considering the imposition of carbon tariffs on import products from the U.S. and other countries with lack luster commitments to dealing with carbon emissions and climate change.

According to Politico, potential carbon tariffs were discussed at the United Nations COP25 climate conference in Madrid where it was thought inevitable that governments will turn to trade barriers in the effort to fight climate change.

The European Union currently imposes a €25 per metric ton carbon tax on oil refineries, steelmakers and paper producers and other major carbon emitters. (Source: Vestnik, Politico, 15 Dec., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  EU,  EU ETS,  Carbon Emissions,  Carbon Tax,  


Credit Agricole CIB Offering Green Securities (Int'l Report)
Credit Agricole,Daiwa Securities
Date: 2019-12-30
Credit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank (Credit Agricole CIB) and Daiwa Securities Group have jointly announced the issuance and sales of Green Securities. This is the first time that Credit Agricole CIB will issue index-linked structured uridashi as green bonds denominated in Japanese yens and distributed by Daiwa Securities Co Ltd to Japanese individuals and institutional investors.

An amount equal or equivalent to the net proceeds of the Green Securities will be used to finance and/or refinance one or more of the new or existing loans and investments including renewable energy -- wind and solar projects, bioenergy, energy efficiency, waste and water management, building sustainability, clean transportation and other "green" projects.

Credit Agricole Group, sometimes called "la banque verte" due to its historical ties to farming, is the world's largest cooperative financial institution. It consists of a network of Credit Agricole local banks, the 39 Credit Agricole regional banks, and a central institute, the Credit Agricole S.A.. Credit Agricole supports environmentally engaged companies and projects which implement best practices in terms of energy transition and climate change strategies in line with the COP25 Paris Agreement. (Source: Daiwa Securities, Credit Agricole, PR, 23 Dec 2019) Contact: Daiwa Securities , www.daiwa-grp.jp › english; Credit Agricole, www.credit-agricole.fr

More Low-Carbon Energy News Credit Agricole,  Green Bond,  Green Securities,  Daiwa Securities ,  


73 Countries Commit to Climate Ambition Alliance, Net-Zero CO2 Emissions by 2050 (Int'l. Report)
COP25,Climate Ambition Alliance
Date: 2019-12-20
The Chilean Presidency of the COP25 Meeting in Madrid has announced a renewed Climate Ambition Alliance aimed at accelerating the transformation necessary to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change and stabilize the global average temperature rise at 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels.

Countries participating in the Alliance commit to accelerate action by 2020 and achieve net-zero CO2 emissions by 2050. To that end, 73 countries have 'signaled their intention to submit an enhanced climate action plan" to the UNFCCC. An additional 11 countries have initiated an internal process to enhance ambition and to reflect this enhanced ambition in their national plans by 2020. Schmidt further announced that 73 parties to the An additional 14 regions, 398 cities, 768 businesses and 16 investors are also on board to achieve net-zero CO2 emissions by 2050.

The Alliance will also focus on implementing measures to strengthen the protection of forests and oceans,improve water management, resilient infrastructure and sustainable cities. (Source: Government of Chile Press Release, Dec., 2019)Contact: UNFCCC, www.unfccc.int

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Climate Change,  UNFCCC,  


Madrid Climate Talks failed! What Now? asks Amnesty International (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
COP25,Amnesty International
Date: 2019-12-20
" 'What do we want? Climate justice! When do we want it? NOW!!!' If you have been to just one climate march in your life, you will have certainly heard this slogan. It has become omnipresent whenever people are expressing concerns over the climate crisis. Behind this simple chant, there are deep demands rooted in human rights principles. There is the call for fast climate action by government and corporations, to avoid even more catastrophic human rights impacts than what we are seeing now. There is the appeal to wealthier industrialized states which have contributed the most to the climate crisis to step up and pay up in order to redress some of the injustices accentuated by climate change. There is the reminder that climate action needs to have people's participation and human rights, including Indigenous peoples' rights, at its centre. At all costs it needs to avoid human rights violations and contribute to making society a more equal, just and inclusive place for all.

"Yet human rights considerations still play a marginal role in climate negotiations. The outcomes of the Madrid climate talks (COP25) are just another proof of it. Following a year of school climate strikes and mass mobilization in many countries of the world, states were expected to act in line with the urgency proved by scientists and increasingly felt by people. Instead, most wealthier countries and other high emitting countries remained stuck in selfish and short-sighted considerations which prevented real progress.

"While the final COP25 decision recognized the urgency of enhancing climate action, it failed to set a clear obligation for states to come up with ambitious national climate plans in 2020 capable of keeping the global average temperature rise below 1.5 degrees C. This shows a complete disregard for the human rights of people who will be most affected by spiking climate impacts. For millions of people around the world, the formulation and, above all, the implementation of strong climate plans simply means a difference between life and death.

"Wealthy countries are responsible for the bulk of greenhouse gas emissions and have for years profited from them, while people in poorest countries are suffering most of the damages inflicted by the climate crisis. In Madrid, they had the opportunity to recognize this historic imbalance and accept their duty to pay for the devastation already wreaked by climate impacts such as cyclones, droughts and sea-level rise. Instead, they opposed the mobilization of new and additional resources to support affected people. This in practice means turning their back to the almost 4 million people who have lost their homes, livelihoods or access to public services in the two cyclones in Mozambique earlier this year, or to residents of Pacific islands in urgent need of relocation due to sea-level rise.

"Similarly, states were once again unable to reach an agreement on mechanisms allowing countries to trade emission reductions. Countries like Australia, Brazil and China continued to push for loopholes which would have ultimately resulted in weakening the effects of climate mitigation measures, in violation of the rights of those who stand most at risk from climate impacts.

"Also, worryingly, there was insufficient willingness from states to include explicit reference to human rights safeguards in carbon trading rules. Such guarantees are necessary to ensure that negative human rights impacts can be assessed and addressed prior to adopting climate mitigation projects and that people directly impacted by carbon market projects have a say in shaping such measures. This is a very strong demand from Indigenous peoples, as they too often have paid the price of ill-conceived climate projects, such as hydroelectric dams or biogas initiatives initiated without their free, prior and informed consent and resulting in forced evictions, water contamination, or permanent damage to their cultural rights.

"What came out of this last round of climate negotiations paints a grim picture. It was certainly a source of frustration at COP25, prompting civil society observers to take a massive direct action inside the negotiation venue on 11 December. This move was met with an unprecedented decision by UN security officers to expel more than 300 observers for the day.

"In 2020 we need to step up our game. We need to forge strong coalitions at national level to demand ambitious and human rights-compliant climate action that achieves a just transition away from fossil fuels. We need to mobilize like never before. The world's most important struggle needs the world's most powerful, diverse and united people's mass movement ever assembled. As the year ends, we can all start 2020 by making our new or renewed commitment to climate justice our New Year's resolution." (Source: Amnesty International, 17 Dec., 2019) Contact: Amnesty International, www.amnesty.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  CO2,  


Madrid COP25 Failure Bemoaned - Notable Quotes
COP25
Date: 2019-12-18
"We're disappointed with the lack of willingness by some parties to work together to ensure environmental integrity, to respond to the needs of the most vulnerable communities, and to build upon rather than undermine the Paris agreement." -- Sonam Wangdi, Chair, Least Developed Countries negotiating group.

"Some countries are championing double counting and pre-2020 rollovers... they are undermining environmental integrity” -- Grenada Environment Minister

"It's time to move on. Countries that are serious about using carbon markets to increase ambition should move forward to set their own strong rules for high integrity international emissions trading." -- Nat Keohane, Snr. VP Climate, US Environmental Defense Fund. (Source: Various Media, Montel, 17 Dec., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  


The European Green Deal -- Full Document Attached (Int'l.)
The European Green Deal
Date: 2019-12-16
The European Union's The European Green Deal resets the European Commission's (EC) commitment to tackling the challenges of a warming atmosphere and global climate change.

The European Green Deal is a new growth strategy that aims to transform the EU into a fair and prosperous society, with a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy where there are no net emissions of greenhouse gases in 2050 and where economic growth is decoupled from resource use.

It also aims to protect, conserve and enhance the EU's natural capital, and protect the health and well-being of citizens from environment-related risks and impacts. At the same time, this transition must be just and inclusive. It must put people first, and pay attention to the regions, industries and workers who will face the greatest challenges. Since it will bring substantial change, active public participation and confidence in the transition is paramount if policies are to work and be accepted. A new pact is needed to bring together citizens in all their diversity, with national, regional, local authorities, civil society and industry working closely with the EU's institutions and consultative bodies.

This Communication presents an initial roadmap of the key policies and measures needed to achieve the European Green Deal.

Download the full The European Green Deal HERE. (Source: The European Commission, 11 Dec., 2019) Contact: European Commission, www.ec.europa.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News The European Green Deal,  Climate Change,  COP25,  


Disappointed COP25 Participant Quotes (Opinions and Asides)
COP25
Date: 2019-12-16
"Never have I seen such a disconnect between what the science requires and what the climate negotiations are delivering in terms of meaningful action. Most of the world's biggest emitting countries are missing in action and resisting calls to raise their ambition." -- Alden Meyer, Union of Concerned Scientists, Director of Strategy and Policy

"The US has not come here in good faith. They continue to block the world's efforts to help people whose lives have been turned upside down by climate change."

"Developing countries came to this climate conference with the expectation that the people who have lost their crops to drought, or who have lost their homes to cyclones, will finally get help from the UN system. Instead, they have faced bullying, arm-twisting and blackmail. Rich countries most responsible for the crisis have refused to provide a single penny of new money to support communities to recover from the devastation caused by increasingly frequent and severe climate disasters." -- Harjeet Singh, ActionAid Climate Lead

"Major players who needed to deliver in Madrid did not live up to expectations. But thanks to a progressive alliance of small island states, European, African and Latin American countries, we obtained the best possible outcome, against the will of big polluters." -- Laurence Tubiana, European Climate Foundation, CEO, France's Top Climate Negotiator and Architect of the Paris Agreement.

"The only thing more disastrous than the state of UN climate negotiations at COP 25 is the state of the global climate. This is nothing less than a breakdown in the Paris Agreement. This is not climate leadership, this is a betrayal of humanity and future generations," -- Eric Holthaus, Meteorologist

"What's happening today at COP 25 is a clear and present threat to civilization itself. The Trump administration and its fossil fuel allies around the world have sabotaged the Paris Agreement -- the only global treaty we have to fight climate change. This is a betrayal of humanity.

"For so many people gripped by devastating floods, fires, and storms, time is up. And instead of helping them, rich countries hold on to your dollars and hold up loss and damage. Public mobilizations are swamping the streets. The status quo you are working so stubbornly to protect is not working for people or the planet." -- Catherine Abreu, Climate Action Network Canada

(Source: COP25 Wrap-Up, Various Media, 15 Dec. 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Climate Change,  


Notable Quote from ScottishPower CEO
COP25,ScottishPower
Date: 2019-12-06
"Every green megawatt of electricity will be crucial if we stand any chance of hitting 'net zero' in 2050, so innovation from energy companies is more important than ever.

"This means squeezing the absolute maximum potential out of every clean energy project that we consider. In the UK and Ireland the perfect blend of clean power from onshore renewables should include a mixture of clean energy technologies.

"The costs for building wind, solar and batteries have reduced considerably in recent years, and they complement each other very well. They perform best at different times of the day and at different times of the year." -- Keith Anderson, ScottishPower, Speaking at COP25 in Madrid.Contact: ScottishPower, Keith Anderson, +44 0 141 614 0000, www.scottishpowerrenewables.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Renewable Energy,  Energy Storage,  ScottishPower,  CO25,  


Cargill Expands, Confirms Climate Change Commitments (Ind. Report)
Cargill
Date: 2019-12-04
Minneapolis-headquartered agriculture industry giant Cargill reports it has adopted a Scope 3 target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in its global supply chains by 30 pct per ton of product by 2030.

To that end, Cargill is focused on targeted supply chain interventions, programming and policy solutions benefiting farmers, customers and the broader food system including: accelerating sustainable progress in beef, advancing soil health, reducing carbon for sustainable shipping and Protecting forests in partnership with farmers . Cargill has also reinforced its intent to prioritize climate change concerns through pledging to the CEO Climate Statement, signing on to the We Are Still In coalition to continue supporting the Paris Climate Accord and convening at this week's UN Climate Change Conference COP25 in Madrid.

The commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from its global supply chain by 30 pct per ton of product by 2030, in combination with the previously announced operational goal to reduce absolute emissions by 10 pct , has been approved by the Science Based Target initiative (SBTi), a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF). (Source: Cargill, PR, 3 Dec., 2019) Contact: Cargill, David MacLennan, CEO, Frank van Lierde, Exec. VP, www.cargill.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Cargill,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


Wa. Post Comments on China, COP25 (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
COP25
Date: 2019-12-04
"China is already the world's carbon-emitting leader, emitting nearly twice the levels of America in second place, and it is building up its lead. And in 2019, China's only significant climate change accomplishment was its slaughter of 100 million methane-producing pigs. But of course, that wasn't about climate change; it was about restraining a swine flu outbreak.

"And things are set to get worse as China opens dozens of new coal-fired power plants. China's carbon output is heading even higher in 2020, even as America's is projected to decline. This speaks to something: Chinese President Xi Jinping is lying when he says he takes climate change seriously. His dirty coal plants and opposition to European carbon tariffs, evidence Xi's global economic and political ambitions come first.

"The COP25 community doesn't seem to care. Instead, this week's summit has opened with a range of thinly veiled jabs at the United States. This, even though America is leading the world in reducing its carbon emissions.

"Why the choice to attack America and ignore China? Because most nations prefer pomp to practicality on this issue. They know they can attack America but keep trading with America. But it's not so simple when it comes to China. These nations know that China views trade through the distinct prism of Xi's mercantilist worldview. And led by President Emmanuel Macron of France, the European Union is keen to keep Beijing happy in order to maintain Chinese investment and trade deals. The contrast here between European leaders' rhetoric and activists' demands is striking.

"But it doesn't change the exigent truth. Until COP25 puts China front and center in its carbon reduction sights, these summits will continue to produce nothing but hot air." (Source: Washington Post, 3 Dec., 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Climate Change,  


COP25 UN Climate Conference Underway in Madrid (Int'l. Report)
COP25,World Meteorological Organization
Date: 2019-12-02
With today's opening, some 25,000 delegates and heads of state will meet for the next two weeks in the Spanish capital city of Madrid for COP25, the annual UN international conference on the global climate challenge and to address related concerns best illustrated by last week's World Meteorological Organization (WMO) report that "world greenhouse gas concentrations rose again in 2018, with carbon dioxide levels hitting 407.8 parts per million, a new record in human history."

COP25 was originally scheduled for Brazil but moved to Chile after Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro, widely criticized by environmentalists for his policies on the Amazon region, took office last January. However, following lengthy spells of civil unrest in Chile, the Sebastian Pinera government there announced in early November that the country was ceding the hosting of COP25 to Spain, four weeks before it was set to start.

Despite having given formal notice on withdrawing from the Paris Agreement, the U.S. will attendant the Madrid meeting. (Source: UN COP25, Various Media, 30 Nov., 20190 Contact: COP25, www.ifema.es/en/cop25; World Meteorological Organization, Petteri Taalas, Secretary General, +41 (0) 22 73 0811, www.wmo.int

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP25,  Climate Change,  World Meteorological Organization ,  


Land is Part of the Climate Solution -- IPCC Report (Ind. Report)
IPCC,Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
Date: 2019-08-12
According to the attached Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, "land is already under growing human pressure and climate change is adding to these pressures." At the same time, keeping global warming to well below 2 degrees C can be achieved only by reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors including land and food, the IPCC report notes.

The report will be a key scientific input into forthcoming climate and environment negotiations, such as the Conference of the Parties of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification (COP14) in New Delhi, India in September and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (COP25) in Santiago, Chile, in December.

The report notes that better land management can contribute to tackling climate change, but is not the only solution. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from all sectors is essential if global warming is to be kept to well below 2 degrees C, if not 1.5 degrees C.

The IPCC assessments provide all levels of government with scientific information that can be used to develop climate policies and in international negotiations to tackle climate change.

The IPCC, the world body for assessing the state of scientific knowledge related to climate change, its impacts and potential future risks and possible response options.

Download the UN IPCC Land is Part of the Climate Solution report HERE. (Source: UN IPCC, 8 Aug., 2019) Contact: IPCC, www.ipcc.ch

More Low-Carbon Energy News IPCC,  Climate Change,  Global Waming,  Carbon Emissions,  

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