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Neste, LyondellBasell Tout Joint Bioplastic Production (Ind. Report)
LyondellBasell, Neste
Date: 2019-06-19
Rotterdam, Netherlands-based chemicals and plastics manufacturer LyondellBasell (LYB) and Helsinki-headquartered renewable diesel maker Neste have jointly announced the first parallel production of bio-based polypropylene and bio-based low-density polyethylene from sustainable bio-based raw materials at a commercial scale.

The joint project combined Neste's renewable feedstock and LyondellBasell's technical capabilities. LyondellBasell's cracker flexibility allowed it to introduce a new renewable feedstock at its Wesseling, Germany site, which was converted directly into bio-based polyethylene and bio-based polypropylene. (Source: LyondellBasell, PR, CISION, 18 June, 2019) Contact: LyondellBasell , www.LyondellBasell.com; Neste, +358 10 458 4128, www.neste.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News LyondellBasell,  Neste,  Bioplastic ,  


Avantium Plans 2023 Bioplastics Plant Opening (Ind. Report)
Avantium
Date: 2019-06-14
In the Netherlands, Amsterdam-based renewable chemicals specialist Avantium reports it is advancing its planned production of furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and polyethylene furanoate (PEF) bio-based polymers at a new bioplastics plant that is slated for opening in 2023.

Avantium's YXY plant-to-plastics process catalytically converts plant-based sugars into a wide range of chemicals and plastics, such as bio-based PEF.

Avantium also notes it has assumed full ownership of the Synvina bioplastics business from joint venture partner, the German chemicals giant BASF, and has rebranded the operation as Avantium Renewable Polymers. Synvina was formed in 2016 to commercialise the YXY technology developed by Avantium to produce PEF-building block FDCA. (Source: Avantium, BioMarket Insights, 13 June, 2019) Contact: Avantium, Tom van Aken , CEO, +31 (0)20 586 8080, www.avantium.com; Synvina, hello@synvina.com, www.synvina.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News BASF,  Synvina,  Avantium ,  Bioplastic,  


Attis Creating NY Ethanol Plant Green Tech Campus (Ind Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2019-06-07
Following up on our previous coverage, Georgia-based Attis Industries Inc. reports its recently acquired Sunoco LP's nameplate 100-million gpy corn ethanol plant and grain malting operation in Fulton, New York, will become the centerpiece of its proposed Green Tech Campus. The company will focus on byproduct optimization of the corn ethanol plant and the new production of advanced biofuels and biobased products while also looking to generate "green" power, thus reducing the overall carbon footprint of the Fulton campus and taking advantage of valuable carbon credits to increase the site's profitability.

Attis plans to immediately begin the process of deploying its patented biorefinery technology to further diversify the biofuel and biobased product manufacturing at the campus. Attis will convert extracted locally sourced woody biomass pulp into cellulosic fuels and lignin into bioplastics, carbon fiber and advanced biofuels like renewable diesel and jet fuel.

Attis also aims to improve the quality and volume of co-products currently being produced at the Fulton ethanol plant by implementing its patented and licensed corn oil extraction technology that will almost double the current corn oil production yields at the plant and provide an augmented revenue stream. (Source: Attis Industries, DTN, June, 2019) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Attis Industries,  Ethanol,  Sunoco LP,  


Anellotech Bio-TCat Hits Commercially-Targeted Yields (Ind Report)
Anellotech
Date: 2019-05-08
Pearl River, New York-based renewable chemicals, bioplastics and fuels from non-food biomass producer Anellotech reports its patented Thermal Catalytic Biomass Conversion technology -- Bio-TCat -- has achieved commercially-targeted yields in its TCat-8 pilot unit in Silsbee, Texas during six months of continuous process operations.

Bio-TCat technology produces a mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene (AnelloMate BTX), which are bio-based and chemically identical to petroleum-derived counterparts. Bio-TCat technology also produces AnelloMate Distillate, a heavier aromatics product that can be upgraded into a high-quality biofuels blendstock for jet or diesel transportation fuel using conventional refinery processing. Cellulosic ethanol or hydrogen can be made from Bio-TCat's carbon monoxide co-product by using third-party technology.

Anellotech is planning construction of its first commercial plant and is engaging in partnership and funding discussions with existing and new strategic partners. The plant will be capable of processing 500 bone-dry tonnes/day of loblolly pine wood into 40,000 tpy of products including benzene, toluene, xylenes, and C9+ aromatics to use as fuels or for production of bio-based plastics for packaging and consumer products. (Source: Anellotech, PR, GreenCar Congress, 7 May, 2019) Contact: Anellotech Inc., David Sudolsky, Pres., (845) 735-7700, DSudolsky@anellotech.com, www.anellotech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Anellotech ,  


Bio3Gen Touts Wastewater Algae-to-Biofuel Technology (Ind. Report)
Bio3Gen,Purdue University
Date: 2019-04-05
In West Lafayette, Indiana, Purdue University affiliate startup Gen3Bio reports it is advancing a unique way to transform algae used to purify municipal wastewater into specialty bio-based chemicals such as biofuels or bioplastics. The company's "patented enzyme technology breaks open the algae and takes out the sugars, fats and proteins, and converts those into specialty chemicals. It's a way to keep the carbon cycle going by renewing the use of the algae into useful and safe products," according to Bio3Gen founder and CEO Kelvin Okamoto.

Gen3Bio has been accepted into two accelerator programs focused on advancing new environmentally friendly technologies -- the BREW in Milwaukee and Carbontech Labs in San Francisco.

The BREW accelerator, sponsored by The Water Council, focuses on fresh water, wastewater treatment and water treatment technologies.The BREW accelerator offers selected companies $50,000 in funds, connections to office and research space, and access to mentors. At the end of the program in June, Gen3bio, along with the other participants, will pitch their technologies to a panel of investors.

Gen3Bio received assistance from the Purdue Foundry, a startup accelerator that works with any Indiana-based company. The technology is patented and exclusively licensed from the University of Toledo. (Source: Gen3Bio, Purdue News Service, 4 April, 2019) Contact: Gen3Bio, Kelvin Okamoto, kokamoto@gen3bio.com; Purdue Research Foundation, Tom Coyne, (765) 588-1044, tjcoyne@prf.org, www.prf.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bio3Gen,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Purdue University ,  


Plant Based Biomass Products Council Launched (Ind. Report)
Plant Based Products Council
Date: 2019-02-04
The newly formed Plant Based Products Council (PBPC), a group of organizations working to promote the adoption and use of products derived from renewable biomass, has reported its official launch. The industry organization will seek plant-based solutions and bring together government, nonprofit, and corporate entities to address environmental challenges while driving economic opportunity.

The new council's membership includes businesses of varying sizes from across the United States that produce, distribute, or sell products or packaging from renewable biomass inputs as well as organizations that made related public sustainability commitments.

Members include Tate & Lyle, Georgia-Pacific, Archer Daniels Midland, and Cargill, Ingredion, WestRock-Multi Packaging Solutions, Stone Straw, Loliware, Visolis Biotechnology, Newtrient, Future iQ, Emerald Brands, Hemp Road Trip, Hemp Industries Association, and Tree Free Hemp.

The PBPC advisory board includes GreenBlue, Californians Against Waste, International Conservation Caucus Foundation, University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and Professor Ramani Narayan, of Michigan State University's Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science.

According to the council's website, plant-based products are derived from sustainable biomass found on six continents. Feedstocks include agricultural residues, algae, bamboo, cassava, dent corn, palm leaf, rice husk, soybeans, sugar beet, sugarcane and wood. (Source: PBPC, Feb., 2019) Contact: PBPC, www.pbpc.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Bioplastic,  


Competitive Green Technologies Wins $500K Fed Funding (Funding)
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Date: 2018-11-26
In Ottawa, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), a federal agency reports it is investing $499,433 in Stapels, Ontario-based Competitive Green Technologies in its quest to develop a new biocomposite material from resin and natural fibres derived from agricultural bio-waste.

The company is working with the University of Guelph's Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre (BDDC) in Ontario.

According to the release, the global bioplastics and biocomposites sector is entering the plastics market at an annual growth rate of 30 pct. (Source: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, PR, 23 Nov., 2018) Contact: Competitive Green Technologies, Mike Tiessen, Pres., (519) 329-2525, www.competitivegreentechnologies.com; Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, (855)773-0241, (613) 773-1081, info@agr.gc.ca, www.agr.gc.ca/eng/home/?id=1395690825741; University of Guelph's Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Dr. Amar Mohanty, (519) 824.4120 X 56664, mohanty@uoguelph.ca, www.bioproductscentre.com, www.uoguelph.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biowate,  Bioplastics,  


Attis Industries Launches Bio-Based Technologies Video (Ind. Report)
Attis Industries
Date: 2018-11-07
Milton, Georgia-based Attis Industries, Inc. is reporting the launch of a video series on the technologies and bio-based products offered under the company's Innovations division. The video discusses the current inefficiencies in biomass processing and how the Company is taking the next steps to double the biofuel output from biomass.

The transcript of the video states in part: "Our [processing] outputs include pulp and a unique form of high purity lignin. While the pulp can be used in traditional pulp and paper markets or to produce cellulosic ethanol, it's this high purity form of lignin that allows Attis to substantially increase the value and products made from biomass. For every 1.0 pound of cellulosic ethanol produced, Attis is able to recover about 1.3 pounds of high purity lignin. This is an alarming amount of highly concentrated carbon, captured from carbon dioxide and stored by photsyntheisis in plants, that has been overlooked for decades. Attis plans to convert its lignin into transportation fuels such as gasoline, diesel and/or jet fuel which could double the fuel output of biomass, or to convert the lignin into various materials such as plastics, adhesives or carbon fiber."

Link to video HERE. (Source: Attis Industries, Inc. PR, 5 Nov., 2018) Contact: Attis Ind., Jeff Cosman, CEO, 678-580-5661, www.attisind.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biomass,  Attis Industries ,  Bioplastic,  Biofuel,  Bio Technologies,  


Anellotech Announces Commercial Bio-TCat Progress (Ind. Report)
Anellotech
Date: 2018-10-19
Pearl River, New York-based renewable chemicals, bioplastics and fuels from non-food biomass producer Anellotech is confirming progress in its Bio-TCat technology development program . The company is planning to scale-up design and engineering of a commercial plant with its process development and design partner IFPEN and commercialization, engineering, and licensing partner Axens.

Anellotech's patented Bio-TCat thermal-catalytic technology produces a mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) which can be used in the production of polymers such as polyester, polycarbonate, and nylon, or high-octane gasoline blendstock. The company notes that co-product gas streams from Bio-TCat can be used to make significant amounts of renewable electricity, hydrogen or cellulosic ethanol using third party technologies. (Source: Anellotech, Public Release, Green Car Congress, 17 Oct., 2018)Contact: Anellotech Inc. David Sudolsky, Pres., (845) 735-7700, DSudolsky@anellotech.com, www.anellotech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Anellotech,  


Kreussler Earns USDA Certified Biobased Product Label (Ind Report)
USDA Certified Biobased Product
Date: 2018-06-13
In the Sunshine State, Tampa-based bio-hemicals firm Kreussler Inc. reports it has earned the USDA Certified Biobased Product Label for it's SOLVONK4 product. the Biobased Product Label identifies a product's percentage of biobased content.

Third-party verified Biobased Product Label is administered through the USDA BioPreferred Program, which aims to increase the development, purchase, and use of biobased products.

According to the USDA, biobased products contributed $393 billion to the U.S. economy in 2014, directly and indirectly supported 4.2 million jobs, and displaced up to 6.8 million barrels of oil. The BioPreferred Program spans a diverse range of applications including lubricants, cleaning products, chemicals, and bioplastics. More than 3,000 products have earned the USDA Certified Biobased Product label, (Source: Kesussler Inc., PR, 12 June, 2018) Contact: Kreussler Inc. Richard Fitzpatrick, VP, (603) 721-9478, richard.fitzpatrick@kreussler.com, www.kreussler.com; USDA BioPreferredĀ® Program, Vernell Thompson, 202.720.4145, Vernell.Thompson@dm.usda.gov; visit www.kreussler.com, SOURCE Kreussler Inc. USDA Certified Biobased Product Label, www.biopreferred.gov, http://twitter.com/BioPreferred.

More Low-Carbon Energy News USDA Certified Biobased Product,  Biochemical,  


Lignocellulosic Biorefinery Network UKBioChem10 Report (Ind. Report)
Lignocellulosic Biorefinery Network
Date: 2018-06-01
In the UK, the Lignocellulosic Biorefinery Network (LBNet) has released its new UKBioChem10 report. LBNet, a government-funded body tasked with fostering cross-disciplinary communities in the industrial biotechnology sector, supports the biotechnology sector and promotes novel bio-based chemical research.

The LBNet report identifies the top ten green alternatives to petroleum-based chemicals and urges the UK government to invest in specific plant-based chemicals to replace environmentally harmful plastics and petroleum products.

The LBNet is one of 13 collaborative Networks in Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy set up by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC NIBB) to boost interaction between academia and industry, and promote the translation of that research into benefits for the UK.

Download highlights from the UKBioChem10 report HERE. (Source: LBNet, May, 2018) Contact: LBNet,, Veronica Ongaro, +44 (0) 1904 328 761, veronica.ongaro@york.ac.uk, https://lb-net.net; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, https://bbsrc.ukri.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioplastic,  Biochemical,  Biofuel,  Lignocellulosic,  


Stora Enso Announces DuraSense Bio-Plastic (Int'l Report)
Stora Enso
Date: 2018-05-16
Finnish pulp and paper manufacturer Stora Enso is touting DuraSense, a new bio-based alternative to plastic. According to the company, its new DuraSense material -- which is made of wood fibres, polymers and additives -- will help meet market demand for greener plastics.

Stora Enso's bio-composites, which can be reused as a material up to seven times or recycled along with other plastic materials, can be used to make a wide range of goods, from car parts to kitchen utensils and bottle caps.

In 2018, Stora Enso invested €12 in bio-based material production, and claims it will be able to produce 15,000 tpy of DuraSense material at its Hylte Mill in Sweden. (Source: Stora Enso, Business Green, May, 2018) Contact: Stora Enso, Patricia Oddshammar, Head of bio-composites, Juan Carlos Bueno, EVP, +55 11 3065 5223, www.storaenso.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Stora Enso,  Bioplastic,  


ADM, DuPont Announce Biobased FDME Plant Opening (Ind. Report)
ADM, DuPont
Date: 2018-05-02
DuPont Industrial Biosciences and Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) are reporting the collaborative opening of the world's first biobased furan dicarboxylic methyl ester (FDME) pilot production facility in Decatur, Illinois. FDME technology, which starts with fructose from corn, is a more efficient and simple process than traditional conversion approaches and results in higher yields, lower energy usage and lower capital expenditures.

DuPont's proprietary Bio-PDO*trade; (1,3-propanediol). PTF is a 100 pct renewable polymer that, in bottling applications, can be used to create plastic bottles that are lighter-weight, more sustainable and better performing. (Source: ADM, DuPont, PR, World Grains, 1 May, 2018) Contact: DuPont Industrial Biosciences, www.biosciences.dupont.com; ADM, Juan Luciano, Pres., CEO, (312) 634-8100, Jackie Anderson, ADM Media, (217) 424-5413, media@adm.com, www.adm.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DuPont,  Archer Daniels Midland,  DuPont ,  FDME,  Bioplastic,  Biochemical,  


Anellotech Scores Additional $6Mn Suntory Investment (Ind. Report)
Anellotech,Suntory
Date: 2018-03-28
Pearl River, New York-based renewable chemicals, bioplastics and fuels from non-food biomass producer Anellotech, is reporting two weeks of continuous operation of its seven-story tall TCat-8 pilot plant in Silsbee, Texas, producing primarily benzene, toluene, and xylenes (aromatics) from loblolly pine feedstock. The company also reports receipt of an additional $6 million investment from Suntory Holdings Limited, which was part of a previously announced $15 million package. To date, Suntorys has invested more than $30 million in Anellotech.

The Anellotech Bio-TCat Process's cost-competitive renewable aromatic chemicals are "drop in" replacements for their identical petroleum-derived counterparts, and can be used in manufacturing plastics renewable transportation fuels.

The alliance with Suntory, one of Anellotech's principal strategic investment partners, began in 2012 with the goal of enabling the development and commercialization of cost-competitive 100 pct bio-based plastics for use in beverage bottles. Suntory currently uses 30 pct plant-derived materials for its Mineral Water Suntory Tennensui brands and is pursuing the development of a 100 pct bio-based PET bottle through this alliance, as part of its commitment to sustainable business practices. (Source: Anellotech Inc., PR, 28 Mar., 2018) Contact: Anellotech Inc. David Sudolsky, Pres., (845) 735-7700, DSudolsky@anellotech.com, www.anellotech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Suntory news,  Anellotech news,  Biochemical news,  Bioplastic news,  Renewable Fuel news,  PET Plastic news,  


PET Recycling Team Cuts Carbon Emissions by 10 pct (Int'l Report)
PET Recycling
Date: 2018-03-26
Wollersdorf, Austria-based PET Recycling Team Gmbh reports it has obtained a measurement of the environmental impact of recycled bio-plastic PET (rPET) bottles and food containers. The calculated value was a CO2 equivalent of 0.45 kg for every kilogram of material produced.

The plant produces approximately 31,000 tpy of rPET and generates a volume of emissions that would take a forest the size of 6,231 football fields to absorb -- the same amount of CO2 emissions the company says it is saving each year compared to the production of new PET material. The GHG emissions for recycled material from Wollersdorf are only a tenth as high as a new material, also known as virgin PET, has a CO2 equivalent of 2.15 kg per kilogram.(Source: PET Recycling Team Gmbh, PR, 22 Mar., 2018) Contact: PET Recycling Team Gmbh, Gunther Lehner, CEO, +43 2622 433330, www.petrecyclingteam.com/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News CO2,  CO2 Emissions,  PET Plastic,  Bioplastic,  


Omani Researchers Convert Wastepaper into Biofuel (New Prod & Tech)
Sultan Qaboos University
Date: 2018-03-21
In Oman, municipal solid wastes (MSW) consisting primarily of wood, waste paper, food materials, plastics, metals and glass are being investigated by Dr Sivakumar Nallusamy, assistant professor at the Department of Biology, Sultan Qaboos University, as an ideal cellulosic-organic waste as a substrate for bacterial fermentation for the growth of microorganisms used for the production of biodiesel, bioethanol, bioplastics and other valuable products.

The project, which is receiving grant funding from the Research Council, is converting pre-treated waste papers and other municipal solid wastes into fermentable sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sugars were successfully converted into bioplastic, bioethanol and biodiesel using appropriate microorganisms. (Source: Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat Daily, 13 Mar., 2018) Contact: Department of Biology, Sultan Qaboos University, Dr. Sivakumar Nallusamy, +968 2414 2229, www.squ.edu.om/science/Departments/Biology

More Low-Carbon Energy News MSW,  Cellulosic,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  Bioehanol,  Biodiesel,  


UPM Biofuels Touts Wood-Based Bioplastic Coating (New Prod & Tech)
UPM Biofuels
Date: 2018-03-21
In Finland, Helsinki-headquartered renewable diesel producer UPM Biofuels reports its Lappeenranta Biorefinery produces renewable naphtha that can be processed into renewable resins for the production of bioplastics, e.g. for the packaging industry, according to a company press release.

The release adds that Norwegian packaging manufacturer Elopak, which supplies 15 billion cartons per year worldwide, has joined forces with UPM Biofuels and Dow to offer 100 pct recyclable and responsibly sourced 100 pct wood-based cartons. (Source: UPM Biofuels,Lesprom, 15 Mar., 2018) Contact: UPM Biofuels, Liisa Ranta, Manager Sustainability, +358 40 582 9338, www.upm.com, www.upmbiofuels.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News UPM Biofuels,  Bioplastic,  


Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Refocuses (Ind. Report)
Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
Date: 2018-02-19
The Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, reports it has embarked on a new mission develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.

GLBRC originally focused on corn stover ethanol production and developing perennial plants like switchgrass and miscanthus as biofuel feedstocks. Now, GLBRC goal is centered on designing advanced biofuels, such as isobutanol. These "drop-in" fuels could be used to replace gasoline without engine modification. By engineering bioenergy crops to enhance their environmental and economic value, and conducting research to generate multiple products from plant biomass, these advancements could optimize the bioenergy field-to-product pipeline.

GLBRC scientists and engineers are also improving the yield and processing traits of dedicated bioenergy crops for cultivation on marginal, or non-agricultural, land. With smart management, these crops have the potential to benefit the ecosystem, help mitigate climate change, and provide farmers with an additional source of revenue.

GLBRC is focused on enabling a new and different biorefinery, one that is both economically viable and environmentally sustainable. Realizing this goal will mean increasing the efficiency of biomass conversion and generating a mix of specialty biofuels and environmentally-friendly bioproducts, from as much of a plant's biomass as possible. One such discovery, breaks down lignin's six-carbon rings -- the "aromatics" -- into individual components. Traditionally sourced from petroleum, aromatics are used in a wide variety of products, including plastic soda bottles, Kevlar, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals, and are essential components of jet fuel. (Source: University of Wisconsin Madison, GLBRC, PR, 18 Feb., 2018) Contact: Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Tim Donohue, Dir., John Greenler, Dir. Outreach, (608) 890-2444, www.glbrc.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center,  University of Wisconsin Madison,  Biofuel,  Biochemical,  Ethanol,  Bioplastics,  


Meridian, Generex Seal Corn Ethanol Byproducts Deal (Ind. Report)
Meridian Waste Solutions,Attis Innovations
Date: 2018-02-12
Further to our Jan. 12, coverage, Atlanta-based Meridian Waste Solutions, Inc. reports it has inked a strategic partnership with Alpharette, Georgia-based Genarex LLC, to develop a range of agricultural waste based bioadditives for the plastics market.

According to Meridian, the US corn ethanol industry produces about 50 million tpy of distillers dried grains(DDGs) which Genarex's technology converts into a polymerized material branded as Bylox. This material is claimed to have a high value as a functional filler in numerous plastic formulations.

Attis Innovations, a wholly owned subsidiary of Meridian Waste Solutions Inc., recovers lignin from the byproduct stream of biomass processing industries, such as pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol. The recovered lignin is said to be unique in that it is a melt flowing biomaterial that is low cost and acts as a polymerized biofiller in applications such as plastics, adhesives and transportation fuels. .(Source: Meridian, WMW, 10 Feb., 2018) Contact: Meridian Waste Solutions, Jeff Cosman, CEO, (917) 658-7878, www.amsnt.comwww.MWSinc.com; Attis, www.attisinnovations.com; Genarex LLC, (470) 253-1616, info@generex.com, https://ca.linkedin.com/company/genarex-inc, www.generex.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Genarex,  Meridian Waste Solutions,  Bioplastic,  Ethanol,  Attis Innovations,  


SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development, Commercialization Center Prototype Awarded $6.6Mn (Funding)
SUNY Alfred
Date: 2018-01-15
Following on our June 19, 2017 coverage, Empire State Governor Andrew Cuomo has announced a further $6.6 million in grant funding for the proposed SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development and Commercialization Center (BDCC). The $14.2 million project previously received about $6.1 million in the form of four grants, from Empire State Development, the state Dormitory Authority, Appalachian Regional Commission and the federal Economic Development Administration.

The grant funding will enable construction to begin on the biorefinery prototype, which could be operational within 24 months. The prototype will utilize a patented hot water extraction process to separate chemical byproducts from regionally sourced low-grade wood, biomass crops and agricultural residuals. In addition to acting as a training center, the BDCC will focus on forest conservation, industrial development and environmental preservation.

Almost one-quarter of the facility's end product contains marketable sugars and chemicals that can be used as animal feed or turned into ethanol, methanol or acetic acid. The remaining thee-quarters is chipped wood with a superior cellulose quality that can be turned into high-end pellets for home heating, composite lumber, or other products such as biodegradable plastic, cellulosic nano materials, platform bio-chemicals, food additives, advanced technology biomaterials, biofuels and acetic acid. (Source: SUNY Alfred, Oleans Time Herald, 12 Jan., 2018) Contact: Alfred State Univ., SUNY Alfred Biorefinery Development and Commercialization Center , (800)425-3733, www.alfredstate.edu; Appalachian Regional Commission, (202) 884-7700, www.arc.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet,  Alfred State College,  SUNY,  Biorefining,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  Bioproducts,  


EU Bioplastics Producers Seek Bioethanol Duty Reductions (Int'l)
Bioplastics
Date: 2018-01-03
The European Bio-based Industries Consortium (BIC) reports that EU-based bioplastics producers are becoming increasingly concerned about their ability to compete with players in the Americas due to the high duties they must pay for their ethanol feedstock and have urged the EU to forego existing import duties of 60-40 pct on bioethanol used exclusively for applications in chemical intermediates.

According to Brussels-headquartered BIC, Europe's bio-industries -- chemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, paper, textile, biofuels and bioenergy -- employ approximately 3.3 million people and have annual turnover of € 674 billion. (Source: Bio-based Industries Consortium, Bioplastics, 3 Jan., 2018) Contact: Bio-based Industries Consortium, www.bioconsortium.eu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioplastic,  Ethanol,  Bioethanol,  


Neste's Taking Action on Climate Change Forecasts Renewable Diesel, Bioplastics Growth -- Report Attached (Ind. Report)
Neste
Date: 2017-10-06
Helsinki-headquartered Neste, the world's largest producer of renewable diesel refined from waste and residues,, has published a business environment outlook called Taking Action on Climate Change.

The Neste report discusses key changes taking place in the energy, transport and chemicals markets. As global commitment to tackle climate change requires major efforts to reduce emissions, the use of fossil raw materials will inevitably need to decline in all of these sectors.

Neste estimates approximately 10 pct of the global car fleet will be electric cars by 2013 and that renewable diesel will remain a competitive solution for reducing transport emissions. By 2021, renewable diesel demand is expected to have doubled in North America, the Nordic countries and Europe. The company also believes that the problem of emissions from diesel vehicles can be solved, and that diesel technology will remain competitive for a long time to come.

Neste is also developing new business operations from bioplastics, a market that is expected to grow by more than 40 pct by 2021. About 80 pct of this growth is expected to come from durable biobased plastics, such as Neste's bioplastics solution, the demand for which is growing faster than for biodegradable plastics. Neste also expects 20 pct of its renewable business sales volume to come from from renewable jet fuel, renewable chemicals and bio-based plastics, according to a company release.

Download Neste's Taking Action on Climate Change report HERE. (Source: Neste Corporation, PR, 5 Oct., 2017) Contact: Neste Corp., Sam Holmberg, VP Marketing & Services, Kaisa Lipponen Director, Corporate Communications, +358 50 458 4078, www.neste.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Neste,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  Climate Change,  Renewable Diesel,  


J. Craig Venter-led Team Granted $10.7 Mn to Optimize Metabolic Networks Enabling Next-Gen. Biofuels (Funding, R&D)
J. Craig Venter Institute
Date: 2017-10-06
In La Jolla, California, the not-for-profit J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) is reporting receipt of a 5-year, $10.7 million grant from the US DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Genomic Science Program to optimize metabolic networks in model photosynthetic microalgae, called diatoms. The aim is to substantially increase oil, or lipid production, enabling next-generation biofuels and other bioproducts.

Building on prior synthetic biology and diatom research, methodologies will be developed and optimized for introducing and transplanting new biological functions into diatoms, which are a globally abundant class of algae. Initial modeling exercises will guide targeted genetic manipulations, associated systems biology experiments, and result in iterative network and genome-scale cellular modeling.

Based on the photosynthetic efficiency and growth potential of microalgae, it is estimated that annual oil production of greater than 30,000 liters, or about 200 barrels of microalgal oil per hectare of land may be achievable in mass culture of oil-rich algae. This is 100-fold greater than that of soybeans, a major feedstock currently used for biodiesel. (Source: J. Craig Venter Institute, PR, 3 Oct., 2017) Contact: J. Craig Venter Institute, Andrew Allen, Ph.D. , (858) 200-1800, www.JCVI.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News AlgaeVenter Institute,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  


Identifying Carbon Compounds Derived from Fossil Fuels (Ind. Report)
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Date: 2017-09-13
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a laboratory instrument that can measure how much of the carbon in many carbon-containing materials was derived from fossil fuels. This will open the way for new methods in the biofuels and bioplastics industries, in scientific research, and environmental monitoring. Among other things, it will allow scientists to measure how much of the carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere came from burning fossil fuels, and to estimate fossil fuel emissions in an area as small as a city or as large as a continent.

This is possible because carbon atoms occur in heavy and light forms, or isotopes, and measuring the relative amounts of each can reveal the source of the carbon. The new instrument, developed by NIST chemists Adam Fleisher and David Long and based on a technology called cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS), promises to dramatically reduce the cost of those measurements "Measuring carbon isotopes is an extremely useful technique, but until now, it has found limited use because of the cost," said Long. "Lowering the cost will open the way for new applications, especially ones that require testing a large number of samples."

The key to these measurements is carbon-14, a radioactive (yet harmless) isotope of carbon that is formed in the upper atmosphere. That carbon-14 finds its way into all living things. Unlike regular carbon, carbon-14 is unstable, with a half-life of 5,730 years. When living things die, they stop incorporating carbon into their bodies, and their carbon-14 starts to decay away.

Fossil fuels also are the remains of living things, mainly plants that died hundreds of millions of years ago. Virtually all their carbon-14 decayed away eons ago, so anything derived from them is marked by the absence of measurable amounts of carbon-14, which is extremely rare.

CRDS instruments analyze gases by detecting the wavelengths of light they absorb. For instance, CO2 that contains carbon-14 -- heavy CO2 -- absorbs a slightly different wavelength than regular CO2.

To test biofuels and bioplastics, you would first burn those materials, then collect the resulting CO2 for analysis. This would allow you to test a fuel mixture to determine what fraction of it is biofuel. In the airline industry, for example, this would be useful because some countries require that aviation fuels include a specific biofuel percentage. Such tests could also be used to verify that bioplastics, which sell for a premium, do not contain petroleum-derived compounds. To estimate fossil fuel emissions in a geographic area, you would collect many air samples across that area and analyze the atmospheric CO2 in those samples. Areas with high fossil fuel emissions, such as cities and industrial zones, will have below-normal concentrations of heavy CO2.

A report from the National Academy of Sciences estimated that 10,000 samples a year, collected at carefully chosen locations around the United States, would be enough to estimate national fossil fuel emissions to within 10 percent of the actual value. Such a system of measurements can increase the reliability of national emissions estimates. This would be especially useful in parts of the world where high-quality emissions data are not readily available. (Source: NIST, PR, 12 Sept., 2017) Contact: NIST, Adam Fleisher, David Long, (301) 975-2758, (303) 497-4044, www.nist.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News National Institute of Standards and Technology,  Carbon,  Carbon Emissions,  


AECI Invests $5Mn in California Bioplastics Startup (Ind. Report)
Origin Materials,AECI
Date: 2017-07-26
South African specialty chemicals group AECI reports it has invested $5-million in West Sacramento, California-based startup Origin Materials to support the development of renewable technologies.

Origin pioneered the development of bio-based chemicals, which can be processed into many products for application in global markets worth over $200-billion.

AECI and its investment will assist Origin and its partners in developing and industrializing its process for producing at least 95 pct bio-based polyethylene terepthalate plastic bottles at commercial scale as early as 2020. (Source: AECI, Engineering News, 24 July, 2017) Contact: Origin Materials , John Bissell, CEO, hello@originmaterials.com, www.originmaterials.com; AECI, Mark Dytor, CEO, +27 (0) 11 806 8700, groupcommunications@aewci.co.za, www.aeci.co.za

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioplastic,  AECI,  Biochemical,  Bioproduct,  Origin Materials,  


Anellotech Touts Texas TCat-8 Pilot Plant Tests (Ind. Report)
Anellotech,Axens
Date: 2017-06-02
Pearl River, New York-headquartered renewable chemicals and fuels from non-food biomass producer Anellotech reports that its engineers, collaborating with petrochemical company Axens, have completed a successful continuous performance test of the TCat-8 pilot plant as part of unit commissioning in Silsbee, Texas.

The test involved continuous injection of MinFree woody biomass feedstock and production of BTX and other valuable chemical by-products.

Anellotech is developing the Bio-TCat process to produce cost-competitive renewable aromatic chemicals such as benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) from non-food biomass for use in the production of polyester, nylon, polycarbonate, polystyrene, or for renewable transportation fuels. Bio-TCat co-products, C9+ aromatics and carbon monoxide, can be used to make cellulosic jet and ethanol bio-fuels respectively, using third-party technology.

The Bio-TCat reactor outlet hydrocarbon product requires only mild hydrotreating to remove trace impurities using existing oil refining technology. By using renewable and readily available non-food materials, such as sustainably harvested wood, corn stover and bagasse, the process is less expensive compared to processes relying on sugar as a feedstock. (Source: Anellotech, PR, Industrial Equipment News, June, 2017) Contact: Axens, www.axens.net; Anellotech, David Sudolsky, (845) 735-7700, DSudolsky@anellotech.com, www.anellotech.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Anellotech,  Biochemical,  Biofuel,  Bioplastic,  


Nestle, Danone Creating PET Bottle from Biomass (Ind. Report)
Nestle, Danone,Origin Materials
Date: 2017-03-06
Nestle Waters r3eports it is partnering with Danone, a French multinational food-products corporation based in Paris, and US startup Origin Materials and have formed the NaturALL Bottle Alliance to develop a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottle made from 100 pct renewable and sustainable biomass materials such as previously used-cardboard or sawdust. PET is one of the most commonly-used plastics in the polyester category.

The partners have pledged to use 75 pct bio-based material in PET bottles by 2020, and 95 pct by 2022. Currently, the technology exists to make only 30 pct of PET bottles out of bio-based materials. (Source: Nestle Waters, European Supermarket, Others 2 Mar., 2017) Contact: Nestle Water, www.nestle-waters.com; Danone, www.danone.com/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioplastic,  Danone,  PET Plastic,  


CO2 to Bioplastics: Beneficial Re-Use of Carbon Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants Using Microalgae R&D Scores $1.2Mn Funding (R&D, Funding)
University of Kentucky,US DOE Office of Fossil Energy
Date: 2017-03-03
In Lexington, the University of Kentucky (UK) Centre for Applied Energy Research's (CAER) Biofuels and Environmental Catalysis Group is reporting receipt of $1.2 million in US DOE Office of Fossil Energy grant funding for research into utilizing coal-fired power plant CO2 emissions to develop bioplastics.

The UK grant was one of seven projects to receive a total of $5.9 million for similar CO2 utilization projects.

CO2 to Bioplastics: Beneficial Re-Use of Carbon Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants Using Microalgae, the University of Kentucky project is led by Mark Crocker, CAER associate director and chemistry professor. The UK CAER team has become a global leader in developing technology to capture carbon dioxide from coal-fired flue gas using microalgae, with subsequent conversion of the resulting algal biomass to bioplastics, biochemicals and biofuels. The CAER team will investigate a combined photobioreactor/pond cultivation process to decrease the cost of algae cultivation while developing a strategy to maximize value from the algal biomass. (Source: University of Kentucky, gasworld, 1 March 2017)Contact: University of Kentucky, Prof. Mark Crocker, (859) 257-0295, mark.crocher@uky.edu, http://www.caer.uky.edu/biofuels/home.shtml; US DOE Office of Fossil Energy, energy.gov/fe/office-fossil-energy

More Low-Carbon Energy News US DOE Office of Fossil Energy,  Algae,  Biofuel,  CO2,  Bioplastic,  CO2,  


Global Green Plans Thai Biochemical-Biofuel Complex (Int'l)
Global Green Chemical, PTT Global Chemical
Date: 2017-02-01
In Bangkok, PTT Global Chemical Pcl subsidiary Global Green Chemical Pcl (GGC) reports it is undertaking a joint feasibility study with Kaset Thai International Sugar Pcl, a Thai sugar manufacturer, for a sugarcane crushing and ethanol-biochemical production facility in in Nakhon Sawan province, Thailand.

The facility is expected to begin ethanol production followed by Lactic Acid and Polylactic Acid (PLA), which is used in the production of bioplastic products, within 24 - 36 months.

GGC has submitted first filing for an IPO, portions of which will fund the new project. The company expects to launch the IPO in the Q2 of this year. Some of the IPO proceeds will be used to invest in a second biodiesel plant to boost its production capacity from 300,000 tpy to 500,000 tpy. The new plant is scheduled to come online in 2018. (Source: Global Green Chemical, Deal Street Asia, 30 Jan., 2017) Contact: Global Green Chemical Pcl, +66 (0) 2558 7300, www.ggcplc.com PTT Global Chemical, www.pttgcgroup.com/en/home

More Low-Carbon Energy News Sugarcane Ethanol,  Biodiesel,  Biochemical,  

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