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ADM Reports Q2 Ethanol-Bioproducts Loss (Ind. Report)
Archer Daniels Midland
Date: 2019-08-07
Following on our 29 April report, Chicago-headquartered biofuel pioneer Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) this week reported a Q2 $26 million loss in bioproducts as a result of negative ethanol margins. The company reported a a $9 million profit from the segment in the same quarter for 2018.

ADM CEO Juan Luciano said the company expects the "ethanol-margin environment to remain challenged until we see a move with China trade." China's ethanol production capacity is approximately 1 billion gpy, but needs up to 4 billion gpy and will need to import between 2 billion and 3 billion gpy from the U.S. and Brazil. (Source: ADM, Aug., 2019) Contact: ADM, Juan Luciano, Pres., CEO, (312) 634-8100, Collin Benson, VP Bioactives, Jackie Anderson, ADM Media, (217) 424-5413, www.adm.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Archer Daniels Midland,  


Greenbelt, NARE Announce Bioproducts Collaboration (Ind. Report)
Greenbelt Resources ,New Age Renewable Energy
Date: 2019-07-03
Paso Robles, California-based Greenbelt Resources Corporation is reporting a technology collaboration with King Ferry, New York-based New Age Renewable Energy, LLC. (NARE), an innovator in dairy waste processing projects, combining the NARE fermentation formulation with Greenbelt's ECOsystem technology to provide a cost-effective solution to convert dairy processing wastes such as "cheese whey" into ethanol and other valuable bioproducts.

In their collaboration, each ECOsystem solution would likely have a capacity between 400,000 and one million gpy of ethanol production per year. (Source: Greenbelt Resources Corp., Yahoo, 2 July, 2019) Contact: New Age Renewable Energy, (315) 314-8077, eduard@narenewableenergy.com, www.narenewableenergy.com; Greenbelt Resources, Darren Eng, CEO, 888-995-4726 x 101, darren@greenbeltresources.com, www.greenbeltresources.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Greenbelt Resources ,  anaerobic digestion,  New Age Renewable Energy,  


Oil from Woody Biomass Developed at U Maine (New Prod & Tech)
University of Maine
Date: 2019-05-29
In the Pine Tree State, the University of Maine in Orono is reporting a team from its Forest Bioproducts Research Institute's (FBRI) pilot plant has developed a chemicals-free process that turns wood biomass into clean, crude oil using heat and pressure.

According to the release, the method was discovered by undergraduate students experimenting with salt and high temperatures when they found that a particular kind of mixed-salt produced crude oil vapors. With a 20-minute process of high heat and pressure, wood pulp is turned into acid before it is turned into salt, which produces the crude oil when introduced to high temperatures. which can be processed just like any oil refinery and make gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel.

The current production is about 1 tpd when the plant is running, but the private sector is interested in the engineering data, which is a patent protected and available for companies to amplify research. (Source: University of Maine, FBRI, Woodworking Network, 27 May, 2019) Contact: University of Maine, FBRI, Hemant Pendse, Director, (207) .581.1489 Fax: 207.581.9418 fbri@maine.edu , https://forestbioproducts.umaine.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Biofuel,  


DOE Announces $79 Mn Funding for Bioenergy R&D (Funding, R&D)
US DOE
Date: 2019-05-06
In Washington, the US DOE has announced over $79 million in funding for bioenergy R&D including biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. This funding supports Agency's goal of providing consumers and businesses with a range of domestic energy options that are affordable, reliable, and secure.

The FOA topics will advance DOE's Bioenergy Technology Office's (BETO) objectives to reduce the price of drop-in biofuels, lower the cost of biopower, and enable high-value products from biomass or waste resources. Topics areas for this funding opportunity include the following:

  • Cultivation Intensification Processes for Algae -- Develop technologies for outdoor algae systems that increase the harvest yield, reliability and quality of algae;

  • Biomass Component Variability and Feedstock Conversion Interface: Research to lower the cost and improve the reliability of biomass handling and preprocessing;

  • Efficient Wood Heaters -- Develop technologies to reduce emissions and increase efficiency of wood heaters for residential heating;

  • Systems Research of Hydrocarbon Biofuel Technologies -- Integrate new technologies and processes in experimental prototype systems to improve and verify real-world performance and lower the cost of drop-in Biofuels;

  • Optimization of Biomass-Derived Jet Fuel Blends -- Identify and develop cost-competitive drop-in renewable jet fuel with improved energy density and lower particulate matter emissions;

  • Renewable Energy from Urban and Suburban Wastes: Support academic research and educational programs that focus on strategies to produce bioenergy and bioproducts from urban and suburban waste feedstocks;

  • Advanced Bioprocessing and Agile BioFoundry -- Reduce the time and cost of developing biological processes for biomanufacturing fuels and products through the use of synthetic biology, low capital intensity methods, and continuous production systems;

  • Plastics in the Circular Carbon Economy -- Develop biobased plastics with improved performance and recyclability and lower the cost and energy-intensity of recycling existing plastics through enhanced degradation;

  • Rethinking Anaerobic Digestion: Develop anaerobic processes or alternative strategies to enhance carbon conversion efficiency and lower costs of smaller scale wet waste systems;

  • Reducing Water, Energy, and Emissions in Bioenergy -- Identify biofuels or bioproducts technologies with the greatest potential for reducing water consumption, energy consumption, and/or emissions relative to existing conventional fuels or products.

    This FOA also supports the Water Security Grand Challenge, a White House initiated, DOE-led framework to advance transformational technology and innovation to meet the global need for safe, secure, and affordable water. In particular, this funding will support R&D focused on anaerobic digestion, a technology that can help achieve the Grand Challenge's goal to double resource recovery from municipal wastewater. (Source: US DOE EERE, 3 May, 2019) Contact: US DOE EERE, www.energy.gov/eere

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US DOE EERE,  Bioenergy,  Biofuel,  Anaerobic Digestion ,  


  • SDTC Commits $10.4Mn to Fortress Bioproducts Demo (Funding)
    Fortress Global Enterprises,Sustainable Development Technology Canada
    Date: 2019-04-10
    British Columbia-based Fortress Global Enterprises Inc. reports its wholly-owned subsidiary, Fortress Xylitol Inc., has inked an agreement with Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) under which SDTC will contribute $10.4 million in funding to support the planned construction and operation of a xylitol and complementary bioproducts demonstration plant at Fortress' dissolving pulp mill in Thurso, Que. The funding is additional to Natural Resources Canada's (NRC) previously announced funding and an anticipated provincial investment and loan of up to $7 million.

    The demonstration plant project is intended to demonstrate technology for the co-production of value-added and sustainable bioproducts that will help transform the wood pulp mill into a biorefinery. The process is expected to validate performance and produce pre-commercial quantities of food-grade xylitol and complementary bioproducts for testing and use by customers. Fortress also operates in the renewable energy generation sector through its cogeneration facility. Fortress operates its bioproducts business through Fortress Advanced Bioproducts Inc., which has laboratory and pilot plant facilities in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. (Source: Fortress Global Enterprises, April, 2019) Contact: Fortress, Giovanni Iadeluca, CEO, (888) 820-3888, info@fortressge.com, www.fortressge.com; Sustainable Development Technology Canada, info@sdtc.ca, (613) 234-6313 ext. 0, www.sdtc.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio-plastic,  Sustainable Development Technology Canada,  


    Emissions Reduction Alberta Funding Ethanol Projects (Funding)
    Emissions Reduction Alberta ,Carbon Clean Energy
    Date: 2019-03-20
    On the Canadian prairies, Emissions Reduction Alberta's Partnership Intake Program reports funding Alberta projects that together are expected to cut 9 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

    Project Wheatland received $5 million for a $285 million biofuels plant being developed by Carbon Clean Energy (CCE). The plant will produce 16 million lpy of denatured ethanol for fuel blending, as well as 1.76 mmBtu of biogas and 12MWh of green power generation per year.

    ERA also granted over $2 million to British Columbia-based SYLVIS Environmental Service's BIOSALIX which process uses municipal biosolids and other organic residuals as supplements to existing topsoil and feedstocks in topsoil production in order to grow willow wood biomass crops on reclaimed mine land. The biomass can then be used as feedstock in clean energy, reclamation or bioproducts development, according to the company. (Source: Emissions Reduction Alberta, Various Media, Biofuels Int'l, 19 Mar., 2019) Contact: Emissions Reduction Alberta, (780)498-2068, info@eralberta.ca, www.eralberta.ca; SYLVIS Environmental Service, (604) 777-9788, www.sylvis.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Emissions,  ,  Wheat Ethanol ,  


    Greenbelt Claims Duckweed Ethanol Feedstock Success (Ind. Report)
    Greenbelt Resources
    Date: 2019-03-08
    Following up on our March 30, 2018 coverage, Paso Robles, California-based Greenbelt Resources Corporation , the developer and producer of a sustainable ECOsystem model that transforms food, beverage and ag industry waste into revenue generating bioproducts, reports it used its Commercial Scale Feedstock Testing Facility (CSTF) to conduct duckweed feedstock feasibility testing for a third party customer funded by the Andrew J. Young Foundation.

    Common duckweed is a very small light green free-floating, seed bearing plant. Duckweed has 1 to 3 leaves, or fronds, of 1/16 to 1/8 inch in length. A single root (or root-hair) protrudes from each frond. Duckweeds tend to grow in dense colonies in quiet, undisturbed water.

    In other Greenbelt news, the company also recently announced receipt of funding funding pursuant to an agreement with Purnol, LLC to produce bioethanol for use in the predominantly hemp based cannabis CBD extraction process. (Source: Greenbelt Resources Corp., PR, 7 Mar., 2019) Contact: Greenbelt Resources, Darren Eng, CEO, 888-995-GRCO (4726) x 101, darren@greenbeltresources.com, www.greenbeltresources.com; Andrew J. Young Foundation, (404) 685-2786

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Greenbelt Resources,  Duckweed,  Ethanol,  Biofuel ,  


    CABBI Sustainable Crop Byproduct Energy Project Progressing (R&D)
    Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation
    Date: 2019-03-04
    The Urbana, Illionis-based Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI) reports that with $115 million in us DOE grant funding, its project to develop energy using sustainable crop byproducts is progressing steadily.

    CABBI is working with soy gum, which is converted into products like biodiesel by looking at the gene structure of the plant stem and extracting the oil and gases which can be used directly as biodiesel or further processed into different value-added products,” according to CABBI director Evan DeLuc1a. (Source: Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation, Illinois News Network, 2 Mar., 2019) Contact: CABBI, Evan DeLuc1a , (217)244-1586 cabbi-bio@illinois.edu, www.cabbi.bio

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel,  CABBI,  Biofuel,  


    PNNL Seeking Algae Bioenergy, Biofuel Collaborations (Ind Report)
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Date: 2019-02-20
    The U.S. DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) reports it is seeking algae industry partners and academic researchers to help find the best algae strains for biofuels and bioproducts to reduce the cost of producing bioenergy from algae feedstocks.

    PNNL leads the Development of Integrated Screening, Cultivar Optimization and Verification (DISCOVR) project that employs the unique complementary capabilities of the four participating national laboratories -- Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratorie -- sand the outdoor testbed at the Arizona Center for Algal Technology and Innovation to identify and test high productivity microalgae strains for year-round outdoor cultivation. The goal is to provide a framework to accelerate meeting DOE's advanced biofuel goals with microalgae.

    "A key cost driver for algae biofuels is productivity, which is directly tied to which algae strain is chosen and how it's cultivated," said Taraka Dale, a scientist at LANL. "By collaborating with industry and academia, we aim to bring together the best of the best strains and cultivation strategies to rapidly boost productivity and reduce costs."

    "So far, we have tested more than 40 new microalgae strains and identified strains with up to 34 percent greater biomass productivity than benchmark strains," said Huesemann. "The success of the DISCOVR strain down selection and testing pipeline was demonstrated in 2018 by achieving more than 13 pct improvement in outdoor pond productivity relative to 2017, reducing the biomass selling price by about 10 pct."

    The goal of the call for collaboration is to solicit algae strains, tools and techniques from the algae community to further boost algae productivity. This call gives industry and academia an opportunity to partner with the four national laboratories in DISCOVR, as well as AzCATI. (Source: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PR, Feb., 2019) Contact: PNNL, Michael Huesemann, DISCOVR Consortium leader, discovr.algae@lanl.gov, https://discovr.labworks.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ,  


    Competitive Green Technologies Wins $500K Fed Funding (Funding)
    Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
    Date: 2018-11-26
    In Ottawa, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), a federal agency reports it is investing $499,433 in Stapels, Ontario-based Competitive Green Technologies in its quest to develop a new biocomposite material from resin and natural fibres derived from agricultural bio-waste.

    The company is working with the University of Guelph's Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC) in Ontario.

    According to the release, the global bioplastics and biocomposites sector is entering the plastics market at an annual growth rate of 30 pct. (Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, PR, 23 Nov., 2018) Contact: Competitive Green Technologies, Mike Tiessen, Pres., (519) 329-2525, www.competitivegreentechnologies.com; Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, (855)773-0241, (613) 773-1081, info@agr.gc.ca, www.agr.gc.ca/eng/home/?id=1395690825741; University of Guelph's Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Dr. Amar Mohanty, (519) 824.4120 X 56664, mohanty@uoguelph.ca, www.bioproductscentre.com, www.uoguelph.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biowate,  Bioplastics,  


    Perstorp Offloads BioProducts Business Unit (Int'l, M&A)
    Perstorp
    Date: 2018-11-26
    Swedish speciality chemicals producer is reporting the sale the sale of its biodiesel and glycerine producer Perstorp BioProducts arm in Fredrikstad, Norway, to a Swedish investor. The sale includes a tolling agreement that will see Perstorp continue to manufacture biodiesel at its Stenungsund production site.

    Following the transaction, the business unit will be established as Adesso BioProducts AB, a leading Scandinavian biofuels supplier. (Source: Perstrop, PR, Chemicals Technology, 22 Nov., 2018) Contact: Perstrop, Jan Secher, CEO, www.perstorp.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biodiesel,  


    Diverse Biofeedstock Ethanol Yields Investigated (R&D Report)
    Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
    Date: 2018-11-16
    Biorefineries are picky eaters. They only consume one or two types of plant matter. Researchers at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison processed and experimentally measured ethanol production from five different herbaceous feedstocks. They examined two annuals (corn stover and energy sorghum) along with three perennials (switchgrass, miscanthus, and restored prairie). They determined that a lignocellulosic ethanol refinery could use a range of plant types without having a major impact on the amount of ethanol produced per acre, or per land area.

    Many biorefineries consume one, or sometimes two, feedstocks grown and harvested nearby. The feedstock contains lignocellulose. That chemical is processed and fermented into biofuels or bioproducts. Accepting a variety of feedstocks could improve the refinery's environmental footprint, economics, and logistics. The team's study showed that a lignocellulosic refinery could be relatively agnostic in terms of the feedstocks used.

    Refineries to convert biomass into fuels often rely on just one feedstock. If the refineries could accept more than one feedstock, it would greatly benefit refinery operation. Scientists investigated how five different feedstocks affected process and field-scale ethanol yields. Two annual crops (corn stover and energy sorghum) and three perennial crops (switchgrass, miscanthus, and restored prairie) were pretreated using ammonia fiber expansion, hydrolyzed, and fermented separately using yeast or bacteria.

    Researchers found that both biomass quality and biomass yield affected the amount of ethanol each acre produces. However, the effect differed. Biomass quality was the main driver for the ethanol yields for high-yielding crops, such as switchgrass. Biomass yield was the main driver for the ethanol yields for low-productivity crops, such as corn stover. Therefore, to increase ethanol yield for high-yielding crops, focusing efforts on improving biomass quality or conversion efficiency may be prudent.

    For low-yielding crops, focusing on increasing biomass yield may be the best strategy. When measuring the amount of ethanol produced during fermentation, most feedstocks fell within a similar range, especially when scientists used bacteria to ferment the biomass. In total, the results of this study suggest that a lignocellulosic refinery may use a variety of feedstocks with a range of quality without a major negative impact on field-scale ethanol yields. (Source: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US DOE, 12 Nov., 2018) Contact: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Tim Donohue, Dir., John Greenler, Dir. Outreach, (608) 890-2444, www.glbrc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center,  US DOE,  Biofuel Feedstock,  ,  


    Biorenewable Deployment Consortium's Raleigh Fall Forum Update (Conference, Ind. Report)
    Biorenewable Deployment Consortium
    Date: 2018-10-31
    The Biorenewable Deployment Consortium (BDC) Fall Forum was held in Raleigh, N.C. on October 9-10 and was combined with a visit to the Velocys' Microchannel Fisher-Tropsch pilot plant that is integrated with the ThermoChem Recovery International (TRI) Biomass Gasification and Gas Clean-up system at TRI's Advanced Development Center in Durham. Velocys has announced the commercial "Bayou Fuels" project for Natchez, MS. The project will combine the two companies' technologies to convert locally sourced waste woody biomass into transportation fuel.

    The Forum boasted record attendance, including a diverse group of international members and guests. Discussions included updates from leading bio-process companies on new processes and commercial advances that can add value to the forest products industry. Highlights of the Forum included commercial progress of nanotechnology presented by keynote Sean Ireland, VP, Business Development for Fiberlean Technologies; evolutionary value added technologies for the chemical recovery cycle and soap removal / tall oil production; commercial progress of wood to bioproducts from Velocys, Ensyn, and Red Rock; and commercial progress for lignin conversion to end products.

    USDA Administrator Bette Brand attended the meeting and tour. "The USDA recognizes the importance of the partnership between government and private industry designed to bridge the early financial issues of start-up companies in the biorenewable area that we believe will help improve economies in rural communities," said Ms. Brand ommented. Meeting attendees participating in USDA programs included Velocys, Ensyn, Red Rock Biofuels, REG, and American Biocarbon.

    Masood Akhtar, President of BDC commented, "In BDC's view, it is important for the government to be confident in the companies they financially assist, and the scale up requirements of the USDA have been critical to the success of new start up companies." "The success of the BDC meeting is due to a combination of the mission of the organization, the make-up and participation of the membership and guests, and the ingenuity and progress of the entrepreneurial management teams in the up and coming bio-industry," Akhtar concluded. (Source: BDC, PR, Oct., 2018) Contact: BDC, Ben Thorp, Chairman, (804) 743-3105, Ben.Thorp@biorenewabledc.org, www.biorenewabledc.org; Velocys, Jeff McDaniel, VP, (614) 733-3300, jeff.mcdaniel@velocys.com, www.velocys.com; ThermoChem Recovery International, Chris Doherty, VP, (410) 525-2400, cdoherty@tri-inc.net, www.tri-inc.net

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biorenewable Deployment Consortium,  Velocys,  ThermoChem Recovery International ,  


    Texas A&M Awarded $2.2 Mn for Biofuel R&D (R&D, Funding)
    Texas A&M
    Date: 2018-10-15
    In College State, Texas A&M AgriLife Research is reporting receipt of $2.2 million in grant funding from grant from the U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office to support investigation of waste products used in lignocellulosic biofuel production, turning them into valuable agents used in producing commercial products such as biodiesel and asphalt binding agents.

    According to Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist and project leader Dr. Joshua Yuan, "The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass has been around for many years, but many of the waste products can not be commercialized due to the configuration of these biorefineries. What we are trying to accomplish is developing a streamlined process where the biomass waste at these refineries can be fractionated to produce lipids for biodiesel, asphalt binder modifier and quality carbon fiber. All of these bioproducts can add great value to the economy and enhance their market value."

    Yuan noted that lignocellulose bioconversion refineries burn off 60 pct of the lignin produced. Utilizing this lignin offers incentives such as improving the efficiencies of a biorefinery, reducing costs and lowering emissions. The work will include developing an integrated biorefinery program or "a blueprint for future biorefinery development," Yuan added. (Source: Texas A&M AgriLife Research, PR, Oct., 2018) Contact: Dr. Joshua Yuan, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Dr. Joshua Yuan, Dir. Synthetic and Systems Biology Hub, people.tamu.edu/~syuan, www.tamu.edu; US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Texas A&M,  US DOE BETO,  lignocellulosic ,  biofuel,  


    DOE Announces Bioenergy Research and Development Funding (R&D)
    DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office
    Date: 2018-09-07
    In Washington. the U.S. Department of Energy has announced the selection of 36 projects totaling $80 million to support early-stage bioenergy R&D aimed at enabling cost-competitive, drop-in renewable hydrocarbon fuels, bio-based products, and power from non-food biomass and waste feedstocks. This work supports the DOE's goal of reducing the cost of bio-based drop-in fuels to $3/gallon by 2022 to continue to provide consumers with affordable, reliable transportation energy choices. The four funding opportunitie include:
  • BioEnergy Engineering for Products Synthesis (up to $28 million) -- 16 selectees will create highly efficient conversion processes to increase the affordability of fuels from biomass and waste feedstocks by improving catalysts and new biological systems, identifying ways to better utilize waste streams like carbon dioxide (CO2) and biosolids, and creating high-value co-products that can improve the economic viability of biofuels production.

  • Efficient Carbon Utilization in Algal Systems (up to $15 million) -- 7 selections will improve the efficiency of carbon utilization and productivity of algal systems either through improving uptake and conversion of waste CO2 emissions or through the development of new, technologies to capture CO2 directly from ambient air to enhance algal growth.

  • Process Development for Advanced Biofuels and Biopower (up to $22 million) -- 10 selections will research integrated processes for the production of biopower from biosolids and cost-competitive, renewable drop-in biofuels and bioproducts from domestic biomass feedstocks and waste resources.

  • Affordable and Sustainable Energy Crops (up to $15 million)-- 3 selections will conduct early-stage R&D related to the production of affordable and sustainable non-food dedicated energy crops that can be used as feedstocks for the production of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. (Source: US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, PR, 4 Sept., 2018) Contact: US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office , (702) 356-1623 – Communications Office, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  Algal,  Drop-ion Biofuel,  


  • CP Group, Fiberight Installation Underway in Maine (Ind. Report)
    CP Group,Fiberight
    Date: 2018-08-15
    Further to our June 11 coverage, San Diego-based CP Group reports it has broken ground on a material recovery facility in Hampden, Maine. The facility will be the front-end system for Maryland-based waste-to-biofuels specialist tFiberight's waste processing and refining facility that features the company's first full-scale biofuels and biogas processing systems.

    Serving 115 municipalities, the 144,000-square-foot Hampden, Maine, facility will feature technologies from CP Group for recovering recyclables and preparing residual waste for further processing on-site.

    Fiberight's proprietary anaerobic digestion and biogas technology converts organic waste to biofuel and refined bioproducts. Residual waste at the facility will be processed by Fiberight's technology, upgrading the municipal solid waste (MSW) residue into industrial bioenergy products. Startup is slated for Q4 this year. (Source: CP Group. 14 Aug., 2018) Contact: CP Group, Terry Schneider, Pres., CEO, (619) 477-3175, www.cpgrp.com; Fiberight LLC, Craig Stuart-Paul, CEO, (408) 390-3275, info@fiberight.com, www.fiberight.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Fiberight,  Biofuel,  Biomass,  


    SUNY ESF Recognizes Volk for Bioenergy, Biomass Work (Ind Report)
    SUNY
    Date: 2018-07-25
    Dr. Timothy Volk, co-director of the State University of New York (SUNY) Center for Sustainable and Renewable Energy and senior research associate in ESF's Department of Forest and Natural Resources Management (FNRM), has been named the College's Exemplary Researcher for 2018-19.

    Volk, who has more than 20 years of experience working in the fields of forestry, agroforestry, short-rotation woody crops, bioenergy and phytoremediation is responsible for a series of research projects focused on the development of shrub willow biomass cropping systems as a feedstock for bioproducts and bioenergy, and the use of willow as an alternative cover for industrial waste sites. He is actively involved in R&D of sustainability assessments of bioenergy systems, life cycle assessments of willow biomass crops and woody biomass from forests, assessments of woody biomass availability from natural forests, economic modeling of short-rotation woody crops, living snow fences, regional woody biomass resource supplies, and harvesting systems for short-rotation woody crops. (Source: SUNY ESF, 23 July, 2018) Contact: SUNY ESF, Prof. Tim Volk, (315) 470-6774, tavolk@esf.edu, www.esf.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News SUNY ESF,  Biofuel,  Woody Biomass,  


    DOE Announces $40Mn for Bio-Based Research (R&D, Funding)
    Office of Biological and Environmental Research
    Date: 2018-06-20
    In Washington, the US DOE has announced $40 million in funding for 31 projects to advance research in the development of microbes as practical platforms for the production of biofuels and other bioproducts from renewable resources.

    Over the past decade, DOE-supported scientists have identified and modified a wide range of microbial organisms to be "production workhorses" transforming microbes into effective platforms for the generation of fuels and other precursor chemicals from renewable plant feedstocks.

    Organisms under study range from yeast and fungi to cyanobacteria and rare thermophilic microbes that thrive at extremely high temperatures. Products to be produced include biofuels, alcohols and other valuable precursor chemicals with multiple possible downstream applications. In addition to the projects focused on specific microorganisms, approximately one third of the projects are focused on developing and improving the essential imaging tools for this work of characterizing and modifying organisms on a microscopic scale.

    Projects were chosen by competitive peer review under two separate DOE Funding Opportunity Announcements, one for Systems Biology of Bioenergy-Relevant Microbes and another for Bioimaging Research for Bioenergy, both sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Department's Office of Science. Total funding is $40 million for projects lasting three years in duration. (Source: US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, 15 June, 2018) Contact: US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental, Research, https://science.energy.gov/ber

    More Low-Carbon Energy News US DOE,  Biofuel R&D,  Biochemical,  


    DOE Awards $3M for Advanced Biofuels, Bioenergy R&D (Funding)
    Biomass Research and Development Initiative
    Date: 2018-05-11
    The US Department of Energy (DOE) reports it's Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will award up to $3 million in grant funding to the University of Tennessee and Northwestern University for advanced biofuels, bioenergy, and biobased products.

    The University of Tennessee (UT). UT will be developing an integrated biorefinery design that combines the production of liquid fuels and renewable chemicals to verify production of affordable cellulosic ethanol.

    Northwestern University will develop a rapid synthesis of next-generation biofuels and bioproducts from lignocellulosic biomass. The project will employ several strategies to reduce the timeframe of discovering biosynthetic pathways to optimize fuel and chemical production, including bottom-up engineering principles, computational models, and cell-free framework systems.

    Both projects aim to lower biofuel production costs and develop diverse, cost-effective cellulosic biomass technologies for use in the production of biofuels and biobased products. (Source: US DOE, Green Car Congress, 10 May, 2018) Contact: DOE Biomass Research and Development Initiative , https://biomassboard.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Cellulosic Biomass,  


    DOE Offering $78Mn for Biofuels, Bioenergy Crop R&D (R&D Funding)

    Date: 2018-05-07
    In Washington, the US Department of Energy has announced the availability of up to $78 million to support early-stage bioenergy research and development.

    Qualifying projects include those that develop highly efficient conversion processes for improving the affordability of fuels and products from biomass and waste streams. Funding is also being offered for research and development related to the production of affordable and sustainable non-food dedicated energy crops -- including algae, energy crops and various waste streams that can be efficiently and effectively converted into affordable biofuels, biopower and bioproducts. (Source: US DOE, Energy Live, May, 2018)

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel Feedstock,  Biofuel R&D,  


    Greenbelt, Biofuels & Energy Tout SLV Biopro Project (Ind. Report)
    Greenbelt Resources
    Date: 2018-03-23
    Paso Robles, California-headquartered Greenbelt Resources Corporation, an innovator of sustainable energy production systems, in collaboration with Biofuels & Energy, LLC (B&E), is touting the San Luis Valley Bioproducts Project (SLV Biopro). The project will feature Greenbelt's waste-to-energy interconnected system (ECOsystem) designed to produce up to 500,000 gpy of bioethanol from potato processing waste and other suitable feedstocks available in the San Luis Valley area of Colorado.

    SLV Biopro aims to be the first independently owned, local-scale bioethanol solution in Colorado. The resulting bioethanol will be sold for both fuel and industrial uses, including by Colorado's cannabis processing industry as a "green" extraction solvent.

    Biofuels & Energy, LLC is a project development company dedicated to the utilization of proven emerging technologies capable of transforming industrial, municipal and agricultural waste streams into energy products. (Source: Greenbelt Resources Corp. PR, 22 Mar., 2018) Contact: B&E, SLV Biopro Project, Richard Mason, (575) 224-9064; Greenbelt Resources, Darren Eng, CEO, (888) 995-4726 x 101, darren@greenbeltresources.com, www.greenbeltresources.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Greenbelt Resources,  Waste-to-Fuel,  Biofuel,  


    Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Refocuses (Ind. Report)
    Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
    Date: 2018-02-19
    The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports it has embarked on a new mission develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.

    GLBRC originally focused on corn stover ethanol production and developing perennial plants like switchgrass and miscanthus as biofuel feedstocks. Now, GLBRC goal is centered on designing advanced biofuels, such as isobutanol. These "drop-in" fuels could be used to replace gasoline without engine modification. By engineering bioenergy crops to enhance their environmental and economic value, and conducting research to generate multiple products from plant biomass, these advancements could optimize the bioenergy field-to-product pipeline.

    GLBRC scientists and engineers are also improving the yield and processing traits of dedicated bioenergy crops for cultivation on marginal, or non-agricultural, land. With smart management, these crops have the potential to benefit the ecosystem, help mitigate climate change, and provide farmers with an additional source of revenue.

    GLBRC is focused on enabling a new and different biorefinery, one that is both economically viable and environmentally sustainable. Realizing this goal will mean increasing the efficiency of biomass conversion and generating a mix of specialty biofuels and environmentally-friendly bioproducts, from as much of a plant's biomass as possible. One such discovery, breaks down lignin's six-carbon rings -- the "aromatics" -- into individual components. Traditionally sourced from petroleum, aromatics are used in a wide variety of products, including plastic soda bottles, Kevlar, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals, and are essential components of jet fuel. (Source: University of Wisconsin Madison, GLBRC, PR, 18 Feb., 2018) Contact: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Tim Donohue, Dir., John Greenler, Dir. Outreach, (608) 890-2444, www.glbrc.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center,  University of Wisconsin Madison,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Ethanol,  Bioplastics,  


    Univ. of Illinois Launches Bioenergy, Bioproducts Innovation Center (Ind. Report)
    University of Illinois
    Date: 2018-02-05
    In Urbana, the University of Illinois is reporting the inauguration of the new Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI), a $115 million, US DOE-funded research center. CABBI is a collaboration between Illinois' Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment, the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, and 17 partner institutions.

    CABBI researchers will focus on: feedstock development, conversion of plants into fuel and the economic and environmental costs of turning plants into fuel. "CABBI seeks to harness the latest technologies in genomic biology, synthetic biology, and crop sciences to create breakthrough discoveries for sustainable, cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts," according to IGB Director Gene Robinson. (Source: The Daily Illini, 30 Jan., 2018) Contact: Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, Gene Robinson, Dir., (217) 284-2999, www.igb.illinois.edu; CABBI, Evan DeLucia, cabbi-bio@illinois.edu, https://cabbi.bio

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy,  Biofuel,  Bioproducts,  


    Woody Biomass Center Slated for Shuttered Old Town Maine Pulp & Paper Mill (Ind. Report)
    OTM Holdings LLC
    Date: 2018-02-05
    In the Pine Tree State, OTM Holdings LLC, a joint venture by a Maine-based group is reporting the purchase of the long troubled Old Town Pulp and Paper mill complex. Terms of the acquisition have not been released.

    OTM plans to redevelop the shuttered mill into a wood-fiber-based complex comprised of multiple tenants, including the University of Maine's Forest Bioproducts Research Institute Technology (FBRI), which presently occupies 40,000 square feet.

    Last May, FBRI conducted a 100-hour demonstration of its continuous processing of 1 tpd of woody biomass into bio chemicals that can be used for biofuels, biochemicals and other advanced materials.

    OTM's redevelopment foresees a fully integrated fiber-based campus capitalizing on the mill's energy platform and the region's plentiful woody biomass fiber supply. According to the OTM release, "This redevelopment is the beginning of what many see as the newest market for Maine's wood fiber, which transforms the cellulose-based, non-edible fiber and wood waste into clean and affordable high-value fuels, chemicals and milled and engineered wood products." (Source: FBRI, MaineBiz, Feb., 2018) Contact: University of Maine Forest Bioproducts Research Institute Technology, https://forestbioproducts.umaine.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Wood Pulp,  


    UPM Biofuels, ZERO Collaboration Promoting Bio-economy (Int'l)
    UPM Biofuels,Zero Emission Resource Organisation
    Date: 2018-01-24
    In Finland, Helsinki-headquartered UPM Biofuels and the Oslo, Norway-based Zero Emission Resource Organization (ZER$O) report they are collaborating to promote green transportation, biochemicals, sustainable bioproducts and a predictable long term operating environment for sustainable, advanced biofuels to enable climate change mitigation in transport with renewable fuels.

    ZERO is a Norwegian environmental organization that focuses on greenhouse gas reduction through promotion of new technologies enabling emission-free energy solutions without harming the environment. ZERO is an independent, environmental foundation that believes that climate is the most important environmental issue, and is working to drive zero-emission solutions and investment in emissions-solving solutions. ZERO's mission is to ensure a practical and fastest possible transition from climate-detrimental activity to emission-free solutions, according to ZERO's website.

    UPM is committed to growing its sustainable product offering for various sectors and therefore engages with civil society to promote the change towards environmental friendly bioeconomy, according to the company website. (Source: UPM, Energy Efficiency, 22 Jan., 2018) Contact: UPM Biofuels, Liisa Ranta, Manager Sustainability, +358 40 582 9338, www.upm.com, www.upmbiofuels.com; ZERO, Maiju Helin, Head of Sustainability and Market Development, +47 92 29 62 00, zero@zero.no, www.zero.no

    More Low-Carbon Energy News UPM Biofuels,  Zero Emission Resource Organisation ,  


    SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development, Commercialization Center Prototype Awarded $6.6Mn (Funding)
    SUNY Alfred
    Date: 2018-01-15
    Following on our June 19, 2017 coverage, Empire State Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced a further $6.6 million in grant funding for the proposed SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development and Commercialization Center (BDCC). The $14.2 million project previously received about $6.1 million in the form of four grants, from Empire State Development, the state Dormitory Authority, Appalachian Regional Commission and the federal Economic Development Administration.

    The grant funding will enable construction to begin on the biorefinery prototype, which could be operational within 24 months. The prototype will utilize a patented hot water extraction process to separate chemical byproducts from regionally sourced low-grade wood, biomass crops and agricultural residuals. In addition to acting as a training center, the BDCC will focus on forest conservation, industrial development and environmental preservation.

    Almost one-quarter of the facility's end product contains marketable sugars and chemicals that can be used as animal feed or turned into ethanol, methanol or acetic acid. The remaining thee-quarters is chipped wood with a superior cellulose quality that can be turned into high-end pellets for home heating, composite lumber, or other products such as biodegradable plastic, cellulosic nano materials, platform bio-chemicals, food additives, advanced technology biomaterials, biofuels and acetic acid. (Source: SUNY Alfred, Oleans Time Herald, 12 Jan., 2018) Contact: Alfred State Univ., SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development and Commercialization Center , (800)425-3733, www.alfredstate.edu; Appalachian Regional Commission, (202) 884-7700, www.arc.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet,  Alfred State College,  SUNY,  Biorefining,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  Bioproducts,  


    Greenbelt Testing Wine Waste as Biofuel Feedstocks (Ind. Report)
    Greenbelt Resources
    Date: 2017-10-27
    In the Golden State, Paso Robles-based Greenbelt Resources Corporation reports it will work with Santa Maria, California-headquartered Central Coast Wine Services (CCWS) to test various wine making wastes for potential use as feedstock for Greenbelt's "Paso Robles ECOsystem" (PRECO) waste-to-energy project. The project will convert local wastes into bioethanol and other products.

    Other waste derived-feedstocks tested or being tested include pomegranate husks, mandarin oranges, pistachio hulls, bagels, brewery wastes, sweet potatoes, sugar beets, and a variety of waste sugar and/or alcohol containing beverages. (Source: Greenbelt Resources Corporation, PR, Markets Insider, 24 Oct., 2017) Contact: Greenbelt Resources, Darren Eng, CEO, www.greenbeltresources.com; Central Coast Wine Services, (805) 318-6500, http://centralcoastwineservices.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Greenbelt Resources ,  Biofuel Feedstock,  Biofuel,  Bioproducts,  


    Center for Low-Cost Biofuels, Biochemicals Funded (R&D Funding)

    Date: 2017-10-23
    Northwestern-led center receives $12 million grant from US Department of Energy Northwestern Engineering will lead a new center dedicated to accelerating the production of sustainable, low-cost bio-fuels and chemicals. Called Northwestern University is reporting the multi-institutional Clostridia Foundry for Biosystems Design is being awarded a five-year, $12 million grant from the US Department of Energy. The center's researchers from Northwestern, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and waste-gas-to-fuel clean-energy specialist LanzaTech, will focus on clostridia, a bacterium that metabolizes carbon to produce fuel.

    The center's work will identify the enzymes and computationally predict biosynthetic pathways within clostridia that are necessary to produce biofuels, develop a technology platform for accelerating testing and pinpoint which iterations produce the highest yields, then demonstrate a Biosystems design approach to engineer clostridia for improved production of next-generation biofuels and bioproducts. (Source: Northwestern University Center for Synthetic Biology, Oct., 2017) Contact: Northwestern Center for Synthetic Biology, syntheticbiology.northwestern.edu; LanzaTech, Dr. Jennifer Holmgren, CEO, (630) 439-3050, jennifer@lanzatech.com, www.lanzatech.com; ORNL Center for Bioenergy Innovation, (865) 576-8141, www.ornl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Biochemical,  LanzaTech,  ORNL,  ,  


    Arizon Univ Funded for Biofuels, Bioproducts R&D (Funding, R&D)
    University of Arizona, Institute for Energy Solutions
    Date: 2017-10-20
    In Tuscon, the University of Arizona Institute for Energy Solutions reports receipt of up to $15 million over 5 years in grant funding from the USADA National Institute of Food and Agriculture to lead a new center focusing on the mass production of biofuels and bioproducts in the U.S. Southwest.

    The center will research guayule and guar, perennial desert shrubs that produce natural rubber and organic resins, as potential feedstocks for developing biofuel and high-value bioproducts such as rubber, polysaccharide and resin. Bridgestone Americas, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, New Mexico State University and the USDA Agricultural Research Servic are partnering in the research project. (Source: University of Arizona Research, Discovery and Innovation, Oct. 16, 2017) Contact: University of Arizona, Institute for Energy Solutions, Kimberly Ogden, Dir., (520) 621-2211, https://energy.arizona.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Arizona,  Biofuel,  Biofuel Feedstock,  Bioproducts,  Biochemical,  


    AVAPCO, BYOGY, Petron Tout Biorefinery Partnership (Ind. Report)
    AVAPCO, BYOGY, Petron Scientech
    Date: 2017-10-11
    The US DOE reports Phase 1 of the American Process Company (AVAPCO) Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts project to co-produce full replacement renewable jet fuel, gasoline, diesel and Bioplus® nanocellulose from woody biomass in an integrated biorefinery at AVAPCO's site in Thomaston, Georgia, is underway.

    The project is intended to demonstrate that co-production of high volume commodity fuels and low volume, high value co-products enables profitable biorefineries at commercial scale. ABBA integrates the biorefinery value chain by converting woody biomass to cellulose and cellulosic sugars, which are then converted to cellulosic biojet and nanocellulose.

    The project received $3.7 million support from the US DOE Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower program , the scope of which includes definition engineering, permitting and financing activities. Upon completion of Phase 1, the project will be eligible for up to $45 million in additional DOE support for project construction and operations.

    The project will utilize AVAPCO's AVAP technology for co-production of biomass-derived lignocellulosic sugars, cellulosic ethanol, cellulosic butanol, nanocellulose, and lignin to demonstrate the conversion of cellulosic ethanol to ethylene. The Byogy Alcohol-to-Jet (ATJ) processing facility has been relocated to the Thomaston site as part of the project to convert the bio-ethylene to full replacement biofuels.

    Petron Scientech Inc., headquartered in Princeton, New Jersey, is a Technology development, Design & Engineering and Consulting company licensing technology for the conversion of renewable ethanol to bioEthylene and further conversion of Ethylene to various derivatives including bioEthylene Oxide, bioGlycols, and other chemicals used in a wide range of day-to-day renewable plastics. (Source: AVAPCO, PR, 10 Oct., 2017) Contact: Byogy Renewables, Kevin Weiss CEO, (408) 800-7704, admin@byogy.com, www.byogy.com; AVAPCO, American Process Inc. , Kim Nelson, PhD, (4040 872-8807, ext 213, knelson@americanprocess.com, www.americanprocess.com; Petron Scientech, Yogendra Sarin, Pres. & CEO , (609) 919-0204, www.petronscientech.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News AVAPCO,  BYOGY,  Petron Scientech,  Aviation Biofuel,  Jet Biofuel,  


    J. Craig Venter-led Team Granted $10.7 Mn to Optimize Metabolic Networks Enabling Next-Gen. Biofuels (Funding, R&D)
    J. Craig Venter Institute
    Date: 2017-10-06
    In La Jolla, California, the not-for-profit J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) is reporting receipt of a 5-year, $10.7 million grant from the US DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Genomic Science Program to optimize metabolic networks in model photosynthetic microalgae, called diatoms. The aim is to substantially increase oil, or lipid production, enabling next-generation biofuels and other bioproducts.

    Building on prior synthetic biology and diatom research, methodologies will be developed and optimized for introducing and transplanting new biological functions into diatoms, which are a globally abundant class of algae. Initial modeling exercises will guide targeted genetic manipulations, associated systems biology experiments, and result in iterative network and genome-scale cellular modeling.

    Based on the photosynthetic efficiency and growth potential of microalgae, it is estimated that annual oil production of greater than 30,000 liters, or about 200 barrels of microalgal oil per hectare of land may be achievable in mass culture of oil-rich algae. This is 100-fold greater than that of soybeans, a major feedstock currently used for biodiesel. (Source: J. Craig Venter Institute, PR, 3 Oct., 2017) Contact: J. Craig Venter Institute, Andrew Allen, Ph.D. , (858) 200-1800, www.JCVI.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News AlgaeVenter Institute,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  


    CSU Funded for Better Algae Biofuels R&D (Funding, R&D)
    Colorado State University
    Date: 2017-10-04
    Colorado State University scientists are reporting receipt of as much as $3.5 million over three years in US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) funding for Rewiring Algal Carbon Energetics for Renewables aimed at improving how algae-based biofuels and bioproducts are made. The overall project goal set by the Department of Energy is to double the yield of biofuel precursors from algae to about 3,700 gallons per acre per year.

    Strategies to be used by the team to meet this goal include increasing algal cultivation productivity, optimizing biomass composition, and extracting and separating different types of algal lipids to reduce the cost of upgrading them to renewable diesel.The study will be led by scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado.

    The researchers will use an algae species called Desmodesmus armatus, and will focus on fundamental processes of efficiently channeling carbon dioxide into useful fuel intermediates. The project will work to ferment carbohydrates in the algal cells into chemicals of interest, including ethanol, as well as a fuel precursor called 2,3 butanediol.

    Other partners on the project will work on the algae-to-bioproduct life cycle, including modification of growing pond conditions, and separating algal solids from water to remove lipids.

    The multidisciplinary team includes CSU's Ken Reardon, professor of chemical and biological engineering; Graham Peers, associate professor of biology; and Jason Quinn, assistant professor of mechanical engineering; along with partners at National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines, Arizona State University, Utah State University, and representatives from industry. San Diego-based Sapphire Energy is a project partner and has pioneered the use of D. armatus for biofuels. (Source: Colorado State University, PR, 2 Oct., 2017) Contact: Colorado State University, Prof. Ken Reardon, kenneth.reardon@colostate.edu, www.colostate.edu; US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Colorado State University,  Sapphire Energy,  Algae,  Algal Biofuel,  BETO,  


    DOE Announces $22Mn Marine Biomass Production Funding (Funding)
    DOE ARPA-E
    Date: 2017-10-02
    On September 19, 2017, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced 18 projects from the Macroalgae Research Inspiring Novel Energy Resources (MARINER) program will receive $22 million in funding through the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). The MARINER projects aim to develop tools to address the technological challenges of efficiently and cost-effectively growing and harvesting macroalgae -- seaweed -- for use as a feedstock for biofuels and other bioproducts.

    The cross-disciplinary MARINER projects focus on transformative, systems-level improvements and engineering, including advanced research in farm design and autonomous operation, which draw on fields such as cultivation and harvesting systems, advanced components, computer modeling, aquatic monitoring, and advanced breeding and genetics tools.

    According to ARPA-E Acting Director Eric Rohlfing, "the United States has offshore resources capable of producing enough seaweed to handle as much as 10 pct of our demand for transportation fuel." The full list of the MARINER projects is available HERE.(Source: DOE ARPA-E, Nat. Law Review, 29 Sept., 2017) Contact: DOE ARPA-E, ARPA-E@hq.doe.gov, arpa-e.energy.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE ARPA-E,  Biofuel,  Seaweed,  


    $15Mn DOE Funding for Integrated Biorefineries R&D (Funding, R&D)
    DOE’s Bioenergy Technologies Office, BETO
    Date: 2017-09-22
    In Washington, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA are reporting the awarding of as much as $15 million to eight projects seeking to enhance the operations of integrated biorefineries and resolve R&D challenges needed for the "successful scale-up and reliable operations" of integrated biorefineries (IBRs). Other objectives will be to cut capital and operating costs and support the production of advanced or cellulosic biofuels and higher-value bioproducts.

    The projects will focus on: continuous handling of solid materials and feeding systems to reactors under various operating conditions; high-value products from waste in an integrated biorefinery; industrial separations within an integrated biorefinery; and analytical modeling of solid materials and reactor feeding systems.

    Thermochemical Recovery International Inc, Texas A&M Agrilife Research, White Dog Labs, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the South Dakota School of Mines, Forest Concepts, Clemson University and Purdue University are among the funding recipients. (Source: US DOE, BETO, Renewables Now, Others, 21 Sept., 2017) Contact: US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, https://nifa.usda.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biorefinery,  DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office,  BETO,  


    U. Illinois Touts New Jet Biofuels Feedstock (New Prod. & Tech.)
    University of Illinois
    Date: 2017-09-13
    Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign estimate that a Boeing 747, which burns one gallon of jet fuel per second, could fly for 10 hours on "lipidcane" bio-jet fuel produced on 54 acres of specially engineered sugarcane.

    The University's Plants Engineered to Replace Oil in Sugarcane and Sweet Sorghum (PETROSS) project, funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), developed sugarcane that produces oil (lipidcane) that can be converted into biodiesel or jet fuel in place of sugar that is currently used for ethanol production.

    The research project analyzed the economic viability of crops with different levels of oil. Lipidcane with 5 pct oil produces four times more jet fuel -- 416 gallons -- per hectare than soybeans. Sugarcane with 20 pct oil produces 1,666 gallons per hectare more than soybeans.

    "We estimate that this biofuel would cost the airline industry $5.31/gallon, which is less than most of the reported prices of renewable jet fuel produced from other oil crops or algae," according to Deepak Kumar, a postdoctoral researcher at Illinois, who led the analysis. This crop also produces a hydrocarbon fuel along with bio-jet fuel or biodiesel that can be used to produce various bioproducts. The remaining sugar could be sold or used to produce ethanol and biorefineries could use lipidcane bagasse to produce steam and electricity. (Source: Univ. of Illinois, Eureka Alert, 11 Sept., 2017) Contact: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology; PETROSS, Stephen Long, (217) 244-2999, wwww.igb.illinois.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aviation Biofuel,  Jet Biofuel,  Biofuel Feedstock,  


    DOE Reports Additional $8.8Mn for Algae Tech. Innovations (R&D)
    DOE ,BETO
    Date: 2017-09-11
    The U.S. Department of Energy is reporting the selection of four additional projects from the Productivity Enhanced Algae and ToolKits funding opportunity to receive up to $8.8 million for projects that will deliver high-impact tools and techniques for increasing the productivity of algae organisms in order to reduce the costs of producing algal biofuels and bioproducts. The funding for this initiative now totals over $16 million.

    The organizations selected include:

  • The Colorado School of Mines, in partnership with Global Algae Innovations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Colorado State University, will improve the productivity of wild algal strains using advanced directed evolution approaches in combination with high-performance, custom-built, solar simulation bioreactors;

  • The University of California, San Diego, will develop genetic tools, high-throughput screening methods, and breeding strategies for green algae and cyanobacteria, targeting robust production strains;

  • The University of Toledo, in partnership with Montana State University and the University of North Carolina, will cultivate microalgae in high-salinity and high-alkalinity media to achieve productivities without needing to add concentrated carbon dioxide;

  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will ecologically engineer algae to encourage growth of bacteria that efficiently remineralize dissolved organic matter to improve carbon dioxide uptake and simultaneously remove excess oxygen. (Source: US DOE BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE BETO,  Algae,  Algal Biofuel,  Algae Biofuel,  


  • Univ. Guelph Bioproducts Researchers Score Funding (Ind. Report)
    University of Guelph
    Date: 2017-08-16
    Guelph Researchers Score $630,000 Funding (Ind. Report) In Ontario, Canada, the University of Guelph reports it has received more than $630,000 in funding from the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) John Evans Leaders Fund for projects ranging from health to converting agri-food waste into energy.

    Among the funding recipients, engineering professor Animesh Dutta will receive $177,127 from CFI. Along with engineering professors Shohel Mahmud and Emily Chiang, he will study how to turn agri-food waste into bioproducts including bio-carbon, a potential replacement for coal, bio-oil, a possible substitute for petroleum, and syngas, an alternative for natural gas. (Source: University of Guelph, PR, Guelph Today, 15 Aug., 2017)Contact: University of Guelph, Prof, Animesh Dutta, (519) 824-4120, www.uoguelph.ca

    More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Guelph,  Biofuel,  Bioenergy,  


    DOE BETO Announces Fourth MEGA-BIO Award (Ind. Report)
    DOE BETO,Michigan State University
    Date: 2017-08-04
    The U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has announced it will award a fourth project -- up to $1.8 million -- under the MEGA-BIO: Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels Funding Opportunity. In August 2016, BETO selected three projects for an initial round of funding. The total funding for the four MEGA-BIO awards is $13.1 million.

    Michigan State University was selected to manage the fourth project, which will work in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and MBI International to optimize a two-stage process for deconstruction of biomass into two clean intermediate streams: sugars for the production of hydrocarbon fuels and lignins for the production of multiple value-added chemicals and as a feedstock for renewable bichemicals.

    All four projects are supporting the development of biomass-to-hydrocarbon biofuels conversion pathways that can produce variable amounts of fuels and/or products based on external factors, such as market demand. Producing high-value bioproducts alongside cost-competitive biofuels has the potential to support a positive return on investment for a biorefinery through converting biomass to where it is most impactful. Producing value-added coproducts is an approach to achieving DOE's strategic goal of producing hydrocarbon fuels at $3 per gasoline gallon equivalent. (Source: US DOE, 2 Aug., 2017) Contact: BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; US DOE EERE, http://energy.gov/eere

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biochemical,  BETO,  DOE EERE,  Biochemical,  Biofuel,  


    Univ. of Illinois Awarded $104Mn for Bioenergy Crop R&D (Funding)
    Univ. of Illinois Center for Advanced Bioenergy & Bioproducts Innovation
    Date: 2017-07-24
    The U.S. DOE reports it is awarding a total of $104 million over 5 years to the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign for biofuel-bioenergy research and development under the school's new Center for Advanced Bioenergy & Bioproducts Innovation.

    The federal government funding is aimed at further developing bioenergy crops crops that can be converted into biofuels, lubricants and other products more efficiently. Researchers are hoping to treat the bioenergy crops themselves as factories, coming up with ways to get them to grow desired products internally, such as oils or triglycerides, rather than being turned into high-value end products later. For example, field grasses have attracted researchers' attention because they come back year after year and are efficient plants. (Source: Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Crains, 20 July, 2017) Contact: Univ. of Illinois Center for Advanced Bioenergy & Bioproducts Innovation, bioenergy@illinois.edu Vijay Singh, Director, vsingh@illinois.edu; Brian Jacobson, Pilot Plant Systems Analyst, bjacobs3@illinois.edu; http://bioenergy.illinois.edu www.illinois.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  


    ORNL Biofuels, Bioproducts R&D Receives Funding (Ind. Report)
    ORNL
    Date: 2017-07-19
    The US DOE reports it has chosen the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Center for Bioenergy Innovation (CBI) as one of four bioenergy centers to receive funding to advance a new bio-based economy with the production of fuels and other products directly from nonfood biomass. The DOE will provide a total of $40 million in initial funding for the four centers in Fiscal Year 2018, with plans for a total five years of funding.

    CBI will focus on the creation of high-yielding biofuel feedstock plants, using genetic studies to accelerate the domestication of perennial plants. CBI will create biocatalytic methods for high-yield production of advanced biofuels that can be blended with existing transportation fuels. The Center will also study ways to develop valuable byproducts from lignin left over after biomass processing.

    CBI will work with partners from the University of Georgia, NREL, Dartmouth College, GreenWood Resources, MIT, Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, University of California-Riverside, University of Colorado-Boulder, Penn State and others. (Source: US DOE, ORNL, 17 July, 2017) Contact: ORNL Center for Bioenergy Innovation, Gerald Tuskan, (865) 576-8141, tuskanga@ornl.gov, www.ornl.gov; US DOE Office of Science, http://science.energy.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ORNL,  Biofuel Feedstock,  


    Berkeley Joint BioEnergy Institute Funding Renewed (Funding)

    Date: 2017-07-19
    The US DOE's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI), led by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), reports it has been selected as one of four DOE Bioenergy Research Centers (BRCs) to share in $40 million DOE funding in support of biofuels and bioproducts R&D. The funding is part of the the Office of Biological and Environmental Research within DOE's Office of Science.

    JBEI was among three BRCs established by DOE a decade ago to accelerate fundamental research in advanced, next-generation biofuels, and to make such technology cost-effective and widely available. The other two centers were the BioEnergy Science Center, led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison in partnership with Michigan State University.

    To date, JBEI research has yielded 672 peer-reviewed publications, 85 licenses, 23 patents, and five startups. JBEI has contributed to many scientific achievements, including: engineering bioenergy crops to increase sugar-containing polymers and decrease lignin in plant cell walls; developing an affordable and scalable ionic liquid pretreatment technology; developing microbial routes for the conversion of biomass-derived sugars into advanced, "drop-in" blendstocks for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. (Source: JBEL, PR, 17 July, 2017) Contact: LBL, www.lbl.gov; DOE Office of Science, science.energy.gov


    DOE Awards $8Mn for Algal Biofuel, Products R&D (Funding, R&D)
    Sapphire Energy,Lumen Bioscience
    Date: 2017-07-14
    The U.S. DOE recently announced the selection of three projects to receive up to $8 million to support research aimed at reducing the costs of producing algal biofuels and bioproducts. The following projects will deliver high-impact tools and techniques for increasing the productivity of algae organisms and cultures:
  • Seattle, Washington-based Lumen Bioscience will work with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to engineer strains that grow in seawater, resist contamination and predation, and accumulate substantial amounts of energy-rich components. Lumen Bioscience is focusing on agricultural production of algae on otherwise non-productive land in rural eastern Washington State, with the ultimate goal of creating new agricultural jobs in that region.

  • El Cajon, California-headquartered Global Algae Innovations in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories, University of California at San Diego's Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and the J. Craig Venter Institute will deliver a tool for low cost, rapid analysis of algae pond microbiota, gather data on the impacts of pond ecology, and develop new cultivation methods that utilize this information to achieve greater algal productivity.

  • Los Alamos National Laboratory, working with San Diego-based Sapphire Energy Inc. at its Las Cruces, New Mexico, field site, will evaluate designed pond cultures containing multiple species of algae, as well as beneficial bacteria, to achieve consistent biomass composition and high productivity. This project will help the algal R&D community better understand these metrics at commercial scales.

    The DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy accelerates research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies and innovative solutions that strengthen U.S. energy security and economic vitality, while preserving our natural resources. The Bioenergy Technologies Office contributes to EERE's mission by working with industry, academia, and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in algal biofuels technologies. (Source: US DOE, 11 July, 2017) Contact: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, https://energy.gov/eere/office-energy-efficiency-renewable-energy; Bioenergy Technologies Office , https://energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; Lumen Bioscience Inc., www.lumenbioscience.com; Sapphire Energy Inc., www.sapphireenergy.com; Global Algae Innovations, www.globalgae.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algal Biofuels,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Sapphire Energy,  Lumen Bioscience ,  


  • Aviation Biofuel Research Progressing at Penn State (Ind. Report)
    Penn State University
    Date: 2017-06-28

    According to Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences professor of bioproducts, Prof. Paul Smith, developing the capability to produce the huge volume of ASTM-certified, high-energy, dense biofuels needed by the airlines, and the logistics to handle the massive amount of feedstocks necessary has been a slow process. And now, oil prices in the low $40-a-barrel range are bogging the process down further, as the cost differential between petrojet and biojet widens and thus increases capital risk.

    Smith's lab is part of a group that is evaluating regional supply chains that could be used for alternative jet fuel production, including feedstock production, transportation and fuel conversion. Researchers are examining fuel-production pathways, feedstock and infrastructure requirements, and commercial fuel demand to create scenarios for future production as well as identifying potential intermediate materials and co-products for each pathway to understand potential ways to aid in making biorefineries more economical. The project aims to identify key barriers that must be overcome throughout the alternative-jet-fuel supply chain to produce and effectively market 1 billion gpy of alternative jet fuel in the near term and 10 billion gpy in the longer term. The goal, Smith pointed out, has been to produce aviation biofuel from non-edible lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as timber harvests and crop residuals.

    Penn State is part of a cooperative aviation research consortium known as the Center of Excellence for Alternative Jet Fuels and Environment, funded by the FAA, NASA, the Department of Defense, the EPA and Transport Canada. Led by Washington State University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the group is a coalition of 16 leading U.S. research universities and more than 60 private-sector stakeholders committed to reducing the environmental impact of aviation. (Source: Penn State University, PR, 26 June, 2017) Contact: Penn State College of Agricultural Science, Prof. Paul Smith, (814) 865-8841, pms6@psu.edu, http://agsci.psu.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Jet Biofuel,  Aviation Biofuel,  Penn State University,  Biofuel,  


    Shuttered Paper Mill Considered for Biofuel Production (Ind. Report)
    Biofine Technology
    Date: 2017-05-15
    Further to our May 8th coverage, shuttered paper mill in Old Town, Maine, is being considered by Biofine Framingham, Mass.-based Biofine Technology LLC as the future the site of a $60 million production facility to turn wood fiber into jet fuel.

    Using technology developed by the University of Maine's Forest Bioproducts Research Institute, the Biofine plant could convert 200 tpd of biomass into 12,000 tons of crude oil for processing into diesel and jet fuel. The mill site includes a pulp mill, a 400,000-square-foot warehouse, and a biomass boiler.

    The company, which hopes to break ground in a year, says it is negotiating with the mill's owner and seeking investors and financing. (Source: Biofine Technology, Woodworking Network, 10 May, 2017) Contact: Biofine Technology, Stephen Fitzpatrick, (508) 532-6760, http://biofinetechnology.com; University of Maine, Hemant Pendse, Director of Bioproduct Research, www.aiche.org/community/bio/hemant-pendse

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofine Technology,  Biofuel,  


    ANL, Roeslein Test Wastewater Sludge-to-RNG Tech. (Ind. Report)
    Argonne National Laboratory,Roeslein Alternative Energy
    Date: 2017-03-06
    The U.S. DOE's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) reports it has developed technology that synergistically uses two waste biomass streams to generate two bioproducts. The technology enhances the process of anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge by incorporating biomass-derived, carbon-sequestering char within the digester, thus creating pipeline-quality renewable natural gas and a biochar co-product.

    ANL has demonstrated success using biochar from gasification of both corn stover and woody sources. Anaerobic digestion usually creates biogas that is mainly a combination of CO2 and methane, and extra steps are required to upgrade the biogas to renewable natural gas by removing the CO2 and other contaminants. Adding biochar directly to the anaerobic digester sequesters the CO2 and creates a biogas stream that is more than 90 pct methane and less than 5 ppb hydrogen sulfide, thus reducing the need for upgrading steps.

    ANL is preparing to scale up the technology with Roeslein Alternative Energy, a company experienced at operating large-scale digester facilities to produce renewable natural gas ecologically and economically. The company plans to perform field demonstrations during 2017 and drive the commercialization of the technology.

    The project received $1.5 million funding from the U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) which supports the development of sustainable, cost-competitive biofuels and bioproducts from cellulosic biomass. (Source: Argonne National Laboratory, U.S. Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, March 01, 2017) Contact: US DOE BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; Roeslein Alternative Energy, Rudi Roeslein, Pres., Chris Roach, Proj. Dev., (314) 729-0055, croach@roesleinae.com, www.roesleinalternativeenergy.com; Argonne National Laboratory, (630) 252-2000, www.anl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Argonne National Laboratory,  Roeslein Alternative Energy,  Renewable Natural Gas,  Methane,  anaerobic digestion,  


    Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities -- DOE Report Attached (Ind. Report)
    US DOE,BETO
    Date: 2017-01-23
    The U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is reporting the the publication of Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities, a comprehensive assessment of the resource potential and technology opportunities provided by feedstocks including wastewater treatment-derived sludge and biosolids, animal manure, food waste, inedible fats and greases, biogas, and carbon dioxide streams. These feedstocks can be converted into renewable natural gas, diesel, and aviation fuels, or into valuable bioproducts.

    The report, conducted by the NREL and PNNL national labs , concludes that wet and gaseous organic waste streams represent a substantial and underutilized set of feedstocks for biofuels and biopower. The analysis found that the U.S. has the potential to use 77 million dry tons of wet waste per year, which would generate about 1,300 trillion Btu of energy. Also, gaseous feedstocks and other feedstocks assessed in the report could produce an additional 1,300 trillion Btu of energy, bringing the total to nearly 2.6 quadrillion Btu annually. For perspective, in 2015, the U.S. total primary energy consumption was about 97.7 quadrillion Btu.

    The reports notes that wet and gaseous waste streams are presently available in abundance and unlikely to diminish in the near future.

    Download the full Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities report HERE. (Source: U.S. DOE, 17 Jan., 2017) Contact: BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BETO,  Biomass,  Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  NREL,  PNNL,  


    BETO Releases Analysis of Biofuels, Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams Report -- Report Attached (Ind. Report)
    US DOE BETO
    Date: 2017-01-16
    The U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is reporting the release of its new report Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities.

    The report is the first comprehensive assessment of the resource potential and technology opportunities provided by feedstocks, including wastewater treatment-derived sludge and biosolids, animal manure, food waste, inedible fats and greases, biogas, and carbon dioxide streams. These feedstocks can be converted into renewable natural gas, diesel, and aviation fuels, or into valuable bioproducts.

    Complementary to the 2016 Billion-Ton Report, this new resource assessment, conducted by NREL and PNNL, concludes that wet and gaseous organic waste streams represent a substantial and underutilized set of feedstocks for biofuels and biopower. The analysis found that the United States has the potential to use 77 million dry tons of wet waste per year, which would generate about 1,300 trillion Btu of energy. Also, gaseous feedstocks, which cannot be "dried" and therefore cannot be reported in dry tons, and other feedstocks assessed in the report could produce an additional 1,300 trillion Btu of energy -- bringing the total to nearly 2.6 quadrillion Btu annually. For perspective, in 2015, the U.S. total primary energy consumption was about 97.7 quadrillion Btu.

    Access Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities HERE. Download the 2016 Billion-Ton Report HERE. (Source: US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, Jan., 2017)Contact: US DOE BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BETO,  Biorefinery,  Biofuel,  DOE EERE,  


    Anaerobic Digestion Enhancing Tech. Touted (New Prod & Tech)
    anaerobic digestion, Argonne National Laboratory
    Date: 2017-01-16
    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) reports it has developed technology that synergistically uses two waste biomass streams to generate two bioproducts. The technology enhances the process of anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge by incorporating biomass-derived, carbon-sequestering char within the digester, thus creating pipeline-quality renewable natural gas while using the remaining biosolids for a high-quality fertilizer.

    With $1.5 million over three years funding from the U.S. DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) ANL has developed and "de-risked" the technology, which is now ready for scale-up.

    Biochar, charcoal derived from plant material, is created in processes such as gasification and pyrolysis, which also produce energy in the form of syngas or liquid fuels. ANL has demonstrated success using biochar from gasification of both corn stover and woody sources. Anaerobic digestion usually creates biogas that is mainly a combination of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, and extra steps are required to upgrade the biogas to renewable natural gas by removing the CO2 and other contaminants. Adding biochar directly to the anaerobic digester sequesters the CO2 and creates a biogas stream that is more than 90 pct methane and less than 5 ppb hydrogen sulfide, thus reducing the need for upgrading steps. The biochar also improves many of the operating conditions for anaerobic digestion, and can serve as a high-quality fertilizer.

    ANL and Roeslein Alternative Energy preparing to scale up the technology to produce renewable natural gas ecologically and economically. The technology could dramatically improve the economics of anaerobic digestion projects. The reduction of upgrading steps alone could make many smaller biogas projects become profitable. The technology further reduces capital and operating expenses by improving digester conditions and producing fertilizer, which would provide even greater economic benefit. (Source: U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, 12 Jan., 2017) Contact: US DOE BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; Roeslein Alternative Energy, Rudi Roeslein, Pres., Chris Roach, Proj. Dev., (314) 729-0055, croach@roesleinae.com, www.roesleinalternativeenergy.com; Argonne National Laboratory, (630) 252-2000, www.anl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Argonne National Laboratory,  Roeslein Alternative Energy,  BETO,  anaerobic digestion ,  Energy,  Biogas,  


    DOE Funds Pilot- and Demo-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower Projects (Funding)
    DOE EERE
    Date: 2017-01-02
    The US DOE EERE reports the selection of six projects for up to $12.9 million in federal funding under its Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower program.

    The funded projects are required to share the cost at a minimum of 50 pct and to develop and execute plans for the manufacturing of advanced or cellulosic biofuels, bioproducts, refinery-compatible intermediates, and/or biopower in a domestic pilot- or demonstration-scale integrated biorefinery. Projects could receive additional federal funds of up to $15 million for pilot-scale facilities or $45 million for demonstration-scale facilities.

    The following projects will utilize thermochemical, biochemical, algal, and hybrid conversion technologies to generate the data required to enable future commercial-scale facilities:

  • Atlanta-based AVAPCO, LLC will receive $3.7 million to develop a demonstration-scale integrated biorefinery that combines AVAPCO's biomass-to-ethanol process with project partner Byogy’s alcohol-to-jet process to create an integrated process that produces jet fuel from woody biomass.

  • LanzaTech, Inc. based in Skokie, Illinois will receive $4 million to design, construct, and operate an integrated demonstration-scale biorefinery that will use industrial waste gases to produce 3 million gpy of low-carbon jet and diesel fuels.

  • Global Algae Innovations of San Diego will receive $1.2 million to design a pilot-scale algae biofuel facility with improved productivity of open pond cultivation and more energy-efficient algae harvest.

  • Baltimore-based ThermoChem Recovery International, Inc. is receiving $800 to work in collaboration with project partners to design a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery to produce transportation fuels from woody waste and agricultural feedstocks. The project proposes many improvements throughout the system, which in combination would allow for smaller, more cost-effective integrated biorefineries with increased liquid fuel yield.

  • In Carlsbad, California, Rialto Bioenergy, will receive $2 million to design the Rialto Advanced Pyrolysis Integrated Biorefinery facility that will have the capacity to convert 300 tpd of biomass such as food extracted from municipal solid waste and wastewater treatment plant biosolids into up to 6.4 megawatts of carbon-negative, renewable biopower.

  • The Water Environment & Reuse Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia will receive $1.2 million to design a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery thatl converts residual sludge and solids into biocrude oil, biogas, and fertilizer. (Source: DOE EERE, PR Jan., 2017)Contact: US DOE EERE, http://energy.gov/eere

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algal,  Algae,  DOE EERE,  Biofuel,  Bioenergy,  Bioproducts,  Cellulosic,  


  • BETO Announces Integrated Biorefinery Optimization Funding Notice of Intent (Funding, R&D)

    Date: 2016-12-07
    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) reports it intends to issue, on behalf of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, a funding opportunity announcement entitled, Integrated Biorefinery Optimization.

    The funding will support R&D to increase the performance efficiencies of biorefineries resulting in continuous operation and production of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower at prices competitive with fossil-derived equivalents. This could be accomplished by improvements in ensuring reliable, continuous, robust handling and feeding of solid materials into reactors under various operating conditions; decreased capital and operating expenses by improved separation processes; production of higher-value products from waste or other undervalued streams; and analytical modeling of handling and feeding of solid materials into reactors.

    Applications that address these challenging operations and convert woody biomass, agricultural residues, dedicated energy crops, algae, municipal solid waste, sludge from wastewater treatment plants, and wet wastes into biofuels, biochemicals, and bioproducts will be considered under this funding opportunity.

    Download details HERE. (Source: US DOE EERE, Dec., 2016)Contact: BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BETO,  Biorefinery,  Biofuel,  DOE EERE,  

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