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Neste Touts Estonian Biodiesel Sales, MY Renewable Jet Fuel (Int'l)
Neste
Date: 2019-05-08
In the capital city of Tallinn, Estonian public broadcaster ERR and other media are reporting Helsinki-headquartered renewable diesel fuel producer Neste will begin offering its palm oil biodiesel to Estonian motorists in July, subject to Estonian Environment Ministry approval.

In other Neste news, the effectiveness of Neste MY Renewable Jet Fuel in reducing black carbon emissions has been recognized in a competition organized by the Climate Leadership Coalition, the Bioenergy Association of Finland, the Finnish Innovation Fund Sitra, the Finnish Environment Institute, and the Central Association of Chimney Sweeps. According to NASA, renewable fuel has the potential to cut particulate emissions by up to 70 pct from aircraft engines. (Source: Neste, Baltic News Network, May, 2019) Contact: Neste, +358 10 458 4128, www.neste.com; Bioenergy Association of Finland, www.bioenergia.fi/English

More Low-Carbon Energy News Neste,  Renewable Diesel,  Alternative Fuel,  Biodiesel,  


Black Carbon Emissions Underestimated (Ind. Report, R&D)
Blabk Carbon
Date: 2019-05-01
Although researchers have developed several historical inventories of black carbon (soot) emissions, new US EPA research suggests that U.S. soot emissions were 80 pct higher during the late 20th century than previously indicated.

In particular, the researchers determined that the emissions from several key sources -- pre-1980 residential boilers and heating stoves, specific off-road engines, and heavy-duty diesel and light-duty gasoline-powered vehicles assembled prior to 1970 -- should be increased significantly.

According to the research, between 1960 and 1980, the updated U.S. emissions totaled approximately 690 gigagrams per year in 1960 and 620 gigagrams per year a decade later. The revised inventory also exhibits a decreasing trend through 1980 that is not apparent in earlier reports. (Source: EPA, Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 2019)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Black Carbon,  


Fossil Fuel Soot Contributes to Arctic Ice Melting (Ind. Report)
Black Carbon
Date: 2019-02-22
According to the US EPA, black carbon (soot), which originates from the burning of fossil fuels, directly absorbs incoming sunlight and heats the atmosphere. In snowy places, soot deposits can absorb the sun's heat, rather then deflect it back into the atmosphere, and thus increase the rate of Arctic melting.

Now, a new 5-year search study has found that fossil fuel combustion is the main contributor to black carbon 9ssot). The research, which collected raw data in Alaska, Russia, Canada, Sweden, and Norway, found that fossil fuel combustion was responsible for most of the black carbon in the Arctic, annually around 60 pct. The findings are an important call to decrease worldwide fossil fuel consumption.

The study is published in the journal Science Advances, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (Source: American Association for the Advancement of Science, Interesting Engineering, 21 Feb., 2019) Contact: American Association for the Advancement of Science, www.aaas.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Black Carbon,  Climate Change,  


Calif. Lauded for Short-Term GHG Pollutants Legislation (REG & LEG)
COP23
Date: 2017-11-15
AT the UN COP23 meeting in Bonn, the Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany, the United Nations Environment Programme's Climate and Clean Air Coalition has recognized the state of California with its Climate and Clean Air Award for having the "most comprehensive and strongest set of targets for reducing short-lived climate pollutant emissions -- black carbon, methane -- into state law."

The U.N. award recognizes California Senate Bill 1383 aimed at cutting California's methane and hydrofluorocarbon gases to 40 pct and black carbon to 50 pct below 2013 levels by 2030. This year, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) began the process of meeting the bill's targetswith the approval of approved new regulations to cut down on methane emissions from oil and gas field operations by more closely monitoring and repairing methane leaks. (Source: CARB, Various Media, WQED, 12 Nov., 2017) Contact: CARB, (800) 242-4450, helpline@arb.ca.gov, www.arb.ca.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News COP23,  GHG,  Methane,  California Air Resources Board,  Black Carbon,  


Arctic Deeply Examines Canadian Wildfire-Soot Arctic Ice Melt Connection (Ind. Report)
Arctic Deeply
Date: 2017-07-07
In its review of the latest Arctic news, including a link between Canadian wildfires, soot -- "black carbon" -- and the Greenland Ice Sheet's melt, Arctic Deeply notes the Earth is no longer absorbing carbon emissions at its previous rate.

As the Washington Post reports, researchers have for the first time tracked soot's journey between these points and noted the presence of soot is helping to speed up the Greenland Ice Sheet's melt, which could eventually contribute to global rising sea levels by more than 6m (20ft). The Post also reports that sea level rise is happening faster than anticipated and that atmospheric CO2 levels are increasing even as global emission levels have stabilized.

Arctic Deeply is an independent "Benefit Corporation" digital media project dedicated to covering Arctic issues. (Source: Arctic Deeply, 30 June, 2017)Contact: Arctic Deeply, www.newsdeeply.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Arctic Deeply,  Soot,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  


Finland Plans Arctic Black Carbon Emissions Database (Int'l)
Arctic Council
Date: 2017-06-21
One of Finland's priorities during its two-year chairmanship of the Arctic Council is to create a database on the sources and impact of black carbon (soot) and methane emissions in the Arctic, according to the Russsian news agency TASS. The database will comprise information from Finland and the other member and observers states of the Arctic Council as well as information about black carbon emissions from ships. The data collected by Scandinavian and Russian researchers in the past few years show that black carbon and methane pollution is accelerating Arctic warming.

Black carbon darkens ice in the Arctic and reduces the albedo of snow, thereby speeding up melting. The main sources of black carbon emissions in the Arctic are vehicles and companies that use wood and coal, as well as forest fires, power stations and gas flares at oil fields.

The Arctic Council is an intergovernmental forum of the Arctic states (Russia, Canada, the United States and North European countries) and Arctic indigenous communities. It focuses on environmental monitoring, identification of pollution risks, preparedness for environmental accidents, sustainable development, conservation of natural diversity, and questions related to the Arctic sea areas. (Source: Arctic Council, 20 June, 2017) Contact: Arctic Council, http://arctic.ru

More Low-Carbon Energy News Arctic Council,  Climate Change,  Black Carbon,  


California Legislates Short-Lived Super Pollutants (Reg & Leg)
California Air Resources Board
Date: 2017-03-31
In Sacramento, the California Air Resources Board is launching a new strategy for slashing short-lived "super pollutants" including methane from cow manure, black carbon (soot) from diesel exhaust and hydrofluorocarbons from refrigerators. These "super pollutants" have a relatively short life span once dispersed into the atmosphere but are particularly potentas green house gases.

The new strategy sets targets for reducing super pollutants emissions by 2030. Methane and hydrofluorocarbons would need to be cut to 40 pct below 2013 levels, and black carbon would need to be reduced to 50 pct below 2013 levels. Meeting the goals could require more efficient refrigerators, replacing wood stoves and diverting waste from landfills. Some of the projects would involve incentives funded with public dollars. The biggest and most controversial changes could occur at dairies, where manure contributes an estimated 25 pct of the state's methane emissions. (Source: CARB, LA Times, 23 Mar., 2017) Contact: CARB, (800) 242-4450, helpline@arb.ca.gov, www.arb.ca.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Methane,  Black Carbon,  California Air Resources Board,  



Date: 2017-03-27
alifornia opened another front in its fight against global warming on Thursday, launching a new strategy for slashing so-called super pollutants that have an outsize impact on the climate.

The plan targets emissions such as methane from cow manure, black carbon from diesel exhaust and hydrofluorocarbons from refrigerators. Regulators at the Air Resources Board, which approved the strategy, and other government agencies will now need to write detailed rules for achieving the reductions.

As the world races to limit rising temperatures from climate change, some experts have suggested that targeting these pollutants could help make big gains more quickly. They hope the state's action will help demonstrate policies that other governments could imitate.

The emissions are sometimes referred to as “short-lived climate pollutants” because they have a relatively short life span once they’re dispersed into the atmosphere. But they’re particularly potent — methane, for example, is about 80 times more damaging in terms of heating the atmosphere than carbon dioxide.

The law sets targets for reducing certain emissions by 2030. Methane and hydrofluorocarbons would need to be cut to 40% below 2013 levels, and black carbon would need to be reduced to 50% below 2013 levels. Meeting the goals could require more efficient refrigerators, replacing wood stoves and diverting waste from landfills. Some of the projects would involve incentives funded with public dollars. The biggest and most controversial changes could occur at dairies, where manure contributes an estimated 25% of the state’s methane emissions. (Source: CARB, LA Times, 23 Mar., 2017)


IMO Members Urged to Drop World's Dirtiest Fuel (Ind. Report)
IMO,Clean Arctic Alliance
Date: 2016-10-26
The London-based Clean Arctic Alliance is calling on members of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to end the use of heavy fuel oil (HFO) in Arctic waters. HFO is already banned throughout Antarctica, and in the national park waters around the Norwegian Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, leaving only a strictly regulated corridor for ships to access the islands.

HFO, a toxic, tar-like sludge that breaks down extremely slowly in cold Arctic waters, is virtually impossible to clean up in the event of a spill and thus poses a severe risk to the Arctic marine environment, related industries and coastal communities.

The burning of heavy fuel oil by ships emits significant quantities of black carbon, potent in accelerating the already rapid pace of Arctic climate change. In the Arctic atmosphere, black carbon absorbs heat from the sun and reflected heat from the snow and ice doubling the warming impact when it settles on the snow and ice surfaces. This increases the surface area of exposed, dark ocean water, and promotes a self-reinforcing cycle of land and sea ice melting and climate warming.

The Clean Arctic Alliance members include: Bellona, Clean Air Task Force, Danish Ecological Council, Environmental Investigation Agency, European Climate Foundation, Friends of the Earth US, Icelandic Nature Conservation Association, Nature And Biodiversity Conservation Union, Ocean Conservancy, Pacific Environment, Seas At Risk, Transport & Environment and WWF. (Source: HFO Free Arctic Alliance, PR, 24 Oct., 2016) Contact: HFO-Free Arctic Campaign, Dave Walsh, Communications Advisor, +34 692 826 764 Dave.Walsh@HFOFreeArctic.org, Sian Prior, Advisor, +44 7785 747945 Sian.Prior@HFOFreeArctic.org, www.hfofreearctic.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News IMOMaritime Emissions,  Carbon Emissions,  Black Carbon,  ,  

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