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Updated Bioheat® Mandates Demonstrate Value of Biodiesel (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
National Biodiesel Board
Date: 2021-07-16
The National Biodiesel Board reports Governors from Connecticut and Rhode Island signed graduated approaches to tackling carbon emissions into law this week through mandates requiring increased use of biomass-based heating oil (Bioheat®) over the next decade. A similar bill in New York awaits Governor Cuomo's signature, highlighting the growing momentum Bioheat fuel is experiencing in the region.

Each of the mandates differ slightly. Yet, each result in elevated blend levels of Bioheat® fuel, including two of the mandates reaching B50 (50 pct biodiesel, 50 pct petroleum diesel): Connecticut's mandate requires B5 by 2022, B10 by 2025, B15 by 2030, B20 by 2034 and B50 by 2035. The Rhode Island mandate expands the B5 mandate to B10 by 2023, B20 by 2025 and B50 by 2030. (Source: National Biodiesel Board, PR, 14 July, 2021) Contact: NBB, Floyd Vergara, Gov. Affairs, (800) 841-5849, www.nbb.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News National Biodiesel Board,  Bioheat,  Biodiesel,  


Clean Fuels Deployment Act of 2020 Introduced (Reg & Leg)
Biofuel
Date: 2020-05-01
In Washington, U.S. Congresswoman Abby Finkenauer (Dem, IA-01)is reporting the introduction of the bipartisan Clean Fuels Deployment Act of 2020 authorizing $600 million over six years to help retailers offer higher ethanol blends, expand the geographic area selling ethanol blends, support biodiesel, bioheat, and sustainable aviation fuel markets, and accelerate the deployment of fueling infrastructure.

The legislation, co-sponsored by Reps. Angie Craig (D-MN), Don Bacon (R-NE), and Roger Marshall (R-KS), would provide funding for installing and converting fuel pump infrastructure to deliver higher blends of ethanol and biodiesel.

The bill, given recent uncertainties in the renewable fuels industry, is more important than ever to fund infrastructure improvements and remove market barriers to accessing clean and renewable fuels. In addition to supporting the distribution of higher ethanol and biodiesel blends at fueling stations, the program could also be used to enhance pipelines and terminals to blend and carry ethanol and biodiesel.

Program grant funding could be used to incentivize the deployment of ethanol and biodiesel fueling infrastructure and convert existing infrastructure to deliver ethanol blends greater than 10 percent and biodiesel blends greater than 20 pct. (Source: Office of Congresswoman Abby Finkenauer, Website, 28 April, 2020) (202) 225-2911, (319) 364-2288, www.finkenauer.house.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Biofuel,  Ethanol,  Biodiesel,  


FPInnovations Releases Solid Wood Bioheat Guide (Ind. Report)
FPInnovations
Date: 2020-03-04
Pointe-Claire, QC, Canada-based is touting its newly released Solid Wood Bioheat Guide for Rural and Remote Communities in Ontario as a key source of information for using woody biomass for heating.

According to the guide, the reliability, efficiency and versatility of modern bioheat systems allows for the supplementation or even replacement of current fossil fuel or electric heating systems. These systems can use local, sustainably sourced, economical, and renewable solid woody biofuels. Provincial laws require that Crown forests be sustainably managed following approved forest management plans that require harvested areas to be regenerated. This means that carbon emitted to create bioheat generated from solid woody biofuels is recaptured by the growing forest making bioheat a low-carbon heating system. Emissions from particles and volatile compounds are also low and on par with fossil fuel heating systems.

Download the Solid Wood Bioheat Guide for Rural and Remote Communities in Ontario guide HERE. (Source: FPInnovations, Cdn, Biomass, 2 Mar., 2020, Contact: FPInnovations, Glen Prevost, Guide Author, (705) 358-4667, (514) 630-4100, glen.prevost@fpinnovations.ca, www.fpinnovations.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News FPInnovations,  Woody Biomass,  


WPA Takes Canadian Clean Fuel Standard to Task (Ind Report)
Wood Pellet Association of Canada
Date: 2019-09-09
Since 2017, the government of Canada has been developing the Clean Fuel Standard (CFS), a low carbon fuel standard-type policy, to reduce the life-cycle carbon intensity of fuels and energy used in Canada. The CFS aims to achieve 30 million tonnes CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalent) of annual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 2030.

The Wood Pellet Association of Canada (WPAC) has been providing input to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) as it works to design and shape the CFS. And, upon review of ECCC's proposed regulatory approach, WPAC is seriously concerned that the government will not allow end-use fuel switching in the buildings/stationary fuel use sector.

WPAC believes it is unfair for ECCC to recognize fuel switching from gasoline to electricity or hydrogen in transportation, but not to recognize switching from heating oil to solid biofuels -- wood pellets or chips -- for Canada's second largest renewable energy product -- solid biomass heating. To that end, WPAC made the following representations to ECCC:

  • One of the three primary objectives of the CFS is low-cost compliance. By prohibiting recognition of fuel switching for stationary applications, ECCC will actually significantly increase the cost of CFS compliance, exclude the forest sector from participation in the short-term, and inhibit investment in the most proven commercial technology for displacement of heating oil -- wood pellet and chip boilers.

  • Canada consumes approximately three billion lpy of heating oil, the majority of which is consumed by Canadians in rural and Atlantic Canada. The latter accounts for 44 pct of heating oil consumption in the residential sector and 50 pct of heating oil consumption in the commercial/institutional sectors. Rural and Atlantic Canada also have among the lowest per capita income. ECCC's proposed regulatory approach will make CFS compliance for these low-income areas significantly more expensive than for those living in cities.

  • Under ECCC's proposed regulatory approach, the principal mechanism for ensuring compliance from heating oil primary suppliers will be to blend renewable diesel with heating oil. Since heating oil has low carbon intensity (CI) relative to other liquid fuels and much of the crude used to produce heating oil is sourced from outside of Canada, there is less opportunity for upstream reductions than with other liquid fuels. The 2030 target of 74 g CO2e/MJ is less than heating oil combustion emissions, meaning upstream efficiency improvements will be insufficient to meet the requirements. The only heating oil-miscible fuel that can also be stored outside in winter, as is often the case with heating oil, is renewable diesel.

  • Renewable diesel has a useful heat fuel cost of $65-82 per gigajoule (GJ) ($234-295 per MWh. In contrast, wood pellets, at $300-350 per tonne for residential sales, have a useful heat fuel cost of $20-24 per GJ. Wood pellets also have half the of default renewable diesel (29 g CO2e/MJ). Wood chips are half the carbon intensity of wood pellets which means, on an implied carbon price basis and assuming wholesale $0.75 per litre for heating oil, blending renewable diesel with heating oil has a fuel cost of $630/ per tonne CO2e to 884 per tonne CO2e. Switching from heating oil to wood pellets saves money on a fuel basis, in addition to avoiding taxes on heating oil. In this case, there is little reason to implement a complex policy such as the CFS.

  • Despite the billions of dollars invested in lignocellulosic liquid transportation biofuels, all technologies are still pre-commercial -- especially forest feedstock-based liquid transportation biofuels due to the recalcitrant structure of wood fibre. Co-processing of pyrolysis oil or biocrude in existing oil refineries at a meaningful volume will not occur before 2030. The forest sector represents over 75 pct of annually-available biomass resources in Canada and its exclusion from participation in the liquids class will dramatically increase the cost of fuel, especially in rural communities where wood chips and bioheat are a cost efficient and convenient source of energy. (Source: WPAC, Canadian Biomass, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 26 Aug., 2019) Contact: Wood Pellet Association of Canada, Gordon Murra, Exec. Dir., ; Environment and Climate Change Canada, www.canada.ca › environment-climate-change

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Environment and Climate Change Canada,  Wood Pellet Association of Canada,  Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet ,  


  • American GreenFuels' Bioheat® Reduces CO2 Emissions (Ind. Report)
    American GreenFuels
    Date: 2018-12-19
    New Haven, Conn.-based biodiesel producer American GreenFuels, LLC is touting its You Are What You Heat campaign to promote their biodiesel Bioheat® blended heating oil -- a renewable, lower carbon cleaner-burning alternative to diesel fuel.

    According to American GreenFuels, Bioheat® provides greenhouse gas savings of minimum 78 pct up to 93 pct as compared with ultra low sulfur heating oil and meets ASTM D6751 specification standards. (Source: American GreenFuels, LLC, PR, 18 Dec., 2018) Contact: American GreenFuels, Raf Aviner, Pres., www.AmericanGreenFuelsCT.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News American GreenFuels,  Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  Carbon Emissions,  

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