Return to Today's Publications

 

Newsletter:
Date Range (YYYY-MM-DD) -
Company, Industry or Technology:
  Search Tips


Arbios Announces BC Woody Biomass-to-Fuels Plant (Ind. Report)
Arbios Biotech, Licella Holdings
Date: 2021-10-13
In British Columbia, Canadian Forest Products and Sydney, Australia-based Licella Holdings joint venture Arbios Biotech reports it will construct a woody biomass- to-low carbon biofuel plant in Prince George, British Columbia. The plant will convert tree bark and sawmill wastes into high value renewable biocrude which can be further refined to produce low-carbon transportation fuels.

The facility will convert 25,000 dry tpy of wood residue to 50,000 bpy of sustainable bio-oil when it begins production in the first half of 2023. The plant, which will utilize Licella' s patented Cat-HTR decarbonization platform , will be constructed on a portion of Canfor's Intercontinental Pulp Mill site and will have the potential to add four processing lines within the existing footprint. (Source: Arbios Biotech, Website PR, Oct., 2021) Contact: Arbios Biotech, Don Roberts, Chair, www.arbiosbiotech.com; Licella Holdings, +61 (02) 9119 6050, info@licella.com, www.licella.com; Canadian Forest Products, www.canfor.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Arbios Biotech news,  Woody Biomass news,  Licella Holdings news,  Canfor news,  


PNNL Touts Biocrude Conversion Process Progress (Ind. Report)
PNNL,Bioproducts Institute
Date: 2021-04-14
The U.S. DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is reporting a large-scale demonstration using hydrothermal liquefaction to convert wastewater sludge and food waste biocrude to renewable diesel fuel has passed a significant test, operating for more than 2,000 hours continuously without losing effectiveness.

"The research showed that essentially any biocrude, regardless of wet-waste sources, could be used in the process and the catalyst remained robust during the entire run. While this is just a first step in demonstrating robustness, it is an important step," according to John Holladay, a PNNL scientist and co-director of the joint Bioproducts Institute, a collaboration between PNNL and Washington State University.

According to the PNNL release, Wet wastes from sewage treatment and discarded food can provide the raw materials for an innovative process called hydrothermal liquefaction, which converts and concentrates carbon-containing molecules into a liquid biocrude. This biocrude then undergoes a hydrotreating process to produce bio-derived fuels for transportation.

The next steps for the research team include gathering more sources of biocrude from various waste streams and analyzing the biofuel output for quality. In a new collaboration, PNNL will partner with a commercial waste management company to evaluate waste from many sources. Ultimately, the project will result in a database of findings from various manures and sludges, which could help decide how facilities can scale up economically. The project is supported by the DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO). (Source: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PR, Website, 12 Apr., 2021) Contact: PNNL, Michael Thorson, Project Manager, www.pnnl.gov; John Holladay, Co-director Bioproducts Institute, contact.bpi@ubc.ca, www.bpi.ubc.ca

More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioproducts Institute,  PNNL,  Biofuel,  Biocrude,  


Marine BioEnergy Seaweed Biofuels Project Tests Continue (R&D)
Marine BioEnergy,DOE Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E)
Date: 2020-03-18
Further to our 30 Nov., 2018 coverage, researchers at the University of Southern California Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies will carry out a project proposed by Marine BioEnergy Inc., a California-headquartered company focused on growing and developing Pacific kelp as a source of biofuel.

The Marine Bioenergy plan includes submersible drones dragging lines seeded with kelp plants in deep, nutrient-rich waters during the night then floating it back up to shallow waters to take advantage of the sunlight during the day. The kelp would then be harvested at sea and processed into biocrude, the basis for biofuel.

Under optimal conditions, giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera, which is used to generate a biofuel, can grow up to three feet per day without fresh water, fertilizer, pesticides or fertile land. These attributes make kelp a viable potential substitute for traditional fuels, as it can be sustainably farmed, harvested and converted into biofuel.

Marine BioEnergy ran its first trial last year is tentatively scheduled to begin its next round of tests this April. (Source: DOE ARPA-E, Mar., 2020) Contact: DOE ARPA-E, Marc von Keitz, Program Dir., arpa-e.energy.gov; Marine BioEnergy Inc., Cindy Wilcox, Pres. Marine BioEnergy, www.marinebiomass.com; USC Wrigley Institute, Diane Kim, Associate Director , (310) 510-0811, www.usc.edu/wrigley

More Low-Carbon Energy News Marine BioEnergy,  DOE ARPA-E,  


WPA Takes Canadian Clean Fuel Standard to Task (Ind Report)
Wood Pellet Association of Canada
Date: 2019-09-09
Since 2017, the government of Canada has been developing the Clean Fuel Standard (CFS), a low carbon fuel standard-type policy, to reduce the life-cycle carbon intensity of fuels and energy used in Canada. The CFS aims to achieve 30 million tonnes CO2e (carbon dioxide equivalent) of annual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 2030.

The Wood Pellet Association of Canada (WPAC) has been providing input to Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) as it works to design and shape the CFS. And, upon review of ECCC's proposed regulatory approach, WPAC is seriously concerned that the government will not allow end-use fuel switching in the buildings/stationary fuel use sector.

WPAC believes it is unfair for ECCC to recognize fuel switching from gasoline to electricity or hydrogen in transportation, but not to recognize switching from heating oil to solid biofuels -- wood pellets or chips -- for Canada's second largest renewable energy product -- solid biomass heating. To that end, WPAC made the following representations to ECCC:

  • One of the three primary objectives of the CFS is low-cost compliance. By prohibiting recognition of fuel switching for stationary applications, ECCC will actually significantly increase the cost of CFS compliance, exclude the forest sector from participation in the short-term, and inhibit investment in the most proven commercial technology for displacement of heating oil -- wood pellet and chip boilers.

  • Canada consumes approximately three billion lpy of heating oil, the majority of which is consumed by Canadians in rural and Atlantic Canada. The latter accounts for 44 pct of heating oil consumption in the residential sector and 50 pct of heating oil consumption in the commercial/institutional sectors. Rural and Atlantic Canada also have among the lowest per capita income. ECCC's proposed regulatory approach will make CFS compliance for these low-income areas significantly more expensive than for those living in cities.

  • Under ECCC's proposed regulatory approach, the principal mechanism for ensuring compliance from heating oil primary suppliers will be to blend renewable diesel with heating oil. Since heating oil has low carbon intensity (CI) relative to other liquid fuels and much of the crude used to produce heating oil is sourced from outside of Canada, there is less opportunity for upstream reductions than with other liquid fuels. The 2030 target of 74 g CO2e/MJ is less than heating oil combustion emissions, meaning upstream efficiency improvements will be insufficient to meet the requirements. The only heating oil-miscible fuel that can also be stored outside in winter, as is often the case with heating oil, is renewable diesel.

  • Renewable diesel has a useful heat fuel cost of $65-82 per gigajoule (GJ) ($234-295 per MWh. In contrast, wood pellets, at $300-350 per tonne for residential sales, have a useful heat fuel cost of $20-24 per GJ. Wood pellets also have half the of default renewable diesel (29 g CO2e/MJ). Wood chips are half the carbon intensity of wood pellets which means, on an implied carbon price basis and assuming wholesale $0.75 per litre for heating oil, blending renewable diesel with heating oil has a fuel cost of $630/ per tonne CO2e to 884 per tonne CO2e. Switching from heating oil to wood pellets saves money on a fuel basis, in addition to avoiding taxes on heating oil. In this case, there is little reason to implement a complex policy such as the CFS.

  • Despite the billions of dollars invested in lignocellulosic liquid transportation biofuels, all technologies are still pre-commercial -- especially forest feedstock-based liquid transportation biofuels due to the recalcitrant structure of wood fibre. Co-processing of pyrolysis oil or biocrude in existing oil refineries at a meaningful volume will not occur before 2030. The forest sector represents over 75 pct of annually-available biomass resources in Canada and its exclusion from participation in the liquids class will dramatically increase the cost of fuel, especially in rural communities where wood chips and bioheat are a cost efficient and convenient source of energy. (Source: WPAC, Canadian Biomass, Environment and Climate Change Canada, 26 Aug., 2019) Contact: Wood Pellet Association of Canada, Gordon Murra, Exec. Dir., ; Environment and Climate Change Canada, www.canada.ca › environment-climate-change

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Environment and Climate Change Canada,  Wood Pellet Association of Canada,  Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet ,  

  • Showing 1 to 4 of 4.