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Global Algae Biofuel Market Could Hit $9.88Bn by 2024 (Ind. Report)
Algae Biofuel
Date: 2019-10-23
Algae Biofuel Market by Type -- Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2017 - 2024, a new report from Zion Market Research provides a comprehensive glance of algae biofuel market on the global and regional level. The study gives historical data from 2015 to 2017 along with the forecast from 2018 to 2024 based on both revenue and volume. The study includes major driving forces and restraints for the algae biofuel market along with the impact they have on the demand within the forecast period. Additionally, the study also provides the major growth opportunities of global algae biofuel market.

The global algae biofuel market study also comprises the detailed value chain analysis for providing a comprehensive view of the market. Moreover, the study also includes Porter's Five Forces model for algae biofuel, to understand the competitive landscape of the global market. The study includes a market attractiveness analysis of all the segments related to the market.

Algae Biofuel Market by Type (Bioethanol, Biodiesel, Methane, Jet Fuel, Biobutanol, Biogasoline, Green Diesel, and Others) and for Application (Transportation, Aerospace, and Other Applications): Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2017 -2024 report details HERE. (Source: Zion Market Research, Oct. 2019) Contact: Zion Market Research, 386-310-3803, www.zionmarketresearch.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  Zion ,  


Algae Biofuel Market Valued of $9.88Bn by 2024 (Ind. Report)
Zion Market Research
Date: 2019-09-23
Zion Market Research is touting its recently published Algae Biofuel Market by Type (Bioethanol, Biodiesel, Methane, Jet Fuel, Biobutanol, Biogasoline, Green Diesel, and Others) and for Application (Transportation, Aerospace, and Other Applications): Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast, 2017 -- 2024 report.

The report covers crucial data associated with worldwide Algae Biofuel Market, highlights the newest technological developments and new launches, and other related developements that impact the algae biofuel market. According to the report the Algae Biofuel Market will will be valued at $9.88 billion by 2024.

Report details are HERE. Request sample copy of Algae Biofuel Market Research Report HERE. (Source: Zion Market Research, Sept., 2019) Contact: Zion Market Research, +49-322 210 92714, USA/Canada Toll-Free No.1-855-465-4651, sales@zionmarketresearch.com, www.zionmarketresearch.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Zion Market Research ,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


Global Algae Biofuel Market 2018 Report (Ind. Report)
Algae Biofuel
Date: 2019-05-13
The Global Algae Biofuel Market 2018 research report from ICRWorld Research provides detailed information on the algae biofuel industry based on the revenue and volume for the forecast period 2018-2023. The research report provides the updated business information and industry future trends, identifies and quantifies the market share held by the significant industry players and gives an in-depth view of the competitive landscape.

The report divides the Algae Biofuel market into various regions -- North America, Middle-East a and Africa, Asia-Pacific, South America, and Europe-- as well as nationally.

The report benchmarks and profiles the Algae Biofuel industry leading players on the basis of product portfolio, manufacturing plants, market pricing, sales footprint, target customer types, etc.

Sample Report PDF HERE. Complete TOC of the Report HERE. (Source: ICRWorld Research, Market News Live, May, 2019) Contact: ICRWorld Research, www.icrworld.com, https://ca.linkedin.com/company/icrworld

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  


PNNL Seeking Algae Bioenergy, Biofuel Collaborations (Ind Report)
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Date: 2019-02-20
The U.S. DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) reports it is seeking algae industry partners and academic researchers to help find the best algae strains for biofuels and bioproducts to reduce the cost of producing bioenergy from algae feedstocks.

PNNL leads the Development of Integrated Screening, Cultivar Optimization and Verification (DISCOVR) project that employs the unique complementary capabilities of the four participating national laboratories -- Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratorie -- sand the outdoor testbed at the Arizona Center for Algal Technology and Innovation to identify and test high productivity microalgae strains for year-round outdoor cultivation. The goal is to provide a framework to accelerate meeting DOE's advanced biofuel goals with microalgae.

"A key cost driver for algae biofuels is productivity, which is directly tied to which algae strain is chosen and how it's cultivated," said Taraka Dale, a scientist at LANL. "By collaborating with industry and academia, we aim to bring together the best of the best strains and cultivation strategies to rapidly boost productivity and reduce costs."

"So far, we have tested more than 40 new microalgae strains and identified strains with up to 34 percent greater biomass productivity than benchmark strains," said Huesemann. "The success of the DISCOVR strain down selection and testing pipeline was demonstrated in 2018 by achieving more than 13 pct improvement in outdoor pond productivity relative to 2017, reducing the biomass selling price by about 10 pct."

The goal of the call for collaboration is to solicit algae strains, tools and techniques from the algae community to further boost algae productivity. This call gives industry and academia an opportunity to partner with the four national laboratories in DISCOVR, as well as AzCATI. (Source: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PR, Feb., 2019) Contact: PNNL, Michael Huesemann, DISCOVR Consortium leader, discovr.algae@lanl.gov, https://discovr.labworks.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ,  


Montana State Investigates Algae Biodiesel Production Costs (R&D)
Montana State University
Date: 2019-02-15
With $3 million in US DOE grant funding, researchers at Montana State University (MSU) in Bozeman are reporting they are in the early stages of a three-year project focused on developing a potential breakthrough in producing biofuels from algae.

Despite promising technology surrounding the conversion of algae oil into biodiesel, the costs of supplying the algae with supplemental CO2 have hampered commercial production. Researchers now believe SLA-04, a recently discovered strain of algae, could be cultivated using only the ambient CO2 of the atmosphere. SLA-04 was discovered in an eastern Washington lake containing high levels of carbonate minerals similar to baking soda. In the lake's unique environment, these algae have been shown to metabolize ambient CO2 very efficiently.

Assoc. Prof. Blake Wiedenheft in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Agriculture and the College of Letters and Science, will explore the use of the genome editing technique called CRISPR for enhancing the algae's ability to produce the oils desired for biofuel production. (Source: Montana State University, PR, Feb., 2019) Contact: Montana State Univ., Prof. Brent Peyton, Director, MSU Thermal Biology Institute, Prof. Robin Gerlach, Norm Asbjornson College of Engineering Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, www.montana.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,  Algae Oil,  Algae Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  


Algae Specialist Solarvest BioEnergy Raises $1,095,500 (Ind. Report)
Solarvest Bioenergy
Date: 2019-01-24
Vancouver-based algae technology specialist Solarvest Bioenergy Inc. is reporting closure of its second tranche of its previously announced financing. The offering raised gross proceeds from both tranches totaling $1,095,500 by way of the issuance of 5,477,500 units.

The proceeds will be used for the production of inventory, sales and marketing, equipment purchases, patenting costs and general working capital. (Source: Solarvest Bioenergy Inc., PR, 22 Jan., 2019) Contact: Solarvest Bioenergy Inc., Gerri Greenham, CEO, (416) 420 0947, ggreenham@solarvest.ca, www.solarvest.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Solarvest Bioenergy,  Algae Biofuel,  Biofuel ,  


2018-2026 Algae Biofuels Market Research Report Offered (Ind. Report)
Algae Biofuels
Date: 2018-11-19
Coherent Market Insights reports the availability of its global Algae Biofuels Market 2018-2026 research report covering the major players and market factors key to the growth of the global Algae Biofuels Market.

The report covers Algae Biofuels market share, growth, trends,forecasts and key statistics for the period 2018-2026. The report also examines the Algae Biofuels market based on national and regional factors as well as on application, technique and end-user. Overall, the report provides an in-depth insight into 2018-2026 global Algae Biofuels Market players, drivers, challenges and trends.

Access a sample PDF file of the Algae Biofuels report HERE.

Download PDF brochure of Algae Biofuels Market report HERE. (Source: Coherent Market Insights, Chemicals News, 17 Nov., 2018) Contact: Coherent Market Insights, (206) 701-6702 - Seattle Office, +44-020 8133 4027 - UK Office, sales@coherentmarketinsights.com, www.coherentmarketinsights.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuels,  


CO2-Algae Biofuel R&D Funded at Arizona State Univ. (Funding, R&D)
Arizona State University
Date: 2018-11-09
The U.S. DOE has announced the awarding of a total of $80 million tp 36 early-stage bioenergy projects aimed at reducing the cost of algae-based, drop-in fuels to $3 per gallon by 2022, Of the $80 million total, two Arizona State University (ASU) research teams received a total grant of nearly $4.5 million.

The two ASU teams are headed by Wim Vermaas, Foundation Professor in the School of Life Sciences and a member of the Center for Bioenergy and Photosynthesis, and Bruce Rittmann, director of Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology.

Both ASU projects are developing innovative approaches for improving the efficiency of microalgae to capture waste CO2 and convert it into biodiesel transportation fuels and other valuable products.

Rittmann will explore ways to make CO2 delivery to algae more efficient. Traditional methods involve sparging (bubbling) CO2 within the liquid used to grow the algae, which releases about 60-80 pct of the CO2 back into the atmosphere. This wasteful process defeats a major goal of using microalgae to remove this greenhouse gas from the atmosphere and decreases cost efficiency.

Rittmann's team developed a membrane carbonation process that uses inexpensive plastic fibers to deliver pure CO2 with nearly 100 pct efficiency directly to the microalgae. The team estimates that the technology will capture fourfold more CO2 than traditional sparging methods.

The team is partnering with the Salt River Project to develop methods for harvesting CO2 from power plant emissions. They are also partnering with the city of Mesa to remove CO2 from the biogas generated from anaerobic digesters at their wastewater treatment facilities. Rittmann's team will investigate whether the fibers can be used with microalgae to remove CO2 from the biogas, which would leave nearly pure methane which could be distributed through existing natural gas pipelines.

Vermaas and his team were awarded $2.5 million to pursue an innovative multi-pronged approach toward improved CO2 utilization. One approach is to increase the solubility of carbon dioxide in growth medium by developing a nanobubble gas delivery system.. A second approach is to utilize amines in the medium, which greatly enhance the solubility of CO2, allowing the gas to be taken up by photosynthetic microbes for producing biofuel. The researchers anticipate at least a 50 pct increase in the efficiency of CO2 use with advanced biofuel production under industrially relevant conditions. (Source: ASU, PR, Nov., 2018) Contact: ASU, Prof. Bruce Rittmann, Dir. Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, (480) 727-8322, www.biodesign.asu.edu/environmental-biotechnology; Willem Vermaas, ASU School of Life Sciences, 480-965-6250, wim@asu.edu, www.sols.asu.edu/willem-vermaas

More Low-Carbon Energy News Micro Algae,  Biodiesel,  Drop-In Fuel,  CO2,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Carbon Dioxide,  


euglena to Mass Produce Algae Jet Biofuel in Japan (Int'l)
euglena
Date: 2018-11-05
Further to our May 22md coverage, Tokyo-headquartered Japanese biotechnology company euglena reports it is set to begin mass production of algae and waste oil based jet biofuel and biodiesel with the completion of its refinery plant in Yokohama.

The Yokohama facility has a production capacity of 125 kiloliters of jet biofuel and ASTM certified biodiesel per year, increasing to 250,000 kiloliters per year by 2025.

The company has partnered with aviation group ANA Holdings with the aim of fueling their commercial international flights departing from Japan by 2020. Euglena is also planning to offer bio jet fuel to other companies taking off from Japan. ANA will support euglena to develop the airport infrastructure to supply aircraft. (Source: euglena, Nikkei, 3 Nov., 2018) Contact: euglena, Mitsuru Izumo, CEO, www.euglena.jp/en

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  euglena,  Jet Biofuel,  Biofuel,  


Mazda Backing Algae Biofuels R&D (Int'l, R&D, Ind. Report)
Mazda
Date: 2018-11-02
Japanese automaker Mazda reports it is backing two research projects in Japan to promote the widespread adoption of biofuels from microalgae growth.

Mazda hopes an ongoing industry-academia-government collaboration will be advantageous to its Sustainable Zoom-Zoom 2030 development program which considers renewable liquid fuels essential to drastic CO2 reduction.

Mazda is lending technical support to research into genome editing by Hiroshima University and to the study of plant physiology by the Tokyo Institute of Technology. (Source: Mazda, Engine Technology, 31 Oct., 2918) Contact: Mazda, www.mazda.com/en/inquiry

More Low-Carbon Energy News Mazda,  Algae Biofuel,  


CSU, NREL Lead $2.1Mn CO2 Utilization for Algae Biofuels R&D (R&D)
Colorado State University,NREL
Date: 2018-10-31
Following up on our October 4, 2017 coverage, a team of five Colorado State University (CSU) and three National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) researchers are reporting a $2.1 million, 3-year effort to increase algae yield for biofuel production by improving carbon dioxide utilization. For the research, New Belgium Brewing will provide CO2 from their fermentation processes, and Qualitas Health, a producer of omega-3 nutraceuticals from algae, will help test the improved CO2 delivery technology. The aim is to improve delivery of CO2 to algae and enhance algae's consumption of the CO2.

The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy in a collaborative effort to improve the cost-competitiveness and environmental sustainability of microalgae-based fuels and products. (Source: CSU, NREL, Various Media, Oct., 2018) Contact: Colorado State University, Prof. Ken Reardon, kenneth.reardon@colostate.edu, www.colostate.edu; US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

More Low-Carbon Energy News Colorado State University,  NREL,  Algae,  CO2,  Biofuel,  


Michigan-Penn State Partner on Algae Biofuel R&D (R&D, Funding)
University of Michigan
Date: 2018-10-08
In Ann Arbor, University of Michigan researchers report they will partner with colleagues at Penn State University to evaluate how best to grow algae, transform it into a diesel fuel and maximize its performance during the combustion process. The effort is being funded with a $2 million grant from the US DOE.

According to University of Michigan Biology professor Bradley Cardinale, researchers are "one of the first teams in the world to go all the way from designing sustainable biofuel feedstocks in outdoor ponds, to refining fuel." Algae-based biofuels are seen as an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional diesel fuels, which produce high levels of greenhouse gases when they burn. (Source: Univ. of Michigan, AP, witf, 7 Oct., 2018) Contact: University of Michigan, University of Michigan, Biology Prof. Bradley Cardinale, (734) 764-9689, bradcard@umich.edu, http://seas.umich.edu/research/faculty/brad_cardinale

More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Michigan,  Algae Biofuels,  Algae,  


LANL Researching Affordable Algae Biofuel Conversion (R&D)
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Date: 2018-07-30
At New Mexico's Los Alamos National Laboratory's New Mexico Consortium lab, molecular biologist Amanda Barry and a team are reportedly working to determine whether one particular strain of algae can be produced at low cost and in short periods of time so that it could economically compete with fossil fuels.

The New Mexico Consortium's lab is a non-profit corporation formed by three New Mexico universities to facilitate research and increase cooperation between academia, industry and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the future, LANL will look for an industrial partner already growing algae outdoors.

Approximately 30 people at LANL are engaged in all sorts of biofuel research, which has been going on since 2009, according to Babetta Marrone, senior scientist and the lab's biofuels program manager. (Source: LLNL, Santa Fe New Mexican, 29 July, 2018) Contact: Los Alamos National Laboratory, (505) 667-5061, www.lanl.gov

More Low-Carbon Energy News Los Alamos National Laboratory,  LANL,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


Global Algae Biofuel Market Could Hit $9.88Bn by 2024 (Ind. Report)
Zion Market Research
Date: 2018-07-13
The recently released Algae Biofuel Market Report from Zion Market Research has found that the algae biofuel market was valued at approximately $4.7 billion in 2017 and is expected to generate revenue of around $9.88 billion by the end of 2024. The report attributes algae biofuel market growth to an increasing worldwide demand foir fuel, growth in the transportation industry, fossil fuel market volatility and an emphasis on reducing fuel emissions.

The report notes that the US and Canada dominated the market in 2017 with more than 30 pct of the global algae biofuel market. The study projects the Asia Pacific region will experience major growth in the market during the forecast period due to technological advancements and materials availability.

The report referenced policies such as the European Commission's Renewable Energy Directive, which would require that at least 10 pct of transportation fuels come from renewable sources by 2020. (Source: Zion Market Research , July, 2018) Contact: Zion Market Research, +49-322 210 92714, USA/Canada (855) 465-4651, sales@zionmarketresearch.com, www.zionmarketresearch.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Zion Market Research,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


Biodiversity Key to Stable Algal Biofuel, says Study (R&D Report)
University of Michigan
Date: 2018-07-03
Researchers from the University of Michigan have confirmed that the key to improving the performance of algal biofuel systems is through biodiversity. In the first large-scale experiment to study the connection between biodiversity and algal biofuel stability, the researchers grew varying combinations of freshwater algal species in 80 artificial ponds and found that a diverse mix of algal species performed better than any single species. They also found that diversity does not necessarily result in more biomass or algal mass, and that monoculture produced larger biomass results in most cases.

After a 10-week study, the researchers compared the ability of the algae and the algal combinations to multitask and found that monoculture algae were able to perform very well in one or two tasks. However, the combined algae species were better at a range of tasks.

"Our findings suggest there is a fundamental trade-off when growing algal biofuel. You can grow single-species crops that produce large amounts of biomass but are unstable and produce less biocrude. Or, if you are willing to give up some yield, you can use mixtures of species to produce a biofuel system that is more stable through time, more resistant to pest species, and which yields more biocrude oil," according to the report. (Source: Univ. of Michigan, GinnersNow, 28 June, 2018) Contact: University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, Casey Godwin, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, (734) 764-6453, seas-info@umich.edu, seas.umich.edu

More Low-Carbon Energy News University of Michigan,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics Tout Algae Biofuels R&D (R&D)
Synthetic Genomics ,ExxonMobil
Date: 2018-03-09
Following up on our June 21, 2017 coverage, Houston-headquartered oil giant ExxonMobil and Synthetic Genomics Inc. are reporting an outdoor field study that will grow naturally occurring algae in several contained ponds in California. The research will enable the partners to better to understand fundamental engineering parameters including viscosity and flow, which cannot easily be replicated in a lab. The joint research program could lead to the technical ability to produce 10,000 bpd of algae biofuel by 2025.

In 2017, ExxonMobil and Synthetic Genomics announced breakthrough research published in Nature Biotechnology that resulted in a modified algae strain that more than doubled oil content without significantly inhibiting growth, a key challenge along the path to commercial scalability. (Source: ExxonMobil, PR, 6 Mar., 2018) Contact: Synthetic Genomics, Oliver Fetzer, CEO, www.syntheticgenomics.com; ExxonMobil, Vijay Swarup, VP, R&D, (972) 444-1107, www.exxonmobil.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,  Algal Fuels,  Biofuel,  ExxonMobil,  Synthetic Genomics ,  


ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics Bullish on Algae Biofuel (Ind. Report)
ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics
Date: 2018-03-07
ExxonMobil and La Jolla,California-based Synthetic Genomics report they are collaborating to produce up to 10,000 bpd of algae biofuel every day by 2025. The pair have been collaborating to create oil from algae since 2009.

"The progress we are making in the lab toward engineering highly efficient algae strains that convert sunlight and CO2 into renewable high energy density biofuel is exciting and warrants continued research about how our technology will scale. Our (California) outdoor algal facility creates a perfect stepping stone from our labs to the greenhouse and to the outdoors to lay the foundation for a large scale commercial deployment of our technology in the future," Synthetic Genomics CEO Oliver Fetzer notes. (Source: ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics, innovators, 6 Mar., 2018) Contact: ExxonMobil, http://corporate.exxonmobil.com; Synthetic Genomica, Oliver Fetzer, CEO, (858) 754-2900, www.syntheticgenomics.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News ExxonMobil,  Synthetic Genomics ,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


LLNL Funded Biofuel-Producing Algae R&D (Funding, R&D)
General Automation Lab Technologies,Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Date: 2018-02-02
The US DOE reports it has awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) a three-year, $1.5 million grant to improve the growth and efficiency of biofuel-producing algae through the alteration of their microbiomes. LLNL will collaborate with San Francisco-based startup General Automation Lab Technologies (GALT) whose novel technology will help the researchers to better understand how algae grow and function in different microbial conditions. This is essential to being able to increase algal production for alternative fuels.

The project is being funded by Funded by the DOE Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). BETO works with industry, academia and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in algal biofuels technologies. (Source: US DOE, LLNL. Feb., 2018) Contact: LLNL, Xavier Mayali, (925) 423-3892, mayali1@llnl.gov; Ty Samo, (925) 423-5837, samo1@llnl.gov, www.llnl.gov; BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office; US DOE EERE, http://energy.gov/eere; General Automation Lab Technologies, (917) 332-7230, www.galt-inc.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE EERE,  DOE BETO,  General Automation Lab Technologies,  Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  Biofuel ,  


Algae.Tec Abandoning Algae Biofuels Sector (Int'l)
Algae.Tec
Date: 2017-12-01
Perth, Australia-headquartered Algae.Tec reports it is exiting the biofuels sector and transitioning into a "plant-based health and wellbeing company."

The company's technology delivers sustainable and renewable advanced algae products such as proteins for consumption and biofuel oils for biodiesel transportation fuel and power generation, according to the company website. (Source: Algae.Tec, Stockhead, 28 Nov., 2017) Contact: Algae.Tec, Malcomb James, CEO, +61 (08) 9380 6790, (678) 679-7370 -- U.S. Office, admin@algaetec.com.au, www.algaetec.com.au

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae.Tec,  Algae Biofuel,  Algae,  Biodiesel,  


ExxonMobil, REG Tout Cellulosic Biodiesel R&D Progress (R&D)
xxonMobil ,Renewable Energy Group
Date: 2017-11-03
In Clinton, New Jersey, ExxonMobil and Renewable Energy Group's REG Life Sciences unit report that by utilizing REG's patented fermentation technology their 2016 joint research program has demonstrated the ability to produce biodiesel through fermentation of renewable cellulosic sugars from agricultural wastes. The companies have agreed to extend the research program and to jointly explore the technology's scalability and commercial potential.

The research also confirmed REG Life Sciences technology can achieve substantial reductions of full-lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compared to traditional diesel fuel.

ExxonMobil is also actively researching other emission-reducing technologies, including algae biofuels and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). In June 2017, ExxonMobil and partner Synthetic Genomics, Inc. announced a joint research breakthrough in advanced biofuels involving the modification of an algae strain that more than doubled its oil content without significantly inhibiting the strain's growth. (Source: ExxonMobil, Auto Channel, Others, Oct., 2017)Contact: REG Life Sciences, Eric Bowen, VP, www.regi.com/technologies/life-sciences; ExxonMobil, Vijay Swarup, VP, R&D, (972) 444-1107, www.exxonmobil.com, Twitter www.twitter.com/exxonmobil.

More Low-Carbon Energy News xxonMobil,  Renewable Energy Group ,  Biodiesel,  Cellulosic,  


Algoma Algal Biotech, MKU Ink Micro-Algae Biofuel MoU (Int'l)
Madurai Kamaraj University,Algoma Algal Biotechnology
Date: 2017-10-30
India's Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU) reports the signing of a MoA with University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh research spin-out Algoma Algal Biotechnology LLC (Algoma) for a mutual transfer of knowledge and technology in the field of producing bio-fuel from micro-algae.

According to MKU, Toivo Kallas, a Distinguished Professor of Microbial Genetics and Biotechnology at UWO and the CEO of Agoma, whose research include photosynthetic energy conversion reactions and environmental responses of cyanobacteria and micro-algae, took interest in the research work led by P. Varalakshmi, an Assistant Professor with Department of Molecular Biology in MKU. Varalakshmi and her research team identified various micro-algae strains which have shown potential as feedstock for the production of biofuel.

Algoma is seeking a collaboration on the possibility of using genetic engineering and other techniques to improve the efficiency of energy conversion by the strains of micro-algae identified by MKU researchers and to advance commercialized production of bio-fuel from micro-algae. (Source: Madurai Kamaraj University, PR, 29 Oct., 2017) Contact: MKU, +91 452 245 8471, www.mkuniversity.org; Algoma Algal Biotechnology, www.algomaalgal.com

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algoma Algal Biotechnology,  Micro-Algae,  Algal Biofuel,  


N.Korea Exploring Algae Biofuel to Skirt Int'l Sanctions (Int'l)
North Korea, 38 North
Date: 2017-10-25
According Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies' North Korea-focused 38north,org website, Pyongyang is developing algae biomass as "a strategic resource" for both food and fuel production, as well as a way around increasingly tight economic sanctions. The country's researchers have reportedly been exploring aquaculture systems since the early 2000s.

Using available data from nine North Korean facilities, 38 North estimates the country presently could produce 2,851 tpy of algae biomass containing approximately 1,425.5 tons of nutritional mass convertible to the equivalent of 4,075.6 barrels of oil. (Source: CNBC Asia-Pacific, 38 North 20 Oct., 2017) Contact: 38 North, www.38north.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,   Algal,   Algae Biofuel,  


CSU Funded for Better Algae Biofuels R&D (Funding, R&D)
Colorado State University
Date: 2017-10-04
Colorado State University scientists are reporting receipt of as much as $3.5 million over three years in US DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) funding for Rewiring Algal Carbon Energetics for Renewables aimed at improving how algae-based biofuels and bioproducts are made. The overall project goal set by the Department of Energy is to double the yield of biofuel precursors from algae to about 3,700 gallons per acre per year.

Strategies to be used by the team to meet this goal include increasing algal cultivation productivity, optimizing biomass composition, and extracting and separating different types of algal lipids to reduce the cost of upgrading them to renewable diesel.The study will be led by scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado.

The researchers will use an algae species called Desmodesmus armatus, and will focus on fundamental processes of efficiently channeling carbon dioxide into useful fuel intermediates. The project will work to ferment carbohydrates in the algal cells into chemicals of interest, including ethanol, as well as a fuel precursor called 2,3 butanediol.

Other partners on the project will work on the algae-to-bioproduct life cycle, including modification of growing pond conditions, and separating algal solids from water to remove lipids.

The multidisciplinary team includes CSU's Ken Reardon, professor of chemical and biological engineering; Graham Peers, associate professor of biology; and Jason Quinn, assistant professor of mechanical engineering; along with partners at National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines, Arizona State University, Utah State University, and representatives from industry. San Diego-based Sapphire Energy is a project partner and has pioneered the use of D. armatus for biofuels. (Source: Colorado State University, PR, 2 Oct., 2017) Contact: Colorado State University, Prof. Ken Reardon, kenneth.reardon@colostate.edu, www.colostate.edu; US DOE BETO, energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

More Low-Carbon Energy News Colorado State University,  Sapphire Energy,  Algae,  Algal Biofuel,  BETO,  


Cornell Reports Bioreactor Algal Biofuel Breakthrough (Ind. Report)
Boyce Thompson Institute
Date: 2017-10-02
Cornell University's Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) and Texas A&M University researchers are reporting "algal droplet bioreactors on a chip", a new technology that may revolutionize the search for the perfect algal strain.

In the new technology, a single algal cell is captured in a droplet of water encapsulated by oil then millions of algal droplets squeeze onto a chip about the size of a quarter. Each droplet is a "micro-bioreactor", a highly controlled environment in which algal cells can grow and replicate for several days, forming a genetically homogenous colony that goes through its typical biological reactions, including the production of lipids.

The researchers first validated the chip system with algae known to grow faster or slower, or produce more or less lipid. They then screened 200,000 chemically mutated cells, identifying six mutants with both faster growth and higher lipid content. The screening, done on-chip, uses fluorescence detection of chlorophyll, representing total cell mass, and BODIPY, a fluorescent molecule that binds to lipids. All mutants with potential for improved growth or lipid production were recovered and verified off-chip.

The tools for improving throughput are already in development, including larger chips that can screen millions of droplets in one experiment.

With the discovery and development of much more efficient algal strains, commercial-scale production of biofuel from algae may finally be a realistic promise. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation. (Source: Cornell University, PR, Plant Direct, 28 Sept., 2017) Contact: Cornell Univ., George Lowery, (607) 255-2171, gpl5@cornell.edu, www.cornell.edu; Texas A&M, Arum Han , (979) 845-9686; Boyce Thompson Institute, (607) 254-1234, https://btiscience.org

More Low-Carbon Energy News Algal,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


DOE Reports Additional $8.8Mn for Algae Tech. Innovations (R&D)
DOE ,BETO
Date: 2017-09-11
The U.S. Department of Energy is reporting the selection of four additional projects from the Productivity Enhanced Algae and ToolKits funding opportunity to receive up to $8.8 million for projects that will deliver high-impact tools and techniques for increasing the productivity of algae organisms in order to reduce the costs of producing algal biofuels and bioproducts. The funding for this initiative now totals over $16 million.

The organizations selected include:

  • The Colorado School of Mines, in partnership with Global Algae Innovations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Colorado State University, will improve the productivity of wild algal strains using advanced directed evolution approaches in combination with high-performance, custom-built, solar simulation bioreactors;

  • The University of California, San Diego, will develop genetic tools, high-throughput screening methods, and breeding strategies for green algae and cyanobacteria, targeting robust production strains;

  • The University of Toledo, in partnership with Montana State University and the University of North Carolina, will cultivate microalgae in high-salinity and high-alkalinity media to achieve productivities without needing to add concentrated carbon dioxide;

  • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will ecologically engineer algae to encourage growth of bacteria that efficiently remineralize dissolved organic matter to improve carbon dioxide uptake and simultaneously remove excess oxygen. (Source: US DOE BETO, www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-technologies-office

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE BETO,  Algae,  Algal Biofuel,  Algae Biofuel,  


  • NATO Funds Serbian Algae Biofuel R&D (Ind. Report, Int'l R&D)
    NATO Science for Peace and Security (SPS) Programme
    Date: 2017-08-21
    The NATO Science for Peace and Security (SPS) Programme reports it is supporting eitht Serbian scientists' three-year research project to develop the commercial production of biofuel from algae. The project is being carried out at the Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Belgrade, in cooperation with Manchester University in the UK and Baylor University in Texas. (Source: NATO, PR, 18 Aug., 2017) Contact: NATO Science for Peace and Security (SPS) Programme, www.nato.int/science; Institute for Multidisciplinary Research in Belgrade, www.imsi.rs

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  


    Algae Cultivation Techniques for Biofuels Explored at WSU (R&D)
    Washington State University
    Date: 2017-07-31
    Washington State University researchers report the development of a way to grow algae more efficiently and quickly -- in days rather than weeks -- and thus make algae a more viable feedstock for biofuels and other applications.

    According to a release, researchers would like to produce algae efficiently because of its potential environmental benefits. Oil from the algae can be used as a petroleum alternative, and algae also can be used as food, feed, fiber, fertilizer, pigments and pharmaceuticals. Growing and harvesting algae in wastewater streams could also reduce the environmental footprint of many manufacturing processes.

    However, its industrial use hasn't caught on, primarily because algae needs a lot of time and water to grow. Generally, large ponds are required, and harvesting is labor intensive. Researchers have begun developing biofilm reactors to grow the algae, but the reactors aren't efficient because of pH or temperature variations or a limited supply of carbon dioxide gas. The patent-pending biofilm reactor recycles gasses and uses less water and lower lighting than typical reactors. The system allows the algae to simultaneously do photosynthesis like a plant while also "eating" carbon and respiring like an animal, the researchers say. The researchers fed the algae glycerol, a cheap waste product of biodiesel production, and urea, another inexpensive chemical that serves as a nitrogen source for the algae. Due to the design, CO2 and oxygen are recycled in the system.

    The researchers have filed a patent application on the technology and are working to optimize the process which was funded through a Fulbright fellowship. (Source: Algae Research, VDF Central, July 26, 2017) Contact: Washington State University, Prof. Haluk Beyenal, Gene & Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering & Bioengineering, https://voiland.wsu.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  Biodiesel,  


    ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics Tout Algae Biofuels R&D (R&D)
    ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics
    Date: 2017-06-21
    Following up on our Jan, 20, 2017 coverage, scientists from ExxonMobil and La Jolla, California-based Synthetic Genomics, Inc. (SGI) are reporting development of a new strain of algae capable of converting carbon into a record amount of energy rich fat -- about 40 pct -- that can be turned into biofuels on an industrial scale.

    Using CO2 to generate fat from algae is not necessarily new, but the amount of fat produced by this new strain of algae is hugely significant since fatty algae make the strain more fit to eventually produce biofuels at an industrial scale, according to the the researchers.

    Algae based fuel emits fewer greenhouse gases than most other energy sources,and could potentially play a vital role in the transition to emission energy sources. Just as significantly, unlike other biofuel feedstocks such as corn or sugar cane, algae production on an industrial scale would not have a negative effect on food production.

    SGI and ExxonMobil have been collaborating on algae biofuels R&D since 2009. (Source: ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics, Biofuels Int'l, Others, 20 June, 2017) Contact: Synthetic Genomics, www.syntheticgenomics.com; ExxonMobil, Media, (972) 444-1107, www.exxonmobil.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News ExxonMobil ,  Synthetic Genomics,  Algae,  Biofuel,  


    PNNL Researching Time, Cost Effective Algal Biofuels (R&D)
    PNNL,BETO
    Date: 2017-06-12
    In Sequim, Washington, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory are working to lower the cost of producing biofuels from algae by utilizing an indoor system that mimics the conditions of outdoor ponds. The project -- Development of Integrated Screening, Cultivar Optimization, and Validation Research (DISCOVR) -- is funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and has created an integrated screening platform for the rapid discovery of high-productivity strains for resilient, year-round outdoor cultivation via crop rotation.

    BETO's Advanced Algal Systems Program aims to demonstrate an algal biofuel intermediate yield of 2,500 gpy per acre by 2018 and 5,000 gallons per acre per year by 2022. The program also aims to cut the total production costs of microalgae biofuels to $3/gasoline gallon equivalent by 2030, with or without co-products.

    Researchers are currently cultivating 30 strains of algae, which they will narrow down to the four most promising strains. Of the four strains the researchers will determine which have the highest oil, protein, and carbohydrate content, as well as other factors, such as bacterial resistance and potential for creating valuable co-products. The team will then compare the strains to two well-studied algae strains, and the top-performing strains will be further tested to identify the optimal algae strain for biofuel production. (Source: PNNL, EIN PressWire, June, 2017) Contact: PNNL, (509) 371-6989, www.pnnl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Alagal Biofuel,  Algae,  Biofuel,  PNNL,  BETO,  


    Japanese Biotech euglena Touts Algae Jet Biofuel PLans (Int'l)
    euglena
    Date: 2017-05-22
    Tokyo-based algae specialist Euglena Co. Tokyo-based euglena, a biotech venture formed by the University of Tokyo reports it is expanding overseas operations and hopes to sell algae-based jet fuel overseas, and expects commercial use of the fuel by 2020.

    euglena, which launched in China in 2015, Construction of euglena's pilot algae biofuel plant in Yokohama will start on June 1. The new plant, which carries a 5.8 billion yen price tag, will produce 125 kiloliters of algae biofuel a year. (Source: euglena, May 19, 2017) Contact: Euglena Co., www.euglena.jp/en

    More Low-Carbon Energy News euglena,  Algae,  Biofuel,  Algae Biofuel,  


    Egyptian Researchers Pursuing Jatropha Jet Biofuel (Int'l, R&D)
    National Research Center's Department of Chemical Engineering
    Date: 2017-05-12
    In Assiut, Egypt, researchers at the National Research Center's Department of Chemical Engineering are researching aviation biofuels from recycled cooking oils and combining them with the oil of Jatropha seeds, a plant watered by sewage in the desert. The researchers are transforming natural oils to have combustion, viscosity, volatilization, flash point, and freezing point characteristics close to that of traditionally used kerosene airplane fuel. The National Research Center research team is also seeking to produce algae-derived biofuels.

    According to the National Research Center, Egypt has succeeded in cultivating 420,000 square meters of Jatropha in Luxor province, south of Cairo. (Source: Egypt National Research Center Department of Chemical Engineering, Al-Fanar Media, 10 May, 2017) Contact: Egypt National Research Center Department of Chemical Engineering, +202 3337 1362, http://www.nrc.sci.eg

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Aviation Biofuel,  Jet Biofuel,  Jatropha,  Algae Biofuel,  


    SUNY Genesco Advancing Biodiesel, Algae Biofuel Programs (Ind. Report)
    SUNY Genesco
    Date: 2017-04-24
    In the Empire State, SUNY's Geneseo State College eGarden is reporting the upgrading of its solar and wind energy system to support it biodiesel and eGarden biofuels operations.

    The eGarden, which presently converts 1,200 - 1,400 gpy of on-campus sourced waste vegetable cooking oil into biodiesel fuel, is currently developing the capacity to convert algae into biodiesel fuel. (Source: Genesco State College, 20 April, 2017) Contact: Genesco State College, (585) 245-5211, www.geneseo.edu; SUNY, www.suny.edu

    More Low-Carbon Energy News SUNY,  Algae,  Biodiesel,  Biofuel ,  


    Manta Biofuels Relocating to Owings Mills, Maryland (Ind. Report)
    Manta Biofuel
    Date: 2017-03-22
    Manta Biofuel LLC, a Baltimore based biotechnology firm that has developed a three step method for growing and harvesting algae for the production of renewable crude oil, is reportedly expanding operations to Owings Mills, Maryland.

    In July, 2016, Manta Biofuel won a $1 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy to further develop its algal technology. Manta's algae biofuel can be used as a drop in replacement for traditional crude oil and can be refined into gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel and other petroleum derived products. Refiners are the primary end consumers of crude oil and this is the larger market Manta will address in the long term. (Source: Manta Biofuel, Baltimore BUsiness Journal, 20 Mar., 2017) Contact: Manta Biofuel, www.mantabiofuel.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Manta Biofuel,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  


    Global Algae Biofuel Industry 2017 Market Overview -- Report Available (Ind. Report)
    Algae Biofuel
    Date: 2017-03-10
    Global Algae Biofuel Industry 2017 Market Overview, Size, Share, Trends, Analysis, Technology, Applications, Growth, Market Status, Demands, Insights, Development, Research and Forecast 2017-2020, a new research study presents a comprehensive analysis and understanding the development of the global Algae Biofuel market.

    The study examines the vital growth factors and the current trends that are estimated to enhance the growth of the global market. The research report also offers an-depth analysis of the global Algae Biofuel market, focusing on the product portfolio, primary applications, latest developments, regional segmentation, and the competitive scenario of the overall market. In addition, with the aid of diverse analytical tools, the research study throws light on the key opportunities and the challenges that are being faced by the prominent players that are operating in the globe market.

    A report sample and details is available HERE. (Source: QY Research Reports, PR, 7 Mar., 2017) Contact: QY Research Reports, (518) 621-2074, sales@qyresearchreports.com , www.qyresearchreports.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  


    National Labs Investigate Algae Strains for Biofuels (R&D)
    DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Sandia National Laboratories,PNNL
    Date: 2017-03-10
    Sandia National Laboratories reports it is partnering with the Los Alamos National Lab, Pacific Northwest Lab, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arizona State University to identify and test various strains of algae for resistance to a host of predators and diseases.

    Their investigations are part of the new, $6 million Development of Integrated Screening, Cultivar Optimization and Validation Research (DISCOVR) project to determine which algae strains are the toughest and most commercially viable. The U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is sponsoring the project.

    Researchers estimate that 30 pct of current production on algae farms is lost each year due to pond crashes. For early crash detection, Jeri Timlin, an analytical chemist on Sandia's DISCOVR team, is using spectro-radiometric monitoring to watch the ponds for subtle changes in reflected light that indicate the presence of pathogens or predators. This technique can detect subtle color changes as well as other physical and chemical properties of the algae, making it possible to determine the pond's density and overall health.

    While Sandia monitors ponds and evaluates resistance to diseases, PNNL will quantify the biomass production rate of 10 strains of algae that they grow in a variety of simulated environmental conditions. NREL then will perform compositional analysis on the same strains, seeking those best suited for fuel production. Later phases of the three-year project will involve partners in this "algae pipeline," increasing pond culture stability and evaluating the potential for generating products other than fuel, such as chemicals used for industrial purposes. (Source: Sandia National Laboratories, 6 Mar., 2017) Contact: U.S. DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, energy.gov/eere/office-energy-efficiency-renewable-energy; Sandia National Lab, Jeri Timblin, (505) 844-7932, jatimbli@sandia.gov,www.sandia.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ,  Sandia National Laboratories,  Algae,  Algae Biofuel,  PNNL,  


    PNNL Lab Investigating Algae as Biofuel Feedstock (R&D)
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Date: 2017-02-03
    Dr. Michael Huesemann, a lead researcher at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, is working on a $6 million, three-year algae Development of Integrated Screening, Cultivar Optimization and Validation Research (DISCOVR) project to identify the optimum algae for biofuel production.

    The project is being pursued at various laboratories in five stages as follows: In Tier I, scientists in Sequim and New Mexico test up to 30 different algae strains to see how weather tolerant they are and the top third will go to Tier II.

    In Tier II, Sequim houses a unique climate-simulating system called Laboratory Environmental Algae Pond Simulator (LEAPS) that simulates climates and seasons around the world inside glass cylinder photobioreactors. Two other labs will evaluate the algae to determine it value and other potential uses that could make algae biofuel production more cost-effective. Scientists also will research how resilient certain algae strains are to predators, like protozoans, and other competing algae.

    In Tier III, researchers in New Mexico will further test top-performing algae strains, which includes forcing cells to grow faster or generate more oils, using state-of-the-art laboratory techniques.

    In Tier IV, algae strains will travel to outdoor ponds in Arizona to compare biomass output with earlier steps.

    In Tier V, scientists will study the algae strains that performed the best in different lighting and temperature conditions. Study data will be added to PNNL's Biomass Assessment Tool to help researchers generate maps that illustrate the expected biomass productivity of each algae species grown in outdoor ponds nationwide. Laboratory officials said work that could stem from this project includes converting harvested algae into biofuels, examining operational changes such as crop rotation to further increase biomass growth and assessing the technical feasibility and economic costs of making biofuel from algae selected through this process.

    Algae project details are HERE. (Source: PNNL, Sequim Gazette, 2 Feb., 2017) Contact: PNNL: Marine Sciences Laboratory, (360) 683-4151, marine.pnnl.gov

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Pacific Northwest National Laboratory,  Algae,  Biofuel,  


    Exxon, Synthetic Genomics Continue Algae Biofuels R&D (Ind. Report)
    ExxonMobil,Synthetic Genomics
    Date: 2017-01-20
    La Jolla, California-based Synthetic Genomics, Inc. and petroleum giant ExxonMobil are reporting the extension of their agreement to conduct joint research into advanced algae biofuels after making significant progress in understanding algae genetics, growth characteristics and increasing oil production.

    The two firms have been jointly researching and developing oil from algae for use as a renewable, lower-emission alternative to traditional transportation fuels since launching the program in 2009. Work continues toward developing strains of algae that demonstrate significantly improved photosynthetic efficiency and oil production through selection and genetic engineering of higher-performance algae strains.

    ExxonMobil is engaged in a broad range of research on advanced biofuels, partnering with universities and other companies. The purpose of these research and development programs is to explore new technologies and seek the best pathways toward scalable and cost-effective production of advanced biofuels. (Source: ExxonMobil, Synthetic Genomics, PR, 18 Jan., 2017) Contact: Synthetic Genomics, www.syntheticgenomics.com; ExxonMobil, Media, (972) 444-1107, www.exxonmobil.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Synthetic Genomics ,  Algae,  Algae Niofuel,  Biofuel,  ExxonMobil,  


    GCC Algae Biofuel Prospects Market Opportunity, Key Trends 2014-2020 -- Report Available (Ind. Report)
    Future Market Insights
    Date: 2017-01-09
    According to Future Marketinsights' GCC Algae Biofuel Prospects Market Opportunity, Key Trends 2014-2020 report, half of algae's composition by weight is a lipid oil which been targeted to convert into biodiesel and other alternative fuels including biobutanol, bio-gasoline, methane, ethanol, hydrogen derived renewable fuel and jet fuel.

    The report finds that algae costs more per unit than other biofuel crops but is claimed to yield 10 to 100 times more fuel per unit area. In 2014, the prices of oil were between US $ 56 to US $ 120 per barrel. The cost of producing micro algal biomass in 2014 was $2.95/kg through photo bioreactors. If the annual biomass production capacity is increased to 1000 tons then the cost will reduce to $1.5/kg for a litre of crude oil.

    The extraction of biofuels from algae is largely dependent on organic solvents such as benzene. The companies that are working on innovating algal biofuel technology are Algenol Biofuels Inc., Blue Marble Productions, Solazyme Inc., Sapphire Energy Inc., Diversified Technologies Inc., Origin Oils Inc., Proviron Industries nv, Oilgae and Genifuel Corporation.

    Request Free Report Sample HERE. (Source: Future Market Insights, PR, Jan., 2017) Contact: Future Marketinsights, + 44 (0) 20 7692 8790, (347) 918-3531 , www.futuremarketinsights.com

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algae Biofuel,  Algal,  Biodiesel,  Etanol,  Alternative Fuel,  


    DOE Funds Pilot- and Demo-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower Projects (Funding)
    DOE EERE
    Date: 2017-01-02
    The US DOE EERE reports the selection of six projects for up to $12.9 million in federal funding under its Project Definition for Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Manufacturing of Biofuels, Bioproducts, and Biopower program.

    The funded projects are required to share the cost at a minimum of 50 pct and to develop and execute plans for the manufacturing of advanced or cellulosic biofuels, bioproducts, refinery-compatible intermediates, and/or biopower in a domestic pilot- or demonstration-scale integrated biorefinery. Projects could receive additional federal funds of up to $15 million for pilot-scale facilities or $45 million for demonstration-scale facilities.

    The following projects will utilize thermochemical, biochemical, algal, and hybrid conversion technologies to generate the data required to enable future commercial-scale facilities:

  • Atlanta-based AVAPCO, LLC will receive $3.7 million to develop a demonstration-scale integrated biorefinery that combines AVAPCO's biomass-to-ethanol process with project partner Byogy’s alcohol-to-jet process to create an integrated process that produces jet fuel from woody biomass.

  • LanzaTech, Inc. based in Skokie, Illinois will receive $4 million to design, construct, and operate an integrated demonstration-scale biorefinery that will use industrial waste gases to produce 3 million gpy of low-carbon jet and diesel fuels.

  • Global Algae Innovations of San Diego will receive $1.2 million to design a pilot-scale algae biofuel facility with improved productivity of open pond cultivation and more energy-efficient algae harvest.

  • Baltimore-based ThermoChem Recovery International, Inc. is receiving $800 to work in collaboration with project partners to design a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery to produce transportation fuels from woody waste and agricultural feedstocks. The project proposes many improvements throughout the system, which in combination would allow for smaller, more cost-effective integrated biorefineries with increased liquid fuel yield.

  • In Carlsbad, California, Rialto Bioenergy, will receive $2 million to design the Rialto Advanced Pyrolysis Integrated Biorefinery facility that will have the capacity to convert 300 tpd of biomass such as food extracted from municipal solid waste and wastewater treatment plant biosolids into up to 6.4 megawatts of carbon-negative, renewable biopower.

  • The Water Environment & Reuse Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia will receive $1.2 million to design a pilot-scale integrated biorefinery thatl converts residual sludge and solids into biocrude oil, biogas, and fertilizer. (Source: DOE EERE, PR Jan., 2017)Contact: US DOE EERE, http://energy.gov/eere

    More Low-Carbon Energy News Algal,  Algae,  DOE EERE,  Biofuel,  Bioenergy,  Bioproducts,  Cellulosic,  

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