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DRAX, Bechtel Partner on Bioenergy/CCS (Ind. Report)
DRAX, Bechtel
Date: 2021-06-07
In the UK, Yorkshire-based DRAX Group reports it is partnering with Reston, Virginia-based U.S. engineering giant Bechtel up to identify opportunities and to construct new bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) power plants around the world, primarily in North America and Western Europe.

DRAX presently has a pilot BECCS project at its power station in Yorkshire. Bechtel will study potential regions for new BECCS plants and how to optimise plant design for maximum efficiency and lowest cost.

BECCS is a negative emissions technology which extracts bioenergy from biomass and then captures and stores the carbon dioxide but is not yet at commercial scale. (Source: DRAX, PR, 3 June, 2021) Contact: Bechtel, www.bechtel.com; DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 (0) 1757 618381, www.drax.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News BECCS,  DRAX,  Bechtel,  CCS,  Biomass,  


Calif. Bioenergy-Carbon Capture Project Announced (Ind. Report)
Chevron, Microsoft
Date: 2021-03-08
Oil and gas major Chevron reports it is collaborating with Schlumberger's New Energy arm and Microsoft to develop a major bioenergy plant with 300,000 tpy CO2e carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in Mendota, California. The project would convert 200,000 tpy of agricultural waste into renewable synthetic gas.

Front-end engineering and design processes will begin immediately, with the hopes of securing a final investment decision in 2022.

Microsoft is notably targeting negative emissions by 2030 and the removal of all historic corporate emissions by 2050. (Source: Chevron, PR, edie news, 8 Mar., 2021)

More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Capture news,  Syngas news,  Biomass news,  Bioenergy news,  


DRAX Advancing Planned Bioenergy CCS Project (Int'l. Report)
DRAX
Date: 2021-03-03
In the UK, Yorkshire-based woody biomass power producer DRAX Group reports it plans to used bioenergy with carbon capture and ctorage (BECCS) to remove millions of tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere and create a negative carbon footprint for the company.

The planned project is subject to its application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) -- a process which takes around two years to complete. If approved construction on the first of two 8 million tpy BECCS units could get underway in 2024.

As we reopoert in Dec. 2020, an Imperial College London report for DRAX Electric Insights found the UK's electricity grid has decarbonised faster than other countries in the last decade and that renewable power has grown six-fold in the last 10 years, helping the UK cut its carbon intensity by 58 pct -- double the reduction seen in other major economies over the 2010-2120 period. The report also noted coal-fired power generation dropped from 30 pct to just 2 pct with renewables rising simultaneously from 8 pct to supplying 42 pct of the UK's electricity over the last decade.

The shift to renewables means individual UK households have cut reduced their CO2 emissions by .75 tpy, according to the report. (Source: DRAX, PR, Yorkshire Post, Mar., 2021) Contact: DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 (0) 1757 618381, www.drax.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Bioenergy,  CCS,  BECCS,  


DRAX Acquiring Pinnacle Renewable Energy (M&A, Ind. Report)
DRAX, Pinnacle Renewable Energy
Date: 2021-02-08
UK-headquartered DRAX Group is reporting a £226 million agreement for its wholly-owned subsidiary DRAX Canadian Holdings' acquisition of British Columbia-based wood pellet producer Pinnacle Renewable Energy. The deal, which is subject to DRAX shareholder, regulatory approval and other customary conditions, is expected to close in Q3 this year.

According to the release, DRAX and Pinnacle combined will have 17 wood pellet plants, 3 major fibre baskets, 4 deep water ports, 4.9 Mt capacity from 2022 with 2.9 Mt available for self-supply, 2.6 GW of renewable biomass generation, with potential for BECCS, global growth opportunities for sustainable biomass. (Source: DRAX, Website, Various Media, 8 Feb., 2021) Contact: Pinnacle Renewable Energy, Duncan Davies, CEO, 604.270.9613, 604.270.9914--fax, www.pinnaclepellet.com; DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 (0) 1757 618381, www.drax.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Wood Pellet,  DRAX,  Woody Biomass,  Pinnacle Renewable Energy,  


Expected 2021 Renewable Energy Trends and Predictions from ENVIVA (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
Enviva Biomass
Date: 2021-01-25
  • Together renewable fuels will further displace coal and natural gas -- As countries take aggressive action on climate change to decarbonize their respective economies by 2050, the direction is clear -- all carbon-neutral and carbon-negative renewable fuels will need to work together if we want to achieve carbon neutrality by mid-century. As the global energy demand for alternative fuels increase, 2021 will mark a turning point for the industry as wind, solar, geothermal, woody biomass, hydrogen, and lithium-ion battery energy providers (among others) make a collective and coordinated effort to combat the global climate crisis.

  • The aftermath of COVID-19 will push economies into a renewable future -- The COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed how societies, businesses, and governments view the world. As various industries saw a decline in the demand for products and/or services throughout the pandemic, the energy industry witnessed the opposite. Energy production and distribution remained essential regardless of the pandemic.

    Throughout the pandemic we've seen an increased global interest in reducing carbon emissions. Looking ahead, we expect renewable fuels will continue to play a crucial role in power generation for decades to come. For this reason, we don't foresee a job loss, rather a job transfer -- or perhaps a job boom - in renewables in 2021. For those currently working in fossil fuels, this shift will present a great opportunity to transition skills as the energy sector continues to evolve into a clean energy future.

  • Europe will continue to be the "Poster Child" for renewable energy implementation, but there will be some regulatory uncertainty. -- Delivering Europe's long-term ambition to become the first climate neutral continent by 2050 requires an extensive set of urgent measures to scale up action. At the very least, the world-leading sustainability criteria established by the Renewable Energy Directive II (REDII) will need to be fully implemented by all member states if Europe plans to meet their 2030 and 2050 emission reduction goals. At best, member states will need to further amend the directive if they wish to succeed in cutting carbon emissions by 55 pct in the next decade from 1990 levels.

  • Bioenergy is the largest renewable energy source in the EU and will be critical to increased deployment of wind and solar -- The use of bioenergy has more than doubled since 2000 as a result of its end-use as heat, transportation, and electricity. In fact, biomass is the only renewable fuel on the market that is readily available today and can replace fossil fuels for heat generation. In heavy industries such as steel, aluminum and cement, sustainably sourced wood-based biomass offers a carbon-neutral fuel replacement for coal and gas-fired furnaces (and combined heat and power plants). As a dependable and dispatchable renewable fuel, sustainably-sourced biomass represents a prime solution to complement the intermittency of wind and solar (among other renewables) that will reduce carbon emissions by more than 85% on a lifecycle basis.

  • Biomass to assist the development and deployment of a hydrogen economy -- Looking ahead to more future-oriented solutions, such as the development of the hydrogen economy, biomass is projected to play an important role. The most obvious is to use biomass directly to create hydrogen through gasification and thereby avoid carbon emissions that are associated with natural gas. Even further down the road, when surplus solar and wind could potentially be used to create hydrogen at scale, there will be an exciting opportunity to produce aviation and other fuels with carbon capture of biomass that could result in even fewer net greenhouse gas emissions. Likewise, as decarbonization efforts in the steel and cement industry rapidly increase, they too will look to bioenergy solutions for support.

  • BECCS on the short rise -- Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is one of the very few options on the table that can remove carbon from the atmosphere. Once matured, BECCS could mark the beginning of a new era for low-carbon fuel applications that will enable us to meet and/or exceed international net zero targets while still enjoying air travel and heavy goods transport, which is difficult and very expensive to decarbonize. We expect 2021 will be the year that we see true progress in climate change mitigation, as a result of new initiatives/policies, new innovations, and new collaborations that are already taking shape.

    ENVIVA Holdings, LP is the world's largest producer of industrial wood pellets, a renewable and sustainable energy source used to generate electricity and heat. Through its subsidiaries, ENVIVA owns and operates wood pellet processing plants and deep-water export terminals in the Southeastern United States and exports pellets primarily to power plants in the UK, Europe and Japan that previously were fueled by coal, enabling them to reduce their lifetime carbon footprint by up to 85 pct. We make our pellets using sustainable practices that protect Southern forests. ENVIVA Holdings, LP conducts its activities primarily through two entities: ENVIVA Partners, LP, a publicly traded master limited partnership (NYSE: EVA), and ENVIVA Development Holdings, LLC, a wholly owned private company. (Source: Enviva Holdings, LP, Jan., 2021) Contact: ENVIVA Holdings, LP., www.envivabiomass.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Enviv news,  Woody Biomass Wood Pellet news,  CCS news,  Renewable Fuel news,  


  • Expected 2021 Renewable Energy Trends from ENVIVA (Opinions, Editorials & Asides)
    ENVIVA
    Date: 2021-01-25
    The following has been submitted by ENVIVA Holdings, LP, the world's largest industrial wood pellets producer:
  • Together renewable fuels will further displace coal and natural gas -- As countries take aggressive action on climate change to decarbonize their respective economies by 2050, the direction is clear -- all carbon-neutral and carbon-negative renewable fuels will need to work together if we want to achieve carbon neutrality by mid-century. As the global energy demand for alternative fuels increase, 2021 will mark a turning point for the industry as wind, solar, geothermal, woody biomass, hydrogen, and lithium-ion battery energy providers (among others) make a collective and coordinated effort to combat the global climate crisis.

  • Europe will continue to be the "Poster Child" for renewable energy implementation, but there will be some regulatory uncertainty. -- Delivering Europe's long-term ambition to become the first climate neutral continent by 2050 requires an extensive set of urgent measures to scale up action. At the very least, the world-leading sustainability criteria established by the Renewable Energy Directive II (REDII) will need to be fully implemented by all member states if Europe plans to meet their 2030 and 2050 emission reduction goals. At best, member states will need to further amend the directive if they wish to succeed in cutting carbon emissions by 55 pct in the next decade from 1990 levels.

  • Bioenergy is the largest renewable energy source in the EU and will be critical to increased deployment of wind and solar -- The use of bioenergy has more than doubled since 2000 as a result of its end-use as heat, transportation, and electricity. In fact, biomass is the only renewable fuel on the market that is readily available today and can replace fossil fuels for heat generation. In heavy industries such as steel, aluminum, and cement, sustainably sourced wood-based biomass offers a carbon-neutral fuel replacement for coal and gas-fired furnaces (and combined heat and power plants). As a dependable and dispatchable renewable fuel, sustainably-sourced biomass represents a prime solution to complement the intermittency of wind and solar (among other renewables) that will reduce carbon emissions by more than 85 pct on a lifecycle basis.

  • Biomass to assist the development and deployment of a hydrogen economy -- Looking ahead to more future-oriented solutions, such as the development of the hydrogen economy, biomass is projected to play an important role. The most obvious is to use biomass directly to create hydrogen through gasification and thereby avoid carbon emissions that are associated with natural gas. Even further down the road, when surplus solar and wind could potentially be used to create hydrogen at scale, there will be an exciting opportunity to produce aviation and other fuels with carbon capture of biomass that could result in even fewer net greenhouse gas emissions. Likewise, as decarbonization efforts in the steel and cement industry rapidly increase, they too will look to bioenergy solutions for support.

  • Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) -- is one of the very few options on the table that can remove carbon from the atmosphere. Once matured, BECCS could mark the beginning of a new era for low-carbon fuel applications that will enable us to meet and/or exceed international net zero targets while still enjoying air travel and heavy goods transport, which is difficult and very expensive to decarbonize. We expect 2021 will be the year that we see true progress in climate change mitigation, as a result of new initiatives/policies, new innovations, and new collaborations that are already taking shape.

  • COVID 19 Pandemic aftermath -- Throughout the pandemic we've seen an increased global interest in reducing carbon emissions. Looking ahead, we expect renewable fuels and energy will continue to play a crucial role in power generation for decades to come.

    ENVIVA Holdings, LP is the world's largest producer of industrial wood pellets, a renewable and sustainable energy source used to generate electricity and heat. Through its subsidiaries, ENVIV Holdings owns and operates wood pellet processing plants and deep-water terminals in the Southeastern U.S. and exports pellets primarily to formerly coal-fired power plants in the U.K, Europe and Japan. ENVIVA makes pellets using sustainable practices that protect Southern forests and employ about 1,100 people and support many other businesses in the U.S. South. ENVIVA Holdings, LP conducts its activities primarily through two entities: Enviva Partners, LP, a publicly traded master limited partnership (NYSE: EVA), and ENVIVA Development Holdings, LLC, a wholly owned private company. (Source: ENVIVA Holdings, LP, Jan., 2021) Contact: ENVIVA Holdings, LP, www.envivabiomass.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ENVIVA,  Renewable Energy,  Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet,  


  • DRAX, Mitsubishi Tout Biomass/Bioenergy CCS Pilot (Int'l. Report)
    DRAX,Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
    Date: 2020-06-26
    In the UK, Drax Group and Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Engineering, Ltd. (MHIE) are reporting a new 12-month bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) pilot project at the Drax Power Station in the Humber region, North Yorkshire.

    The pilot, which is expected to get underway this autumn, will test two of MHI's proprietary solvents -- KS-1TM Solvent which is presently being used at 13 commercial plants including Petra Nova in Texas where it is capturing 1.4 million tpy of CO2 , and KS-21TM Solvent which is designed to achieve significant performance improvements and cost savings, according to MHIE.

    Implementing BECCS at Drax could deliver 16 million tpy of negative emissions -- a third of the negative emissions the UK needs from BECCS to reach its zero carbon targets by 2050, according to DRAX. (Source: DRAX, MHI, Cdn. Biomass, 24 June, 2020) Contact: DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44(0)1757 618381 www.drax.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Mitsubishi Heavy Industries,  DRAX,  CCS,  Biomass,  


    Net-Zero and Beyond -- What Role for Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage? (Int'l., Ind. Report Attached)
    Chatham House
    Date: 2020-02-03
    Further to our 23rd Feb., 2017 Chatham House, biomass and climate change report coverage, according to Net-Zero and Beyond -- What Role for Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage?, new report from the London-headquartered NGO Chatham House, the UK Government is over-prioritizing carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) and biomass in its net-zero plans and failing to account for the impact these technologies could have on land use.

    The potential unintended consequences of scaling up biomass energy carbon capture and storage (BECCS} in the UK and assesses the extent to which the technologies could deliver true and sustainable decarbonisation to the energy sector.

    BECCS has received a swathe of Government support and media coverage in recent times, both in the build-up to the ratification of the UK's 2050 net-zero goal, and after its implementation. Supporters of the technologies point out that biomass, unlike gas or other fossil fuels, is renewable, and that it is produces less emissions when burned. If these emissions can be captured for storage and reuse, the process can become carbon neutral or even carbon negative, firms including Drax have claimed.

    The report, however, warns that BECCS is "no silver bullet" for a net-zero energy sector. It claims that there has not been enough research into the likely energy output of BECCS or the environmental impacts of scaling up biomass supply chains, making it difficult to determine whether BECCS systems can be carbon-neutral across the life cycle.

    According to the report, deployment of BECCS at the scales assumed by the UK's modelling, on a global scale, would consume land equivalent to that currently accounted for by cropland. This could pose problems for food security, result in biodiversity loss and hamper plans to re-assess land-use in line with net-zero, Chatham House concludes. Chatham House claims that failures to account for biomass supply chain emissions undermine the assumption that BECCS systems are inherently carbon-neutral and is accordingly calling for stricter sustainability requirements for biomass feedstock and urging the Government to prioritise decarbonisation across carbon-intensive sectors, reshape its land-use strategies to ensure BECCS decisions are made after full considerations of all alternatives, both technology-based and nature-based.

    Download the report HERE. (Source: Chatham House, edie news, February 2020) Contact: Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs, +44 (0) 20 7957 5710, contact@chathamhouse.org, www.chathamhouse.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News BECCS,  Chatham House,  Carbon Emissions,  Biomass,  Bioenergy,  


    Sutdy Examines Farming as CO2 Absorber (Ind. Report)
    University of Virginia
    Date: 2019-12-11
    A recently released study from the University of Virginia notes that farming, agriculture and other land practices presently contribute around 11 gigatons to CO2 emissions per year -- roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. However, the study argues that the land could actually be converted into an absorber of carbon, given the right conditions.

    Among the measures recommended by the study were richer countries transitioning to plant-based diets and reducing food waste, while aiding poorer nations to curb deforestation and restore degraded land. If a concerted global effort was made, land could be absorbing three gigatons of carbon by 2050, turning one of our biggest liabilities into a helping hand in the fight against climate change. The study also recommends:

  • 95 pct reduction in deforestation and land degradation by 2050. This would include more robust conservation policies in developing tropical countries, as well as the conversion of coastal wetlands into protected areas and the prohibition of peatland burning.

  • 25 pct reduction in agricultural emissions by 2050. This would include introducing synthetic or organic fertilizers, enhancing the water-agriculture interface in places where rice cultivation is a primary industry and managing emissions from fermentation and manure.

  • 50 pct adoption of plant-based diets by 2050. This would involve encouraging a healthier diet through consumer campaigns and governmental policies, as well as the development of new foodstuffs to entice unconvinced consumers.

  • 50 pct reduction of current level of food waste by 2050. This would involve tightening up gaps in the supply chain, improving consumer awareness through advertising campaigns and enhancing refrigeration and distribution capabilities in the developing world.

  • Restoration of forests, coastal wetlands and drained peatlands. This would involve financing ecosystem services, improving in local and national conservation policies and investing in restoration practices.

  • Improving forestry and agroforestry management. This would include optimising current forestation conservation process and integrating agroforestry into lands currently used for agriculture and grazing.

  • Enhancing soil carbon sequestration capabilities. This would include controlling soil erosion, reducing tillage of the land and restoring degraded soils, as well as the application of biochar where appropriate.

  • Deploying bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) in developed countries. This would involve investing into the research and development of BECCS technologies and deploying them in relevant sites. (Source: University of Virginia, Environmental Technology, 1 Dec., 2019) Contact: University of Virginia, Stephanie Roe, Environmental Researcher, Report Lead Author, 434-924-7761, www.evsc.as.virginia.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon,  Carbon Storage,  


  • Packard Foundation Warns Put a Brake on Bioenergy by 2050 to Avoid Negative Climate Impacts (Ind. Report)
    Packard Foundation
    Date: 2019-12-09
    According to the newly released Global Change Biology study from the Los Altos, California-based David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the burgeoning bioenergy sector must peak and decline in the next 30 years to alleviate extreme pressure on land. The study researchers assert that projections envisioning the use of biomass from crops, trees or grasses for fuel through 2100 overlook the technology's high carbon footprint and excessive land use.

    An Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report released last year found that many scenarios capable of reducing the threat of climate change relied heavily on bioenergy, predicting that energy from biomass could make up 26 pct of primary energy in 2050 -- up from 10 pct in 2020 -- and predicting that solar and wind combined would likely only account for 22 pct. Those scenarios often relied on significant use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS), which involves growing trees across a large area of land to produce wood pellets burned for energy, then capturing and sequestering the carbon emissions. In its analysis, though, the IPCC found significant challenges associated with a high reliance on bioenergy, noting in particular that the vast areas of land required to produce biomass for energy would compete with food production and other human needs.

    The Global Change Biology assessment examine a flurry of recent reports that suggest even more problems with large-scale bioenergy projects reliant on large tracts of land, and also show that more cost-effective alternatives will be available in the coming decades. Pulling from these recent studies, the authors establish three reasons why large-scale bioenergy must and can peak and decline in the next 30 years:

  • Large-scale bioenergy emits carbon. Carbon emissions from bioenergy can be greater in the near-term than emissions from the fossil fuels it is replacing, undermining the assumption that bioenergy is always a relatively low-emission and low-cost form of energy. Burning wood pellets, for example, creates a "double climate problem." Manufacturing and shipping wood pellets entails substantial emissions of fossil CO2, and it can take decades or centuries for harvested areas to return to pre-harvest carbon stocks.

  • Large-scale bioenergy puts a squeeze on land. Land is already a scarce resource, and it will become even scarcer with time due to an increase in the human population and a rise in the appreciation of the conservation value of natural and mostly-natural ecosystems--even if agricultural yields continue to increase. Because land is so limited, we should use it as efficiently as possible for energy production. In contrast to land-intensive bioenergy, the amount of electricity that can be produced from a hectare of land using photovoltaics is at least 50-100 times that from biomass.

  • Large-scale bioenergy is inferior to other solutions. And, by mid-century, land-intensive bioenergy will face fierce competition from superior technologies such as wind and solar energy, the development of efficient storage and other flexibility solutions, and the advent of more effective carbon removal technologies such as direct air capture with carbon storage.

    The assessment comes at a time when the bioenergy industry is ramping up worldwide, with the EU in the lead. Bioenergy currently accounts for 10 pct of the world's energy, and 50 pct of our renewable energy. In the EU, bioenergy accounts for two-thirds of all renewable energy (nearly half from wood). Two-thirds of the EU's "20 pct Renewable Energy by 2020" target depends on bioenergy. And the bloc is also about to greenlight the conversion of five large coal plants to bioenergy plants that burn imported wood pellets from overseas forests.

    Land-intensive electrical power projects in particular are picking up steam as governments and industry leaders seek to transform disused coal factories into new profit centers. Between 2006 and 2015, the production of wood pellets for biomass energy use quadrupled to 26 million tons. Worldwide, demand for globally traded wood pellets destined for use in phased-out coal plants or new dedicated bioenergy plants is expected to rise 250 pct by 2027.

    The study lays out a bioenergy trajectory that policymakers can use to encourage sustainable bioenergy while also opening the door for new technologies to replace land-intensive bioenergy in the very near future. These recommendations include improved accounting of the actual carbon emissions associated with the use of biomass, favoring biomass from waste, residues or land management practices that enhance carbon storage, and providing incentives for energy storage, direct air capture technologies, and low-carbon alternatives to fossil fuels. Above all, the authors argue that bioenergy projects should be avoided if they involve natural forests, such as converting natural forests to bioenergy plantations, or use land best suited for food crops. And the authors caution that claims that bioenergy projects are a zero-carbon form of energy should be met with skepticism.

    The Packard Foundation through 2020, will have awarded nearly $1 billion in grants to reduce carbon emissions, one of the its greatest program commitments in its 55-year history. (Source: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Dec., 2019) Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Walt Reid, Director Conservation and Science Program, Report Author, 650-948-7658, www.packard.org

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Bioenergy,  CO2,  CCS,  Biofuels,  Carbon Emissions,  


  • DRAX, Deep Branch Biotech to Turn CO2 into Animal Feed (Int'l)
    DRAX
    Date: 2019-06-24
    In the UK, power plant operator DRAX and Nottingham-startup Deep Branch Biotechnology, a lab located at DRAX's giant power station in Yorkshire, reports the two organizations will explore ways to capture and process CO2 into protein for sustainable animal feed.

    Deep Branch Biotechnology is to run the new pilot project within the DRAX power plant's Carbon Capture Usage and Storage (CCUS) Incubation Area. For the pilot project, scientists will gather waste CO2 from energy generation and feed it to microbes which will use it to make single-cell proteins that could replace soy and fish meal in fish and livestock feeds.

    Deep Branch claims it can convert "up to 60-70 pct of CO2 into protein, helping to both minimize the greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere during power generation and other industrial processes, whilst producing protein for animal feeds which will help reduce the impact of agricultural sectors on the environment as well."

    The Deep Branch pilot, which is slated to get underway this autumn, aims to capture enough CO2 to produce 100kg of protein. If successful, Deep Branch Biotechnology plans to build a larger production facility by 2020. DRAX has been capturing CO2 since February through its Bioenergy Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) pilot project, which uses technology developed by Leeds University spin-out company C-Capture. (Source: Deep Branch Biotechnology, DRAX, June, 2019) Contact: Deep Branch Biotechnology, Peter Rowe, CEO, info@deepbranchbio.com, www.deepbranchbio.com; DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, www.drax.com; C-Capture, Caspar Schoolderman, Director of Engineering, Tel/Fax +44 0 113 245 0418, www.c-capture.co.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News C-Capture,  CCUS,  DRAX,  CO2,  Carbon Capture,  


    Ending Woody Biomass Power Gen. Subsidies Urged in UK (Int'l)
    Committee on Climate Change
    Date: 2019-05-03
    In the UK, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) and other environmental groups are calling for an end to the government's multi-billion pound subsidy programme for wood-fired electric power generation on the grounds that woody biomass does not fit the government's net-zero GHG by 2050 plan.

    Environmental groups, including to Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), Biofuelwatch, the Dogwood Alliance, and the Southern Environmental Law Center, have noted that relying on woody biomass with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) to achieve climate targets is "misguided" and will prove overly expensive. Biomass power generation reached a record 35.6 TWh in 2018, up by 12 pct year-on-year, according to government statistics.

    The environmental organizations say the UK should rely on genuinely zero-emission renewables like wind, wave, and solar power, energy efficiency and conservation, and smart resources like energy storage, rather than woody biomass power generation. (Source: Committee on Climate Change, Renewables,May, 2019) Contact: Committee on Climate Change, www.theccc.org.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Biomass,  Committee on Climate Change ,  


    CO2 Now Being Captured in DRAX Biomass CCS Pilot (Int'l)
    DRAX
    Date: 2019-02-11
    In the UK, DRAX, the UK's biggest renewable power generator is reporting the first BECCS demo pilot project of its kind in the world has begun capturing carbon dioxide at its biomass-fired power station near Selby in North Yorkshire. The pilot project uses proprietary solvent technology developed by University of Leeds spin-out C-Capture. The pilot project is the first-time CO2 has been captured from the combustion of a 100 biomass biomass feedstock anywhere in the world.

    Drax has invested £400,000 in the pilot, which could be the first of several projects undertaken at the power station to deliver a rapid, lower cost demonstration of BECCS. According to the Royal Society and Royal Academy of Engineering, BECCS could enable the capture 50 million tpy of CO2 by 2050 -- approximately half the UK's emissions target.

    As previously reported, DRAX converted two thirds of the Selby Station to use sustainable biomass instead of coal making the plant the country's largest renewable power generator and the largest decarbonisation project in Europe.

    C-Capture designs world-leading, patented chemical processes for carbon dioxide removal.The company's solvent-based technology offers a safe, low-cost way to remove CO2 from emissions sources such as power stations, industrial plants and anaerobic digestion. (Source: DRAX, PR, 7 Feb., 2019) Contact: University of Leeds, www.leeds.ac.uk; C-CAPTURE, Caspar Schoolderman, Director of Engineering, www.c-capture.co.uk; DRAX , Will Gardiner, CEO, www.drax.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Carbon Capture,  C-CAPTURE,  CO2,  CCS,  


    DRAX Biomass Carbon Capture Pilot Now in Action (Int'l Report)
    DRAX
    Date: 2019-02-11
    In the UK, the nation's largest renewable power energy generator DRAX is reporting the nation's first Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) pilot project at its power station near Selby in North Yorkshire has begun capturing carbon dioxide.

    The "first of its kind" demonstration plant uses innovative technology developed by Leeds University spin-out C-Capture to capture CO2 from the combustion of a 100 pct biomass feedstock. The pilot plant was commissioned last November.

    Drax has invested £400,000 in the pilot, which could be the first of several projects undertaken at the power station to deliver a rapid, lower cost demonstration of BECCS. According to the Royal Society and Royal Academy of Engineering, BECCS could enable the capture of 50 million tpy by 2050 -- almost half of the UK's emissions target.

    Drax operates electric power generation and compressed wood biomass pellet production operations across the UK, including the woddy biomass-fired Selby, North Yorkshire plant which supplies fully 6 pct of the country's electricity needs.

    C-Capture's proprietary solvent-based chemical processes removes CO2 from emissions sources such as power stations, industrial plants and anaerobic digestion. (Source: DRAX, PR, 7 Feb., 2019) Contact: University of Leeds, www.leeds.ac.uk; C-CAPTURE, Caspar Schoolderman, Director of Engineering , www.c-capture.co.uk; DRAX , Will Gardiner, CEO, www.drax.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Biomass,  Woody Biomass,  Wood Pellet,  


    Nordic Nations Ink Carbon Neutrality Declaration (Int'l. Report)
    Carbon Neutrality
    Date: 2019-02-01
    The Prime Ministers of Finland, Norway and Iceland, the Swedish Minister for the Environment and Climate and the Danish Minister for Energy, Utilities and Climate have announced the Jan. 25th signing of the Declaration on Nordic Carbon Neutrality during a summit in Helsinki, Finland,.

    In the declaration, the five countries commit to enhance their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and intensify their cooperation to:

  • remove obstacles to low-emission development and promote transformations towards renewable energy;

  • promote carbon pricing and fossil fuel subsidy reform;

  • incentivize climate action in the private sector;
  • decarbonize the transport sector and enable green financing and deploy green procurement, green deals and impact investing;

  • promote joint Nordic business and research consortiums and contribute to the development and deployment of, inter alia, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and bioenergy with CCS (BECCS) technologies;

  • maintain or enhance biological carbon sinks and measure carbon sinks with an internationally agreed methodology;

  • develop information on reducing individual climate impacts and use existing consumer information schemes and initiatives on carbon and other environmental impacts on products and services;

  • ensure that youth organizations have a role in awareness raising on climate-friendly consumer behavior;

  • cooperate to encourage Nordic companies, investors, local governments, cities, organizations and consumers to step up their efforts towards carbon neutrality.

    The Nordic Council of Ministers will prepare a proposal on how to follow up on the declaration by 31 August 2019.

    The Copenhagen-headquartered Nordic Council is the official body for formal inter-parliamentary co-operation among the Nordic countries. Formed in 1952, it has 87 representatives from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden as well as from the autonomous areas of the Faroe Islands, Greenland, and the Aland Islands. (Source: Nordic Council of Ministers, IISDS, 31 Jan., 2019) Contact: Nordic Council of Ministers, Sunitha Senanayake, +45 33 96 02 00, Receptionen@norden.org www.norden.org/en/nordic-council

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Carbon Neutral,  Carbon Neutrality,  CO2,  Carbon Emissions,  GHGs,  


  • DRAX Plan Said to Threaten UK Emissions Target Success (Int'l)
    ClientEarth,DRAX
    Date: 2019-01-30
    In the UK, London-headquartered environmental law specialist ClientEarth is warning DRAX Powers' planned gas plant in Selby, North Yorkshire would produce 75 pct of the country's entire power sector emissions budget.

    The DRAX proposal for four combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) was warranted to replace its existing two coal-fired units ahead of the government's proposed coal phase-out in 2025. However,ClientEarth's assessment of the DRAX plans noted the project's scale, high emissions intensity and expected long operating life combined make it a "significant" threat to the UK achieving its carbon targets. ClientEarth also noted "DRAX has failed to prove why adding so much new large-scale fossil fuel power is necessary given existing and planned capacity. It has also failed to assess the project's full climate impact, at the precise time when the UK needs to rapidly decarbonize."

    The UK government estimates the UK will need 6GW of new gas power generation capacity through to 2035. Approving DRAX project would take this to 18GW -- three times the government's estimates.

    As previously reported, Drax announced that it is to pilot the first bioenergy carbon capture storage (BECCS) project of its kind in Europe which could make the renewable electricity produced at its North Yorkshire power station carbon negative. DRAX partnered with Leeds, UK-based C-Capture who invested £400,000 in what could be the first of several pilot projects undertaken at DRAX. (Source: DRAX, Air Quality News, Jan., 2019) Contact: ClientEarth, Sam Hunter Jones, Jon Bennett, +44 (0) 303 050 5935, jbennett@clientearth.org, www.clientearth.org; DRAX, Will Gardiner, CEO, +44 0 1757 618381, www.draxpower.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DRAX,  Biomass,  Carbon Emissions,  


    UK Committee on Climate Change Tables Woody Biomass Report (Int'l)
    Committee on Climate Change
    Date: 2018-11-19
    W In London, the UK government advisory Committee on Climate Change's recently released Biomass in a Low Carbon Economy report is recommending waste wood biomass should be reused and recycled as an "end-of-life" solution to delay or prevent the release of CO2 back into the atmosphere. The report also calls for the integration of carbon capture and storage (BECCS) technology with waste wood burning for energy generation wherever possible.

    According to the CCC report, "There is significant potential to increase domestic production of sustainable biomass to meet between 5 pct and 10 pct of energy demand from UK sources by 2050. The lower end of this range can be delivered by fully exploiting the UK's organic waste resource (after reduction, reuse and recycling) whilst maintaining today's level of agricultural and forest residue use." The report also recommends the government "not provide further policy support (beyond current commitments) to large-scale biomass power plants that are not deployed with CCS technology." It also called for the government to limit support for bioenergy use in buildings to biomethane produced from anaerobic digestion, thus creating a demand for UK sourced food and garden waste.

    Access the full biomass report HERE. (Source: The Committee on Climate Change, Nov., 2018) Contact: The Committee on Climate Change, www.theccc.org.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Woody Biomass,  Committee on Climate Change,  


    UK CCC Recommends CCS-Equipped Bioenergy Plants (Int'l Report)
    UK Committee on Climate Change
    Date: 2018-11-16
    In the UK, a newly released study from the government watchdog Committee on Climate Change is predicting bioenergys' contribution to the country's energy mix could meet between 5 and 15 pct of the UK's energy demand and slash the UK's total emissions by 50 MtCO2e/yr by 2050. The report also estimates that as much as 65 megatons of CO2, equivalent to up to around 15 pct of current UK CO2 emissions, could be sequestered through combined biomass and carbon capture and storage (BECCS) plants.

    Accordingly, the CCC recommends that the BEIS Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Department (BEIS) and Treasury create a value for removing CO2 from the atmosphere and storing it by extending carbon pricing. CCC also recommends that future biomass power plants receive government support only if they incorporate CCS technology. (Source: Committee on Climate Change, Utility Weeks, 15 Nov., 2018) Contact: CCC, Chris Stark, CEO, +44 (0) 207 591 6080, communications@theccc.gsi.gov.uk, www.theccc.org.uk

    More Low-Carbon Energy News UK Committee on Climate Change,  Carbon Emissions,  Climate Change,  Biomass,  


    Scottish Power Going 100 pct Wind Power After Drax Sale (Int'l)
    Scottish Power,DRAX
    Date: 2018-10-19
    Glasgow-headquartered Scottish Power reports that with the £702 million sale of its last coal-fired and hydro power plants to DRAX, it will become the first major UK energy company to generate all its electricity from wind power. Scottish Power now plans to invest £5.2 billion over four years to more than double its renewables capacity.

    Scottish Power scuttled all of its coal plants over the last 10 years and now has 2,700 MW of wind power capacity operating or under construction in the UK. It also has 3,000 MW of projects in the planning stage.

    Drax runs the UK's largest power plant near Selby in North Yorkshire and is moving away from coal ahead of a government deadline for an emissions limit on coal plants from 2025. To date the company has converted four of its six generating units to burn wood pellets. The Selby plant is believed to be the first bioenergy carbon capture storage (Beccs) project of its type in Europe. (Source: DRAX, BBC, 16 Oct., 2018) Contact: Scottish Power, Keith Anderson, CEO, +44 800 027 0072, www.scottishpower.co.uk; DRAX Power, Andy Koss, CEO, +44 0 1757 618381, www.draxpower.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Scottish Power,  DRAX,  Biomass,  Carbon Capture,  

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